AuthorTopic: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature  (Read 4886 times)

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The Strafing Run of Mother Nature: The OBLITERATION of Puerto Rico
« Reply #75 on: September 20, 2017, 05:59:40 AM »
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« Last Edit: September 20, 2017, 06:04:43 AM by RE »
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The Strafing Run of Mother Nature: Maria may make it to the East Coast
« Reply #76 on: September 20, 2017, 10:39:15 AM »
Here's the GFS model 162 hours out.  That's about 7 days.  The models aren't too good that far out though, and yesterday's spaghetti plot showed it veering off east.  If it makes the East Coast at even a Cat 2, TSHTF.


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Re: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature: Maria may make it to the East Coast
« Reply #77 on: September 20, 2017, 10:54:49 AM »
Here's the GFS model 162 hours out.  That's about 7 days.  The models aren't too good that far out though, and yesterday's spaghetti plot showed it veering off east.  If it makes the East Coast at even a Cat 2, TSHTF.


RE

You may be sure I am fervently tracking the path of this monster. It took a decided jog to the left this morning.

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

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Re: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature: Maria may make it to the East Coast
« Reply #78 on: September 20, 2017, 11:15:04 AM »

You may be sure I am fervently tracking the path of this monster. It took a decided jog to the left this morning.


Got your batteries and bottled water already I hope.

Might not be a bad day to go buy a generator either.

Very embarrasing if a Diner Admin is caught unprepped.

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Puerto Rico entirely without power in the wake of Maria
« Reply #79 on: September 20, 2017, 06:40:33 PM »
How many $Billions$ did this one cost?  ???  :icon_scratch:

Will Da Federal Goobermint cough up the relief money necessary?

RE

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-nation/wp/2017/09/20/hurricane-maria-takes-aim-at-puerto-rico-with-force-not-seen-in-modern-history/?utm_term=.253adaad92e3

Puerto Rico entirely without power as Hurricane Maria hammers island with devastating force
by Samantha Schmidt, Joel Achenbach and Sandhya Somashekhar September 20 at 8:50 PM


Hurricane Maria passed through Puerto Rico on Wednesday, leaving behind a path of destruction across the national territory. (Photo by Dennis M. Rivera Pichardo for The Washington Post)

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico — Hurricane Maria delivered a destructive full-body blow to this U.S. territory on Wednesday, ripping off metal roofs, generating terrifying and potentially lethal flash floods, knocking out 100 percent of the island's electrical grid and decimating some communities.

With sustained winds of 155 mph at landfall — a strong Category 4 storm and nearly a Category 5 — Maria was so powerful that it disabled radar, weather stations and cell towers across Puerto Rico, leaving an information vacuum in which officials could only speculate about property damage, injuries or deaths.

"Definitely Puerto Rico — when we can get outside — we will find our island destroyed," Abner Gómez, director of Puerto Rico's emergency management agency, said in a midday news conference here. "The information we have received is not encouraging. It's a system that has destroyed everything it has had in its path."

The entire island experienced hurricane conditions, with 20 inches or more of rain falling, often at torrential rates of up to seven inches per hour, leading to reports of raging floodwaters and people seeking help to escape them.

The storm, having passed through the U.S. Virgin Islands earlier, made landfall on the Puerto Rican coast near Yabucoa at 6:15 a.m. It was the first Category 4 storm to strike the island directly since 1932. By midmorning, Maria had fully engulfed the 100-mile-long island.

[Capital Weather Gang: Tracking Maria]


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Hurricane Maria brings extreme wind and rain to Puerto Rico
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Hurricane Maria made landfall early Sept. 20 in the southeast coastal town of Yabucoa as a Category 4 storm. It's one the strongest hurricanes to ever hit Puerto Rico. (The Washington Post)

Winds snapped palm trees, shredded homes and sent debris skidding across beaches and roads. Recreational boats sank in San Juan's marinas. Across the island, residents reported trees downed and blocking roadways. Far inland, floodwaters inundated homes that had never before flooded.

In San Juan, the capital, Maria shook buildings and blew out windows. Residents of high-rise apartments sought refuge in bathrooms.

First responders, including a fire-rescue team deployed from Fairfax, Va., had to ride out the storm for hours before emerging to help people. In the meantime, calls to emergency services went in vain. A family in the southern coastal town of Guayama, for example, reportedly pleaded for help as they were trapped in their home with rising water. In Hato Rey, a San Juan business district, a woman sought assistance as she was experiencing labor pains. "Unfortunately, our staff cannot leave," Gómez said at the news conference. "They will be rescued later."


Macarena Gil Gandia, a resident of Hato Rey, helped her mother clean out water that had started flooding the kitchen of her second-floor apartment at dawn.

"There are sounds coming from all sides," Gil Gandia said in a text message. "The building is moving! And we're only on the second floor, imagine the rest!"

Farther west, in the community of Juana Matos, in the city of Catano, 80 percent of the structures were destroyed, the mayor of Catano told El Nuevo Día.

"The area is completely flooded. Water got into the houses. The houses have no roof," the mayor said. "Most of them are made of wood and zinc, and electric poles fell on them."

William "Brock" Long, administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, told The Washington Post that rescue and recovery operations are poised to help the U.S. territories — and had significant resources already deployed in the area as a result of Hurricane Irma, which hit the region just days ago.

"Right now we're in wait-and-see mode," Long said Wednesday afternoon. "We know that St. Croix took a tremendous hit, and we know obviously Puerto Rico took the brunt of the storm. Once the weather clears and the seas die down, we'll be in full operation."

Satellite images showed that Maria became disorganized, without a defined eye, and weakened as it moved slowly across the high terrain of Puerto Rico. Late Wednesday afternoon, the center of the vast storm exited the north coast of the island, its peak winds having dropped to 110 mph as a dangerous but less powerful Category 2 storm.

As Maria journeys across open Atlantic waters, it is expected to reorganize and gain strength. It is moving parallel to the northeast coast of the Dominican Republic, heading toward the Turks and Caicos Islands and the southeast Bahamas.


Fishing boats with severe damage at Club Nautico in the San Juan Bay. (Photo by Dennis M. Rivera Pichardo for The Washington Post)

The storm track and atmospheric conditions suggest it will stay offshore of the U.S. East Coast and eventually curve northeast and out to sea. But forecasters warn that it is too soon to say with certainty that the U.S. mainland is in the clear.

Southern New England already is dealing with pounding surf and powerful wind gusts from Hurricane Jose. That storm could help in keeping Maria away from the coast by drawing it to the northeast. If Jose weakens too quickly, Maria could drift closer to the East Coast by the middle of next week.

Maria was the most violent tropical cyclone to hit Puerto Rico in more than 80 years. It had raked St. Croix hours earlier, just two weeks after that island was the only major land mass in the U.S. Virgin Islands that was spared Hurricane Irma's wrath. Maria also produced flooding in St. Thomas, an island that Irma hit.

In the French island of Guadeloupe, officials blamed at least two deaths on Maria, and at least two people were missing after a ship went down near the tiny French island of Desirade. At least seven deaths have been reported on the devastated island of Dominica.

Rep. Stacey Plaskett, who represents the U.S. Virgin Islands in Washington, said St. Croix had been a staging ground for relief efforts after Hurricane Irma devastated other parts of her district before Maria's eye skimmed the edge of St. Croix on Tuesday night as a Category 5 storm with winds of 175 mph.

The damage has yet to be fully assessed, but in a sign of the possible devastation, Plaskett said the roof of the local racetrack blew into the runway of the airport, complicating relief efforts.


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This is what the eye of Hurricane Maria looks like
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NOAA’s GOES 16 satellite captured a close view of Hurricane Maria’s swirling eye on Sept.19 as it made its way to Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands and the British Virgin Islands. (NOAA)

Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rosselló on Wednesday afternoon imposed a 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. curfew for the general public, which will continue until Saturday.

"Resist, Puerto Rico," the governor tweeted earlier as the storm blew in. "God is with us; we are stronger than any hurricane. Together we will lift up."

Speaking on NBC's "Today" show Wednesday, Rosselló said, "This is clearly going to be the most devastating storm in the history of our island."

Buildings that meet the island's newer construction codes, established around 2011, should have been able to weather the winds, Rosselló said. But wooden homes in flood-prone areas "have no chance," he predicted.

The last hurricane to make landfall in Puerto Rico was Georges in 1998. Just one Category 5 hurricane has hit Puerto Rico in recorded history, in 1928.


Broken windows at an apartment in the Ciudadela complex of Santurce. (Photo by Dennis M. Rivera Pichardo for The Washington Post)

Puerto Rico's vulnerability to tropical cyclones has been driven home in the past two weeks as first Irma and then Maria have howled into the Caribbean. The back-to-back nature of the storms has had one minor upside: Some 3,200 federal government staffers, National Guardsmen and other emergency personnel overseen already were in Puerto Rico when Maria approached.

President Trump praised FEMA and the Department of Homeland Security for "lifesaving and life-sustaining" work in the islands, and he sent his thoughts and prayers to "all those in harm's way," according to a White House statement.

The federal recovery effort, FEMA administrator Long said, will attempt to restore power to Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands as quickly as possible but in a way that makes the grid less vulnerable to similar disruptions. The power grid, he said, "is a fragile system in both territories. It's going to be a long and frustrating process to get the power grid up."

In the lobby of Ciqala Luxury Home Suites in Miramar, a neighborhood in San Juan, Maria Gil de Lamadrid waited with her husband as the rain and wind pounded the hotel's facade. The door of the hotel's parking garage flopped violently in the wind.

Hurricane Maria passed through Puerto Rico leaving behind a path of destruction. (Photo by Dennis M. Rivera Pichardo for The Washington Post)

Gil de Lamadrid had spent the night in the hotel after evacuating her nearby 16th floor waterfront apartment. But even in a luxury hotel room, Gil de Lamadrid could not evade flooding. On Wednesday morning, water began seeping into her room through the balcony doors.

"I'm feeling anxious," she said.

Her husband shrugged.

"For me, it's an adventure," he said. "Something to talk about later."

By midafternoon, the gusts had become less frequent, and lashing rains had eased. Soon residents emerged to survey the damage from a storm for the ages. Some walked their dogs.

"The hotels, they lost all the windows, they had structural damage even on concrete," reported Dennis M. Rivera Pichardo, a freelance photographer working for The Washington Post, as he surveyed the tourist area of San Juan. "Trees are without a single leaf."

Residents of San Juan take refuge at Roberto Clemente Coliseum, the biggest shelter in the island. (Photo by Dennis M. Rivera Pichardo for The Washington Post)

In Miramar, residents began clearing the roads of larger trees. One man walked down the street wearing only a T-shirt, shorts and a fedora hat, beaming despite the rain. "I was bored," he said.

The Nieves Acarón family decided to walk their dogs just before nightfall.

"He couldn't last any longer," Adriana Acarón said, pointing at her dog, Toffee.

She had been anxious throughout the storm. With cellphone reception down, she had not yet heard from her mother-in-law, who is 83 and lives in an area where a river reportedly overflowed its banks.

"It didn't stop for hours," she said of the storm. "I could feel everything. You could feel things flying at your window shutters."
Hurricane Maria slams into Puerto Rico as Category 4 storm
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The storm carries the potential to cause widespread destruction along its path, including some areas battered earlier by the huge Hurricane Irma.

Achenbach and Somashekhar reported from Washington. Daniel Cassady in San Juan; Amy Gordon in Vieques, Puerto Rico and Brian Murphy, Jason Samenow and Angela Fritz in Washington contributed to this report.
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The Strafing Run: Hurricane Maria cause massive destruction in Puerto Rico
« Reply #80 on: September 21, 2017, 03:14:40 AM »
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The Strafing Run of Mother Nature 4: 2017 Autumn of the Apocalypse
« Reply #81 on: September 21, 2017, 03:35:17 AM »


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Published on The Doomstead Diner September 21, 2017









Discuss this article at the Environment Table inside the Diner



I was going to take a break from Hurrican Reporting and devote my next article to another form of storm, the Financial Storm surrounding the breach of the Equifax security of Credit Data and the sprinkling out of SS#s and all the rest of your personal data for nefarious people to use in Identity Theft, for the rest of your LIFE.  I actually got most of this article done already, but then Maria waltzed into town, with a direct bead on the FSoA Virgin Islands and after that Puerto Rico, with the Eyewall targeting the capital city of San Juan.  As if Puerto Rico didn't have enough problems being totally DEAD BROKE even before Maria came a-knocking.



So now, here I am once again sitting here safely in my digs on the Last Great Frontier of Alaska at 6PM my time while ALL HELL is breaking loose down in the Lower 48, the Carribean and Central America.



Maria has been on a Bee Line for St. Croix in the FSoA Virgin Islands and looks set for the Eyewall to make FIRST CONTACT in the next couple of hours.  It's a BULL'S EYE direct hit like Irma pulled on Barbuda.  St. Croix will be FLATTENED.



Puerto Rico and the Capital City of San Juan are also on the Navigational Chart of Maria on her journey across the High Seas for a STRAFING RUN there as well.  Puerto Rico has NEVER been hit by a Cat 5 in recorded history.  As I write this post, Maria's winds have kicked up to 175 MPH and the Barometric Pressure has fallen to 909 millibars.  This is lower pressure than Irma kicked out at her strongest.  The lower the pressure, the stronger the hurricane gets.  The only saving grace here is that Maria is not as big as Irma was, and the Eye she presents is not as wide covering so much territory.  It's a "pinhole" eye, very small only maybe 10 miles in diameter at this point.  However, for the folks in the path of that eyewall, this is BAD NEWZ.  Like a spinning Figure Skater who pulls her arms in to speed up a spin, the smaller the Eye in one of these behemoths, the faster the wind speeds are.  They may yet still increase further before landfall on Puerto Rico, but they are already at CATASTROPHIC level.



As if this was not enough, today Mexico got hit by a massive Earthquake which demolished buildings and already the official Death Toll there is at 248 and steadily rising.  Multi-story concrete buildings collapsed inside Mexico Shity, and that wasn't even the epicenter.  They just HAD an earthquake 2 weeks ago which killed 90 people.  In a gesture of Humanitarian aid, they offered to assist after Harvey hit Houston but then had to withdraw the offer after that one rolled in.  This latest one comes on PRECISELY the day in 1985 they got hit with a big one which killed in the 1000s..  They actually were staging Earthquake drills right before this one occured.  Whether this saved any lives, I don't know but one hopes it did.  It's still an amazing coincidence though and makes you wonder.



The pics so far coming out from Mexico are horrific in their destruction, although at least the whole city wasn't obliterated like Barbuda was after Irma.  The scenes aren't too much different though.



  https://media.boingboing.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/barbuda.jpg



http://i2.cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/170907120621-irma-damage-barbuda-exlarge-169.jpg



Barbuda after Irma



https://media3.s-nbcnews.com/j/newscms/2017_36/2148901/170909-world-mexico-quake-0746_11dc59e1f32566fb8ad2f53c0f302c6b.nbcnews-ux-2880-1000.jpg



https://www.standard.co.uk/s3fs-public/styles/story_large/public/thumbnails/image/2017/09/19/20/mexicoquake1909g.jpg



Mexico after the Quake



Of course, these are only THIS WEEK'S disaster Feature Stories.  Although the MSM has already left them behind, let's not forget…



http://a57.foxnews.com/images.foxnews.com/content/fox-news/us/2017/08/29/harvey-floodwaters-put-houston-reservoirs-in-uncharted-territory/_jcr_content/article-text/article-par-2/embed_image/image.img.jpg/612/344/1504028726465.jpg?ve=1&tl=1



http://a.abcnews.com/images/US/hurricane-harvey-houston-street-ap-ps-170828_4x3_992.jpg



Houston after Harvey



http://i2.cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/170912064755-01-irma-florida-0912-super-169.jpg



http://i2.cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/170912072024-10-irma-florida-0912-super-169.jpg



Florida after Irma



This is only the shit Mother Nature has been pitching for the last month.  We also have the "Rocket Man" Kim Long Dong over in North Korea pitching out the Missiles:



http://i2.cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160622090923-n-korea-missile-exlarge-169.jpg



http://i2.cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/170515211523-north-korea-missile-test-0514-super-169.jpg



North Korean Missiles



Less visually arresting but possible more DANGEROUS than all of the above was the Data Breach at Equifax.  The Identity information for 143M "customers" of the Credit system was compromised, which basically is about every adult who has a Social Security Number.  That information is now out there in the ether for any nefarious criminal to use to impersonate your identity and set up credit lines which will be charged to YOUR credit record.



https://d.ibtimes.co.uk/en/full/1636224/massive-equifax-data-breach-hits-143-million-americans.jpg?w=1280&h=720&l=50&t=40



https://www.creditcards.com/credit-card-news/images/equifax-breach-laptop-lg.png



That's not enough DOOM for you this month?  Catalonia in Spain wants to hold a Referendum to Secede from Spain, but Da Goobermint of Spain doesn't want to even ALLOW the people to vote on this!  This is "Democracy" at the End of the Age of Oil and the Collapse of Industrial Civilization.  From Reuters:










September 19, 2017 / 11:57 PM / Updated 2 hours ago


Spanish police raid Catalan government to halt banned referendum



http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2017/09/20/gettyimages-849994100_wide-995861366802f70acb5bc7cf63c972c35362386c-s900-c85.jpg



Did I happen to forget that Pennsylvania went BANKRUPT this month?  They can't pay their bills.  That didn't even happen in the Great Depression!  Filling the potholes is becoming a problem.



 



 



 



 




 



 



 



 




 



 



 



 




 



 



 



 




 



 



 



 



 





http://assets.nydailynews.com/polopoly_fs/1.1253250.1359993184!/img/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/article_750/sinkholes2n-4-web.jpg



Not to mention of course paying a few teacher salaries, sanitation worker salaries and of course those pesky PENSIONS they are on the hook for!



Do I want to review the problems with Da Federal Goobermint Budget and Deficit here at this point?  No, first off because we are already overloaded with DOOM, second because nobody even cares about that shit anymore and knows all they will do is hike the debt ceiling again, and third because there are no good Graphics to go with that story! lol.



I could of course go on and on with the many other facets of Collapse directly confronting us at the moment, but I think this is quite enough.  From Climate to Economics to Geopolitics, there are massive threats on every front, some of them being realized in real time as we speak, but about all on the edge of the precipice of a Tipping Point.  Something's gotta give here.  BAU cannot stand up under this kind of pressure indefinitely.



After each and every disaster of the last month, POTUS Donalditry Trumpovetsky has PROMISED every disaster area under the FSoA Umbrella the FULL help of Da Federal Goobermint in Disaster Relief.  Let us do a short conservative estimate of the damages JUST to territories under the FSoA Umbrella here.



Houston:  Gotta be $100B there at least.  You're not hearing jack shit from Houston these days, because that disaster was overrun in the MSM by the succeeding ones of Irma and Marie that followed it, but to be sure this place is no where near recovered. In the direct aftermath, Da Federal Goobermint "authorities" talked about a "years long" recovery project.  Does this sound like a Katrina "recovery" or what?



Florida:  That one dwarfs Houston, since it was spread out over such a large area.  Again being conservative, that is $200B



FSoA Virgin Islands:  This one is chump change compared to the first two, $20B would probably do an OK job for rebuilding them they are so tiny with such low resident populations.  They might actually get some decent money to rebuild, since they are such important Tourista destinations in the neighborhood.  Billionaires like Richard Branson have Private Islands down there and need services and working Airports for their Private Jets. (OK, I know his island is on the Brit side of the VI divide, but he probably uses the airport in St. Croix)



http://res.cloudinary.com/www-virgin-com/virgin-com-prod/sites/virgin.com/files/Articles/Richard%20Branson/necker/richard_necker_roof_full_width_1.jpg



Puerto Rico:  While I have been writing this article, Maria made her STRAFING RUN directly across the island as a high Cat 4, finishing off the trip by making a BULL'S EYE DIRECT HIT on San Juan.  Not a lot of information has yet come out of Puerto Rico, other than 100% of the power grid is down.  A few deaths have been reported so far, but a real death count will never be tallied up, or at least reported by the MSM.  No matter how bad the devastation is in Puerto Rico, the MSM will move on to the next disaster of the week arriving somewhere else in a World of Collapse.  I'm sure you can tack on another $230B to the $70B they currently owe and can't repay for a nice round figure of $300B there.



So all together here in the last month, the FSoA has racked up over $600B in liabilities on the balance sheet.  A $Billlion$ here, a $Billion$ there, pretty soon you are talking about real money.  WTF is the $MONEY$ to pay for all this shit supposed to come from?  This is PENTAGON territory money!  The FSoA NEEDS this money to fund the War Machine!  They can magically find this money every year to fund the military or pay off disasters in select locations but they CAN'T find $45B in Chump Change to get Pennsylvania out of the hole?  What is wrong with this picture?



The fact is of course, it is NOT Da Goobermint who is issuing out the money here, it is the International Banking Cartel, through the proxy of the Federal Reserve Bank, a wholly owned subsidiary of the TBTF Banks.  The money is credit to buy the resources and products of the Age of Oil, and they will only issue it out to those who they can still maybe get some return on for it.  So Houston will get new credit, because without Houston you have no oil industry at all!  Florida will get credit, because you can't let a full state like that with retirees still paing taxes and tons of expensive real estate and golf courses go down the toilet either.  Puerto Rico on the other hand, you can probably let Twist in the Wind, like the Europeans have been letting Greece Twist in the Wind for close to the last decade.



Although most of the current models say that Maria will take a right hand turn after she does her STRAFING RUN along the north shore of the Dominican Republic over the next couple of days, there still remains a decent possibility she will track far enough west to do another STRAFING RUN along the East Coast.  That will cost a lot too, but if it targets lower Manhattan Island and Wall street, you can be sure all the credit necessary to rebuild Goldman Sachs and JP Morgan Chase will flow out copiously to those neighborhoods.



Collapse is becoming positively BIBLICAL in scale these days, so how anyone can still be a denier absolutely boggles my mind.  It's all around you in the Newz, and it's all around you in the stores closing in your neighborhood, from Radio Shack to Sears.  This is FAST COLLAPSE.  It is ongoing as we speak.  "BEHOLD, the Mighty Hand of God!"



http://4.bp.blogspot.com/--5dmQ_5UWdc/UyR-YFn8r1I/AAAAAAAAZq0/JYVk-kGBr_E/s1600/letmypeoplego.jpg


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Maria leaves Puerto Rico paralyzed with blocked roads, no electricity
« Reply #82 on: September 21, 2017, 05:18:05 AM »
They aren't going to "bounce back" anytime too soon.

MONTHS without electricity and no A/C in that climate?  Anyone with enough money for a plane ticket is gonna be outta there inside a month.

RE

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/ct-puerto-rico-hurricane-maria-20170921-story.html

News Nation & World
Maria leaves Puerto Rico paralyzed with blocked roads, no electricity
Hurricane Maria grows into a Category 5 storm and makes landfall in Puerto Rico


Hurricane Maria is churning through the Caribbean, delivering new devastation to islands previously hit by Hurricane Irma.
Danica CotoAssociated Press

Tens of thousands of Puerto Ricans stunned by a hurricane that knocked out power for the whole island and paralyzed the U.S. territory with landslides, flooding and downed trees vowed to slowly rebuild amid an economic crisis as rescue crews fanned out Thursday.

The extent of the damage is unknown given that dozens of municipalities remained isolated and without communication after Maria hit the island Wednesday morning as a Category 4 storm with 155 mph winds, the strongest hurricane to hit Puerto Rico in over 80 years.

Uprooted trees and widespread flooding blocked many highways and streets across the island, creating a maze that forced drivers to go against traffic and past police cars that used loudspeakers to warn people they must respect a 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. curfew imposed by the governor to ensure everyone's safety.

"This is going to be a historic event for Puerto Rico," said Abner Gomez, the island's emergency management director.
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Previously a Category 5 with 175 mph winds, Maria hit Puerto Rico as the third-strongest storm to make landfall in the U.S., based on its central pressure. It was even stronger than Hurricane Irma that storm roared into the Florida Keys earlier this month.

In the capital of San Juan, towering eucalyptus trees fell nearly every other block over a main road dotted with popular bars, restaurants, and coffee shops, some of which were damaged. Outside a nearby apartment building, 40-year-old tourism company operator Adrian Pacheco recounted how he spent eight hours in a stairwell huddled with 100 other residents when the hurricane ripped the storm shutters off his building and decimated three balconies.
Hurricane Maria makes landfall near Yabucoa, Puerto Rico

Twitter users have shared videos showing the impact of Hurricane Maria on Puerto Rico. As of 10 a.m. on Wednesday, the storm had max sustained winds of 145 mph.

"I think people didn't expect the storm to reach the point that it did," he said. "Since Irma never really happened, they thought Maria would be the same."

Hurricane Irma sideswiped Puerto Rico on Sept. 6, leaving more than 1 million people without power but causing no deaths or widespread damage like it did on nearby islands. Maria, however, blew out windows at some hospitals and police stations, turned some streets into roaring rivers and destroyed hundreds of homes across Puerto Rico, including 80 percent of houses in a small fishing community near the San Juan Bay, which unleashed a storm surge of more than 4 feet.

"Months and months and months and months are going to pass before we can recover from this," Felix Delgado, mayor of the northern coastal city of Catano, told The Associated Press.

The sound of chain saws began to fill the silence that spread across San Juan late Wednesday afternoon as firefighters began to remove trees and used small bulldozers to lift toppled concrete light posts. Some neighbors pitched in to help clear the smaller branches, including Shawn Zimmerman, a 27-year-old student from Lewistown, Pennsylvania who moved to Puerto Rico nearly two years ago.
Hurricane Maria smashes Dominica, causing 'mind-boggling' devastation

"The storm didn't bother me," he said. "It's the devastation. I get goosebumps. It's going to take us a long time."

Maria has caused at least 10 deaths across the Caribbean, including seven in the hard-hit island of Dominica and two in the French Caribbean territory of Guadeloupe. Puerto Rico's governor told CNN one man died after being hit by flying debris. No further details were available, and officials could not be immediately reached for comment.

Maria weakened to a Category 2 storm later in the day but re-strengthened to Category 3 status early Thursday with winds of 115 mph. It was centered about 70 miles north of Punta Cana, Dominican Republic, and moving northwest near 9 mph.

The hurricane was still dumping rain overnight Wednesday in Puerto Rico, where crumbled red roof tiles lay scattered across many roads, and curious residents sidestepped and ducked under dozens of black power lines still swaying in heavy winds. But they posed no danger: Maria caused an island-wide power outage, with officials unable to say when electricity would return.

Puerto Rico's electric grid was crumbling amid lack of maintenance and a dwindling staff even before the hurricanes knocked out power. Many now believe it will take weeks, if not months, to restore power.

Edwin Rosario, a 79-year-old retired government worker, said an economic crisis that has sparked an exodus of nearly half a million Puerto Ricans to the U.S. mainland will only make the island's recovery harder.

"Only us old people are left," he said as he scraped a street gutter in front of his house free of debris. "A lot of young people have already gone...If we don't unite, we're not going to bounce back."

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The Strafing Run of Mother Nature: Part 4 now UP on GEI
« Reply #83 on: September 21, 2017, 05:44:39 PM »
2017 Autumn of the Apocalypse on Global Economic Intersection

http://econintersect.com/pages/opinion/opinion.php?post=201709211929

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The Strafing Run of Mother Nature: Florida Knee Deep in Shit
« Reply #84 on: September 22, 2017, 12:58:37 AM »
https://newrepublic.com/article/144798/floridas-poop-nightmare-come-true


Florida’s Poop Nightmare Has Come True
Hurricane Irma caused massive sewage overflows, highlighting the twin dangers of an aging infrastructure and climate change.
By Emily Atkin
September 14, 2017

In the days and hours before Hurricane Irma slammed into Florida, its residents were treated to copious media speculation about nightmare scenarios. This monster storm, journalists said, could bring a 15-foot storm surge, blow roofs off of buildings, and cause tens of billions of dollars in damage. But perhaps no scenario seemed more dire than the one Quartz warned about the day before Irma made landfall: “Hurricane Irma will likely cover South Florida with a film of poop.”

Quartz’ apparent hyperbole turned out to be an understatement. Pollution reports submitted to Florida’s Department of Environmental Protection show that, due to power outages and flooding caused by Irma, human waste has been spilling into streets, residences, and waterways across the entire state. At the time of this article’s publication, at least 113 “Public Notices of Pollution” had been submitted to the DEP. Combined, those discharge reports showed more than 28 million gallons of treated and untreated sewage released in 22 counties. The total amount is surely much more; at least 43 of those reports listed either an “unknown” or “ongoing” amount of waste released, and new reports continue to roll in—sometimes as many as a dozen per hour.

In other words, Irma was a literal shitstorm. But it’s no laughing matter. Sewage spills pose a major threat to public health, and they’re likely to become more common due to two increasingly connected crises facing America: an aging infrastructure and climate change.

The spills in Florida range from benign to revolting. In some cases, a few hundred gallons of raw sewage burst from manholes into non-flooded areas and were quickly cleaned up. But in Miami, the city’s South District Wastewater Treatment Plant reported a six-million-gallon sewage spill that reached Biscane Bay, a state aquatic preserve. While the report said the area was cleaned and disinfected, it also says the public was not notified and the sewage was not recovered. In Seminole County, north of Orlando, a sewer overflowed for six hours, spilling two million gallons. More than 300,000 gallons flowed into Stevenson Creek, which the Tampa Bay Times reports is already “one of Pinellas County’s most polluted bodies of water.” The St. John’s River in Jacksonville has seen at least 130,000 gallons of sewage released into its tributaries. And in Volusia County, which holds Daytona Beach, a two-million-gallon spill of treated sewage has seen “no cleanup efforts” so far, according to a notice.

The DEP emphasizes that these notices contain estimates. “It should be noted that these are initial incident reports, and that information on the volume of wastewater released during an event like Hurricane Irma may fluctuate depending on the initial estimates and the overall amounts that are able to be recovered after a spill,” Florida DEP spokesperson Dee Ann Miller said in an email. “Frequently these numbers continue to be refined as additional information becomes available.” It will likely take days, if not weeks for the full extent of sewage overflows and contamination in Florida to be assessed. But state officials aren’t taking any chances. Bloomberg reports that “utilities across the state warned residents to boil water before drinking it,” and the Environmental Protection Agency “has deployed specialists to Florida to help get wastewater systems back online.” The DEP is urging Floridians to stay out of floodwaters, and to look for warning signs posted by local authorities about accidental sewage releases.
Related
America Is on the Verge of Ratpocalypse Warmer weather is fueling a rodent surge, straining public health systems and the economy. It's time for the federal government to step in.

In other words, though the state is still determining the extent of the pollution, there’s widespread agreement about the risk to human health. “Public health is the most imminent threat with these releases,” said Mary Grant, the director of Food and Water Watch’s Public Water for All campaign. “Contamination of water leads to people being exposed to disease.” Dr. Valerie Harwood, whose University of South Florida lab researches water quality microbiology, said humans exposed to raw or poorly treated sewage could experience a number of gastrointestinal problems or a nasty virus. “You can get nausea, vomiting, diarrhea … the noroviruses, better known as cruise ship viruses,” she said. The polluted water may also contain bacterial pathogens like salmonella and giardia.

Harwood said exposure risk is short-lived in most cases, so long as contaminated water is flushed out into larger sources—like the Biscane Bay, which she said would likely be fine despite welcoming six million gallons of sewage. “You wouldn’t have wanted to be in the water when [the spill] happened, but it’s gone now,” she said. The real risks come when human waste reaches stagnant floodwaters, retention ponds, or slow-moving streams. Texas is dealing with this now, after Hurricane Harvey caused massive sewage overflows in Houston. Scientists are finding that stagnant floodwaters there contain startling amounts of human fecal matter and E. coli. If any mucous membranes or open wounds come into contact with that bacteria—or if people who touch it fail to wash their hands before eating—it could cause bloody diarrhea and other unpleasantness.

To some extent, sewage overflows are to be expected during big storms. “Those who know how these systems work understand that when this amount of water comes into the system, there’s absolutely nothing that can to be done except to let the water go,” Harwood said. “If we engineered the plants to accommodate water overflows from a hurricane, it would cost so much that people would be very angry. It’s a trade-off between uncommon events when they occur that pose a health risk, versus having a really expensive overcapacity that’s not used 99 percent of the time.”

At the same time, the nation’s sewage infrastructure—particularly Florida’s—is in worse shape than it should be, making it more susceptible to accidents and overflows. As The New York Times reported last week, “Much of the state’s infrastructure is now nearing the end of its useful life.” Last year, the EPA said $17 billion would be needed over the next two decades just to maintain Florida’s existing systems. And that’s nothing compared to the $271 billion the EPA says is needed to maintain and improve the aging, crumbling wastewater infrastructure across the country. What’s more, climate change is slowly making the problem worse—not only because of more intense rainfall, but because rising seas cause more leaks from coastal septic systems.

The Trump administration has partly acknowledged this problem. Though the president’s proposed budget nearly demolishes every other aspect of the EPA, it would slightly increase, by half of one percent, funding for the agency’s State Revolving Funds, which provide loans for construction and improvement of wastewater facilities. And Trump signed a bill in May that increases, also by half of one percent, the amount the EPA is able to lend states and municipalities for sewage system improvements.

But environmental advocates and publicly owned water utilities contend that these efforts aren’t nearly enough. When adjusted for inflation, federal funding for water infrastructure has fallen 74 percent since 1977—so increasing State Revolving Funds by half a percent, as Trump as proposed, “is insufficient to the need,” said Food and Water Watch’s Mary Grant. Trump has also proposed eliminating a separate program for rural wastewater projects and using the minuscule increase in State Revolving Funds to cover those projects. And because Trump is hostile to any policy that takes climate change into account, there’s no plan to make these sewage systems more resilient to the impacts of global warming. “Trump’s approach is not the right one,” Grant said. “We need direct federal spending in our water and sewer systems.” Until that happens, we’ll continue to be knee deep in shit.
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Puerto Rico dam bursts in wake of Hurricane Maria
« Reply #85 on: September 22, 2017, 03:12:54 PM »
Now we are talking REALLY Fast Collapse!  :o

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http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-41368478

Puerto Rico dam bursts in wake of Hurricane Maria

    1 hour ago
    From the section US & Canada


Image caption Floodwaters from Hurricane Maria have destroyed homes in Puerto Rico and knocked out the island's electricty  Image copyright Getty Images

A dam failure has caused "extremely dangerous" flooding on a Puerto Rico river in the wake of Hurricane Maria, authorities say.

The National Weather Service (NWS) said the failure of the Guajataca Dam is a "life-threatening situation".

More than 70,000 people live in the nearby towns of Isabela and Quebradillas.

At least 13 people have died since Maria ripped through Puerto Rico, knocking out power to the whole island.

Operators of the Guajataca Dam said the structure, at the northern end of Lake Guajataca in northwest Puerto Rico, failed at 14:10 local time (18:10 GMT).

It sparked a flash flood emergency for Isabela and Quebradillas municipalities, the NWS said in a series of tweets.

The agency urged residents in the area to "move to higher ground now" in an alert posted on its website.

Many who live near the dam are being evacuated by buses.
Media captionWhere has Hurricane Maria hit?

Maria, a category three storm, is now moving away from the Turks and Caicos Islands.

It is expected to head to the northeast and east of the Bahamas over the weekend, forecasters say.

    In pictures: Maria aftermath on Puerto Rico
    Hurricane Maria: What to do before, during and after

Puerto Rico's governor has called Maria the worst hurricane in a century.

Ricardo Rossello says it could take months to restore electricity to all 3.4 million of the US island territory's residents.

Roofs were ripped off as 140mph (225km/h) winds battered Puerto Rico's capital city, San Juan.

The hurricane has claimed more than 30 lives across the region, and is the second devastating storm to hit the Caribbean this hurricane season.

The first was category five Irma earlier in September.

Maria also caused widespread destruction on the small island of Dominica when it hit on Monday night, leaving at least 15 dead and 20 missing.

US President Donald Trump has pledged to visit Puerto Rico, saying it was "totally obliterated" by the storm.

He has yet to declare the island a disaster area, but has made federal emergency aid available.
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The Strafing Run of Mother Nature: 500K Carz In Houston TOTALLED
« Reply #86 on: September 22, 2017, 03:41:08 PM »
Good time to have some carz for sale in TX.

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<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/mjNMmMg0Zls" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/mjNMmMg0Zls</a>
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Re: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature: 500K Carz In Houston TOTALLED
« Reply #87 on: September 22, 2017, 04:39:30 PM »
Good time to have some carz for sale in TX.

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<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/mjNMmMg0Zls" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/mjNMmMg0Zls</a>

Add this loss to the 3/4 of a trillon dolars in home mortgage defaults of the 1st month since the catastrophes.
AND, we're still in Franken-cane season.....
Cha-Ching......
Oh, let the sun beat down upon my face
And stars fill my dream
I’m a traveler of both time and space
To be where I have been
To sit with elders of the gentle race
This world has seldom seen
They talk of days for which they sit and wait
All will be revealed

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Re: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature: 500K Carz In Houston TOTALLED
« Reply #88 on: September 22, 2017, 05:49:51 PM »

Add this loss to the 3/4 of a trillon dolars in home mortgage defaults of the 1st month since the catastrophes.
AND, we're still in Franken-cane season.....
Cha-Ching......

Indeed.  Maria also now has a track moving more westward, and might actually hit NY Shity!  :o  That would really be something.

Meanwhile, despite the fact Puerto Rico has a Dam Failure in progress, Donalditry Trumpovetsky STILL has not signed a Disaster Declaration for them to get the Federal Goobermint Loan Money to rebuild.  Where will they get money to restring the wires if the FSoA doesn;t cough it up?

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Hurricane Maria skirts Turks and Caicos as Puerto Rico endures fresh flooding
« Reply #89 on: September 23, 2017, 01:12:25 AM »
At least Puerto Rico doesn't have a Volcano ready to blow!  :icon_sunny:

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http://www.reuters.com/article/us-storm-maria/hurricane-maria-skirts-turks-and-caicos-as-puerto-rico-endures-fresh-flooding-idUSKCN1BT1RW?il=0

Hurricane Maria skirts Turks and Caicos as Puerto Rico endures fresh flooding
Dave Graham, Robin Respaut


6 Min Read

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (Reuters) - Hurricane Maria, the second major storm to ravage the Caribbean in a month, skirted past the Turks and Caicos Islands on Friday, leaving devastation in its wake that included fresh flooding on Puerto Rico two days after pummeling the U.S. island territory.

Maria, which ranked as the most powerful hurricane to strike Puerto Rico in nearly a century, has killed at least six people there and claimed 19 lives on several other Caribbean islands, according to government officials and local news media accounts.

But even as Puerto Ricans struggled without electricity to clean up and dig out from tangles of rubble, uprooted trees and fallen power lines, another potential disaster was unfolding in northwestern corner of the island, where a dam was on the verge of collapse.

The U.S. National Weather Service warned in a series of bulletins that the dam on the rain-engorged Guajataca River, was failing, causing flash flooding in the area and prompting an evacuation of communities below the reservoir by way of buses.

Roughly 70,000 people live in the area downstream from the earthen dam that was under evacuation, the island’s governor, Ricardo Rossello, said in a late-afternoon news conference.

Christina Villalba, an official for the island’s emergency management agency, said there was little doubt the dam would give way.

“It could be tonight, it could be tomorrow, it could be in the next few days, but it’s very likely it will be soon,” she said, adding that authorities were aiming to complete evacuations Friday night.

Maria struck Puerto Rico as a Category 4 storm on the five-step Saffir-Simpson scale and cut a path of destruction through the center of the island on Wednesday, ripping roofs from buildings and triggering widespread flooding. Torrential downpours from the storm sent several rivers to record levels.

Officials in Puerto Rico, an island of 3.4 million inhabitants, confirmed six storm-related fatalities: three from landslides in Utuado, in the island’s mountainous center; two from drowning in Toa Baja, west of San Juan, and a person near San Juan who was struck by a piece of wind-blown lumber.
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Buckeye Partners' Puerto Rico oil terminal still closed after Maria
Factbox: How U.S. multinationals in Puerto Rico are responding to Hurricane Maria
Factbox: How U.S. multinationals in Puerto Rico are responding to Hurricane Maria

Earlier news media reports had put the island’s death toll as high as 15.

“We know of other potential fatalities through unofficial channels that we haven’t been able to confirm,” said Hector Pesquera, the government’s secretary of public safety.

In and around San Juan, the capital, people worked to clear debris from the streets on Friday, some working with machetes, while others began to reopen businesses, though they wondered how long they could operate without power and limited inventory.

“There’s no water, no power, nothing,” said Rogelio Jimenez, a 34-year-old pizzeria worker.
Locals stand along a street affected by the overflow of the Soco River in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in El Seibo, Dominican Republic, September 22, 2017. REUTERS/Ricardo Rojas

Motorists lined up for hours outside the few gasoline stations that were open. “I’ve been here for three and a bit hours,” said Angel Serra, sitting in a blocks-long line hoping to fill up his tank.

Long lines also formed at the handful of automated teller machines that appeared to be working in the region.
DAMAGE ESTIMATED AT $45 BLN

Puerto Rico was already facing the largest municipal debt crisis in U.S. history. A team of judges overseeing its bankruptcy has advised involved parties to put legal proceedings on hold indefinitely as the island recovers, said a source familiar with the proceedings.

The storm was expected to tally $45 billion in damage and lost economic activity across the Caribbean, with at least $30 billion of that in Puerto Rico, said Chuck Watson, a disaster modeler at Enki Research in Savannah, Georgia.
Slideshow (19 Images)

Elsewhere in the Caribbean, 14 deaths were reported on Dominica, an island nation of 71,000 inhabitants. Two people were killed in the French territory of Guadeloupe and one in the U.S. Virgin Islands. Two people died when the storm roared past the Dominican Republic on Thursday, according to local media outlet El Jaya.

Maria churned past Turks and Caicos and was 295 miles (480 km) east of the Bahamas by 8 p.m. EDT (midnight GMT) on Friday, the NHC said. It was packing sustained winds of up to 125 miles per hour (205 km per hour), making it a Category 3 hurricane, but was expected to gradually weaken over the next two days as it turned more sharply to the north.

Officials on Turks and Caicos, a British overseas territory, had ordered residents to remain indoors and businesses to close on Friday as the hurricane neared, bringing a storm surge of as much as 12 feet (3.7 meters) above normal tide levels. But hurricane warnings were later canceled as Maria passed.

Storm swells driven by Maria were expected to reach the southeastern coast of the U.S mainland on Friday, the NHC said, adding that it was too soon to determine what, if any, other direct effects it would have.
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