Plumbing

Tiny House Chronicles: A Plumbing Polemic

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Published on the Doomstead Diner on July15, 2016

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The ongoing tiny house chronicles: A venturi exhaust system for the shower stall and solar hot water arrays incorporating a direct HWC

Geoffrey Chia, July 2016

DIAGRAM 1  DIAGRAM 2  DIAGRAM 3  DIAGRAM 4 HeatpipeCoreEvacTubes

DIAGRAM 5 HollowCoreEvacTubes  DIAGRAM 6 HollowCoreEvacTubes  DIAGRAM 7 Thermosiphoning HeatpipeCoreEvacTubes  DIAGRAM 8 Thermosiphoning HollowCoreEvacTubes

VENTURI EXHAUST SYSTEM FOR THE SHOWER STALL:

I could not find any "off the shelf" exhaust fan models specifically designed to be located in a shower stall which operated on 12V or 24V DC.
A simple computer-type fan can certainly do the job, at least in the short term, and there are many of suitable size eg 12cm diameter, which can run on 24V DC diagram 1. However even if rated as "moisture resistant" they may not cope with sauna type humidity and are likely to fail prematurely. Even though they are quite cheap, the idea is to seek durable items and not be forced to keep replacing them. Furthermore heat loss from this open vent will be substantial, especially at night. A removable internal insulated cover can be added, however that will be another finicky add-on.

24V DC blower type ducted fans are easily available but are probably not suitable to be used "in-line" for air extraction. If embedded in the wall, due to the longer profile than a computer fan, it will stick out awkwardly. Even if mounted exteriorly and extracting air via a duct, it will be directly exposed to the sauna type moisture and may also fail prematurely, being made to do a job it was not designed to do. One way to ensure it has no contact with such moist air is to position the blower upstream of the shower exhaust port, to create a venturi effect to suck air out of the shower stall diagram 2. This will admittedly be an experimental system however I received no practical objections to the design from the intellectual resource folks I consulted (Doone W: scientist, engineer, geologist and homesteader, Lara N: architect, designer & builder, and Lara J: mathematics and physics expert). Any failure in execution of this system will of course be the fault of the author. This system will sacrifice some efficiency for better durability and longevity. If the external "inverted U" pipe or duct is well insulated, this configuration will help prevent heat loss because warm air from within the tiny house will tend to sit static in the top bend of the inverted U at night when the external atmosphere is cool (unless there are strong external breezes).
 

ADDITIONAL HOT WATER SYSTEM OPTIONS:

Roof mounted solar tube arrays utilising direct hot water cylinder (HWC) on loft floor

Designing a system in theory is one thing, but in practice we must always modify the design according to whatever components are available to us in the real world. I was offered false hope about obtaining a small indirect copper hot water cylinder by the false advertising of a UK vendor on eBay. Having now found the option of an affordable, small 50 litre simple direct HWC from an Australian vendor (diagram 3), this can be incorporated into the system and placed in the loft to increase the volume of hot water available and reduce concerns about inadequate pressure head for the taps. Unfortunately the roof mounted options require an additional small electric water pump and a small solar PV panel, however these are simple robust devices with good longevity. All these solar hot water system options remain free of dependence on microprocessors.

 

"Heat pipe core" type tubes (manifold on top of array) diagram 4

Caveats of this system: the manifold does NOT use glycol for heat exchange through internal copper coils in the HWC, water is circulated through a direct HWC. Hence it is NOT suitable for locations prone to substantial frost and subzero temperatures. However occasional ground frost should not be a problem as this should not affect the roof mounted system.

Pipes and Circulation:

All pipes are insulated except pipe 6, the overflow pipe from the header tank (which drains externally)

  1. Each morning, water is actively pumped from the rainwater tank at ground level into the header tank (this inlet pipe is not shown in the diagram for simplicity). Water from the header tank passively flows down through wide calibre (DN32) pipe 1, through the low resistance valve, filling the loft HWC to the brim and also filling pipe 5 up to the same level as the water level in the header tank.

  2. Water passively fills the electric pump which hence becomes primed. During the day when there is sunlight striking the PV panel, the pump drives water up pipe 2 and through the heated manifold into pipe 3. Note this manifold circuit will therefore automatically bleed air out by itself during initiation.

  3. Pipe 3 joins pipe 1 but cannot backfill into the header tank due to the presence of the upstream valve in pipe 1. Water in pipe 3 is hence forced into the HWC. Water circulates continuously through this HWC/manifold circuit in the day, progressively heating up the water in the HWC but this flow ceases at night when there is insufficient light to power the solar PV panel.

  4. Pipe 4 supplies the hot water taps. As water is extracted from this pipe it is replaced at the base of the HWC by cooler water from the header tank. At night there will be thermoseparation between the top hot layer of water and bottom cooler layer.

  5. If the sunlight is too intense and the pump is working too fast, causing the loft HWC to overfill and overflow via pipe 5 into the header tank, then the flow rate from the pump must be dialed back with the potentiometer. The expectation is that the potentiometer will be set for the brightest summer day and thereafter be fixed in that setting and not need attending. The loft HWC cannot overpressurise or boil over because such pressurised water will spill over from pipe 5 into the header tank and be replaced by cold water via pipe 1. Water in the header tank does not overheat due to the large volume of water here. as well as the heat being radiated out of the steel walls of this uninsulated matt black header tank.

  6. Over filling of the header tank in the morning is seen through the kitchen window as external spillage via pipe 6

 

"Hollow core" type tubes (small HWC on top of array) diagram 5

Pipes and Circulation:

All pipes are insulated except pipe 6, the overflow pipe from the header tank (which drains externally)

  1. Each morning, water is actively pumped from the rainwater tank at ground level into the header tank (this inlet pipe is not shown in the diagram for simplicity). Water from the header tank passively flows down through pipe 1, through the low resistance valve, filling the 50 litre loft HWC to the brim.

  2. Water passively fills the electric pump which hence becomes primed. During the day when there is sunlight striking the PV panel, the pump drives water up pipe 2 into the rooftop 30 litre HWC, filling it eventually to the outlet of pipe 3.

  3. Pipe 3 joins pipe 1 and although the pressure head in pipe 3 is higher than pipe 1, water cannot backfill into the header tank due to the presence of the valve in pipe 1. Water in pipe 3 is hence forced into the 50 litre loft HWC. Water circulates continuously through this loft/rooftop circuit in the day, progressively heating up the water in both HWCs but this flow ceases at night when there is insufficient light to power the solar PV panel.

  4. Pipe 4 supplies the hot water taps. As water is extracted from this pipe it is replaced at the base of the HWC by cooler water from the header tank via pipe 1. At night there will be thermoseparation in the loft HWC between the top hot layer of water and bottom cooler layer. There is no flow down pipe 3 at night.

  5. There is normally free movement of air to and fro within pipe 5. The HWCs cannot overpressurise or boil over, because overpressurised vapour will exit pipe 5 (and will ultimately vent to the external air via pipe 6). If the sunlight is too intense and the pump is working too fast in the day, causing the rooftop HWC to overfill and overflow via pipe 5 into the header tank, then the flow rate from the pump must be dialed back with the potentiometer. The expectation is that the potentiometer will be set for the brightest, longest summer day and thereafter be fixed in that setting and not need attending. This overflow scenario is very unlikely if pipe 2 is narrow in calibre, thus limiting the inflow rate into the rooftop HWC, and pipe 3 is wide in calibre thus enhancing the outflow rate.

  6. Over filling of the header tank in the morning is seen through the kitchen window as external spillage via pipe 6.

 

NOTES: in this system, the rooftop 30 litre HWC is treated as no different from a simple manifold. Hence the water in the rooftop HWC is "dead water" being generally unavailable for use*. Total available hot water remains 50 litres from the loft HWC only. The system will NOT work properly (for reasons too complicated to get into here) if water is pumped into the rooftop HWC at the level of pipe 3 connection and is drained from the base of the rooftop HWC at the level of pipe 2 connection.

 

*It will be possible however to manually harvest the hot water from the rooftop HWC at night from pipe 7 by opening the manual tap as indicated in the diagram. This tap in pipe 7 must be kept closed in the day for the system to function (otherwise water will merely circulate between pipe 2 and the loft HWC without going up through the solar array)

 

**Alternatively the connection in diagram 6 with an additional valve in pipe 4 should work well without the need for manual input. In this system, there will be an abrupt reduction of flow rate from a hot water tap when the rooftop HWC empties and the hot water then derives from the loft HWC. The disadvantage of this arrangement is that having a extra valve in pipe 4 can further reduce the forward flow rate from the loft HWC compared with diagram 5. To minimise this, it will be necessary for pipes 1 and 4 to be as wide as possible.

 

Thermosiphoning solar tube arrays utilising direct hot water cylinder (HWC) on loft floor

Whether or not the arrangements in diagrams 7 and 8 will work is unclear, because the basic direct HWC is not designed for thermosiphoning. Proper thermosiphoning cylinders have a convex top, in the centre of which is located the hot water outlet. Furthermore the connection ports are larger.

In diagram 8, air at the top of the 30 litre HWC may be an issue, however it should be possible to manually bleed most of this air out using the pressure release port at the top. I intend to give them a try.

 

Potential issue with all these systems: If the level of water in the header tank drops below the top level of the loft HWC, there will no longer be sufficient driving pressure to expel water from the latter. This can easily be resolved by refilling the header tank, a matter of turning on a switch.

 

G. Chia, July 2016

Tiny House Chronicles: More Adventures in Plumbing

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Published on the Doomstead Diner on June 27, 2016

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My preferred system for solar thermal water heating with passive gravity/thermosiphoning circulation was explained in these old diagrams: (for explanatory text see previous tiny house article on plumbing).

diagram1  diagram2

That arrangment offered these advantages:

  1. Hot water cylinder (HWC) is located indoors, hence retains heat better

  2. HWC positioned vertically, hence more effective thermolayering (smaller interface between cold water layer at the base and hot water layer above, hot water being extracted from the top)

  3. The "heat pipe core" type evacuated tube is preferable to the hollow type, because if one tube breaks, the entire system can continue to function well

Unfortunately I was completely unable to obtain my preferred type of indirect small hot water cylinder with large bore internal copper coil capable of thermosiphoning. This forced me to change tack.

diagram3My other alternative is the "hollow core" type evacuated tube system with HWC mounted on top of the tube array, the entire system which sits outdoors. This is often promoted as a stand alone system: cold water is poured into the inlet near the top of the cylinder and after a few hours, hot water is drained from the base diagram 3. The tubes fill with water from the cylinder and this water is heated directly by the sun (in contrast to the heat pipe core type where fluid picks up heat within a manifold which houses the tops of heat pipes which contain acetone).

diagram4Convection currents in the hollow evacuated tubes are set up as shown in diagram 4. Obviously the convection currents cease at night.

The stand alone system does not allow for continuous filling of the cylinder, unless a header tank with ball-valve is attached to the vent at the top of the HWC.

That arrangement was not suitable for my purposes, hence using some lateral thinking I am pursuing the following arrangement where cold water fills from the base of the HWC, hot water is extracted from the top and at night there is reliance on thermolayering to deliver further hot water. The vent connects to a vertical pipe of around 3 metres height, which ensures a constant pressure within the HWC of 3 metres water, above which pressure is expelled out of that vent (option to return it to the top of the header tank within the tiny house is shown in diagram 5).

Diagram5Disadvantages of the hollow core system are the converse of the heat pipe system:

  1. Hot water cylinder (HWC) is located outdoors, hence cools down faster (unless extra insulation is added around it).

  2. HWC sits horizontally, hence less effective for thermolayering

  3. If one tube breaks, water will immediately drain out of the entire system (including the header tank)

One other option would be to mount the array on the roof and use a solar activated electric pump to pump the water from header tank up to the HWC, however that adds electronic complexity, hence I am going with the ground based system at this time.

Having visited a friend at his offgrid homestead who currently uses the "hollow core" type evacuated tubes, I was advised this system can cope with overnight temperatures down to minus 20 degrees C.

In the case of the heat pipe core type, if water is passed directly through the manifold, at night this small volume of stagnant water can easily freeze and break the manifold. Hence in the heat pipe core type, in cold climates, it is necessary to use food grade antifreeze (eg propylene gylcol) as the heat exchanging fluid through the manifold, which then circulates through a copper coil in the HWC. My friend previously had electrolysis problems with the heat pipe / manifold type system, presumably because, in his case, water rather than glycol was directly passed through the manifold. Some systems use magnesium anodes to overcome this problem but another way to minimise that risk could be to use pure (undiluted) propylene glycol as the heat exchange liquid in the manifold, which has an electrical conductivity a thousand times less than that of pure water. He has not however had electrolysis problems with the hollow core type system.

Having received the stamp of approval for my latest arrangement after discussions with my plumber, we will try it out once the plumbing has been fitted in the tiny house.

Current design of the header tank is shown in diagram 6 and the plan is to elevate it above the loft floor on a heavy duty support base as in diagram 7.

Diagram6  Diagram7

The plan to thermosiphon water heated by the wood stove through the header tank remains, however I discovered that the "Hobbit" stove I ordered could not incorporate both external air intake system and the backboiler tank together. Hence because the former option was far more important, I gave up the latter. This has actually worked out favourably because I now plan to harvest heat from a copper coil wrapped around the base of the hot flue and because this will be less efficient than the backboiler tank (which sits inside the combustion chamber) there will be little to no risk of the water in the header tank overheating (the main purpose will be to raise the temperature of the water in the header tank from finger numbing coldness, perhaps 10 degrees C to a tepid temperature, perhaps 20 degrees C. The header tank will then serve as a modest thermal mass heat radiator through the night).

 

G. Chia, June 2016

Plumbing the Tiny House

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Published on the Doomstead Diner on February 9, 2016

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1 ColdWaterSystemOverview

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Plumbing the Tiny House

Geoffrey Chia, February 2016

This continues the series of articles by which we hope to empower readers to exit the "killing fields of the future" (the cities), to help you achieve and maintain a comfortable offgrid lifestyle for at least a couple of decades after TSHTF (assuming you have purchased sufficient spare parts for maintenance and/or are creative in your repairs). For example, solar evacuated tubes invariably break, therefore it will be prudent to purchase many spares, in addition to those in your working solar thermal array.

In this article I outline my plumbing preferences for my tiny house which, to say the least, is a little unconventional compared with "standard" arrangements. The plumbing here is specifically configured for my tiny house design which I have described in a previous article: http://www.resilience.org/resource-detail/2544932-building-a-tiny-house

2 ColdWaterSystemNoExternalTank3 ColdWaterToHotWaterConnection4 ConventionalSystemUsingMicroprocessor&Sensors

 

Preferences for the cold water system:

 

  1. A steel rainwater storage tank within the lounge (under the seats) doubles up as a thermal mass tank which picks up passive solar heat in the daytime. This minimises the need to operate the wood stove at night. The water in this tank (eg 500 litres) may not last long depending on the rate of use, hence my preferred configuration is a permanent connection to an additional external rainwater tank with capacity of perhaps 1000 to 2000 litres.

  2. In off-grid configuration, the 150 litre header tank is all-important feature and serves three main purposes: first and most important is that if a tap is accidentally left open, the greatest amount of water that can be lost is only 150 litres (even if a hot water tap is left open, the last 50 litres of water in the cylinder will not be lost because at the end there will be no pressure head left to empty the cylinder). If however the system is directly connected to a community shared large (eg 40,000 litres) water tank uphill, it will be possible to lose many thousands of litres. The second reason for a header tank is that the ritual of filling of this tank each morning, either by electric or manual pumping, will reinforce the value of fresh water and encourage daily limitation of water consumption (of course this is not true rationing because the header tank can always be refilled at any time, but being creatures of habit we will probably just fill it once a day or even on alternate days, thus limiting water consumption to <150 litres per day per tiny house). Thirdly, a header tank eliminates the need for a frequently operating electric water pump (triggered by the pressure drop detected by an electronic sensor whenever a tap is opened). It eliminates another layer of electronic complexity (even though a high volume electric pump is part of my configuration, it does not require any electronic sensor and also has a manual backup). Another purpose of this header tank is additional thermal mass.

  3. This system includes the option of direct connection to town (reticulated water) supply at normal mains pressure. This high pressure port will also be suitable for permanent direct connection to a larger water tank situated uphill, although as stated before this is to be discouraged.

 

The diagrams are self explanatory

5 TypicalHotWaterCylinder6 HeliatosVendorsDiagram7 Mini10EvacTubeArray

Preferences for the hot water system:

 

Contemporary conventional solar / hybrid hot water systems are highly complex and depend on sophisticated electronics. I initially describe my general preferences, then outline the workings of proven "standard" setups, then go through a process of deconstruction and simplification to pare things down to the bare bones system I personally prefer.

My general preferences:

  • I prefer solar heating of water with an evacuated tube system (the "heat pipe" type evacuated tubes, NOT the hollow core type) with no integrated gas or electrical backup. Evacuated tubes are more efficient in temperate climates in winter compared with flat panel arrays*. Best orientation is facing the equator (ie facing North if in the Southern hemisphere) and permanently angled around 15 degrees higher than your latitude eg if you are 40 degrees South, it should be angled around 55 degrees from horizontal, which is optimal for winter. Suboptimal angling for the summer sun is in fact desirable, to avoid overheating in summer.

  • If there are several overcast days, the wood stove (or LPG stove) can be fired up and hot water obtained from the backboiler tank or by heating a kettle. Adding the hot water to cold water in a bucket will create a comfortably tepid wash mixture. For me the expense and complexity to plumb a system which connects pipes from the woodstove backboiler (eg from the Salamander Hobbit system) to the hot water storage tank is not worthwhile.

8  Heliatos configurationWithTubeArray9 PassiveThermosiphoning10 PassiveExternalStandaloneSystem

Conventional systems:

  • Contemporary conventional domestic solar hot water systems use a microprocessor controller with electronic sensors. The "Heliatos" system http://www.heliatos.com/ obviates the need for microprocessor control of the pump. I have no pecuniary interest in Heliatos but mention them repeatedly because their components and configurations enable simplification of conventional complex solar systems (and easy retrofitting of non-solar to solar systems) while still working well, and I have had productive dealings with them previously. The key components are the "bottom feed connector" and a simple 12V DC electric pump + 10W photovoltaic panel. The standard Heliatos configuration assumes the solarthermal array is on the roof, ie above the level of the hot water cylinder, and the cylinder incorporates backup gas/electric heating. Typical cylinders operate at around mains water pressure. Whenever hot water is taken from the top of the cylinder, cold water under mains pressure replaces it at the base to keep the cylinder full, to enable ongoing sourcing of hot water from the top. The entire water mass in the cylinder is always kept hot because backup heating kicks in as needed, as determined by temperature sensors. Please note: all pipes containing hot water must obviously be heavily insulated, this is not shown in the diagrams for simplicity.

  • My modifications:

  • My modifications involve use of evacuated tubes rather than the Heliatos flat panels and placing the tube array on the ground rather than on the roof for ease of cleaning and maintenance (also easy to cover with a tarpaulin to shut down the system if it overheats or to protect against a hailstorm). Tubes are thus located at a lower level than the hot water cylinder. I also choose not to have backup gas/electric heating. The mode of operation is described on the diagram. Thermosiphoning during the day should be enabled, thus eliminating the need for an electric pump and PV panel.

  • My aim is to reduce complexity (resulting in only minor inconvenience) and thus ensure long term robust performance. This configuration is pretty much guaranteed to work, because there are already well proven "stand alone" outdoor evacuated tube systems which utilise passive convection currents, with the tank situated above the tubes. Such standalone outdoor systems are suitable for warmer climates such as Queensland but not ideal for cold climates such as New Zealand, where it is best to locate the hot water cylinder in a warmer indoor environment for greatest efficiency. I sought the opinion of the Heliatos consultant, Dr Abtahi (Phd) about my split system preference, who emailed me back that what I propose is not only workable, it is actually not uncommon. Thus I cannot claim any originality here and can be quite confident of its feasibility. His main caveats were that the pipes must be properly insulated and the array should be tilted so that the hotter end of the manifold sits higher, to kick start thermosiphoning in the morning.

  • It is always important to seek the advice of your local plumber, which I am also doing. We can expect problems to arise if the sizes of the tank and solar array are mismatched between each other and also with regard to the climate. For example of the tank is too big, solar array is too small and winter sun is too feeble, you can expect persistent poor heating performance. Conversely if the tank is too small, solar array is too big and summer sun is too strong, the system can boil away the water in the tank and cause the tubes to overheat. The good thing about "heat pipe" evacuated tubes is that one or more tubes can be removed from the array and the system will continue to function perfectly (obviously with less heating power). So you can reduce the array size in summer and increase its size in winter very easily. Alternatively simply cover one or more tubes if the day is too sunny.

 

 

11 ExternalHeatExchanger12 PassiveThermosiphoningThruInternalHeatXchanger

 

 

Frost

  • If frost is a likely problem, a glycol solution must be run through the manifold and this circuit must be kept separate from the domestic water. Heliatos have an external heat exchanger which connects to the bottom feed connector, hence if retrofitting, there is no need to purchase a hot water cylinder with internal heat exchange tubes. The Heliatos external heat exchange system requires two pumps and a 20W solar PV panel in the usual "high panel" configuration (compared with the standard Heliatos arrangement which uses one pump and a 10W solar PV panel).

  • If establishing your system de novo, obtaining a cylinder with internal heat exchange tubes will be preferable and more efficient. As the internal heat exchange tubes will be much wider than the tiny tubes of the Heliatos external heat exchanger (thus posing less resistance to flow), there should be no need for any electrical pumps at all in the "low panel" configuration. This arrangement may turn out to be the simplest yet most robust configuration, which can suit all climates (even with freezing winters), as seen in the final diagram. Hence this is my preferred configuration. As in all things the proof of the pudding is in the eating and the end user must try their own system out for themselves and tweak things if necessary to make it work. There will be different specifications of different components purchased by different users in different climates, hence no two systems are likely to be identical and some customisation may be necessary.

 

Exclusive use of rainwater will avoid the problem of lime deposits from hard water.

 

CONCLUSION: This article outlines a variety of options. Different configurations will suit different people depending on whether they want roof mounted or ground mounted panels and what level of complexity they are happy with. Conventional systems are convenient (hot water is available at all times with backup heating which however requires complex electronics) but also have more potential points for failure. I do not mind some inconvenience (no hot water in tank after several heavily overcast days) but prefer an easily maintained, simple and robust system with greater longevity. Just remember to buy good quality components from the outset and obtain plenty of spare parts (eg extra evacuated tubes, magnesium anodes etc) and you should be able to enjoy using the same system for at least the next twenty years.

 

G. Chia Feb 2016

 

*Footnote:

Boat based solar thermal arrays must by necessity be mounted flush on deck, which when stationary will be horizontal (or near horizontal), but due to boat movement will be constantly varying in angle. Evacuated tube systems are not feasible for boats because:

  1. Irrespective of latitude, the tubes need to be angled at least 20 degrees from horizontal to allow convectional forces to operate within the tubes

  2. Even though designed to cope with small hailstones, tubes are easily shattered (whereas a flat panel with polycarbonate cover will not break if a heavy shackle drops on it)

A boat based, horizontally mounted flat panel system will therefore require water to be circulated by electric pump: there is no option for passive thermosiphoning.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Creative Loafing with Joe the Baker"I just want to make a really good loaf every time."Malthouse Couching by Andrea GentlWhil [...]

Planting A Personal Forest"If you appreciate the effort it takes for a single individual to become carbon-neutral, you ca [...]

The folks at Windward have been doing great work at living sustainably for many years now.  Part of [...]

 The Daily SUN☼ Building a Better Tomorrow by Sustaining Universal Needs April 3, 2017 Powering Down [...]

Off the keyboard of Bob Montgomery Follow us on Twitter @doomstead666 Friend us on Facebook Publishe [...]

Visit SUN on Facebook Here [...]

Americans are good on the "thoughts and prayers" thing. Also not so bad about digging in f [...]

In the echo-sphere of political punditry consensus forms rapidly, gels, and then, in short order…cal [...]

Discussions with figures from Noam Chomsky and Peter Senge to Thich Nhat Hanh and the Dalai Lama off [...]

Lefty Greenies have some laudable ideas. Why is it then that they don't bother to really build [...]

Democracy and politics would be messy business even if all participants were saints. But America doe [...]

Top Commentariats

  • Our Finite World
  • Economic Undertow

Karl Malantes --- one thing I learned from war ... we are not the top species on the planet because [...]

We know where that leads... you end up with parents who were brother and sister... and weighing 400k [...]

20 Foot Container filled with food booze guns ammo. Live a little longer... [...]

Food and water stocks, gold, silver, etc, are only useful for dealing with minor economic perturbati [...]

Hey welome back - can't believe I haven't even looked at EU for nearly three weeks. For a [...]

Tagio said: Steve, if you have time to indulge me, what do you think the effect of the depreciating [...]

The Bakken statistics are still kept: https://www.dmr.nd.gov/oilgas/stats/historicalbakkenoilstats.p [...]

Steve, if you have time to indulge me, what do you think the effect of the depreciating dollar (103 [...]

Some truth comes out of MSM: "Electrical power is needed, too, to keep water and sanitation sys [...]

RE Economics

Going Cashless

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Simplifying the Final Countdown

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Bond Market Collapse and the Banning of Cash

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Do Central Bankers Recognize there is NO GROWTH?

Discuss this article @ the ECONOMICS TABLE inside the...

Singularity of the Dollar

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Kurrency Kollapse: To Print or Not To Print?

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SWISSIE CAPITULATION!

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Of Heat Sinks & Debt Sinks: A Thermodynamic View of Money

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Merry Doomy Christmas

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Peak Customers: The Final Liquidation Sale

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Collapse Fiction

Useful Links

Technical Journals

This study analyzed the trends of extreme daily rainfall indices over the Ouémé basin using the obse [...]

Climate change is prevalent across the world and can have large influence on plant regeneration, rec [...]

This study aims to estimate the influence of atmospheric circulation modes on future Baltic Sea leve [...]