Cash

Going Cashless

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Published on The Doomstead Diner on December 22, 2016

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One of the hottest topics in Collapse Economics these days is the prospect of the "Cashless" society.  Denmark is flirting with being the first country to go completely cashless, along with the other Scandinavian countries of Sweden and Norway.

In debates about the future of cash money, Denmark is often cited as the possible World’s first cashless society. Is that true? An investigation on the current state of cash in Denmark. 

Cash is dirty.
Cash is expensive to print.
Cash is for criminals.

Opponents of paper money, such as established economists Bofinger and Haldane, have declared the war on cash. In 2016, this is more apparent than ever before. The European Commission for instance currently assesses a potential ban of the 500 Euro banknote, as “these notes are in high demand among criminal groups.”

More so the finger is often pointed to Scandinavia, to show how some countries are already on the move to become ‘cashless societies’ – to eliminate cash whatsoever. And Denmark could be the World’s first. Hold up – is that true?

http://www.matoska.com/catgraph/3005-001b.jpg Money is symbology for a credit system that allocates the resources available in a society. It can be just about anything, as long as what you choose as the physical symbol is hard to counterfeit.  In Africa for a long time, Cowrie Shells were used as money.  They were relatively rare and about impossible to counterfeit.  Similarly, Gold and Silver have been used as the symbol, the metals themselves are elements and can't be counterfeited.  However, they can be alloyed with other metals, thus debasing the coinage made with them.  This was what the Romans did as their civilization collapsed.  They weren't able to keep bringing in enough gold and silver to keep coining up to have enough money in circulation.

The metals are in relatively short supply for a growing population, and they tend to be hoarded as well taking them out of circulation.  So in the modern era, paper money which was hard to counterfeit was developed as the currency and means of exchange.  The way paper money is traditionally made hard to counterfeit is through fine engraving and special paper and ink.  However, modern scanners made the engraving easy to duplicate, and if you have enough scientific expertiese and a big enough budget, the paper and ink can be duplicated as well.

http://www.accountingformanagement.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/balance-sheet.png Money originates in the banking system as credits and debits on a balance sheet.  Then the bills get printed up, and each one has a Serial Number on it.  At the origin point when it first gets handed out over the counter with fresh bills, the bank has a record of the serial numbers and the person that money was handed to.  After that though, there is no keeping track of where those bills go or to who.  In theory you could track it if in every transaction the serial numbers were recorded, but in practice that is never done, it's too cumbersome.

Because it can't be tracked, cash is very useful in the Black Economy, for things like drug deals and making bribes to politicians.  Its also useful to hide your transactions from the Tax Man.  If you begin to believe your banking system is untrustworthy or unsafe (they always are, but sometimes more than others), people start taking their money out of the banks and stuffing it in mattresses instead.  This can make a bank insolvent, because it needs deposits as part of its capital.  When you deposit your money in the bank, it becomes an unsecured loan to the bank, which they will then use as the basis for making other loans.  Making loans and originating money is how banks MAKE MONEY.

So, as far as Da Goobermint and the Banksters are concerned, paper money is not very good.  Da Goobermint wants to be able to track all transactions so they can be taxed and the Banksters want your money in the bank as much of the time as possible so they can use it for more lending. How can we solve these problems, they wonder?

https://historyinlivingcolor.files.wordpress.com/2013/11/westernunion803kanawhastreetcharkanawhablv_edited-1.jpg?w=670 Well, until the advent of the modern computer and the internet, it was basically an insoluble problem.  However, once the communications systems were in place and enough places where transactions take place were wired into it, the possibility of being all electronic balance sheet transfers became possible.  It goes back as far as the Telegraph and Western Union and the ability to "Wire Money".  It further expanded with the Telephone, which made Credit Cards possible.  If you remember back to the early days of American Express, if you used your card at a restaraunt they would call AMEX to get a verification, and once verified the transaction was cashless, going from your credit line over to the restaraunt's bank account.

At first, these credit cards were available only to the very rich, and few people used them.  The verifications were done manually and when the restaraunt called for verification, there was a live person on the other end of the line who did the verification of your account, on a big old clunky IBM Mainframe at the Amex Headquarters.  However, as the computer systems and communications systems improved and you could put Point of Sale (POS) terminals in stores, it became possible to issue Credit Cards to many more people.  Thus Master Card and Visa were born, and banks began issuing out Debit cards as well.

http://blog.couponrani.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/creditcard.jpg This brings us up to today, where at least in the FSoA pretty much everybody has Plastic of some kind, and over 90% of all transactions are done this way, so cash has become unecessary, at least as far as the Banks & Goobermint are concerned anyhow.  They would like to see cash eliminated entirely, because this is good for them.  Not so good for the average J6P though who is worried his money isn't safe in the bank and one day it will just be…GONE!  Also not good if he currently runs some type of cash bizness and wants to hide some of the income from the tax man.

What's the PROBLEM with taking cash out of the system entirely then?  Well, as long as you have complete faith that your computer systems will be up and running 100% of the time, communications up 100% of the time in 100% of locations and the system won't be hacked, there is no problem.  Unfortunately, none of those conditions are true even in the 1st World countries, and definitely not true in 3rd World countries.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/content/dam/news/2016/11/13/113589873RupeesNEWS-small.jpg In places like India, vast areas of the country aren't even wired for electricity, much less have full internet coverage available 24/7.  Many in the population don't even have bank accounts or ID.  The only way they function in the society is with cash.  They get paid in cash, they buy their groceries with cash, they pay their rent with cash.  When India recently took its two largest denomination bills out of circulation, it created instant HAVOC, and is still causing havoc.  They may very well never recover from this poorly planned and executed monetary experiment.  It's already created a massive deflation in their housing market, as people simply don't have working money to pay the rent with.  Getting replacement bills out into circulation also has been a clusterfuck and goods are becoming hard to come by whether you have working money or not, because the supply chains are breaking down.

Now, in a place like Denmark where just about every square inch of the country is wired up, you wouldn't have this same kind of problem if you went cashless, although even in Denmark there are people who live off the official economy and depend on Cash to work.  Besides that though, you run into all sorts of problems on occassions where you have a power outage or communications outage or the computers with all the account information go down, even for short periods of time.  All of a sudden, everyone in the checkout line at the grocery store can't pay for their food.  Everyone commuting home from work can't pay the fare on the light rail.  Everyone whose gas gauge is on empty can't fill up on gas at the pump.  etc, etc, etc.  Anyplace that does go 100% cashless is going to run into these problems, and I think TPTB have to know this.

Even though I use Plastic almost all the time myself, I always do carry enough cash to buy groceries or buy gas if the debit card doesn't work.  At my local grocery store this has occurred twice due to the system being down itself, and then a couple of other times because my account at the bank was "frozen" due to suspicious charges being dropped on the card number.

http://www.zerohedge.com/sites/default/files/images/user5/imageroot/2016/02/09/500%20euro_0.jpg What is more likely than 100% cashless is that just the large bills will be taken out of circulation, but how large is large?  In Europe, they have a €500 note, that one is just about certain to go the way of the Dinosaur.  Here in the FSoA, the largest note is a $100 Ben Franklin.  This would be harder to get rid of, because even just for buying groceries a family can spend $300 in the checkout line, I see that all the time with overflowing baskets of food.  You would need 15 Andrew Jackson's or Harriet Tubman $20s to cover this, which makes your wallet uncomfortably thick.

What you may have noticed however is that recently, in about the last year a new $100 note on new paper with more "security" devices has been substituted for the old $100 note.  My suspicion is these notes can be run through a reader and their serial numbers tracked.  All stores will be required to have the readers, which will probably be part of the POS terminal, and anytime you use such a bill, it will be recorded in the transaction.  You'll need your Goobermint ID to spend the bill.  So, similar to plastic transactions, the bill can be traced back to you.

http://www.usagold.com/images/coinstack.gif In the Black economy what may occur to circumvent this problem is a system of Barter may arise, and for this purpose such as large Drug Deals, Gold WOULD be very useful.  After the large exchange is done this way, then the street level exchanges are all done with the small bills still in circulation.  However, then when the drug dealer spends his money, he has to account for where he got it.  If he can't account for it, it's a criminal offense.

Because Gold and to a lesser extent Silver could be used in the black economy and to try and store wealth outside the Banking system, it will either be made illegal and confiscated, or any official transactions done with it heavily taxed.  So if you went to the Coin Dealer to exchange it for some of the paper currency, there might be a 50% tax on that transaction.  In the case of the Great Depression, Gold ownership was made illegal and the Gold confiscated and then revalued.  No reason to believe that would not occur again here as things further spin down in the Bankstering system.

http://www.knology.net/~bilrum/goldverbot-4128.jpg What you have to remember here is that "your money" doesn't belong to you, it's part of a very large and complex system of credit that has been evolving in this iteration since the Medici Banking era.  That system gradually spread its tentacles around the entire globe, and now most of the 1st World countries at least are fully wired up with the communication system necessary for all electronic transactions, fully recorded with everything bought and sold and by who to who.  It's the ultimate means of control over everything that goes on in the society, and as long as these systems are up and running, TPTB that run the system are going to use every means possible to maintain this control.  Even if a 100% Cashless society is not achieved, in the 1st World countries it will reach close to that goal before the system crashes in it's entirety.

The reasons it will crash in its entirety are many.  First of all, whether the money being moved around here is cash or digibit, the entire system is horrifically insolvent, and even if ovenight 100% of all depositors money was confiscated to recapitalize the banks, it still would be insolvent.  There's more debt out there than there are credits to balance it, because of the interest charges on all the loans.  On top of that you have trillions to quadrillions in derivative bets which can't be paid off.  Then you have the problem that either cash or digibit, money is not flowing through the system to the end consumer to buy the products of industrialization. Some still have access to the credit, but fewer all the time as people drop out of the work force.  Finally, what the money actually REPRESENTS, the resources available to the society are depleting, especially measured against the increasing global population size.  So you can't make it work long term no matter what you use for money.

What the conversion to (mostly) cashless can do is stretch out the Extend & Pretend a while longer, so it's likely to be undertaken in 1st World countries, at least if the monetary system doesn't reach critical mass and crash before a further changeover can be implemented.  The possibility such a system could be implemented in India or other 3rd World countries is exceedingly small, thus the reason they attempted to exchange one paper bill for another, and in the process took themselves one step closer to complete collapse.

The mostly unanswerable question is just how long the the Extend & Pretend game can be extended out here?  All you can say for sure is that it will crash at some point in the future, but pegging a date to it is quite difficult, if not impossible.  You have another variable in the equation, which is the political instability that arises as more people lose more purchasing power, whatever the money is that is being used.  You also have the geopolitical instability as different countries jockey for position trying to control what is left of global resources, mainly China, Russia and the FSoA there.  There are inumerable possible Trigger Events that could set off a cascade failure at any time, so any kind of mathematical prediction is useless because of a discontinuity in the function.  WAG though, it's hard to see how it holds together more than another 5 years, but it's just a guess.

So, even if the Banksters and Da Goobermint get their wish and convert to all digimoney, don't sweat it too much because it won't last all that long.  When it does crash, you'll have much bigger problems than trying to hide income from the Tax Man or keep your wealth safe from thieving Banksters.

http://playgrad.ru/uploads/posts/2012-07/1342419304_zombie_wallpapers-39.jpg

War on Cash 2 (Show Me the Money!)

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Published on the Doomstead Diner on February 11, 2016

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showmethemoney-Jerry-Maguire-1…Besides the major problem of WTF you do when the lights go out and/or the 4G network goes out on your cell phone are all those little transactions done each day, like for instance your kid buying a Hershey bar at the convenience store on the bike ride to school. Is every kid going to have her own plastic and cell phone to do these transactions also? Are you going to use plastic to buy some breathmints or condoms on the way to the local cathouse? Are you going to pay the hooker with plastic so your wife can see the charge on the bill? That's an even bigger problem for the Banksters and Politicians who are promoting this idea than the average J6P too.

 

What would Jerry Maguire (Tom Cruise) do when Rod Tidwell (Cuba Gooding Jr.) asks him to SHOW ME THE MONEY! ? Is Rod really going to believe Jerry has the money when he holds his smart phone up to him with a 1 and lots of zeros behind it on the new super OLED touchscreen?…

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The War on Cash 1

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Published on the Doomstead Diner on February 4, 2016

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What are the benefits to TPTB for getting rid of cash? They are many, but let me read from a recent Op-Ed featured on Bloomberg Newz, home base for tentative 3rd Party POTUS candidate Michael Bloomberg:

Much depends on the details, of course. But this is a welcome trend. In theory, digital legal tender could combine the inventiveness of private virtual currencies with the stability of a government mint.

Most obviously, such a system would make moving money easier. Properly designed, a digital fiat currency could move seamlessly across otherwise incompatible payment networks, making transactions faster and cheaper. It would be of particular use to the poor, who could pay bills or accept payments online without need of a bank account, or make remittances without getting gouged.

For governments and their taxpayers, potential advantages abound. Issuing digital currency would be cheaper than printing bills and minting coins. It could improve statistical indicators, such as inflation and gross domestic product. Traceable transactions could help inhibit terrorist financing, money laundering, fraud, tax evasion and corruption.

Don't you just LOVE how this is going to be of “particular use to the poor”? See, the guys pitching this bullshit are REALLY CONCERNED about the plight of poor people, and this will HELP them!     hahahahahahaha

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The Cashless Society Cometh

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Published on the The Economic Collapse on December 27, 2015

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European Nations Such As Sweden And Denmark Are ‘Eradicating Cash’

Did you know that 95 percent of all retail sales in Sweden are cashless?  And did you know that the government of Denmark has a stated goal of “eradicating cash” by the year 2030?  All over the world, we are seeing a relentless march toward a cashless society, and nowhere is this more true than in northern Europe.  In Sweden, hundreds of bank branches no longer accept or dispense cash, and thousands of ATM machines have been permanently removed.  At this point, bills and coins only account for just 2 percent of the Swedish economy, and many stores no longer take cash at all.  The notion of a truly “cashless society” was once considered to be science fiction, but now we are being told that it is “inevitable”, and authorities insist that it will enable them to thwart criminals, terrorists, drug runners, money launderers and tax evaders.  But what will we give up in the process?

In Sweden, the transition to a cashless society is being enthusiastically embraced.  The following is an excerpt from a New York Times article that was published on Saturday…

Parishioners text tithes to their churches. Homeless street vendors carry mobile credit-card readers. Even the Abba Museum, despite being a shrine to the 1970s pop group that wrote “Money, Money, Money,” considers cash so last-century that it does not accept bills and coins.

Few places are tilting toward a cashless future as quickly as Sweden, which has become hooked on the convenience of paying by app and plastic.

To me, giving money in church electronically seems so bizarre.  But it is starting to happen here in the United States, and in Sweden some churches collect most of their tithes and offerings this way

During a recent Sunday service, the church’s bank account number was projected onto a large screen. Worshipers pulled out cellphones and tithed through an app called Swish, a payment system set up by Sweden’s biggest banks that is fast becoming a rival to cards.

Other congregants lined up at a special “Kollektomat” card machine, where they could transfer funds to various church operations. Last year, out of 20 million kronor in tithes collected, more than 85 percent came in by card or digital payment.

And of course it isn’t just Sweden that is rapidly transitioning to a cashless society.  Over in Denmark, government officials have a goal “to completely do away with paper money” by the year 2030

Sweden is not the only country interested in eradicating cash. Its neighbor, Denmark, is also making great strides to lessen the circulation of banknotes in the country.

Two decades ago, roughly 80 percent of Danish citizens relied on hard cash while shopping. Fast forward to today, that figure has dropped dramatically to 25 percent.

We’re interested in getting rid of cash,” said Matas IT Director Thomas Grane. “The handling, security and everything else is expensive; so, definitely we want to push digital payments, and that’s of course why we introduced mobile payments to help this process.”

Eventually, establishments may soon have the right to reject cash- a practice that is common in Sweden. Government officials have set a 2030 deadline to completely do away with paper money.

Could you imagine a world where you couldn’t use cash for anything?

This is the direction things are going – especially in Europe.

As I have written about previously, cash transactions of more than 2,500 euros have already been banned in Spain, and France and Italy have both banned all cash transactions of more than 1,000 euros.

Little by little, cash is being eradicated, and what we have seen so far is just the beginning.  417 billion cashless transactions were conducted in 2014, and the final number for 2015 is projected to be much higher.

Banks like this change, because it enables them to make more money due to the fees that they collect from credit cards and debit cards.  And governments like this change because electronic payments enable them to watch, track and monitor what we are all doing much more easily.

These days, very rarely does anyone object to what is happening.  Instead, most of us just seem to accept that this change is “inevitable”, and we are being assured that it will be for the better.  And no matter where in the world you go, the propaganda seems to be the same.  For example, the following comes from an Australian news source

AND so we prepare to turn the page to fresh year — 2016, a watershed year in which Australia will accelerate towards becoming a genuine cashless society.

The cashless society will be a new world free of $1 and $2 coins, or $5 or $10 bank notes. A new world in which all commercial transactions, from buying an i-pad or a hamburger to playing the poker machines, purchasing a newspaper, paying household bills or picking up the dry-cleaning, will be paid for electronically.

And in that same article the readers are told that Australia will likely be “a fully cashless society” by 2022…

Research by Westpac Bank predicts Australia will be a fully cashless society by 2022 — just six years away. Already half of all commercial payments are now made electronically.

Even in some of the poorest areas on the entire globe we are seeing a move toward a cashless society.  In 2015, banks in India made major progress on this front, and income tax rebates are being considered by the government as an incentive “to encourage people to move away from cash transactions“.

Would a truly cashless society reduce crime and make all of our lives much more efficient?

Maybe.

But what would we have to give up?

To me, America is supposed to be a place where we can go where we want and do what we want without the government constantly monitoring us.  If people choose to use cashless forms of payment that is one thing, but if we are all required to go to such a system I fear that it could result in the loss of tremendous amounts of freedom and liberty.

And it is all too easy to imagine a world where a government-sponsored form of “identification” would be required to use any form of electronic payment.  This would give the government complete control over who could use “the system” and who could not.  The potential for various forms of coercion and tyranny in such a scenario is obvious.

What would you do if you could not buy, sell, get a job or open a bank account without proper “identification” someday?  What you simply give in to whatever the government was demanding of you at the time even if it went against your fundamental beliefs?

That is certainly something to think about.

Many will cheer as the world makes a rapid transition to a cashless society, but I will not.  I believe that a truly cashless system would open the door for great evil, and I don’t want any part of it.

What about you?

Would you welcome a cashless society?

 

 

 

The War on Cash

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Published on the Daily Impact on October 23, 2015

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I’m sorry, sir, your cash has expired and we are obliged to confiscate it. (Photo by photosteve101/Flickr)

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For a couple of years now the Masters of the Universe have been massing their armored laptops on the borders of insanity to conduct a blitzkrieg against physical cash, to wipe every vestige of paper money and coinage from the face of the earth. Mutterings about the offensive began, as far as I know, six months or so ago on the financial-conspiracy and -contrarian websites. And now Lo! and Behold! the Plastic Curtain is on the verge of falling over two whole countries, Sweden and Denmark. And the softening-up process, the preliminary bombardments of explosive factoids,  and the eruption of fifth columns, is well under way around the world.

Large banks such as J.P. Morgan Chase have told their customers they may not keep cash is deposit boxes (can’t wait to see how they’re going to enforce that). Public transportation companies in London, Sweden and Denmark will not accept cash, only cards activated by computer or cell phone (things that poor people, who disproportionately rely on public transportation, disproportionately lack). The amount of cash that we can withdraw without invoking scrutiny from the Authorities, legally $10,000, is steadily being ratcheted downward.   

A brief, unauthorized biography of money will show us that we should have seen the War on Cash coming. Money stands for something else, something we can eat or wear or burn or otherwise use to live, or to make more money. It was at first a convenience for people whose wealth was in, for example, grain, and instead of moving all the bulky stuff around they could trade it simply by presenting a stick or a tablet that represented the grain. The stick could be traded many times before the end user got it and went for the grain.  

Such a system was eminently hackable, as present-day holders of gold certificates either know or will soon find out. What if the stick didn’t represent anything at all, but was just a stick? The answer was currency with inherent value, gold or silver coins that were themselves worth their denomination. Terrific if you’re primitive, but way too clumsy if you’re bent on becoming a Master of the Universe, and have to get an oxcart of gold coins to the betting window at the Coliseum by 5 o’clock.

The next step was paper currency that was guaranteed, honest, to represent a bit of gold held on your behalf by your government. But the storing of that gold, and the physical limit on the money supply imposed by the necessity to find and refine gold, became way too inconvenient for the wheelers and dealers, so we all went off the gold standard and let cash be free. It also set the banks free to create cash (not to print it, as is often said, but simply to imagine it). Banks are obligated to keep available only a fraction of the money deposited with them, and are allowed to invest (or gamble) with many multiples of the cash actually entrusted to them.

Now, even this has become too restraining on the high rollers. There is still way too much physical cash out there — about 10% of the currency that is in circulation via computer — for their convenience and protection. Which has nothing to do, of course, with our convenience and protection. To the contrary, our political leaders, wholly owned and -operated by the Masters, are coming to believe that we are deriving way too much convenience and protection from the pittance of physical cash that remains in our possession. Among their problems with it:

  • We can spend and receive physical cash without paying taxes;
  • Cash in our possession cannot (usually) be confiscated without pesky legal procedures;
  • Authorities don’t know what we’re doing with our physical cash, or how much we have;
  • In the event of a run on the bank, when all the depositors want their cash back and there’s only a fraction of it that even exists, the bank can’t unilaterally confiscate our physical cash (it’s called a “bail-in.” Isn’t that cute?) to keep itself afloat. Not even with a pesky legal procedure, because there isn’t one. Yet.

But consider the wonders of a (physical) cash-free society:

  • A bank in trouble can give its depositors a haircut simply by declaring a negative interest rate;
  • Authorities will know instantly what you are buying, where you are, who you owe and who owes you, because every single transaction will be on the electronic record.
  • Every exchange can be — make that will be — taxed, and charged a fee.

Freedom from cash would at the same time exacerbate the disparity between rich and poor; and prove in the end to be a great equalizer. The poor lack credit cards, bank accounts, and smart phones (not to mention cash) and would find life a great deal more difficult every day under regulations the rest of us, as a practical matter, would barely notice.

On the other hand, when the electric grid goes down, every man, woman, child and business will be instantly and utterly without money. Solidarity at last.     

Bond Market Collapse and the Banning of Cash

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Aired on the Doomstead Diner on May 22, 2015

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…Bitcoins, a relatively new form of electronic money are also often hawked as the latest and greatest solution to keeping your money safe. Except EVERYBODY KNOWS about Mt. Gox by now. From Wiki:

Mt. Gox was a Bitcoin exchange based in Tokyo, Japan. It was launched in July 2010, and by 2013 was handling 70% of all Bitcoin transactions.[1] In February 2014, the Mt. Gox company suspended trading, closed its website and exchange service, and filed for a form of bankruptcy protection from creditors called minji saisei, or civil rehabilitation, to allow courts to seek a buyer.[2][3] In April 2014, the company began liquidation proceedings.[4] It announced that around 850,000 bitcoins belonging to customers and the company were missing and likely stolen, an amount valued at more than $450 million at the time.[5][6] Although 200,000 bitcoins have since been "found", the reason(s) for the disappearance—theft, fraud, mismanagement, or a combination of these—are unclear as of March 2014.[7]

You think Fraud, Mismanagement and Hacking will STOP if money goes cashless? OF COURSE NOT, IT WILL GET WORSE! There is no computer system ever that is foolproof and incapable of being hacked, and of course the rewards for hacking such a system or “mismanaging” it gets bigger all the time, so the Best & the Brightest spend all their time figuring out how to do that…

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Doomstead Diner Daily June 16The Diner Daily is av [...]

Doomstead Diner Daily June 14The D... [...]

Quote from: UnhingedBecauseLucid on March 18, 2019 [...]

CleanTechnicaSupport CleanTechnica’s work via dona [...]

QuoteThe FACT that the current incredibly STUPID e [...]

Incense burners found at 2,500-year-old cemetery s [...]

I have to disagree with that.  It is confusing Cau [...]

   "We're all drunks looking under the l [...]

In November 2018, a 66-year-old man named Tommy Th [...]

Dear Readers, Things in Venezuela are getting mess [...]

Quote from: Golden Oxen on April 27, 2019, 01:49:4 [...]

Quote from: Eddie on April 25, 2019, 09:09:46 AMQu [...]

Alternate Perspectives

  • Two Ice Floes
  • Jumping Jack Flash
  • From Filmers to Farmers

The Brainwashing of a Nation by Daniel Greenfield via Sultan Knish blog Image by ElisaRiva from Pixa [...]

A Window Into Our World By Cognitive Dissonance   Every year during the early spring awakening I qui [...]

Deaf, Dumb and Blind Who Is Better at Conceding They Are Wrong - Conservative or Liberal Extremists? [...]

The Apology: From baby boomers to the handicapped generations. by David Holmgren Re-posted from Holm [...]

Society Is Made Of Narrative. Realizing This Is Awakening From The Matrix. By Caitlin Johnstone Orig [...]

Event Update For 2019-06-15http://jumpingjackflashhypothesis.blogspot.com/2012/02/jumping-jack-flash-hypothesis-its-gas.htmlThe [...]

Event Update For 2019-06-14http://jumpingjackflashhypothesis.blogspot.com/2012/02/jumping-jack-flash-hypothesis-its-gas.htmlThe [...]

Event Update For 2019-06-13http://jumpingjackflashhypothesis.blogspot.com/2012/02/jumping-jack-flash-hypothesis-its-gas.htmlThe [...]

Event Update For 2019-06-12http://jumpingjackflashhypothesis.blogspot.com/2012/02/jumping-jack-flash-hypothesis-its-gas.htmlThe [...]

Event Update For 2019-06-11http://jumpingjackflashhypothesis.blogspot.com/2012/02/jumping-jack-flash-hypothesis-its-gas.htmlThe [...]

With fusion energy perpetually 20 years away we now also perpetually have [fill in the blank] years [...]

My mea culpa for having inadvertently neglected FF2F for so long, and an update on the upcoming post [...]

NYC plans to undertake the swindle of the civilisation by suing the companies that have enabled it t [...]

MbS, the personification of the age-old pre-revolutionary scenario in which an expiring regime attem [...]

Daily Doom Photo

man-watching-tv

Sustainability

  • Peak Surfer
  • SUN
  • Transition Voice

Carbon in the Dale"Rather than put back the coal mines, we should seriously think about putting back the forests. [...]

Farewell to the Fishes"Ninety percent of the world’s marine fish stocks are now fully exploited, overexploited or dep [...]

Climate Change Reversal at Whole Village"During the burn people were taken around the farm to see the 40,000+ trees we have planted, ou [...]

Pitching Seaweed Straws"Kelp-based straws will beat the price of paper straw competitors later this year and could und [...]

What is your climate pawprint?"If US dogs had their own country it would be bigger than 200 other countries and likely be on [...]

The folks at Windward have been doing great work at living sustainably for many years now.  Part of [...]

 The Daily SUN☼ Building a Better Tomorrow by Sustaining Universal Needs April 3, 2017 Powering Down [...]

Off the keyboard of Bob Montgomery Follow us on Twitter @doomstead666 Friend us on Facebook Publishe [...]

Visit SUN on Facebook Here [...]

Why has it taken so long for the climate movement to accomplish so little? And how can we do better [...]

To fight climate change, you need to get the world off of fossil fuels. And to do that, you need to [...]

Americans are good on the "thoughts and prayers" thing. Also not so bad about digging in f [...]

In the echo-sphere of political punditry consensus forms rapidly, gels, and then, in short order…cal [...]

Discussions with figures from Noam Chomsky and Peter Senge to Thich Nhat Hanh and the Dalai Lama off [...]

Top Commentariats

  • Our Finite World
  • Economic Undertow

Get on a boat? And then what? I for one do not want to live in an imploded world. Live life now and [...]

This is why I don't watch local news. I also don't watch national news for all together di [...]

This is sort of what happens when we try to us dams to dry out the flood plain. It works some years, [...]

Battery backup for these resources is likely iffy, however. Intermittent resources aren’t worth very [...]

Hi Steve. I recently found what I believe is a little gem, and I'm quite confident you'd a [...]

The Federal Reserve is thinking about capping yields? I don't know how long TPTB can keep this [...]

As some one who has spent years trying to figure out what the limits to growth are. let me say that [...]

Peak oil definitely happened for gods sake. Just because it isn't mad max right now is no indic [...]

@Volvo - KMO says he made some life choices he regrets. Not sure what they were. And I don't th [...]

RE Economics

Going Cashless

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Simplifying the Final Countdown

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Bond Market Collapse and the Banning of Cash

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Do Central Bankers Recognize there is NO GROWTH?

Discuss this article @ the ECONOMICS TABLE inside the...

Singularity of the Dollar

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Kurrency Kollapse: To Print or Not To Print?

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SWISSIE CAPITULATION!

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Of Heat Sinks & Debt Sinks: A Thermodynamic View of Money

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Merry Doomy Christmas

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Peak Customers: The Final Liquidation Sale

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Collapse Fiction

Useful Links

Technical Journals

This paper assessed the variability and projected trends of solar irradiance and temperature in the [...]

Following the impact of droughts witnessed during the last decade there is an urgent need to develop [...]

A “nadir-only” framework of the radiometric intercomparison of multispectral sensors usi [...]

A fuzzy random conditional value-at-risk-based linear programming (FCVLP) model was proposed in this [...]