AuthorTopic: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature  (Read 59089 times)

Offline RE

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🌀 5 pm Monday Update: Tropical Storm Marco and Laura
« Reply #615 on: August 25, 2020, 05:55:00 AM »
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Looks like wet weather down in the Bayou.

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Nice light show!

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🌀 Laura blasts Louisiana coast with wind and wall of seawater
« Reply #618 on: August 27, 2020, 12:52:26 PM »
Not a good day to be living in Coastal Louisiana.

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https://www.ajc.com/news/nation-world/laura-blasts-gulf-coast-with-wind-rain-and-wall-of-seawater/IBLJKEQGGBGRLMOFYVS4D7CL5I/

Laura blasts Louisiana coast with wind and wall of seawater

Buildings and homes are flooded in the aftermath of Hurricane Laura Thursday, Aug. 27, 2020, in Cameron, La. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

Credit: David J. Phillip
National & World News
| Updated 23 minutes ago
By GERALD HERBERT, MELINDA DESLATTE and STACEY PLAISANCE, Associated Press
Laura has weakened to a tropical storm after blasting the Louisiana coast with high winds and heavy rain for hours

LAKE CHARLES, La. (AP) — One of the strongest hurricanes ever to strike the U.S. pounded the Gulf Coast with wind and rain Thursday as Laura roared ashore in Louisiana near the Texas border, unleashing a fearsome wall of seawater and killing at least two people.

Louisiana took the brunt of the damage when the Category 4 system barreled over Lake Charles, an industrial and casino city of 80,000 people. Laura's powerful gusts blew out windows in tall buildings and tossed around glass and debris. Police spotted a floating casino that came unmoored and hit a bridge.

Drone video showed water surrounding homes with much of their roofs peeled away. A 14-year-old girl and a 68-year-old man died when trees fell on their homes, authorities said.

The hurricane’s top wind speed of 150 mph (241 kph) put it among the most powerful systems on record in the U.S. Not until 11 hours after landfall did Laura finally weaken into a tropical storm as it churned toward Arkansas.

“It looks like 1,000 tornadoes went through here. It’s just destruction everywhere," said Brett Geymann, who rode out the storm with three family members in Moss Bluff, near Lake Charles. He described Laura passing over his house with the roar of a jet engine around 2 a.m.

“There are houses that are totally gone. They were there yesterday, but now gone," he said.

Not long after daybreak offered the first glimpse of the destruction, a massive plume of smoke began rising over Lake Charles, where authorities responded to a chlorine leak at a chemical plant. Police said the leak was at a facility run by Biolab, which manufactures chemicals used in household cleaners such as Comet bleach scrub and chlorine powder for pools.

Nearby residents were told to close their doors and windows and turn off air conditioners.

Elsewhere, initial reports offered hope that the destruction might be somewhat less than originally feared, but a full damage assessment could take days. Wind and rain blew too hard for authorities to check for survivors in some hard-hit places.

Hundreds of thousands of people were ordered to evacuate ahead of the hurricane, but not everyone fled from the area, which was devastated by Hurricane Rita in 2005.

“There are some people still in town, and people are calling ... but there ain’t no way to get to them,” Tony Guillory, president of the Calcasieu Parish Police Jury, said over the phone from a Lake Charles government building that was shaking from the storm.

Guillory said he hoped the stranded people could be rescued later in the day, but he feared that blocked roads, downed power lines and floodwaters could get in the way.

“We know anyone that stayed that close to the coast, we’ve got to pray for them, because looking at the storm surge, there would be little chance of survival,” Louisiana Lt. Gov. Billy Nungesser told ABC’s Good Morning America.

More than 700,000 homes and businesses were without power in the two states, according to the website PowerOutage.Us, which tracks utility reports.

Forecasters had warned that the storm surge of 15 to 20 feet would be “unsurvivable” and could push 40 miles inland. They expected “catastrophic” damage along a stretch of coast from Lake Charles to Port Arthur, Texas. Damaging winds extended outward as far as 175 miles (280 kilometers), according to the hurricane center.

Dick Gremillion, the emergency director in Calcasieu Parish, said authorities were unable to get out to help anyone or survey the storm's effects.

More than 580,000 coastal residents were ordered to join the largest evacuation since the coronavirus pandemic began and many did, filling hotels and sleeping in cars since officials did not want to open large shelters that could invite more spread of COVID-19.

But in Cameron Parish, where Laura came ashore, Nungesser said 50 to 150 people refused pleas to leave and planned to endure the storm, some in elevated homes and even recreational vehicles. The result could be deadly.

Bucky Millet, 78, of Lake Arthur, Louisiana, considered evacuating but decided to ride out the storm with family due to concerns he had about the coronavirus. He said a small tornado blew the cover off the bed of his pickup and made him think the roof on his house was next.

“You’d hear a crack and a boom and everything shaking,” he said.

Becky Clements, 56, did not take chances. She evacuated from Lake Charles after hearing that it could take a direct hit. With memories of Rita's destruction almost 15 years ago, she and her family found an Airbnb hundreds of miles inland.

“The devastation afterward in our town and that whole corner of the state was just awful,” Clements recalled. “Whole communities were washed away, never to exist again.”

Federal Emergency Management Agency Administrator Pete Gaynor urged people in Laura's path to stay home, if that's still safe. “Don't go out sightseeing. You put yourself, your family at risk, and you put first responders at risk," he told “CBS This Morning.”

FEMA had resources ready to help survivors, Gaynor said. Edwards mobilized the National Guard to help, and state Department of Wildlife crews had boats prepared for water rescues.

Forecasters expected a weakened Laura to cause widespread flash flooding in states far from the coast. Little Rock, Arkansas, expected gusts of 50 mph (80 kph) and a deluge of rain through Friday. The storm was so powerful that it could regain strength after turning east and reaching the Atlantic Ocean, potentially threatening the densely populated Northeast.

Laura hit the U.S. after killing nearly two dozen people on the island of Hispaniola, including 20 in Haiti and three in the Dominican Republic, where it knocked out power and caused intense flooding.

It was the seventh named storm to strike the U.S. this year, setting a new record for U.S. landfalls by the end of August. The old record was six in 1886 and 1916, according to Colorado State University hurricane researcher Phil Klotzbach.

Laura was tied with five other storms for fifth most powerful U.S. hurricane, behind the 1935’s Labor Day storm, 1969’s Camille, 1992’s Andrew and 2004’s Charley, Klotzbach said.
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🌀 Collapse has ARRIVED in Louisiana. Her name is Laura.
« Reply #619 on: August 28, 2020, 04:02:29 AM »
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🌀 Louisiana in ruins, 6 dead in wake of Laura as storm moves east
« Reply #620 on: August 28, 2020, 10:01:23 PM »
https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2020/08/lousiana-ruins-6-dead-wake-laura-storm-moves-east-200828131747585.html

Louisiana in ruins, 6 dead in wake of Laura as storm moves east

Residents of hard-hit Lake Charles, Louisiana, will return home to a city without electricity or running water.
13 hours ago

Latasha Myles and Howard Anderson stand in their living room where they were sitting when the roof blew off as Hurricane Laura passed through Lake Charles, Louisiana [Joe Raedle/Getty Images via AFP]


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The remnants of Hurricane Laura unleashed heavy rain and twisters hundreds of miles inland from a path of death and mangled buildings along the US Gulf Coast, and forecasters warn of new dangers as the tropical weather blows towards the Eastern Seaboard and the open water of the Atlantic Ocean.

Flooding and more tornadoes were possible as the leftovers of the once fearsome Category 4 hurricane move eastwards through Tennessee, Mississippi and Alabama on Friday after an apparent tornado tore through a church and homes in Arkansas on Thursday night. Laura weakened to a tropical depression late on Thursday, but could become a tropical storm again when it moves off the mid-Atlantic coast on Saturday.

More than 750,000 homes and businesses were without power in Louisiana, Texas and Arkansas in the storm's wake, according to poweroutage.us, which tracks utility reports.

One of the strongest hurricanes ever to strike the United States, Laura was blamed for six deaths as it barreled across Louisiana and parts of Texas.

A sense of relief prevailed that Laura was not the annihilating menace forecasters had feared, but a full assessment of the damage could take days. Buildings were demolished and entire neighbourhoods left in ruins along the coast. Thunderstorms and sizzling heat were expected in the disaster area on Friday, complicating recovery efforts.
Laura destruction
 Debris and downed power lines in Lake Charles, Louisiana, after Hurricane Laura passed through the area with strong winds causing extensive damage to the city [Joe Raedle/Getty Images via AFP]

"It is clear that we did not sustain and suffer the absolute, catastrophic damage that we thought was likely," Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards said. "But we have sustained a tremendous amount of damage."

Finishing search and rescue efforts was a top priority, Edwards said, followed by efforts to find hotel or motel rooms for those unable to stay in their homes. Officials in Texas and Louisiana both sought to avoid traditional mass shelters for evacuees over fears of spreading COVID-19.

He called Laura the most powerful hurricane to strike Louisiana, meaning it surpassed even Katrina, which was a Category 3 storm that hit the US in 2005.

The hurricane's top wind speed of 241km per hour (150 miles per hour) put it among the strongest systems on record in the US.

Not until 11 hours after landfall did Laura finally lose hurricane status as it ploughed north and thrashed Arkansas, and up until Thursday evening, it remained a tropical storm with winds of 65km/h (40mph).
Rampant destruction

The storm crashed ashore in low-lying Louisiana and clobbered Lake Charles, an industrial and casino city of 80,000 people.

On Broad Street, many buildings had partially collapsed. Windows were blown out, awnings ripped away and trees split in eerily misshapen ways.

A floating casino came unmoored and hit a bridge, and small planes were thrown atop each other at the airport. A television station's tower toppled.
Hurricane Laura
A couple, Lonnie Gatte and Teri Goleman, kiss after returning to their residence, a 40-foot camping trailer, to find it completely destroyed in the aftermath of Hurricane Laura in Louisiana [Adrees Latif/Reuters]

A Confederate statue in front of a court that local officials had voted to keep in place just days earlier was knocked down by Laura.

"It looks like 1,000 tornadoes went through here. It's just destruction everywhere," said Brett Geymann, who rode out the storm with three relatives in Moss Bluff, near Lake Charles. He described a roar like a jet engine as Laura passed over his house about 2am (06:00 GMT)

"There are houses that are totally gone," he said.

As the extent of the damage came into focus, a massive plume of smoke visible for miles began rising from a chemical plant.

Police said the leak was at a facility run by Biolab, which manufactures chemicals used in household cleaners and chlorine powder for pools. Nearby residents were told to close their doors and windows, and the fire smouldered into the night.

Four people were killed by falling trees in Louisiana, including a 14-year-old girl and a 68-year-old man. A 24-year-old man died of carbon monoxide poisoning from a generator inside his residence. Another man drowned in a boat that sank during the storm, authorities said.
Returning home

No deaths had been confirmed in Texas, which Republican Governor Greg Abbott called "a miracle". Chevellce Dunn considered herself among the fortunate after a night spent huddling on a sofa with her son, daughter and four nieces and nephews as winds rocked their home in Orange, Texas. Left without power in the sweltering heat, she wondered when the electricity might come back.

"It ain't going to be easy. As long as my kids are fine, I'm fine," Dunn said.

More than 580,000 coastal residents evacuated despite fears of infection from the coronavirus pandemic, saving many lives, but it was unclear when their journeys might end.
Thousands to evacuate Texas and Louisiana coasts ahead of storm

There is no electricity or running water in Lake Charles, a city of 80,000, and the coastal towns of Cameron and Holly Beach were swamped by the storm surge. Restoring these services could take weeks.

"People who are outside of Lake Charles, thinking about coming back, they need to be really blunt with themselves about the harsh reality of what they're coming back to," Mayor Nic Hunter told NBC's Today show on Friday. "I'm sorry about that, but we just got hit with the largest hurricane to hit Louisiana in the last 150 years."

A lower-than-expected storm surge also helped save lives. Edwards said ocean water rose as much as four metres (13 feet) rather than six metres (20 feet) that was predicted.

Laura was the seventh named storm to strike the US this year, setting a new record for US landfalls by the end of August. Laura hit the US after killing nearly two dozen people on the island of Hispaniola, including 20 in Haiti and three in the Dominican Republic.

President Donald Trump planned to visit the Gulf Coast this weekend to assess the damage.
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https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2020/08/28/after-hurricane-laura-forecasters-eye-two-tropical-waves-atlantic/5655117002/

Forecasters eye two developing systems in the Atlantic: Nana, Omar could be next up on the heels of Hurricane Laura
Doyle Rice   Kimberly Miller
USA TODAY


    The National Hurricane Center has identified two areas for potential tropical development.
    The next two names on the storm list are Nana and Omar.
    Peak hurricane season lasts from about Aug. 20 through early October.

Hello Nana and Omar?

Although the remnants of Hurricane Laura are still drenching parts of the eastern U.S. Friday, there are already concerns about more storms stirring in the Atlantic Ocean.

The National Hurricane Center has identified two areas for potential tropical development, one in the central Atlantic, the other in the eastern Atlantic.

Both have a 30% chance of development within the next five days. For the one in the central Atlantic, the hurricane center said that "some gradual development of this system is possible during the next several days while it moves westward at about 15 mph toward the eastern Caribbean islands."

For the other one, in the eastern Atlantic near the Cabo Verde Islands, "some development of this system is possible early next week when it begins to move slowly westward over the eastern and central tropical Atlantic," according to the hurricane center.

Should the systems develop into named storms, the next two names on the list are Nana and Omar. Storms get names when their sustained winds reach 39 mph.
Forecasters are eyeing two areas in the Atlantic for possible tropical development over the next five days.

Peak hurricane season lasts from about August 20 through early October with the pinnacle being Sept. 10. But this season has flouted climatology, with many more storms than average.

Seven of this season's 13 storms have made landfall in the U.S., including hurricanes Hanna, Isaias and Laura.

That's a new record for U.S. landfalls by the end of August.

'Destruction everywhere':Photos show Hurricane Laura flooded streets, shredded buildings

Hurricane Laura:Threat of tornadoes, heavy rain looms after Hurricane Laura; tropical depression heads to Mid-Atlantic

Laura was the first major hurricane to make landfall this season, barreling into western Louisiana with 150 mph winds early Thursday morning. 

One of the strongest hurricanes on record to strike the United States, Laura was blamed for six deaths in Louisiana.

"Laura rapidly intensified by a remarkable 65 mph in just 24 hours on August 26," wrote Weather Underground co-founder Jeff Masters in his column for Yale Climate Connections. "That ties Hurricane Karl of 2010 for fastest intensification rate in the Gulf of Mexico on record."

The Atlantic hurricane season officially lasts until November 30.

'I didn’t know it was going to be this bad': Cameron Parish, Louisiana, bears brunt of Laura's wrath
Forecasters eye two developing systems in the Atlantic: Nana, Omar could be next up on the heels of Hurricane Laura
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Get the latest news straight to your phone: Download the USA TODAY app

Miller reports for the Palm Beach Post. Follow her on Twitter: @Kmillerweather
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Looks like a toasty day for Eddie!

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https://www.foxnews.com/us/extreme-heat-texas-louisiana-hurricane-laura-severe-weather-threat-plains

Extreme heat in areas of Texas, Louisiana still powerless after Laura; severe storm threat for Plains
Heat advisories have been issued across eastern Texas and in most of Louisiana

By Travis Fedschun, Adam Klotz | Fox News


National forecast for Monday, August 31

Fox News meteorologist Adam Klotz has your FoxCast.

Hundreds of thousands who remain without power in Texas and Louisiana after Hurricane Laura's wrath now are having to deal with scorching heat on Monday.

Over 350,000 customers in both states remain without power after Hurricane Laura blasted through the region last week, with major damage reported to infrastructure. So far, 18 deaths in Texas and Louisiana have been attributed to the storm; more than half of those people were killed by carbon monoxide poisoning from the unsafe operation of generators.

Extreme heat is now expected Monday across portions of the Deep South, especially in areas hardest hit by the storm.

HURRICANE CENTER SAYS 2 ATLANTIC SYSTEMS 'LIKELY' TO DEVELOP, 2 OTHERS WATCHED

Heat advisories have been issued across eastern Texas and in most of Louisiana.
The forecast heat index for Monday, Aug. 31, 2020.

The forecast heat index for Monday, Aug. 31, 2020. (Fox News)

Afternoon high temperatures in these areas will range from the middle 90s into the low 100s. Heat indices will range from 108 to 114 degrees Fahrenheit.
Heat advisories stretch over parts of Texas and Louisiana still without power after Hurricane Laura.

Heat advisories stretch over parts of Texas and Louisiana still without power after Hurricane Laura. (Fox News)

Workers in Louisiana have started to patch up roofs and clean up the damage, but on Sunday most of the homes in Lake Charles that saw a direct hit from the storm were still untouched.
Rakisha Murray cries in relief as she arrives to see her mother's home largely undamaged, after she returned from evacuation with her mother and other family in Lake Charles, La., in the aftermath of Hurricane Laura, Sunday, Aug. 30, 2020.

Rakisha Murray cries in relief as she arrives to see her mother's home largely undamaged, after she returned from evacuation with her mother and other family in Lake Charles, La., in the aftermath of Hurricane Laura, Sunday, Aug. 30, 2020. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

In Calcasieu Parish, where Lake Charles is located, parish spokesman Tom Hoefer said water had not been flowing from taps in many areas, and the entire area was still without power.
placeholder
Linda Smoot, who evacuated from Hurricane Laura in a pickup truck with eight others, reacts as they return to see the damaged home of her niece for the first time, in Lake Charles, La., in the aftermath of the hurricane, Sunday, Aug. 30, 2020.

Linda Smoot, who evacuated from Hurricane Laura in a pickup truck with eight others, reacts as they return to see the damaged home of her niece for the first time, in Lake Charles, La., in the aftermath of the hurricane, Sunday, Aug. 30, 2020. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

James Townley, who had the front of his trailer blown away by the storm, told the Associated Press he was out of medication for his heart and kidneys but was planning on remaining at his home.
James Townley, who has a heart condition, lies on his couch with no electricity in his partially destroyed mobile home in Lake Charles, La., in the aftermath of Hurricane Laura, Sunday, Aug. 30, 2020.

James Townley, who has a heart condition, lies on his couch with no electricity in his partially destroyed mobile home in Lake Charles, La., in the aftermath of Hurricane Laura, Sunday, Aug. 30, 2020. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

“I’m just going to sit here and do what I can do,” he told the AP. “Maybe I’ll make it, maybe I won’t.”

Townley's only way to stay cool was a fan connected to a neighbor's generator that was circulating hot, humid air around his home.

HURRICANE LAURA 'COMPLETELY REVERSED' TEXAS RIVER FOR 'ABOUT 12 HOURS' WHEN IT MADE LANDFALL, OFFICIALS SAY

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has sent hundreds of workers to the region to help with search and rescue and other efforts.
Hurricane Laura demolishes buildings, homes in Louisiana
Hurricane Laura demolishes buildings, homes in Louisiana

As of Sunday, more than 52,500 people had applied for FEMA assistance, and the agency had conducted over 200 home inspections and distributed more than $650,000 in assistance, according to Tony Robinson, FEMA's administrator for the region.

But some who have requested help from the agency, such as 53-year-old Patricia Mingo Lavergne, have run into issues. Lavergne told the AP she didn't have a checking account in which to receive federal money.
placeholder

CLICK HERE FOR MORE WEATHER COVERAGE FROM FOX NEWS

"It’s frustrating," she said. “I’ve already been going through a lot and this is a lot more on my shoulders.”

Severe storms, heavy rain possible in Plains

As the heat rises in portions of the south, strong to severe storms and heavy rain are also possible on Monday from the south-central Plains to the Mississippi River Valley.

Damaging winds, large hail and flash flooding are possible through Tuesday.

Strong to severe storms will develop from Texas and Oklahoma into Missouri and Arkansas Monday afternoon and evening, including Oklahoma City, Tulsa and Little Rock.
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Offline John of Wallan

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Re: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature
« Reply #623 on: August 31, 2020, 11:51:37 AM »
After all the rain now high temps... What is the wet bulb temp in these areas?
Must be getting close to dangerous levels as I assume humidity would be very high.
40c with low himidity like I am used to in the SE States of Oz is much more manageable than 30c with 90% humidity like I have experienced in North Queensland a few years back on holiday.
Makes it nearly impossible to do any physical activity without getting heat stroke.

JOW

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Re: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature
« Reply #624 on: August 31, 2020, 12:24:55 PM »
After all the rain now high temps... What is the wet bulb temp in these areas?
Must be getting close to dangerous levels as I assume humidity would be very high.
40c with low himidity like I am used to in the SE States of Oz is much more manageable than 30c with 90% humidity like I have experienced in North Queensland a few years back on holiday.
Makes it nearly impossible to do any physical activity without getting heat stroke.

JOW

They still have HVAC in TX.

RE
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Re: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature
« Reply #625 on: August 31, 2020, 02:44:55 PM »
After all the rain now high temps... What is the wet bulb temp in these areas?
Must be getting close to dangerous levels as I assume humidity would be very high.
40c with low himidity like I am used to in the SE States of Oz is much more manageable than 30c with 90% humidity like I have experienced in North Queensland a few years back on holiday.
Makes it nearly impossible to do any physical activity without getting heat stroke.

JOW

They still have HVAC in TX.

RE

If you have HVAC system installed.
If you have power or If the power grid does not go down from overload like it does in heat waves or if you dont have to work outside.'


JOW

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💡 Parts of Louisiana face long outages after deadly Hurricane Laura ravages
« Reply #626 on: August 31, 2020, 02:59:00 PM »
They'll be Slow Cooking Loisiana for a while.

RE

https://www.cnn.com/2020/08/30/weather/laura-louisiana-power-lines-wx/index.html

Parts of Louisiana face long outages after deadly Hurricane Laura ravages power grid


By Tyler Mauldin, CNN meteorologist

Updated 5:06 PM ET, Sun August 30, 2020
Laura remnants bring severe storms to the Northeast

Laura remnants bring severe storms to the Northeast 02:08

(CNN)The backbone to Louisiana's power grid suffered catastrophic damage after Hurricane Laura barreled ashore, killing at least 14 people in the state.
Laura crumpled homes and ripped away power lines, with nearly 360,000 customers still in the dark days after it hit Thursday. Carbon monoxide poisoning from the use of generators has been responsible for more than half the deaths, according to health officials.
Entergy, which serves Louisiana and Texas, says the damage to its high-voltage transmission lines and other key infrastructure is some of the most severe the company has ever experienced.
Customers cannot get power until this critical part of the system is restored, and damage is so extensive in some areas that it will need to be rebuilt from the ground up.
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"We expect the recovery to be as difficult and challenging as we have ever faced in the past. Customers should expect extended power outages lasting weeks," Phillip May, the president and CEO of Entergy Louisiana, said in a statement Saturday.
Transmission lines act as the interstate system for electricity, allowing companies to carry electricity generated by power plants to main power lines that feed into communities.
More than 29,000 lineworkers from 29 states, DC and Canada, according to an email from the Edison Electric Institute, have settled into the region to help restore power to those affected by the strongest hurricane to hit Louisiana in 164 years.
Despite the large contingent of crews, the restoration can't come quick enough.
The National Weather Service has issued heat advisories for southwest Louisiana, which includes hard-hit Lake Charles, and east Texas, where it could feel as hot as 110 degrees Fahrenheit on Sunday afternoon.
Residents are reverting to generators to try and beat the heat without electricity. It's paramount to operate the generator correctly to keep families safe. Of Louisiana's storm-related deaths, officials have said at least eight were from carbon monoxide poisoning while trying to use generators during power outages.
Carbon monoxide is odorless and can be dangerous indoors if used without proper ventilation. Generators should be used outdoors and placed away from windows, doors and vents that can allow carbon monoxide inside, according to the Louisiana Department of Health.
Laura no longer poses a threat to the US and has since dissipated.
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🌀 Lake Charles, Louisiana - Hurricane Laura: Catastrophic Damage Aerials
« Reply #627 on: September 03, 2020, 04:41:03 PM »
Looks like Collapse to me.

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🌀 Super Typhoon Haishen is now expected to be one of the most intense storms on
« Reply #628 on: September 06, 2020, 01:00:28 AM »
Japan gets hammered again.

RE

https://www.severe-weather.eu/tropical-weather/haishen-japan-typhoon-mk/

Super Typhoon Haishen is now expected to be one of the most intense storms on record for Japan
By Marko Korosec |  Tropical weather |  05 September 2020


Super Typhoon Haishen has been maintaining its powerful high-end Category 4 strength through Friday and Saturday. The peak sustained winds were at 155 mph (135 knots or 250 km/h). Haishen is the Earth’s 3rd strongest storm of 2020 and is expected to hit Japan and South Korea on Sunday.

Haishen is expected to be one of the most intense storms on record for Japan. The steongest storm ever hit Japan was a Category 5 Super Typhoon Very that struck Japan back in September 1959.

Vera holds the record of the strongest and deadliest typhoon on record to make landfall on the country.

Haishen will be set a remarkable typhoon statistic for the Korean peninsula. When Haishen makes landfall, it will be the third landfall of the typhoon in the Korean peninsula within the past 14 days. South Korea was already badly hit with Maysak a few days ago, while typhoon Bavi hit North Korea in late August.
haishen-japan-visible-satellite-sunset

Haishen is also the Earth’s 3rd strongest storm on record for 2020. The only two strongest systems this year were Harold (165 mph winds) and Amphan (160 mph) peak sustained winds.
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The lowest estimated central pressure during the peak intensity of Haishen has been fluctuating between 915 and 925 mbar, according to Dvorak ADT satellite analysis. Haishen intensified from 85 knots to 135 knots in 24 hours (between 00 UTC Sept 3rd to 00 UTC Sept 4th).
Record-high warm seas near Japan

 

The sea surface temperatures south of Japan are the highest ever observed since the records began in the year 1982. Temperatures are roughly 2 degrees Celsius (4F) higher than normal there.
haishen-japan-sea-waters-temperarature

The above graphics by Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) indicates that the average temperature of the sea just south of Japan has been at 29.8 °C through August. About 1.7 °C above the long-term average.

Even warmer, 2.1 °C above the average, were the temperatures further south. Directly in the area (between 130-140° E and 25-30° N) where Haishen is tracking this weekend, nearing Japan islands.
haishen-japan-visible-satellite-image

This is the main reason why typhoon Haishen has literally exploded in intensity on Thursday. Being within a very low shear environment, oceanic conditions lead to very rapid intensification.
Outstanding satellite presentation

 
haishen-japan-visible-satellite
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Haishen has gone through a very rapid intensification on Thursday, which began soon after the Eyewall Replacement Cycle (EWRC) was finished. A very large eye has appeared, with the central pressure rapidly deepening into 915 to 920 mbar range.

NASA MODIS infrared satellite scan reveals that the cloud tops temperatures were extremely low. Occasionally, the cloud tops temperature was near -90 °C. This often happens with the most intense tropical systems on Earth.
haishen-japan-infrared-satellite

Advanced Dvorak Technique (ADT) estimates are indicating that Haishen is an extremely powerful and very large typhoon. Its tropical-storm-force 50-knot winds are spread across the 100-130 mile radii. It already has 40-75 miles radii of hurricane-force 64-knot winds.
haishen-japan-dvorak-winds
haishen-japan-dvorak-intensity
Destructive impact for Japan islands

 

The first effect for any land areas will be the small Japanese island Minamidaitōjima. Nearly 2000 population on the island will experience a full force of this violent typhoon tonight.
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Very significant damage is expected on the island. Especially as major storm surge and flooding are likely as well.

Just hours later, Haishen is expected to pass near the Japanese island of Amami Oshima, around 150 km northeast of Okinawa. A typhoon chaser James Reynolds is reporting from there.
haishen-japan-wind-accumulation

Haishen seems to be taking a more westerly track that it was previously anticipated. Therefore, a direct landfall in Japan’s Kyushu Island is becoming unlikely. Nevertheless, Haisen’s size and violent strength are huge, so it will be devastating there as well.

After the typhoon enters the northeast region of the East China Sea, Haishen will likely graze into the cold wake left behind the Typhoon Maysak. This could cause a faster weakening of the storm, moving towards South Korea on Sunday.
After Japan, Haishen heads for Korea

 

The landfall of typhoon Haishen in Korea will be historic and record-breaking. No season over the last 75 years has seen three typhoons making landfall anywhere on the Korean peninsula.

Actually, only named 14 typhoons have passed over South Korea prior to 2020. Only three typhoons passed over North Korea prior to 2020.

Here is the animation of typhoon Haishen winds along with its final days tracking across Amami Oshima, Kyushu islands and further towards the landfall in South Korea:
Super Typhoon Haishen landfall in Japan and South Korea (Click to play)
Violent Super Typhoon Haishen on its way towards Japan and Korea - SWE /MA
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Rainfall and flooding threat

 

An extremely dangerous situation is developing, as both Japan and Korea will be severely hit by an excessive amount of rain. The widespread 200-400 mm of rain is likely along Haishen’s track. With a much above normal wet monsoon season in Korea, additional deadly flooding threat is expected.
haishen-japan-rainfall-accumulation

A significant amount of rainfall is expected across the Amami Oshima, Kyushu islands, and across the Korean peninsula afterward. Just days after Maysak’s impact. The amount of rain will be extreme and flooding/landslides are very likely to occur.
Typhoon – the strongest storms on Earth

 

A typhoon is a mature tropical cyclone, forming in the western Pacific (between 100° and 180° East in the Northern Hemisphere). Typhoons are, besides hurricanes, the most powerful tropical weather events on Earth.

The region where typhoons form is known as the Northwestern Pacific Basin. It is the most active tropical cyclone basin on Earth, accounting for almost one-third of the world’s annual tropical cyclones forming.
typhoon-haishen-longterm-tracks
Typhoon needs warm water and high humidity to form

 

Very warm to hot sea surface temperatures of above 26 °C, high atmospheric instability, and high humidity in the lower to middle levels of the troposphere are the most important ingredients that lead to tropical cyclogenesis.

The final ingredient is environmental support, the upper-level divergence. This is a very important factor as it is supporting the upward motion for deep convective storms to develop.

At the surface, a pre-existing low-level wave or disturbance develops and moving through an environment with low vertical wind shear.
haishen-japan-large-satellite-view

A tropical cyclone gets designated to a typhoon when maximum sustained winds are above 64 knots (73 mph or 118 km/h). If winds exceed 130 knots (150 mph or 241 km/h), the typhoon is upgraded to a Super typhoon.

Water vapor analysis of tropical cyclones indicates the potential a tropical system has to develop. Water vapor releases latent heat as it condenses into a liquid. That liquid then form clouds and thunderstorms, gradually organizing into a tropical cyclone.
haishen-japan-geocolor-satellite

Typhoons often have very high cloud tops, even below -85 °C or -90 °C at times. There is a rough estimation – the higher the cloud tops, the colder and the stronger tropical cyclones are.
Typhoon frequency and tracks

 

On average, there are more than 26 tropical storms and typhoons every year. These systems have a general westward track towards the Philippines, southern China, Taiwan, and Vietnam.

There are some rare events than a tropical cyclone formed east of the 180° East longitude, over the central Pacific, as a tropical storm or a hurricane. When it travels westward into the western Pacific, it continues as a typhoon.
Conclusion

 
Typhoon Haishen will remain a very intense system while tracking across the Minamidaitōjima island tonight. The next in line are Amami Oshima islands, to the northeast of Okinawa. Destructive winds, storm surge, and flooding are expected.

Haishen is expected to be one of the most intense storms to hit Japan on record.
haishen-japan-visible-satellite-image

Some uncertainties still remain how intense Haishen will be when approaching Kyushu Island, Japan on Sunday. Then, another severely damaging and historic impact on South Korea is expected.
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