AuthorTopic: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature  (Read 26399 times)

Offline agelbert

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Puerto Rico is doomed - So is the USA
« Reply #210 on: May 30, 2018, 04:24:46 PM »
I bet it was more than that.

RE


https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2018/05/study-hurricane-maria-killed-4600-puerto-rico-180529144146777.html

    Newz
    Puerto Rico

Study: Hurricane Maria killed more than 4,600 in Puerto Rico

A third of the storm-related deaths on the island was caused by issues over access to healthcare, researchers say.
15 hours ago



Hurricane Maria was the strongest storm to hit Puerto Rico in 90 years [Alvin Baez/Reuters]

Hurricane Maria killed directly or indirectly more than 4,600 people in Puerto Rico, more than 70 times the toll recorded by officials, a new study has suggested.

In the 102 days since the hurricane hit the island, an estimated 4,645 people died, according to the study published on Tuesday by US-based The New England Journal of Medicine.

A third of the deaths were caused by delayed or interrupted access to healthcare, said the Mortality in Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria study, which was compiled by Harvard University researchers.

The overall figure dwarfs the government count of 64 people.

It also follows earlier independent studies which placed the death toll at around 1,000 in the 40 days since the hurricane struck.
READ MORE
Puerto Rico crisis ongoing months after Hurricane Maria

Hurricane Maria, the strongest storm to hit the US territory of Puerto Rico in 90 years, made landfall on the island in September 2017.

It caused an estimated $90bn of damages, destroyed more than 70,000 homes and leaving many people with limited access to electricity, fuel, mobile phone coverage and basic supplies.

"On average, households went 84 days without electricity, 64 days without water, and 41 days without cellular telephone coverage after the hurricane," the study said.
Official toll under review

The latest estimate was based on interviews conducted with more than 3,000 randomly selected Puerto Rican households in January and February this year.

Experts alleged the disruption and widespread devastation hampered attempts to accurately record the number of people killed by the storm.

Puerto Rico officials have not shared any new data on hurricane-related deaths since December 2017, when Governor Ricardo Rossello ordered a review of the official toll.

The study, however, said mortality rates on the island increased 62 percent from September 20 - when Hurricane Maria made landfall - to December 31, compared with the same period in 2016.

WATCH
00:00

The Puerto Rican mayor who challenged Trump

The report used criteria from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to determine if a person's death could be blamed on the hurricane.

Deaths can be attributed to a cyclone if they are caused by forces directly related to the event or unsafe or unhealthy conditions resulting from it, according to CDC criteria.

Accurate recording of the deaths is vital, the study said, for "future risk reduction and preparedness planning".

At least one independent expert questioned the methods and the number in the new study.

"This estimate could be off by thousands. Easily," Donald Berry, a professor of biostatistics at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, told The Associated Press.

Hurricane Maria was the second Category 5 storm to affect Puerto Rico - home to 3.4 million people - within the space of two weeks last year, after Hurricane Irma killed three people earlier in September.
Puerto Rico: Shelter After the Storm

Fault Lines

Puerto Rico: Shelter After the Storm

SOURCE: Al Jazeera and news agencies

Very interesting collapse article on PR here that predicts they will lose more than half their population by mid century. This is without additional major hurricanes.[/size]

https://medium.com/migration-issues/how-low-will-puerto-ricos-population-go-c8d108ac8b3b

Good article. 

There are a series of problems in Puerto Rico that too few people know about. Those environmental problems are more harmful to human health than the hurricane caused infrastructure destruction. Those problems were exacerbated by the hurricanes.

Here is a brief list of those problems:

1) SEVERE aquifer contamination by pharmaceutical plants for the last 40 years causing increased cancer, bith defects, IQ decrease and mental disease.

2) SEVERE air and aquifer contamination by Chemical plants for over 50 years.

3) SEVERE air pollution from fossil fuel power plants, some using coal and others using Venezuelan high sulfur crap to run the plants.

4) SEVERE chemical poisoning of the soil, which also leaches into the aquifers to add poison insult to injury, from routine massive use of pesticides and non-selective herbicides like Glyphoste for over 50 years. This too, contributes to cancer and birth defects.

5) Improper garbage disposal and no effective recycling campaign adds to air and ground pollution and disease near the dumps.

6) The south of Puerto Rico has been the wild west for Monsanto to test WHATEVER it wants for over 50 years on the "test" crops. If you think those efforts are innocuous, I have a bridge to sell you in Brooklyn.

7) ALL the birth control products now used all over the world were initially tested by American Doctors on Puerto Rican women in the 1940's. Birth defects and deaths frequently resulted from the drugs that didn't work as planned. If you think Puerto Rico does not continue to be a testing ground for drugs, I have a bridge to sell you in Brooklyn.

Of course Puerto Rico iwill be depopulated to a great extent. Puerto Rico is a textbook example of a Capitalist "deregulated" Paradise. They used to have some social programs to help the people get by. That's old hat now. Puerto Rico is going FULL Libertarian. The laws are written for the rich and the poor either live with this cruel capitalist slavery or leave.

The irony of all this for me is that Climate Change is going to give the same sucker punch, on steroids, to the USA as the Capitalists (a lot of them were, and are, bought and paid for Puerto Ricans) gave to Puerto Rico for over a century. What goes around really does come around.

Nothing like first hand knowledge. Thanks AG. When we flew out of San Juan last time in the Cessna twin, I was struck by the absolute astonishing beauty of the island. It's sad that it and the people of PR have been so badly treated.

I've been watching this Spanish language TV cop drama set in Cuba  (Cuatro Estacianos En la Habana --- Netflix). It's interesting to compare PR and Cuba. I'd sure like to spend some time in both places.


Yep. The thing about PR versus Cuba, that too few people know, is that a significant portion of the most brazen, greed infested, take no prisoners fascists that left Cuba around 1959 settled in Puerto Rico WITH FEDERAL GOVERNMENT LOANS to start their businesses. This immediately caused a lot of anger among Puerto Rican businessmen who could not get small business loans on easy terms. It's been festering ever since.

The (mostly light skinned) Cubans promptly took over most of the media and have been quite busy turning the TV shows into as vulgar displays of profanity, nudity and whatever else they could corrupt Puerto Ricans into "enjoying". Most of the Cubans that went to Miami were in about the same category.

Did you know that Cubans have a reputation among Latins as being the "Jews" of the Caribbean?  Since I am of Sephardic Jew stock, I know a thing or two about that. The negative stereotype of the hoarding, slave driver businesman that too many Jews have is well deserved among the upper crust Cubans that left Cuba.

IMHO, the best there was stayed in Cuba. Cubans "helped" Puerto Rico beome the mess it is now. Of course Puerto Ricans (the lighter skinned variety with DA MONEY that think they are better than the rest of them - my sociopath family is well represented there) "helped" too.

I can give you historical chapter and verse starting from 1825 on WHY Cubans and Puerto Ricans are so prone to KISS EMPIRE ASS. But that is a long, sad story starting with who the Spanish "Tories" were back when King Ferdinand was sweating losing all his stolen land to upstarts in South America who had the temerity to claim people should be treated with respect.

All the Spaniards loyal to the Spanish Crown rushed to the Caribbean. Thus the peoples of those beleagered islands set the spineless mold for colonized submission. All that said, the Cubans still had an independent streak, as the USA eventually found out.

My daddy, the US Army officer, told me to never trust a Puerto Rican. He said, and I confirmed it in the FAA, than when Puerto Ricans work under an American system, they jockey for position to see who can double cross their fellow Puerto Rican the most and thus gain favor with the Americans working with them. He said the Americans, despite seeing us as second class salt water niggers, could be trusted to reward our labor more objectively. I was raised in Kansas. I never got along well with most Puerto Ricans, including my egomaniac dad, even when I was an atheist.

It seems obvious, at least to me, especially after the remorseless disdain and non compassion for its suffering colony, that the US will pay in spades one way or another for its astonishing cruelty. It's only a matter of time, and that time is shortening in the gathering whirl wind all around the world. And the US population in its apathy, self centeredness and ignorance and collusion deserves everything coming to it in return.

Karpatok, in her comment, shows some knowledge of what the colonized mentality is subjected to. As she surmises, it's no bed of roses.

I am ashamed of the colonized Puerto Rican culture. No I am not "blaming the victim". Most of the blame goes to the USA from Thomas Jefferson on down the line. But, Puerto Ricans have turned into crabs in an empire bucket!

Yes, the tropical rain forest and beaches are lovely, but it is very, very hard to live in peace down there. If you stop your car on a part of El Yunque Rain Forest, as my wife and I used to do, to enjoy the view of the citiy lights in the distance, it would not be long before some shifty characters would show up with their boom, boom ,boom music in their cars checking you out to see if they could rob you (and that's when all they want is money). 

As to the environment, there are lots of tiny concrete bridges all over the island, since the place is rather mountainous. You used to be able to stop near one of these bridges and look at some small brook or stream with all the pretty tropical foliage around. You could see beautiful multi-colored guppies in the clear waters. Back in 1996, just before leaving, all you saw was plastic bottles and old appliance junk, and whatever else people would throw out when no one was looking, trashing the small streams with cloudy waters.  :(

Do you know what the car thieves do routinely down there? They take whatever they can get from the vehicle they steal and then they BURN the car. :P

It's sad. I don't like to think about it. I'm just talking here because I wish to help folks here keep this Puerto Rican environmental tragedy in the proper context.

People are people, regardless of where they were born or their genetics. Most Americans think they are somehow "different" from other people. They aren't. They mostly are simply NOT prepared for what is already here and increasing in severity from morally degenerate fascist elitists to impovershed, criminalized crazed people to a polluted environment. They mostly DO NOT GET IT. They will. All of us will increasingly experience IT. God is NOT mocked.
« Last Edit: May 30, 2018, 04:41:32 PM by agelbert »
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Offline Karpatok

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Re: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature
« Reply #211 on: May 30, 2018, 04:51:02 PM »

But Surly, I am just sooooooo sick of Trump as the villain. He is nothing. An empty suit. He is a figure head probably not even aware that he is now surrounded by controllers.

I understand your POV. It is the Koch Brothers coup he has brought in, or rather, they have brought in, using Trump as a battering ram. A fox for every henhouse, realizing the Bannon/Koch credo of "deconstructing the administrative state." Tearing American society apart every day, brick by brick. Pretty soon there will be nothing left but surveillance orgs and goons.
Hi Surly. All worthwhile untangling further. As I have witnessed and seen it for the past sixty or so years,  the "Tearing American society apart every day, brick by brick" can be laid directly at the feet of Cultural Marxism from the Frankfort School and all their followers and adherents. And believe me I was a personal student and close to several of them. It was my understanding that these invaders penetrating and destroying what was not theirs to begin with, was what Bannon wished to surgically remove. I do not believe that Trump has the intelligence or background to understand one iota of that, especially considering his present allegiances and family connections. On the other hand there is a physical if not intellectual alignment there. Was that what made Trump attractive to the Kochs as a tool? But I still don't get a Koch connection with Bannon? If the Kochs are running this mess, why did they dispense with Bannon  who wanted to get the US back home minding its own business and helping its own people? I don't think Bannon was pushing for hegemony in the world and annilhililating all who refused by means of the national security state and the MIC. But the Kochs, probably so, just like Cheney, Rumsfield, Brzezinsky and so forth. A clear continuation. And who directed Obama, in extra judicial killings and enlistment of Jihadists, and Clintons murder by sodomy of Ghadafi? The Kochs? Because this direction was clear from the destruction of Yugoslavia and before, both within and without the US, on both sides of the aisle.
« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 08:09:25 AM by Surly1 »

Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature
« Reply #212 on: May 30, 2018, 05:27:17 PM »
It seems obvious, at least to me, especially after the remorseless disdain and non campassion for its suffering colony, that the US will pay in spades one way or another for its astonishing cruelty. It's only a matter of time, and that time is shortening in the gathering whirl wind all around the world. And the US population in its apathy, self centeredness and ignorance and collusion deserves everything coming to it in return.

I am ruefully reminded of the quote that has it, "Every country has the government it deserves."

The administrationour polity has elected will surely hasten our appointment with destiny. Morris Berman has observed that if you want the entire rotten edifice to come tumbling down, Trump is the perfect president.
But Surly, I am just sooooooo sick of Trump as the villain. He is nothing. An empty suit. He is a figure head probably not even aware that he is now surrounded by controllers. I believe there was a coup All completely now visible with Bolton etc. I did not vote for Trump. Neither did I vote for the pantsuit cunt whore selling favors for bribes to fill her bag. I hoped against hope for a change, and just like the appointed mestizo or equivalent lying figurehead Obama the lying was confirmed right after the election. Bush, too was a moron, and Clinton a complete sack of veniality and hedonism. Face it.. There is no health in us any longer. Why beat dead and soulless rats. Assasinate him or wait until the next election. But the system is broken, because only vermin will be put up for election by the offal of corporatism, primarily of one stripe. Criticize these flaws in the system that bring such rotten flesh up to fool the ignorant and apathetic public who think they uphold a respectable democracy that still exists. It doesn't and they don't. But flogging Trump, Trump, Trump goes nowhere. There is no individual coming along that will or can do better. Only a yes man in front, covering a hive of suicidal paranoid messianic insanity headed toward complete mass destruction.

While not as eloquent as K, as a doomer my belief is the system is coming down no matter who the POTUS happens to be. It's a worldwide situation that has been been building for a very long time.

There are no saints or savior nations out there, it's not just us. Blaming a showman hotel and casino builder, in office a year, for what faces us doomers just doesn't make sense to me.

Might as well blame it on the SNL show or Roseanne as far as I'm concerned. China is very busy destroying the planet environmentally, Russia is quite committed to starting a new nuclear missile weapon race and has showed off and boasted to the world of it's new prowess in attack weapons, Germany and it's bankers have taken over Europe with it's Debt credit based Euro scheme, Brazil is a quagmire of complete corruption as is Venezuela, Mexico and most of South America. Israel is a mad dog hell bent on war and Middle East domination. Our own deep state psychos are well known to us as well with their war for ever plans and hide away bunkers.

Cannot offer any solution to the myriad of ills and evils facing us, but it was this way long before Trump and will remain after Trump, if we are still here of course and escape Palloy's very legitimate fears of a nuclear showdown.

Offline agelbert

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Re: Puerto Rico’s Uncounted Dead
« Reply #213 on: May 30, 2018, 05:59:47 PM »
Here's more info on the uncounted dead in Puerto Rico:

Puerto Rico’s Uncounted Dead: Study Says Hurricane Maria Toll Far Higher Than Official Count (Pt. 1/2)

May 29, 2018

A Harvard study has found that at least 4,645 people have died as a result of Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico, 70 times more than Puerto Rico officials claim. We speak to Omaya Sosa, co-founder of Puerto Rico’s Center for Investigative Journalism, who first reported  the government’s official death toll was underreported.

Story Transcript
AARON MATÉ: It’s The Real News, I’m Aaron Maté. When he visited Puerto Rico in October, President Trump lauded what he called, the “low death toll” from Hurricane Maria.

DONALD TRUMP: Every death is a horror. But if you look at a real catastrophe, like Katrina, and you look at the tremendous hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of people that died, and you look at what happened here with really a storm that was just totally overpowering, nobody’s ever seen anything like this. What is your death count as of this moment, seventeen? Sixteen people certified, sixteen people, versus in the thousands. You can be very proud of all of your people, all of our people working together. Sixteen versus literally thousands of people.

AARON MATÉ: But for months, Puerto Rico’s residents and experts have warned that the death toll has been vastly undercounted, and a new study confirms their fears. A team of researchers estimates that at least 4,645 people have died as a result of Hurricane Maria. About one third of the deaths were caused by delayed or inaccessible medical treatment. Omaya Sosa is co-founder of Puerto Rico’s Center for Investigative Journalism. In September, just days after Hurricane Maria hit, she broke the story that the government’s official death toll was far too low. Omaya, welcome. Talk to us about the reporting you’ve done from the days after Hurricane Maria, what you found, and how it tracks with what had just come out in this new study today?

OMAYA SOSA: Thanks For having me, Aaron. We started reporting on this story literally a couple of days after the hurricane. We heard what the government was putting out, and what we saw on the streets, and from regular people, policemen, rescuers, people at the hospitals, doctors, was very different from what the government was saying. So, already, from September 28, we published our first story, saying that we already knew it was dozens more than what the government was saying. And we have continued investigating since.

In Early December, we said that those first forty days, the death toll was around 1,000 in excess, compared to 2016, and that was based on official mortality data, only covering the month of October and the first ten days after the hurricane in September. So, this report basically confirms what we were already reporting in September, October and November, and finally in that first week of December, that the death toll was much higher, that many of the deaths happened after the hurricane because of the inadequate response and because of problems with the health care system in Puerto Rico. Which is really a pity, because when President Trump got here and made those unfortunate comments, a lot could have been done to prevent thousands of these deaths.

So, the data that Harvard put out today is consistent with what we have been reporting and with what we have been investigating. We are still in the middle of the second phase of our investigation, and we’re actually concentrating on the health care system and what happened there. And we are seeing that the deaths that were linked to problems with services, health care services, are probably even higher than what Harvard is saying today.

AARON MATÉ: So, when you say there that more could have been done to prevent these deaths, even after President Trump spoke. What are you referring to? Are you referring to the health facilities or particular?

OMAYA SOSA: There was no plan from our government and our health department to really get to know what was happening on the ground in the health care facilities, and when I say health care facilities, I refer to all the levels in health care, hospitals, elderly homes, maybe smaller doctors and specialists, offices and so forth. It was a disaster, it was a complete disaster, and all the patients that needed lifesaving services, or that were even stable but needed some kind of support- like for example, people that depend on oxygen, or people that need dialysis, those persons were really left stranded with no support system. And many of those people died.

The government could have put in a response plan, an emergency response plan in terms of public health to first know what was going on, and then tried to canalize these patients to where the best facilities were, or support certain facilities. But there was no organization of any kind. There was no information for patients to know where there were hospitals that were actually working. It was a complete mess.

AARON MATÉ: Sorry to interrupt, but you mentioned oxygen. If I have it right from your reporting, the lack of available oxygen is due, in large part, to the fact that delivery of oxygen is privatized. Do I have that right?

OMAYA SOSA: Yes, it’s privatized, and many roads were- you could not drive through them after the hurricane aftermath. The electricity was down everywhere, basically, so these companies were not working. There are not many of them, and they were not working. So, the whole system of delivery of oxygen and supplies and medicines- it wasn’t only oxygen, it was- all kinds of supplies was stopped. And there was no effective way for facilities to get these life-supporting services; medication, insulin for diabetics, for example. And the government didn’t do much to try and fix this.

AARON MATÉ: What do you think accounts for the vast discrepancy between the official death toll- we heard President Trump, back in October, say it was sixteen, and later on, the government of Puerto Rico increased that to just sixty-four. But now the study says it’s over 4,600. What accounts for the discrepancy?

OMAYA SOSA: I think there was a total lack of interest from our Puerto Rican government and from the federal government to really try and get to know what was going on. The resources were not assigned. From week number one, they already knew that people were dying at hospitals. I did a couple of interviews with the health secretary, our health secretary. Months after, I did an interview with the governor himself, and I told him we were seeing all these data, and what was going on. And there was no interest in really assigning researchers to know what was going on, on the ground. And that’s what- maybe they thought it would reflect badly on the image of how the response was coming along. I don’t know, you know, they never said.

AARON MATÉ: All right. We’ll pause there and come back in part two. My guest is Omaya Sosa, co-founder of Puerto Rico’s Center for Investigative Journalism.


Puerto Rico’s Uncounted Dead: Study Says Hurricane Maria Toll Far Higher Than Official Count (Pt. 2/2)

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/yDQVL_xYYPA" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/yDQVL_xYYPA</a>

https://therealnews.com/stories/puerto-ricos-uncounted-dead-study-says-hurricane-maria-toll-far-higher-than-official-count

« Last Edit: May 30, 2018, 06:04:15 PM by agelbert »
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Offline Palloy2

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Re: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature
« Reply #214 on: May 30, 2018, 07:08:33 PM »
Was everybody who died given a death certificate and buried in a cemetery?  If so, they should be able to work numbers out from that.  If not, they could be listed and counted.   No doubt for some deaths it might be difficult to say "this death was caused by the hurricane" but those could be easily sorted out later.  Either way they would be counted.

Have any of these Harvard experts produced any names of people that have died that the Government doesn't have?
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https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2018/05/30/hurricane-maria-puerto-rico-death-toll-white-house/656252002/

White House defends FEMA after study finds Hurricane Maria killed 5,000 in Puerto Rico
John Bacon, USA TODAY Published 4:41 p.m. ET May 30, 2018 | Updated 4:43 p.m. ET May 30, 2018
AFP AFP_12R9N5 I DIS PRI


(Photo: RICARDO ARDUENGO, AFP/Getty Images)

The White House on Wednesday shook off criticism of the emergency response to Hurricane Maria following a Harvard study that estimated the death toll from last year's tragedy in Puerto Rico may have reached 5,000.

The official death toll from the storm is listed as 64, but Puerto Rican officials have maintained they believe the number is far higher.

White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders, asked about the startling numbers in the Harvard study, defended FEMA's response to the storm that slammed into the island as a Category 4 hurricane Sept. 20, two weeks after the island was ravaged by Hurricane Irma.

Sanders said the government responded to the storm with the largest FEMA effort in history.

"We have been supportive of Gov. Rosello's efforts to ensure full accounting and transparency, and those who have suffered from this tragedy deserve nothing less," she added.

More: Hurricane Maria killed more than 4,600 people, study says.

More: Caribbean hotels make a comeback after hurricanes

National Nurse United, the nation's largest union for registered nurses, said the study confirmed what volunteer nurses who went to the island in the days and weeks after the Sept. 20 landfall witnessed — residents "left to die" by a federal response that "failed its own American citizens."

“Nurses on the ground saw that people were dying," said Bonnie Castillo, executive director of the union. "Our volunteer RNs came back to the U.S. and said again and again, ‘The people of Puerto Rico are dying. Do something!'"

Rep. Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., who serves on the House Committee on Homeland Security, called the Harvard estimate "heartbreaking" and blasted the federal response to the storm as "woefully inadequate."

FEMA assistant administrator Michael Byrne defended his agency's effort before a House committee two months ago.

Byrne testified more than 19,000 federal staff from 80 agencies were on the ground at the height of the emergency effort. More than a billion dollars in commodities, such as food, water, tarps, and construction materials "were delivered by air, off-road vehicles and on foot, making it the largest and longest commodity delivery mission in FEMA’s history," he said.

Maria destroyed thousands of buildings and knocked out power to virtually the entire U.S. territory of more than 3 million people. Researchers at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health released a study this week based on a survey of more than 3,000 households on the battered island.

The researchers determined at least 4,645 "excess deaths" occurred during the storm and the weeks that followed as the island struggled to provide basic services such as food, water and medical care. The researchers also said the number was probably conservative, and that the total could have exceeded 5,000.

By comparison, more than 1,800 people died when Katrina roared across the U.S. Gulf Coast as a Category 5 hurricane in 2005.

Christy Delafield, a spokeswoman for the global humanitarian organization Mercy Corps, has spent time in Puerto Rico since Maria. She said her group always believed official numbers seemed low, but "Harvard's numbers are worse than we feared."

"The lack of electricity and basic services meant that people couldn't get the help they needed for a long time after the storm," she said. "The elderly, people with health problems and the very young were at particular risk."

Carlos Mercader, executive director of the Puerto Rico Federal Affairs Administration, said the Puerto Rico government welcomed the study and would analyze it further. He said officials expected the number would be much higher than previous counts, and a team at George Washington University has been conducting a review of the death total that is due soon.

"As the world knows, the magnitude of this tragic disaster caused by Hurricane Maria resulted in many fatalities," he said. "Both studies will help us better prepare for future natural disasters and prevent lives from being lost.”
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Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature
« Reply #216 on: May 31, 2018, 03:47:08 AM »
It seems obvious, at least to me, especially after the remorseless disdain and non campassion for its suffering colony, that the US will pay in spades one way or another for its astonishing cruelty. It's only a matter of time, and that time is shortening in the gathering whirl wind all around the world. And the US population in its apathy, self centeredness and ignorance and collusion deserves everything coming to it in return.

It might happen that way in a just world K, cruelty and evil being punished.

Unfortunately my limited experience on this planet shows me quite the opposite. The cruel and mean are seldom held accountable. Accountability and justice are sorely lacking.

Who was punished for the loss of life in Vietnam? How is Germany being punished for the millions upon millions of Russians it slaughtered? What about England and it's empire built at the cost of much blood letting. Look at our New York Banksters and what they did to everyone and their punishment of hundred million dollar homes in the Hamptons where they fill their swimming pools with champagne and party. When are we going to get it for what we did to the Indians? Of course this list could go on for volumes.

Might I also suggest that if what you say becomes reality, it is we, not them who will do the majority of the suffering.

Julian Assange is in prison suffering, the animals of the world are living in castles planning wars at our expense.  :icon_scratch: :icon_scratch:

It's all such a contorted mess I don't even know what I'm talking about anymore. Going to get a fresh cup of coffee, and just hope for the best. Look at some paintings as well this morning. Praise the Lord for my wonderful computer, how did I live so many years without it. 


                                       

Massacre in Korea is a 1951 expressionistic painting by Pablo Picasso which is seen as a criticism of American intervention in the Korean War. It depicts the 1950 Sinchon Massacre, an act of mass killing carried out by North Koreans, South Koreans, and American forces in the town of Sinchon located in South Hwanghae Province, North Korea. Although the actual cause of the murders in Sinchon is in question, Massacre in Korea appears to depict them as civilians being killed by anti-Communist forces. The art critic Kirsten Hoving Keen says that it is "inspired by reports of American atrocities" and considers it one of Picasso's communist works. Picasso's work is drawn from Francisco Goya's painting The Third of May 1808, which shows Napoleon's soldiers executing Spanish civilians under the orders of Joachim Murat.

As with Goya's The Third of May 1808, the painting is marked by a bifurcated composition, divided into two distinct parts. To the left, a group of naked women and children are seen situated at the foot of a mass grave. A number of heavily armed "knights" stand to the right, also naked, but equipped with "gigantic limbs and hard muscles similar to those of prehistoric giants." The firing squad is rigidly poised as in Goya. In Picasso's representation, however, the group is manifestly helter-skelter - as was often apparent in his portrayals of armored soldiers in drawings and lithographs - which may be taken to indicate an attitude of mockery of the idiocy of war.

Their helmets are misshapen, and their weaponry is a mishmash amalgamation of the instruments of aggression from the medieval period to the modern era - not quite guns or lances, they perhaps most resemble candlesticks. What is more, none of them have penises. This representational feature is highlighted by the pregnant state of the women on the left side of the panel. Many viewers have interpreted that the soldiers, in their capacity as destroyers of life, have substituted guns for their penises, thereby castrating themselves and depriving the world of the next generation of human life.

Offline Karpatok

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Re: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature
« Reply #217 on: May 31, 2018, 09:29:20 AM »
It seems obvious, at least to me, especially after the remorseless disdain and non campassion for its suffering colony, that the US will pay in spades one way or another for its astonishing cruelty. It's only a matter of time, and that time is shortening in the gathering whirl wind all around the world. And the US population in its apathy, self centeredness and ignorance and collusion deserves everything coming to it in return.

It might happen that way in a just world K, cruelty and evil being punished.

Unfortunately my limited experience on this planet shows me quite the opposite. The cruel and mean are seldom held accountable. Accountability and justice are sorely lacking.

Who was punished for the loss of life in Vietnam? How is Germany being punished for the millions upon millions of Russians it slaughtered? What about England and it's empire built at the cost of much blood letting. Look at our New York Banksters and what they did to everyone and their punishment of hundred million dollar homes in the Hamptons where they fill their swimming pools with champagne and party. When are we going to get it for what we did to the Indians? Of course this list could go on for volumes.

Might I also suggest that if what you say becomes reality, it is we, not them who will do the majority of the suffering.

Julian Assange is in prison suffering, the animals of the world are living in castles planning wars at our expense.  :icon_scratch: :icon_scratch:

It's all such a contorted mess I don't even know what I'm talking about anymore. Going to get a fresh cup of coffee, and just hope for the best. Look at some paintings as well this morning. Praise the Lord for my wonderful computer, how did I live so many years without it. 


                                       

Massacre in Korea is a 1951 expressionistic painting by Pablo Picasso which is seen as a criticism of American intervention in the Korean War. It depicts the 1950 Sinchon Massacre, an act of mass killing carried out by North Koreans, South Koreans, and American forces in the town of Sinchon located in South Hwanghae Province, North Korea. Although the actual cause of the murders in Sinchon is in question, Massacre in Korea appears to depict them as civilians being killed by anti-Communist forces. The art critic Kirsten Hoving Keen says that it is "inspired by reports of American atrocities" and considers it one of Picasso's communist works. Picasso's work is drawn from Francisco Goya's painting The Third of May 1808, which shows Napoleon's soldiers executing Spanish civilians under the orders of Joachim Murat.

As with Goya's The Third of May 1808, the painting is marked by a bifurcated composition, divided into two distinct parts. To the left, a group of naked women and children are seen situated at the foot of a mass grave. A number of heavily armed "knights" stand to the right, also naked, but equipped with "gigantic limbs and hard muscles similar to those of prehistoric giants." The firing squad is rigidly poised as in Goya. In Picasso's representation, however, the group is manifestly helter-skelter - as was often apparent in his portrayals of armored soldiers in drawings and lithographs - which may be taken to indicate an attitude of mockery of the idiocy of war.

Their helmets are misshapen, and their weaponry is a mishmash amalgamation of the instruments of aggression from the medieval period to the modern era - not quite guns or lances, they perhaps most resemble candlesticks. What is more, none of them have penises. This representational feature is highlighted by the pregnant state of the women on the left side of the panel. Many viewers have interpreted that the soldiers, in their capacity as destroyers of life, have substituted guns for their penises, thereby castrating themselves and depriving the world of the next generation of human life.

Very good illustration and true words, GO, as we may never ourselves see justice or the denouement of this cycle of suffering. You are a man of faith. Those Jesuits taught you well. So I ask you clearly. Does it really make sense to consort with Malloch and pretend tolerance towards the followers of Baal? I think not. What do you think now?

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https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/02/us/puerto-rico-death-tolls.html

Why Are the Death Tolls in Puerto Rico From Hurricane Maria So Different?


Outside the emergency room at Centro Medico in San Juan, P.R., in September, when Hurricane Maria swept through the island. Death tolls from the storm have varied widely.CreditVictor J. Blue for The New York Times

By Sheri Fink

    June 2, 2018

Widely different estimates of Hurricane Maria’s death toll in Puerto Rico have led to confusion. Here is a guide to the tallies, what accounts for their differences and how a new study aims to provide a more definitive account:
What is The New York Times’s estimate?

In December, The New York Times analyzed vital statistics from the Puerto Rican government that showed that in the 42 days after Hurricane Maria made landfall on Sept. 20, 2017, 1,052 more people than usual died in Puerto Rico.

That figure was particularly striking because thousands of people had left the island, including many with chronic medical conditions. Based on the likelihood that the population there was smaller in the fall of 2017, we would have expected the number of deaths per day to decrease, not increase.
How did The Times get to that number?

To obtain our figure of 1,052, we compared the number of deaths for each day in 2017 with the average of the number of deaths for the same days in 2015 and 2016. The figures came from the Puerto Rican government, which provided us with tables showing the number of deaths per day and deaths broken down by cause. The 2017 numbers were preliminary, so we limited our analysis to September and October.

We found that people died from certain causes more often in September 2017 than they had in the previous two years. Those included sepsis — a complication of severe infection — which jumped 50 percent over the previous year. Pneumonia and emphysema deaths also rose notably.

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Using the same data and similar methods, Puerto Rico’s Center for Investigative Journalism reached a similar estimate, that 1,065 more people than usual had died in September and October. Likewise, the demographer Alexis Santos of Pennsylvania State University, and Jeffrey T. Howard, an independent researcher, compared deaths in 2017 with figures derived from 2010 to 2016 and established an estimate of 1,085 excess deaths. (The increased deaths were concentrated in older age groups, in nursing homes and in emergency departments, Dr. Santos reported in Health Affairs in April.)
Why does a new study suggest there could be more than 4,000 deaths?

The study, which was published in The New England Journal of Medicine, one of the most highly regarded peer-reviewed medical journals, analyzed a longer period than we did. It also used completely different methods.

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Researchers visited more than 3,000 residences across the island and interviewed their occupants, asking whether anyone in their households had died, and whether the storm and its aftermath might have contributed. Residents reported that 38 people living in their households had died between Sept. 20, 2017, when Hurricane Maria struck, and the end of that year.

That toll, converted into a mortality rate, was extrapolated to the larger population and compared with official statistics from the same period in 2016. Researchers arrived at an estimate of roughly 4,600.
Is that the most accurate estimate?

Because the number of households surveyed was relatively small in comparison to the population’s size, there was a large margin of error. The true number of deaths beyond what was expected could range from nearly 800 to close to 8,500 people, the researchers’ calculations showed. The widely reported figure of 4,645 was simply the midpoint of that statistical window, known as a 95 percent confidence interval. Including a midpoint figure in such a report is standard academic practice.
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The study’s main finding was that residents of Puerto Rico died at a significantly higher rate during the three months after the hurricane than they did during the same period in the previous year, and that roughly a third of those deaths resulted from delayed medical care. The researchers said in the report that their conclusions were consistent with the analyses of The Times and others.

“All these methods complement each other,” said Dr. Satchit Balsari, one of the study’s senior authors. “By no means is the number we’re estimating the end-all.”
What was the official death toll?

At the time our analysis was released, the official death toll was 64. That number included only people whose death certificates listed Hurricane Maria as a contributor, as certified by the Puerto Rico Forensic Sciences Institute in San Juan. But under pressure from a skeptical public, the Puerto Rican government announced in December that all deaths that had occurred in the months after Hurricane Maria would be reviewed and that people who died either directly or indirectly from the storm and its aftermath would be included in a revised tally.
What are direct and indirect deaths?

In relation to hurricane deaths, the term “direct” means those that occurred from drowning or other effects of the storm itself. “Indirect” deaths include those in which related factors, such as difficulty reaching a hospital for care, or trouble refilling medical prescriptions, played a role. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that medical examiners record both types of deaths as associated with disasters, and the government of Puerto Rico says that it does so.
Why was the official count so low?

The government acknowledged that its tally of 64 was likely to be a significant undercount. In the days after the storm, with widespread power outages and extreme difficulty moving around the island, it was likely that many storm-related deaths went uninvestigated by the island’s medical examiner.

In November, CNN compiled figures from half the island’s funeral homes to report that funeral directors believed that 499 more deaths than the official count were tied to the hurricane. In many instances, local doctors had not sent the cases to the forensics bureau for analysis.

Also in November, BuzzFeed reported that 911 bodies were cremated following Hurricane Maria without being examined, and that in many cases, funeral home and crematory directors believed that those people had died as a result of the hurricane.

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What is being done to establish a more precise figure?

The government of Puerto Rico has a contract with the Milken Institute School of Public Health at George Washington University to conduct a more thorough review. The initial phase of the study will use the island’s vital records and information from funeral homes, the medical system and the larger public. In a second phase, the researchers will conduct interviews with survivors of those who died. Dr. Lynn R. Goldman, the school’s dean, said she expected to deliver the initial review this summer, with the results from the second phase following perhaps nine months later.

In recent months, pending the completion of the review, the government of Puerto Rico had stopped issuing statistics on deaths. After Puerto Rico’s Institute of Statistics and the Center for Investigative Journalism went to court to demand their release, the commonwealth’s health department and demographic registrar released a portion of the data on Friday, a table of deaths over all by month. Figures for September and October of 2017 were similar to those that had been released to The Times last year, having increased slightly. Total deaths in November and beyond did not appear elevated compared with previous years. However the population of Puerto Rico had likely declined, so an analysis of the rate of deaths would be needed to detect any possible increases, also accounting for changes in the makeup of the population remaining.

Follow Sheri Fink on Twitter @SheriFink
« Last Edit: June 03, 2018, 02:08:33 AM by RE »
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Offline Palloy2

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Re: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature
« Reply #219 on: June 03, 2018, 07:09:27 AM »
That's how the numbers should have been reported.
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🌀 Hurricane season starts today, and Trump still hasn’t learned
« Reply #220 on: June 22, 2018, 12:34:47 AM »
https://grist.org/article/hurricane-season-starts-today-and-trump-still-hasnt-learned-from-his-deadliest-blunder-hurricane-maria/

art of the denial
Hurricane season starts today, and Trump still hasn’t learned from his deadliest blunder — Hurricane Maria
By Justine Calma   on Jun 1, 2018


It wasn’t until five days after Hurricane Maria made landfall that President Trump tweeted about the devastation. FEMA administrator Brock Long arrived in Puerto Rico that same day — he was among the first Trump officials to get to the battered U.S. territory.

This week, a Harvard study revealed that the September 2017 storm is likely the deadliest disaster in modern U.S. history — with more casualties than Hurricane Katrina and the 9/11 attacks combined. The analysis places Puerto Rico’s death toll at somewhere between 4,645 and 5,740 people, 90 times more dead than the government’s widely disputed official death toll.

The president has yet to offer any public condolences on the death count in the new study. He has, however, tweeted vigorously in the wake of Roseanne Barr being fired to Disney CEO Bob Iger demanding an apology for “HORRIBLE” statements made about him on ABC.

“What if 5,000 people in any US state died because of a natural disaster? It would be 24/7 news. Well, that happened in #PuertoRico as a result of #HurricaneMaría, and we are now talking about a mediocre sitcom being cancelled,” tweeted journalist Julio Ricardo Varela.

Writing in an opinion piece for NBC news, Varela continued: “Puerto Ricans are not suddenly shocked by the Harvard study … because the proof was already there months ago. But almost nobody else wanted to look for it.”

Trump’s only visit to the island after the storm — when he said that Maria wasn’t a “real” tragedy like Hurricane Katrina — Varela writes, “served to highlight the late response and federal neglect to Puerto Rico’s catastrophe.”

The president’s inattention, critics argue, contributed to a disaster response that was slow, meager, and ripe with allegations of misconduct and corruption. And rather than drive compassion for fellow Americans, his priorities have helped shift attention elsewhere. Cable news dedicated more than 16 times more airtime to the Roseanne controversy than it did to the Puerto Rico death toll.

Because of the silence, Refinery 29 journalist Andrea González-Ramírez has started a viral thread on Twitter in an effort to remember and name the dead:

“This should be a day of collective mourning in Puerto Rico. Thousands dead because of administrations that could not get the job done,” San Juan Mayor Carmen Yulin Cruz tweeted on Tuesday. “These deaths & the negligence that contributed to them cannot be forgotten. This was, & continues to be, a violation of our human rights.”

And with Hurricane Season 2018 beginning today, there’s still uncertainty about how prepared this administration is for another storm. Puerto Rico’s power authority announced yesterday that it may take another two months to get power back completely on the island, and officials say it’s likely that the electrical grid will crash again with the next hurricane.

On top of that, FEMA is going through a “reorganization,” Bloomberg reported last week, and several key leadership roles are still vacant or temporarily filled.

“What the impacts from the 2017 disasters show is that there is also still work to do in order to build a culture of preparedness across the country at all levels of government, including improved resilience among our critical infrastructure,” FEMA wrote to Grist in an email.
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Re: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature
« Reply #221 on: June 22, 2018, 06:57:14 AM »
The death toll has been debunked earlier in this thread, so of course Trump hasn't offered any condolences.  If they got the power on by redoing the wires on poles then, yes, they will be trashed by the next storm.  That is always true everywhere, but it doesn't stop wires on poles.
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'We're doomed': Mayer Hillman on the climate reality no one else will dare mention

The 86-year-old social scientist says accepting the impending end of most life on Earth might be the very thing needed to help us prolong it


Patrick Barkham
Dr Mayer Hillman with his bike outside his home in London.
Dr Mayer Hillman with his bike outside his home in London. Photograph: John Alex Maguire / Rex Features

“We’re doomed,” says Mayer Hillman with such a beaming smile that it takes a moment for the words to sink in. “The outcome is death, and it’s the end of most life on the planet because we’re so dependent on the burning of fossil fuels. There are no means of reversing the process which is melting the polar ice caps. And very few appear to be prepared to say so.”

Hillman, an 86-year-old social scientist and senior fellow emeritus of the Policy Studies Institute, does say so. His bleak forecast of the consequence of runaway climate change, he says without fanfare, is his “last will and testament”. His last intervention in public life. “I’m not going to write anymore because there’s nothing more that can be said,” he says when I first hear him speak to a stunned audience at the University of East Anglia late last year.

From Malthus to the Millennium Bug, apocalyptic thinking has a poor track record. But when it issues from Hillman, it may be worth paying attention. Over nearly 60 years, his research has used factual data to challenge policymakers’ conventional wisdom. In 1972, he criticised out-of-town shopping centres more than 20 years before the government changed planning rules to stop their spread. In 1980, he recommended halting the closure of branch line railways – only now are some closed lines reopening. In 1984, he proposed energy ratings for houses – finally adopted as government policy in 2007. And, more than 40 years ago, he presciently challenged society’s pursuit of economic growth.

When we meet at his converted coach house in London, his classic Dawes racer still parked hopefully in the hallway (a stroke and a triple heart bypass mean he is – currently – forbidden from cycling), Hillman is anxious we are not side-tracked by his best-known research, which challenged the supremacy of the car.

“With doom ahead, making a case for cycling as the primary mode of transport is almost irrelevant,” he says. “We’ve got to stop burning fossil fuels. So many aspects of life depend on fossil fuels, except for music and love and education and happiness. These things, which hardly use fossil fuels, are what we must focus on.”

While the focus of Hillman’s thinking for the last quarter-century has been on climate change, he is best known for his work on road safety. He spotted the damaging impact of the car on the freedoms and safety of those without one – most significantly, children – decades ago. Some of his policy prescriptions have become commonplace – such as 20mph speed limits – but we’ve failed to curb the car’s crushing of children’s liberty. In 1971, 80% of British seven- and eight-year-old children went to school on their own; today it’s virtually unthinkable that a seven-year-old would walk to school without an adult. As Hillman has pointed out, we’ve removed children from danger rather than removing danger from children – and filled roads with polluting cars on school runs. He calculated that escorting children took 900m adult hours in 1990, costing the economy £20bn each year. It will be even more expensive today.

Our society’s failure to comprehend the true cost of cars has informed Hillman’s view on the difficulty of combatting climate change. But he insists that I must not present his thinking on climate change as “an opinion”. The data is clear; the climate is warming exponentially. The UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change predicts that the world on its current course will warm by 3C by 2100. Recent revised climate modelling suggested a best estimate of 2.8C but scientists struggle to predict the full impact of the feedbacks from future events such as methane being released by the melting of the permafrost.

Hillman is amazed that our thinking rarely stretches beyond 2100. “This is what I find so extraordinary when scientists warn that the temperature could rise to 5C or 8C. What, and stop there? What legacies are we leaving for future generations? In the early 21st century, we did as good as nothing in response to climate change. Our children and grandchildren are going to be extraordinarily critical.”

Global emissions were static in 2016 but the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere was confirmed as beyond 400 parts per million, the highest level for at least three million years (when sea levels were up to 20m higher than now). Concentrations can only drop if we emit no carbon dioxide whatsoever, says Hillman. “Even if the world went zero-carbon today that would not save us because we’ve gone past the point of no return.”

Although Hillman has not flown for more than 20 years as part of a personal commitment to reducing carbon emissions, he is now scornful of individual action which he describes as “as good as futile”. By the same logic, says Hillman, national action is also irrelevant “because Britain’s contribution is minute. Even if the government were to go to zero carbon it would make almost no difference.”

Instead, says Hillman, the world’s population must globally move to zero emissions across agriculture, air travel, shipping, heating homes – every aspect of our economy – and reduce our human population too. Can it be done without a collapse of civilisation? “I don’t think so,” says Hillman. “Can you see everyone in a democracy volunteering to give up flying? Can you see the majority of the population becoming vegan? Can you see the majority agreeing to restrict the size of their families?”

Hillman doubts that human ingenuity can find a fix and says there is no evidence that greenhouse gases can be safely buried. But if we adapt to a future with less – focusing on Hillman’s love and music – it might be good for us. “And who is ‘we’?” asks Hillman with a typically impish smile. “Wealthy people will be better able to adapt but the world’s population will head to regions of the planet such as northern Europe which will be temporarily spared the extreme effects of climate change. How are these regions going to respond? We see it now. Migrants will be prevented from arriving. We will let them drown.”

A small band of artists and writers, such as Paul Kingsnorth’s Dark Mountain project, have embraced the idea that “civilisation” will soon end in environmental catastrophe but only a few scientists – usually working beyond the patronage of funding bodies, and nearing the end of their own lives – have suggested as much. Is Hillman’s view a consequence of old age, and ill health? “I was saying these sorts of things 30 years ago when I was hale and hearty,” he says.

Hillman accuses all kinds of leaders – from religious leaders to scientists to politicians – of failing to honestly discuss what we must do to move to zero-carbon emissions. “I don’t think they can because society isn’t organised to enable them to do so. Political parties’ focus is on jobs and GDP, depending on the burning of fossil fuels.”

Without hope, goes the truism, we will give up. And yet optimism about the future is wishful thinking, says Hillman. He believes that accepting that our civilisation is doomed could make humanity rather like an individual who recognises he is terminally ill. Such people rarely go on a disastrous binge; instead, they do all they can to prolong their lives.

Can civilisation prolong its life until the end of this century? “It depends on what we are prepared to do.” He fears it will be a long time before we take proportionate action to stop climatic calamity. “Standing in the way is capitalism. Can you imagine the global airline industry being dismantled when hundreds of new runways are being built right now all over the world? It’s almost as if we’re deliberately attempting to defy nature. We’re doing the reverse of what we should be doing, with everybody’s silent acquiescence, and nobody’s batting an eyelid.”

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Palloy2

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Re: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature
« Reply #223 on: July 05, 2018, 06:16:34 PM »
Quote
Global emissions were static in 2016 but the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere was confirmed as beyond 400 parts per million, the highest level for at least three million years (when sea levels were up to 20m higher than now). Concentrations can only drop if we emit no carbon dioxide whatsoever, says Hillman. “Even if the world went zero-carbon today that would not save us because we’ve gone past the point of no return.”

400 parts per billion.  IPCC AR5 doesn't have a "zero carbon today" scenario, but RCP-2.6 has a temperature increase of +1.6C in 2045 and falling slowly after that.

Quote
A small band of artists and writers, such as Paul Kingsnorth’s Dark Mountain project, have embraced the idea that “civilisation” will soon end in environmental catastrophe but only a few scientists – usually working beyond the patronage of funding bodies, and nearing the end of their own lives – have suggested as much.

But let's not talk about that any further.   Let's just believe that Global Warming will be the killer.
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Offline Surly1

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Re: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature
« Reply #224 on: July 05, 2018, 06:33:06 PM »
  Let's just believe that Global Warming will be the killer.

No, let's just pretend it won't.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

 

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