AuthorTopic: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature  (Read 23902 times)

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Re: Michael - The Path of Total Destruction
« Reply #480 on: October 14, 2018, 06:43:25 AM »

agreed. It's even worse then that they seem to use building codes as gentrification tools down there.  I would like to see when those ruined concrete structures were built. Modern Hurricane standards are less then 20yrs old. Your dome structures would survive for sure. Sound post apacalyptic imagine the real estate ads for a ruined world. "Bermed structure to resist the highest surge. Fully integrated powered storm shutter doubles as effective crowd control, lab tested to level5a hurricane, deployable solar array for emergencies, water purifacation system... it become almost like terraforming only on a hostile earth not a far away planet.

lol.  One of these days I'll have to show you my design for a fortified housing system made from Monolithic Domes and Steel Conex containers.  ;D

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Re: Michael - The Path of Total Destruction
« Reply #481 on: October 14, 2018, 07:16:29 AM »

agreed. It's even worse then that they seem to use building codes as gentrification tools down there.  I would like to see when those ruined concrete structures were built. Modern Hurricane standards are less then 20yrs old. Your dome structures would survive for sure. Sound post apacalyptic imagine the real estate ads for a ruined world. "Bermed structure to resist the highest surge. Fully integrated powered storm shutter doubles as effective crowd control, lab tested to level5a hurricane, deployable solar array for emergencies, water purifacation system... it become almost like terraforming only on a hostile earth not a far away planet.

lol.  One of these days I'll have to show you my design for a fortified housing system made from Monolithic Domes and Steel Conex containers.  ;D

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If I was building in florida as a single dwelling not in a built up area I would do an ICF with a concrete roof and bury it in my own built up berm.  They make great powered roll down hurricane shutters as well. Heather and I thought down the road inland florida land would be an interesting winter homestead. lots of cheap land as soon as you are not on the water. I love the cold Heather not so much. That's all changed now of course. Now I think walapini...
If its important then try something, fail, disect, learn from it, try again, and again and again until it kills you or you succeed.

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Re: Michael - The Path of Total Destruction
« Reply #482 on: October 14, 2018, 07:33:50 AM »

agreed. It's even worse then that they seem to use building codes as gentrification tools down there.  I would like to see when those ruined concrete structures were built. Modern Hurricane standards are less then 20yrs old. Your dome structures would survive for sure. Sound post apacalyptic imagine the real estate ads for a ruined world. "Bermed structure to resist the highest surge. Fully integrated powered storm shutter doubles as effective crowd control, lab tested to level5a hurricane, deployable solar array for emergencies, water purifacation system... it become almost like terraforming only on a hostile earth not a far away planet.

lol.  One of these days I'll have to show you my design for a fortified housing system made from Monolithic Domes and Steel Conex containers.  ;D

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If I was building in florida as a single dwelling not in a built up area I would do an ICF with a concrete roof and bury it in my own built up berm.  They make great powered roll down hurricane shutters as well. Heather and I thought down the road inland florida land would be an interesting winter homestead. lots of cheap land as soon as you are not on the water. I love the cold Heather not so much. That's all changed now of course. Now I think walapini...

I read your post and didn't even know what ICF was. So I looked it up. Fascinating AF.
I found this:

http://www.nudura.com/build-with-nudura-icf-in-se-usa?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIgPrDvZKG3gIVkLfsCh3jeQ-iEAMYASAAEgIjYPD_BwE

Real interesting possibilities.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

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Re: Michael - The Path of Total Destruction
« Reply #483 on: October 14, 2018, 07:38:17 AM »

agreed. It's even worse then that they seem to use building codes as gentrification tools down there.  I would like to see when those ruined concrete structures were built. Modern Hurricane standards are less then 20yrs old. Your dome structures would survive for sure. Sound post apacalyptic imagine the real estate ads for a ruined world. "Bermed structure to resist the highest surge. Fully integrated powered storm shutter doubles as effective crowd control, lab tested to level5a hurricane, deployable solar array for emergencies, water purifacation system... it become almost like terraforming only on a hostile earth not a far away planet.

lol.  One of these days I'll have to show you my design for a fortified housing system made from Monolithic Domes and Steel Conex containers.  ;D

RE
If I was building in florida as a single dwelling not in a built up area I would do an ICF with a concrete roof and bury it in my own built up berm.  They make great powered roll down hurricane shutters as well. Heather and I thought down the road inland florida land would be an interesting winter homestead. lots of cheap land as soon as you are not on the water. I love the cold Heather not so much. That's all changed now of course. Now I think walapini...

I read your post and didn't even know what ICF was. So I looked it up. Fascinating AF.
I found this:

http://www.nudura.com/build-with-nudura-icf-in-se-usa?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIgPrDvZKG3gIVkLfsCh3jeQ-iEAMYASAAEgIjYPD_BwE

Real interesting possibilities.
Its a game changer. its the formwork, the framing for hanging drywall, the insulation, and 2 people with a handsaw can install a whole basement form in a day after the footings are in. Its very common for basements here.  A giant grown up lego set. It takes a good crew to pour them but you can hire one for a day. Nodura is a good system and is the one I usually use. These guys here are awesome the have a custom system that needs very little bracing and is poured in one shot roof sections and all. Cheap too. They are packaging it for the developing world.  http://hugbuildingsystems.com/
« Last Edit: October 14, 2018, 07:44:10 AM by Nearingsfault »
If its important then try something, fail, disect, learn from it, try again, and again and again until it kills you or you succeed.

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Re: Michael - The Path of Total Destruction
« Reply #484 on: October 14, 2018, 10:08:55 AM »

agreed. It's even worse then that they seem to use building codes as gentrification tools down there.  I would like to see when those ruined concrete structures were built. Modern Hurricane standards are less then 20yrs old. Your dome structures would survive for sure. Sound post apacalyptic imagine the real estate ads for a ruined world. "Bermed structure to resist the highest surge. Fully integrated powered storm shutter doubles as effective crowd control, lab tested to level5a hurricane, deployable solar array for emergencies, water purifacation system... it become almost like terraforming only on a hostile earth not a far away planet.

lol.  One of these days I'll have to show you my design for a fortified housing system made from Monolithic Domes and Steel Conex containers.  ;D

RE
If I was building in florida as a single dwelling not in a built up area I would do an ICF with a concrete roof and bury it in my own built up berm.  They make great powered roll down hurricane shutters as well. Heather and I thought down the road inland florida land would be an interesting winter homestead. lots of cheap land as soon as you are not on the water. I love the cold Heather not so much. That's all changed now of course. Now I think walapini...

I read your post and didn't even know what ICF was. So I looked it up. Fascinating AF.
I found this:

http://www.nudura.com/build-with-nudura-icf-in-se-usa?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIgPrDvZKG3gIVkLfsCh3jeQ-iEAMYASAAEgIjYPD_BwE

Real interesting possibilities.
Its a game changer. its the formwork, the framing for hanging drywall, the insulation, and 2 people with a handsaw can install a whole basement form in a day after the footings are in. Its very common for basements here.  A giant grown up lego set. It takes a good crew to pour them but you can hire one for a day. Nodura is a good system and is the one I usually use. These guys here are awesome the have a custom system that needs very little bracing and is poured in one shot roof sections and all. Cheap too. They are packaging it for the developing world.  http://hugbuildingsystems.com/

You should write a blog about that.

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🌀 Thousands in Florida May Not Get Electricity Back for Weeks
« Reply #485 on: October 15, 2018, 08:53:54 AM »
I bet it won't be a Trump Golf Course!  ::)

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Thousands in Florida May Not Get Electricity Back for Weeks


Mayor Margo Anderson of Lynn Haven, Fla., made the rounds of her city on Sunday, notifying residents that electric service may not be restored for weeks.CreditCreditGabriella Angotti-Jones/The New York Times

By Audra D. S. Burch and Patricia Mazzei

    Oct. 14, 2018

LYNN HAVEN, Fla. — Mayor Margo Anderson drove through the neighborhoods of her small bayside city on Sunday to deliver some unwelcome news: The electric power knocked out nearly a week ago by Hurricane Michael might not be restored for two months.

Behind the wheel of a black golf cart, she made the rounds as shellshocked neighbors emerged from houses with busted windows and walls and front porches, the damage from the punches of fast wind, rushing waters and toppled trees.

“Just about every tree is down,” said Ms. Anderson, a fifth-generation citizen who was elected mayor of Lynn Haven, Fla., three years ago. “The power lines are destroyed. The transformers are destroyed. The power grid is destroyed. We have to start over.”

That is the dire reality in the necklace of rural towns and coastal communities across northwest Florida that Michael gutted. Residents already reeling from the storm’s unexpectedly brutal winds now face the prospect of spending weeks relying on generators burning expensive fuel, or depending on aid from emergency workers.

Ms. Anderson’s grim prediction of two months of darkness might be a bit pessimistic. Gulf Power, the main utility in the area, estimated on Sunday that electricity would be restored in Lynn Haven, downtown Panama City and neighboring communities by Oct. 24, two weeks after the hurricane made landfall. But Duke Energy, which serves another hard-hit swath of the Florida Panhandle, including Bay County and some parts of Gulf County, said it could not yet estimate how long it might take to get the lights back on in those areas.

“I just want to be realistic and warn people that for a while, it’s going to be pretty primitive living,” Ms. Anderson said.

Some 371,000 customers were still without electricity in Florida, Georgia, North Carolina and Virginia on Sunday afternoon, according to the Edison Electric Institute, while more than 2.3 million customers who lost power in the storm have had it restored. The majority of customers still suffering from Michael-related blackouts — about 182,000 — were in Florida, according to the state’s emergency response team.

About 2,000 people remained in storm shelters on Sunday, and the storm’s confirmed national death toll rose to 19.

The power situation is worst in the Florida counties directly in the northward path traced by Michael’s destructive eye: 99 percent of customers remained in the dark on Sunday in Gulf County, 98 percent in Calhoun County and 91 percent in Jackson County. Neighboring counties were nearly as badly off.


Some 371,000 customers were still without electricity in Florida, Georgia, North Carolina and Virginia on Sunday afternoon, according to the Edison Electric Institute.CreditJohnny Milano for The New York Times

“It’s almost like a huge bulldozer went down the middle of Panama City and straight up through,” said Jeff Rogers, a Gulf Power spokesman. “This is kind of the Super Bowl of all big storms.”

In Blountstown, the city manager, Traci Hall, said the city had 40 linemen working 16 hours a day, but even so, the municipal power grid would take weeks to piece back together.

“It’s a total rebuild of our system,” she said. “Almost every single light pole in this city is on the ground. There is hardly any wires left hanging, period.”

The city is in the process of getting the poles, cables and other supplies that its municipal electric utility needs so crews can keep working at full speed, Ms. Hall said. In the meantime, she has advised residents to prepare to be in the dark for 30 days.

“I think everybody’s pretty much staying put at this point,” Ms. Hall said. “There are many, many that do not have a generator and can’t afford to purchase a generator. But I think that neighbors are going to help neighbors.”

The biggest municipal utility in the storm-affected area is in Tallahassee, the state capital, which was spared the worst of the hurricane. But given the city’s dense tree cover, 96 percent of customers lost power anyway. Eighty-six percent had service restored by Sunday afternoon, according to Amy Zubaly, executive director of the Florida Municipal Electric Association, which includes five public utilities affected by Michael.

In the Panama City region, amid destruction on almost every street corner, residents on Sunday continued to wait in long lines for hot food, bottled water, gasoline and prepaid cellphones that might get better reception than their own. The army of utility trucks in the area showed the scale of the recovery work underway, but they also clogged the region’s damaged roads.

Tony McClean, a cook at a Panama City restaurant, said the storm pounded his rental house with such ferocity that a pine tree punctured the roof, its jagged remains hovering over his bed.

“Hard not to look at that and not think about what would have happened to me if I hadn’t gone to a friend’s house at the last minute,” said Mr. McClean, 40.

At first, he said, he thought about trying to live among the shredded remains, but with no running water and no power in the house, it did not make sense. Then he got the idea to try camping, something he had never done. He figured he could ride his trusty five-speed bike and set up on some quiet patch of the city.

“I figure I can stay with friends for a few nights, maybe hit the shelter, then I will be on my own,” he said. “Everything is gone. I am on zero. If you haven’t gone through something like this, I don’t think people understand how bad it is.”

In Lynn Haven, over the roar of chain saws, Mayor Anderson told residents living in a cluster of homes on the city’s east side to prepare for a long haul.

She estimated that more than half of the city’s roughly 20,000 residents do not have generators. Or, in some cases, they have one that does not work.

Starlia Jackson, 56, spent Sunday afternoon huddled outside her camper with her dogs, Romeo and Pooh. The old camper rocked from side to side during the storm’s afternoon assault but survived in the driveway of her late mother’s one-story brick house. The house took in water and wind after the French doors in the back shattered, so now the camper is home.

Since the storm, Ms. Jackson has lived on strawberry soda, canned tuna and bottled water. The camper has a stove, but Ms. Jackson is low on propane gas, and on money to buy more. The house has a generator, but it is sitting broken on a tarp in the driveway.

She cannot take her two pets with her to a shelter, so for now she plans to stay, dragging a grill she has not used in years next to the camper.

“No power for possibly two months? Are you serious?” she asked. “I have no idea what I am going to do for that kind of time. You survive a storm, and then there is all the stuff that comes afterward that can be just as devastating.”

Wanda Grigsby stepped among the downed trees and limbs to find a cleared spot to stand in her yard. She stood in the brutal heat wearing shorts, a T-shirt and rubber boots. Hurricane Michael had brought her to tears: It ripped off chunks of her house’s roof and dumped an impossibly thick layer of pink insulation all over the kitchen, living room and den. Even if she cleaned it up, the power will not be coming back soon, and neither will the running water that relies on it.

“I have my 6-year-old grandson with me — no way can we do this,” said Ms. Grigsby, 54, who used to own a day care center and now is a caretaker for her mother. “I am going to stay with family in Jacksonville for a while.”

At one point, Ms. Anderson eyed a large white Federal Emergency Management Agency vehicle that had arrived at a parking lot just behind the city’s heavily damaged police station. The lot had become an outdoor community center of sorts, where one of the local dentists was grilling hamburgers and hot dogs, and residents could pick up free bottled water, diapers, canned goods and dog food.

Ms. Anderson jumped out of the golf cart and moved a portable street barrier to allow the FEMA bus into the lot.

“You have no idea how happy this makes me,” she said. “People need relief.”

Audra D. S. Burch reported from Lynn Haven, Fla., and Patricia Mazzei from Miramar Beach, Fla.
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🌀 Families of people missing after Hurricane Michael turn to social media
« Reply #486 on: October 16, 2018, 12:10:51 AM »
https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/families-people-missing-after-hurricane-michael-turn-social-media-clues-n920396

Families of people missing after Hurricane Michael turn to social media for clues
"Please Help Me Find My Son," one mother wrote in a Facebook group that was set up to locate missing people during disasters.
by Farnoush Amiri / Oct. 15, 2018 / 3:57 PM AKDT


A firefighter searches for survivors in Mexico Beach, Florida, on Friday.Douglas R. Clifford / Tampa Bay Times via AP

Keith Douglas' family has been trying to reach him since last Wednesday, when Hurricane Michael directly hit Panama City, Florida, where he lives. He had decided not to evacuate, and his sister, Mandy Robinson, wanted to make sure he'd weathered the storm. But every time she called, all she heard was beeping.

Robinson grew even more frantic to reach Douglas on Saturday, when their brother, Mark Bonner, 48, died unexpectedly of congestive heart failure. Bonner's funeral is Tuesday in LaGrange, Georgia, and Robinson knows that Douglas would want to be there. But she still hasn't been able to reach him.
The Bonner siblings, Mark Bonner, from left, Mandy Bonner Robinson, Tina Bonner and Keith Douglas, who is missing
The Bonner siblings, from left: Mark Bonner, Mandy Bonner Robinson, Tina Bonner and Keith Douglas, who is missing.Courtesy Bonner family

"I don't want him to not know about it," said Robinson, 44, who posted on Facebook to ask if anyone had seen or spoken to her brother. "We've tried everything. No one has heard from him."

Five days after Hurricane Michael devastated beach towns in the Florida Panhandle, search-and-rescue teams are still combing through rubble in search of hundreds of people reported missing. As of Sunday night, authorities said that 250 people who had chosen to stay behind were unaccounted for.
00:03 / 01:19
Hurricane Michael destruction exposes weaker building codes in Florida Panhandle
Oct. 15, 201801:20

It's too soon to say what happened to those who are missing. Nearly 200,000 Floridians still don't have electricity, and some areas are without cellphone service, which could be preventing people from reaching out for help. In the absence of official information on their loved ones, dozens of relatives who live outside of the hardest-hit areas are turning to social media to fill in the gaps.

"Please Help Me Find My Son," Kristine Wright wrote Saturday in a Facebook group that was set up to locate missing people during disasters. Wright and her husband, Robert Perry, who live in Freeport, Florida, have been anxiously trying to reach their son Nicholas Sines, 22, who lives in Panama City and didn't plan to evacuate.

Wright and Perry had been driving about 60 miles each day to Panama City in an attempt to reach their son's home, but each time they were rebuffed by authorities who told them the area was not safe to enter. They had reached out to rescuers, but there were no updates. So the post with photos of their son in the Facebook group, Hurricane Michael: Missing & Separated Resources, was a last-ditch hope.
Nicholas Sines
Nicholas SinesCourtesy Kristine Wright

On Monday afternoon, Erica Rodgers, a resident of Panama City Beach, wrote that she would check on Sines. No one answered the door of his apartment, Rodgers said, but Rodgers told Wright that neighbors had seen him on Sunday and he was fine.

“I can’t believe she got to Nick’s apartment,” said Wright, who was glad for the news but still worried. “I hope and pray that it really was him who the neighbors saw."

Rodgers, 33, said she had checked on two other residents of the area for family members on Facebook after returning home to Panama City Beach on Monday and finding her waterfront property virtually untouched. "We were very, very fortunate," Rodgers said. "That's why I wanted to help those who were in need."

The Facebook group where Rodgers and Wright connected was created last year by Tara Holmes, a Florida resident, after Hurricane Harvey hit Houston. With each new storm, the group grows.
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"Sometimes it takes a disaster to bring people to work together," Holmes said.

Another person who posted in the Facebook group was Danielle Garone. She last spoke with her aunt, Agnes Vicari, 79, on Wednesday when Vicari was boarding up her Mexico Beach, Florida, home of 30 years after receiving a mandatory evacuation order.

Mexico Beach was "wiped out" in the storm, Brock Long, head of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, said during a press conference one day later, calling the beach town "ground zero."
Agnes Vicari
Agnes VicariCourtesy Vicari family

Garone, who lives in Miami, has struggled to piece together what happened to her aunt. An Oct. 13 Tampa Bay Times article reported that an elderly woman named Agnes was airlifted out for medical assistance, but when Garone reached out to the Coast Guard, hospitals and shelters, no one was able to confirm that they'd seen her aunt.

"It has been an absolute whirlwind trying to get any sort of information," Garone said. "We don't know if she is alive or if she is buried underneath something."

While the Facebook group hasn't turned up any solid leads, Garone is glad more people are seeing her aunt's photo and information.

"More than anything I am surprised by the amount of backing and support we have been getting from absolute strangers on Facebook and Twitter," she said.
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🌀 Michael: The Path of Total Destruction GEI Crosspost
« Reply #487 on: October 16, 2018, 12:59:48 AM »
Michael: The Path of Total Destruction now UP on Global Economic Intersection!  :icon_sunny:

http://econintersect.com/pages/opinion/opinion.php?post=201810152202

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https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-10-13/hurricane-cost-may-skyrocket-billions-stealth-fighter-jets-unaccounted-tyndall-afb

Hurricane Cost May Skyrocket As Billions In Stealth Fighter Jets Unaccounted For; Tyndall AFB "Complete Loss"
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by Tyler Durden
Sun, 10/14/2018 - 13:50


After Hurricane Michael rendered Tyndall Air Force Base a "complete loss" from "widespread, catastrophic damage" - questions remain over nearly two-dozen F-22 Stealth Fighters which are unaccounted for.
Static F-15 display flipped over
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According to the New York Times, Tyndall is home to 55 stealth fighters, "which cost a dizzying $339 million each." Before Michael hit, the Air Force evacuated at least 33 of the planes to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio, however they would not comment on the status of the remaining 22 fighters.
F-22 Raptor

    Air Force officials have not disclosed the whereabouts of the remaining 22 planes, other than to say that a number of aircraft were left at the base because of maintenance or safety reasons.

    An Air Force spokeswoman, Maj. Malinda Singleton, would not confirm that any of the aircraft left behind were F-22s.

    But photos and video from the wreckage of the base showed the distinctive contours of the F-22’s squared tail fins and angled vertical stabilizers amid a jumble of rubble in the base’s largest building, Hangar 5. Another photo shows the distinctive jet in a smaller hangar that had its doors and a wall ripped off by wind.

    All of the hangars at the base were damaged, Major Singleton said Friday. “We anticipate the aircraft parked inside may be damaged as well,” she said, “but we won’t know the extent until our crews can safely enter those hangars and make an assessment.” -NYT

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F-22s are notoriously finicky and, as the Times puts it "not always flight-worthy." The Air Force reported earlier this year that just 49% of F-22s were mission ready at any given time - the lowest rate of any fighter in the Air Force. The total value of the unaccounted-for fighters is arouind $7.5 billion.

The eye of Hurricane Michael traveled directly over Tyndall, peeling back stormproof roofs like tin cans and flipping over an F-15 fighter jet display at the base entrance.

    When it was over, the base lay in ruins, amid what the Air Force called “widespread catastrophic damage.” There were no reported injuries, in part because nearly all personnel had been ordered to leave in advance of the Category 4 hurricane’s landfall. Commanders still sifting through mounds of wreckage Thursday could not say when evacuation orders would be lifted. -NYT

The last Air Force Base to suffer catastrophic damage was in 1992, when Category 5 Hurricane Andrew slammed into Homestead Air Force Base just south of Miami with winds estimated at 150 m.p.h. Two years later it was reopened as a smaller, Air Force Reserve base.

    Tyndall, where about 3,600 airmen are stationed, sits on 29,000 acres that include undeveloped woods and beaches, as well as stores, restaurants, schools, a bowling alley and quiet, tree-lined streets with hundreds of homes for both active-duty and retired military. Video footage captured the ruin there, too: The high-powered storm skinned roofs, shattered windows, and tossed cars and trailers like toys, transforming the normally pristine base into a trash heap. Multistory barracks buildings stood open to the sky. -NYT

"Tyndall residents and evacuated personnel should remain at their safe location," said Col. Brian Laidlaw on Thursday. "We are actively developing plans to reunite families and plan to provide safe passage back to base housing."
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https://www.npr.org/2018/10/21/659194405/in-hurricane-michaels-wake-florida-panhandle-faces-steep-path-back-to-normal

In Hurricane Michael's Wake, Florida Panhandle Faces Steep Path Back To Normal
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October 21, 20188:12 AM ET
Heard on Weekend Edition Sunday
Debbie Elliot 2010

Debbie Elliott


Port. St. Joe Mayor Bo Patterson stands in front of what's left of one of the towns two gas stations. Both were destroyed by Hurricane Michael, the fuel pumps torn from their concrete slabs.
Debbie Elliott/Debbie Elliott/NPR

More than a week after Hurricane Michael slammed into the Florida panhandle, cities and towns are facing the daunting task of trying to rebuild. The recovery is hampered by catastrophic damage not only to homes and businesses, but to vital infrastructure as well.

The small Gulf coast town of Port St. Joe, with a population of about 3,500 residents, is one of countless communities that was hit by the storm.

"Everywhere you turn and go you see some kind of destruction," says the town's mayor, Bo Patterson. "Whether it was wind damage, whether it was water, one of the two."

Patterson says Hurricane Michael pushed in a 13-foot storm surge that flooded the streets closest to St. Joseph Bay on the west side of Port St. Joe. The rest of town saw roofs ripped off, windows blown out and huge oak and pine trees toppled.

"Devastating, devastating," he repeats. "I don't know any other word to describe what you're seeing."

The roof is off at the local Baptist church; its steeple is bent over. The walls are gone from the Burger King. Port St. Joe's two gas stations are also destroyed — the fuel pumps torn from their concrete slabs.
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"We can't even pump gas," Patterson says.

The mayor says the city can't even start to think about recovery until it can clear all of the downed trees from local roadways. Backhoes have been brought in to help, and crews are working on most streets to replace power poles.


In the community of Highland View, just west of Port St. Joe, the storm surge from Hurricane Michael toppled houses and knocked mobile homes completely over.
Debbie Elliott/Debbie Elliott/NPR

Meanwhile, residents are trying to muck out soggy homes, and using chain saws to cut up downed trees.

"You hear that sound a lot," Patterson says of the buzz of chain saws. "Up until dark. You hear that all day long."

Couches, mattresses and piles of soaked clothing are stacked up curbside on residential streets.

"Just about every street you go down ... you'll see destruction like that," Patterson says. "People just — all they own is by the road to be thrown away."

At a flooded apartment near the bayfront, Alesha Smiley and her brother spent a recent afternoon moving soaked mattresses from the unit she shares with her grandmother, an elderly amputee in poor health.

"It is depressing," she says. "I try not to think about it too hard. But it's been a lot of people come in and helping."

Mayor Patterson says the city has been getting help from relief agencies and the state and federal government. He admits the town is at the mercy of outside assistance because its main source of revenue — tourism and water and sewer bills — has been decimated.
After Hurricane Michael, A Call For Stricter Building Codes In Florida's Panhandle
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After Hurricane Michael, A Call For Stricter Building Codes In Florida's Panhandle

"We don't know how we'll pay our bills," he says. "Seriously."

Driving through a neighborhood on the west side of town, Patterson does see signs of progress as he greets residents out cleaning up storm debris.

"I think most people in this area do have power, so that's good," Patterson says.

He stops at an old high school gym that's been converted into an emergency supply distribution point. Among those helping to coordinate the response from there is Port St. Joe city commissioner Eric Langston.

"We still have some things to look forward to," Langston says. "We're still here. We're still breathing. The worst has already happened as far as the hurricane. All we can do is look ahead and try to rebuild."

But Langston acknowledges it will be a long time before the town gets back to a sense of normalcy.

Back on the road, Mayor Bo Patterson points out the damage in the downtown business district. The roof is off his pest control business.

"It's unbelievable," he says.http://www.doomsteaddiner.net/forum/index.php/topic,11567.msg163495/topicseen.html#msg163495

He contemplates the rebuilding that's ahead.

"It's going to take years," Patterson says. "And I'm hoping the city can survive it."
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Hurricane Willa, now a Category 4 storm, threatens Mexico's Pacific coast
« Reply #490 on: October 23, 2018, 03:08:57 AM »
Hurricane Willa, now a Category 4 storm, threatens Mexico's Pacific coast--


Hurricane Willa, now a Category 4 storm, threatens Mexico's Pacific coast

Hurricane Willa, a potentially catastrophic storm, swept toward Mexico's Pacific coast with winds of 155 mph, the National Hurricane Center said Monday. Forecasters expect the Category 4 storm to make landfall along Mexico's southwestern coast Tuesday afternoon or evening.

Willa is an "extremely dangerous storm" that is expected to bring life-threatening storm surge, wind and rainfall over west-central and southwestern Mexico, the hurricane center. After it briefly strengthened to a Category 5 storm, it weakened slightly Monday afternoon.

Willa was located about 135 miles south-southwest of Las Islas Marias, Mexico, and some 110 miles southwest of Cabo Corrientes, Mexico, the hurricane center said in its 5 p.m. ET advisory. It was moving north at 8 mph.

A hurricane warning was posted for a stretch of shore between San Blas and Mazatlan. A tropical storm warning was in effect for Playa Perula to San Blas and north of Mazatlan to Bahia Tempehuaya.

hurricanevillamap.jpg

This map shows the projected path of Hurricane Willa on Oct. 22, 2018.

CBS NEWS

Enrique Moreno, the mayor of Escuinapa, said officials were trying to evacuate everyone in the village of Teacapan, the Associated Press reports. He said nearly 3,000 were affected but some residents would stay.

"The people don't want to evacuate, but it's for their security," he said.

In Mazatlan, Mayor José Joel Bouciegues said officials were preparing shelters and monitoring low-lying areas, the AP reports. The popular vacation town is home to a large number of American and Canadian expatriates.

Forecasters said Willa was expected to produce total rainfall accumulations of 6 to 12 inches, with local amounts up to 18 inches, across portions of western Jalisco, western Nayarit and southern Sinaloa in Mexico. The rainfall could cause life-threatening flash flooding and landslides.

Farther inland, Willa was expected to produce rainfall amounts of 2 to 4 inches across portions of Zacateca, Durango, southeast Chihuahua, and Coahuila in Mexico, with local amounts up to 6 inches possible. That could cause life-threatening flash flooding.

After Willa makes its way across Mexico, it could drop between 1 and 3 inches of rain on central and southern Texas during the middle of the week. The additional rainfall could cause additional flooding in already saturated areas.

Jeff Berardelli and Peter Martinez contributed to this report.

© 2018 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.
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🌀 Hurricane Willa makes landfall near Mazatlan, Mexico as powerful Cat 3
« Reply #491 on: October 24, 2018, 12:01:29 AM »
https://www.foxnews.com/world/hurricane-willa-makes-landfall-as-powerful-category-3-storm-near-mazatlan-mexico

Hurricanes - Typhoons
Published 1 hour ago
Hurricane Willa makes landfall near Mazatlan, Mexico as powerful Category 3 storm
Nicole Darrah
By Nicole Darrah | Fox News


Threatening a major tourist resort area, the storm landed near Isla del Bosque in Sinaloa with winds of 120 mph, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) said during a special 7 p.m. MT advisory.

https://twitter.com/twitter/statuses/1054902309396901889

NHC E. Pacific Ops
‏Verified account @NHC_Pacific

Hurricane #Willa made landfall at 7 PM MDT near Isla Del Bosque, Sinaloa, or about 10 miles (15 km) south of Escuinapa.  Maximum winds at landfall were estimated to be 120 mph (195 km/h), with a minimum central pressure of 965 mb (28.50 inches). https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/text/refresh/MIATCUEP4+shtml/240104.shtml

Threatening a major tourist resort area, the storm landed near Isla del Bosque in Sinaloa with winds of 120 mph, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) said during a special 7 p.m. MT advisory. (NOAA)

Hurricane Willa made landfall on Mexico's Pacific coast on Tuesday night as a powerful Category 3 storm.

Threatening a major tourist resort area, the storm landed near Isla del Bosque in the state of Sinaloa with winds of 120 mph, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) said during a special 7 p.m. MT advisory.

Willa came ashore roughly 10 miles south of Escuinapa, and roughly 50 miles southeast of Mazatlan, a resort city that's home to high-rise hotels and about 500,000 people, including many U.S. and Canadian expatriates.

HURRICANE WILLA'S PATH: TRACK THE STORM HERE

Forecasters warned those in the area to "not venture out into the relative calm of the eye" because dangerous winds in the area "will suddenly increase as the eye passes."

Torrential rain in the area began Tuesday afternoon. Emergency officials said that more than 4,000 people were evacuated from coastal towns and close to 60 shelters were set up before the storm.
Hurricane Willa made landfall near Mazatlan, Mexico on Tuesday night as a powerful Category 3 storm.

Hurricane Willa made landfall near Mazatlan, Mexico on Tuesday night as a powerful Category 3 storm. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)

The federal government issued a decree of "extraordinary emergency" for 19 municipalities in Nayarit and Sinaloa states.

Willa, according to forecasters, could bring 6 to 12 inches of rain, with up to 18 inches in some places, to parts of Jalisco, Nayarit and Sinaloa states, with flash flooding and landslides possible in mountainous areas.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.
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🌀 The Atlantic and Pacific Ocean hurricane season is most powerful on record
« Reply #492 on: October 24, 2018, 12:03:10 AM »
https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2018/10/23/hurricane-season-most-active-record-atlantic-pacific-combined/1741226002/

The Atlantic and Pacific Ocean hurricane season is most powerful on record this year
Doyle Rice, USA TODAY Published 3:36 p.m. ET Oct. 23, 2018 | Updated 5:36 p.m. ET Oct. 23, 2018


(Photo: NOAA)

The oceans near North America have been angry this year.

When all the hurricanes and tropical storms that have formed in the Atlantic and eastern Pacific Oceans this year are added together, the 2018 hurricane season is the most active season ever recorded, Colorado State University meteorologist Phil Klotzbach announced Tuesday.

Florence and Michael were the most destructive storms in the Atlantic, while the eastern Pacific featured several powerhouse storms, including Lane, Rosa, Sergio and now, Willa.

To determine the strength of a given season, scientists use the "Accumulated Cyclone Energy" (ACE) index, which adds together the intensity and duration of all the tropical storms and hurricanes that formed.

So far in 2018, the ACE for the Atlantic and eastern Pacific seasons together is 432 units of energy, shattering the record of 371, which was set in 1992, Klotzbach said.

On average, the two ocean's combined ACE is 221 units.

More: Will Hurricane Willa affect the migrant caravan marching through Mexico?

The Atlantic by itself did not set an ACE record this year. However, it's been a record breaker for storms in the eastern Pacific Ocean: "The current ACE in the eastern Pacific is 311," Klotzbach said. "That is the record – breaking the old record of 295 set in 1992."

A total of 22 named storms have formed in the eastern Pacific, still five short of the all-time record of 27 set in 1992. 

Though the number of storms is not a record, their extreme wind speeds have been: Klotzbach said that the most impressive record in the eastern Pacific this year is the number of major hurricane days. That stat measures the number of days that a major hurricane (winds of 111 mph or greater) occurred.

"We've already had 34.5 major hurricane days this year, which shatters the old record of 24 major hurricane days set in 2015," Klotzbach said.

The fierce season in the Pacific was due in part to abnormally warm sea-surface temperatures there, which in some places was as much as 2 to 4 degrees above average.

As the global climate heats up in the decades ahead, sea water will also warm, potentially fueling more storms. Scientists in a 2015 study in the Journal of Climate predicted an increase in tropical cyclone frequency in the eastern Pacific Ocean and near Hawaii.

Both the Atlantic and Pacific hurricane seasons will continue until Nov. 30, so the final chapter on this year's activity cannot be written quite yet.
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https://www.npr.org/2018/10/24/660224741/super-typhoon-yutu-strongest-storm-of-2018-slams-u-s-pacific-territory

Environment
Super Typhoon Yutu, 'Strongest Storm Of 2018,' Slams U.S. Pacific Territory

October 24, 20184:25 PM ET
Colin Dwyer 2018


Super Typhoon Yutu, seen in infrared satellite imagery. See those white outlines at the heart of Yutu's red buzz-saw-like shape? Those are the Northern Mariana Islands.
Courtesy of NESDIS Satellite Services Division (NOAA)


<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/iPvd6IBGO6E" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/iPvd6IBGO6E</a>

A massive typhoon slammed into a U.S. territory in the west Pacific, lashing the Northern Mariana Islands with gusts of Category 5 intensity Wednesday night local time. Super Typhoon Yutu brought to bear maximum sustained winds of about 180 mph — much more powerful, in other words, than the historically powerful storm that hit Florida two weeks ago.

The islands of Saipan, Tinian and Rota remain under typhoon warnings from the National Weather Service, while Guam and several smaller islands have been placed under a tropical storm warning. And the NWS expects typhoon conditions to continue through late Thursday morning local time.

"The strongest winds have already occurred and will continue to slowly
diminish through the day," the service said.

The tone of the latest update was significantly more subdued than the one sent as Yutu prepared to make landfall. "Catastrophic winds for Tinian and Saipan are imminent!" officials said. "Super Typhoon Yutu is a very dangerous Category 5 storm!"

Those exclamations were warranted.

Meteorologists described the storm as not only "Earth's strongest storm of 2018" but also "one of the most intense hurricane strikes on record for the United States and its territories." The more than 50,000 people who live in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands faced a storm surge of up to 20 feet and rainfall of up to 10 inches in certain areas.




NOAA Satellites
‏Verified account @NOAASatellites

#NOAA20 captured the moment the eye of Super Typhoon #Yutu passed directly over Tinian Island, one of three main islands of the Northern Mariana Islands and a U.S. commonwealth. More imagery: http://go.usa.gov/xPNAB

And just listen to the unsettling wails of the wind recorded by a camera on Saipan. The island, together with Tinian, stood in the path of Yutu's eye.
YouTube

The typhoon's intensity escalated at an "unbelievable" pace prior to hitting the islands, according to meteorologist Steve Bowen, just two weeks after Hurricane Michael's intensification in the Gulf of Mexico stunned meteorologists, too.

"As the storm starts to rapidly intensify, it takes on this buzz-saw-like shape. It becomes very well-defined," Angela Fritz of The Washington Post's Capital Weather Gang told NPR earlier this month, referring to Michael's surprising escalation. "You have this sinking feeling that things are about to get much worse than the forecast had suggested."

Michael caused catastrophic damage to communities in the Florida Panhandle, where the storm made landfall.

The extent of the damage in the Marianas remains unclear, but the NWS in Guam did not mince words upon its approach.

"Devastating damage is expected. Collapse of some residential structures will put lives at risk. Airborne debris will cause extensive damage," the service warned. "Persons ... pets ... and livestock struck by the wind-blown debris will be injured or killed."

The storm is now moving away from the Mariana Islands — though that does not mean it is finished. Super Typhoon Yutu continues to beat a path northwest and has the potential to threaten the Philippines or Taiwan in the days to come.
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🌀 Remnants of Hurricane Willa to help fuel powerful East Coast nor’easter
« Reply #494 on: October 25, 2018, 12:02:36 AM »
https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2018/10/24/noreaster-blast-east-coast-weekend-rain-wind-and-snow/1749201002/

Remnants of Hurricane Willa to help fuel powerful East Coast nor’easter
Doyle Rice, USA TODAY Published 1:45 p.m. ET Oct. 24, 2018
Epa Usa Texas Flooding Wea Weather Usa Tx


(Photo: LARRY W. SMITH, EPA-EFE)

Hurricane Willa may be gone, but some of its remnant energy and moisture will help fuel the first nor'easter of the season for the East Coast this weekend, the National Weather Service said.

Power outages, travel delays, flooding, rough surf and widespread "miserable conditions" are all likely from the storm, AccuWeather said. Rain and wind will spread up the East Coast Friday through Saturday night or early Sunday, weather.com said.

The worst weather will be from from Virginia to Maine. "At this time, it looks like this storm will bring a general 1-2 inches of rain and a period of 40- to 50-mph wind gusts to the coast," according to AccuWeather senior meteorologist Dave Dombek.

Nor'easters – named for the direction from which their winds blow – are most common from fall through the early spring. In the heart of the winter, they can become notorious powerhouse snowstorms, sometimes delivering a crippling blow to the big East Coast cities.

Since it's only October, however, most of the precipitation that falls this weekend will be rain, so snow shovels won't be needed for most folks. Some of the higher elevations of northern New England and the interior Northeast could see some wet snow from the storm.

The combination of rain, wind and a low cloud ceiling is also likely to lead to airline delays and slow travel on area highways, AccuWeather said.

Even before the nor'easter lashes the East Coast, the South will see a soggy couple of days as the remnants of Willa merge with other weather systems. After a rainy day Wednesday in waterlogged Texas, the heaviest rain Thursday will be along the Gulf Coast from Mississippi to Florida.

"The downpours will expand eastward along the central Gulf Coast by Wednesday and Thursday, and eventually target areas of the Florida Panhandle and Georgia that were ravaged by powerful Hurricane Michael," AccuWeather meteorologist Kyle Elliott said.



The Weather Channel
‏Verified account @weatherchannel

A weekend nor'easter will likely bring wind-driven rain and coastal flooding to the East Coast and wet snow to the interior Northeast: https://wxch.nl/2yVXbYi

Early Wednesday, Hurricane Willa weakened rapidly into a tropical depression after slamming into a stretch of beach towns, fishing villages and farms along Mexico’s Pacific coast as a Category 3 storm late Tuesday,

Willa hit the mainland near Isla del Bosque, Mexico, which is about 50 miles southeast of the tourist town of Mazatlan.

Contributing: The Associated Press
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