AuthorTopic: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature  (Read 22217 times)

Offline RE

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🌀 ruh-roh...Isaac heads for the GoM
« Reply #360 on: September 15, 2018, 05:01:35 AM »

A repeat performance of Harvey?  Or can-u-spell K-A-T-R-I-N-A?



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🌀 North Carolina braces for Florence’s devastating deluge
« Reply #361 on: September 16, 2018, 12:01:00 AM »
A State-sized Swimming Pool!

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https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/we-face-walls-of-water-north-carolina-braces-for-extreme-flooding-dangers/2018/09/15/208bed46-b8fa-11e8-a7b5-adaaa5b2a57f_story.html?utm_term=.ff5b4ad6984d

North Carolina braces for Florence’s devastating deluge


 LUMBERTON, N.C. — North Carolina officials warned residents Saturday not to become “complacent” about Tropical Storm Florence, which, despite weaker-than-expected winds, is poised to cause historic flooding and devastation for many days across much of the region.

“We’re trying to make it totally clear that this is deadly,” Fayetteville Mayor Mitch Colvin said, shortly after announcing an unprecedented mandatory evacuation order for all people who live within a mile of the Cape Fear River and the Little River. “We can’t force folks to leave, but we are letting them know if they don’t get out, they are not going to get help for some time.”

The Cape Fear River was about 12 feet high on Friday afternoon and is expected to rise to more than 62 feet in Fayetteville by Tuesday, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Colvin noted that four people died in his city during Hurricane Matthew in 2016, when the river crested at 52 feet.
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Florence already has set rainfall records and left tens of thousands of people in shelters and more than 1 million homes without power. Officials confirmed at least 11 deaths, including one Saturday in South Carolina.

But Gov. Roy Cooper (D) and other officials repeatedly warned Saturday that although people might think the worst of the storm is over, the volume of rainwater it will drop in the coming days will cause flooding not seen in a generation — if ever.

A farm house is surrounded by flooded fields in Hyde County, N.C., on Saturday. (Steve Helber/Associated Press)

As of Saturday, Florence had dropped 30 inches of rain, shattering the record of 24 inches set during Hurricane Floyd in 1999. And the forecast is for the storm, which has essentially stalled over North Carolina, to continue pouring down rain, perhaps 15 more inches.

“We face walls of water — at our coast, along our rivers, across farmland, in our cities and in our towns,” Cooper said at a news briefing. “More people now face imminent threat than when the storm was just offshore. I cannot overstate it. Floodwaters are rising, and if you aren’t watching for them, you are risking your life.”

Officials issued several mandatory evacuation orders, including some 100 miles or more from Wrightsville Beach, N.C., where Florence came ashore Friday with powerful winds and driving rains that only hinted at the catastrophic damage it is likely to inflict.
How water damages a flooded house — and which parts can be saved View Graphic

Florence’s sheer volume of water, much of it sucked up during its slow journey over warmer-than-usual Atlantic water, has left scientists sputtering for adequate descriptions.

The storm is going to dump about 18 trillion gallons of water, which is about the volume of the Chesapeake Bay, or enough to cover the state of Texas in four inches of water, said Ryan Maue, a meteorologist with weathermodels.com.

Maue said about 6 trillion gallons had fallen by Saturday afternoon. So, he said, “we’re only about one-third of the way through this.”

That means rain will overflow already full rivers and streams far from the shoreline, and that, in turn, will have cascading effects throughout the watershed.

First responders close a road Saturday after a car was trapped in rising floodwater covering streets in Waccamaw, N.C. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)

In Lumberton, about 90 miles from the coast, the Lumber River was just below the flood stage of 13 feet at midday Saturday, and NOAA predicted that will nearly double by midday Sunday and remain at that level at least into Thursday.

Even farther inland, NOAA predicted that the Little River will rise from 18 feet on Saturday to a record 35 feet on Sunday in Manchester, N.C., and it is predicted to stay above the previous record of 29 feet until at least Wednesday.

Despite the dire predictions and official warnings, some residents were staying put at home, hoping for the best.

As many of his Lumberton neighbors moved out Saturday, Tyson Jerald was busy moving in, hauling a dryer into the kitchen and assembling living room furniture.

Jerald, a 40-year-old truck driver, had one eye on the move. The other, as he put it, was “24/7 on the Weather Channel,” as the swirling red-and-green image known as Florence traveled across the screen and toward his new home.

Two years ago, Hurricane Matthew swamped half of this neighborhood, which is divided by a canal that leads to the Lumber River. Jerald lived on the other side of the canal then, and his house was spared. But this storm feels different to him.

“We’ve never seen anything like this,” he said. “But Matthew taught us some things. Now I’ve got gas in all the cars, a generator, cash and we will get out of Dodge if we have to.”

A few houses down from Jerald’s — and a few houses closer to the canal — Charlie McCormick was riding out the storm Saturday, his teenage children “happy and on Xbox and Netflix.” But he said that decision could change Sunday, depending on Florence.

McCormick was in his home during Matthew, and he watched the canal spill the other way and flood the older section of the neighborhood.

“Our concern now is that the river will rise higher than it did with Matthew, and it looks like it will,” he said. “We’re watching, but there’s not much else to do.”

The storm also is predicted to swell rivers to extreme flood levels well into Virginia. The Dan River in Danville, Paces and South Boston is projected to rise from its current level of about seven to 10 feet to about 30 feet on Tuesday and Wednesday, according to NOAA.
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In Roanoke, at the foot of Virginia’s Shenandoah Mountains and nearly 300 miles from where Florence made landfall on a North Carolina beach, the Roanoke River is expected to rise from less than three feet now to more than 16 feet — major flooding levels — on Monday.

Rescue crews — federal, state, local and private volunteers — have helped hundreds of stranded people. And at least 20,000 people have moved into shelters in North Carolina, officials said.

Conditions are so poor across so much of the state that the head of North Carolina’s transportation department asked that travelers avoid the state altogether.

Jim Trogdon suggested that travelers essentially go around the state, detouring through Virginia, Tennessee and Georgia, if necessary. He said he wanted to prevent drivers from getting stranded amid rising floodwater and to keep roads as clear as possible for emergency workers.

He noted that roads were flooding fast; the number of closures nearly doubled during the span of a few hours Saturday. Even major arteries such as Interstates 40 and 95 have been affected.

“Road conditions across nearly all of our state will be rapidly deteriorating in coming days,” he said.

Also appearing at the afternoon briefing, Cooper, the governor, added: “Roads you think may be safe can be washed away in a matter of minutes.”

During a driving rain, children leave a flooding mobile home community in Lumberton, N.C. (Randall Hill/Reuters)

In Wilmington, close to where Florence came ashore, county and local officials said at a news conference that they are pleased with the state and federal response, but they also pleaded for agencies to help the Wilmington area as soon as possible, before the flooding worsens.

“We’re just now entering the thick of it,” said Woody White, chairman of the New Hanover County Commission. “Overall, we survived this . . . but we’re still in the middle of it.”

Wrightsville Beach Mayor Bill Blair said that his oceanfront community suffered significant damage, but that “the structural damage is not as severe as it looks” on social media.

“We had some pretty big surges, and at high tide, the five- to six-foot surges very quickly covered a good portion of the island,” he said. “We put out 75,000 cubic yards of sand on the beach a few months ago, and it looks like we lost most of it. But we did not have a breach” through the island.

Access to the popular beach community Saturday was still limited to police, fire, government and repair crews. Blair said teams were working to get water and sewer facilities open again.

Fallen trees and power lines blocked many Wilmington roads, and traffic lights were out virtually everywhere. Residents, clearly getting cabin fever after a full day indoors, began venturing out Saturday, but officials warned them to stay off the roads.

Wilmington Mayor Bill Saffo said some water-covered roads hide sinkholes that have developed in some locations. Twenty crews are clearing felled trees, but because many hanging or downed power lines hide within and beneath the trees, crews sometimes have to stop mid-work and call for utility crews to respond.

About 112,000 people, out of 127,000 locally, remain without power in Wilmington, and Duke Energy officials warned Friday that it could be weeks before power is fully restored.

At a Waffle House on Market Street, one of the very few businesses open Saturday, more than 20 people lined up outside, seeking hot food and a chance to get out of their homes.

“My kids are tired of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches,” said April Bellamy, 38, who said her apartment in the Creekwood neighborhood is without power and is likely to remain so for weeks.

“I’ve been on that side of town all my life, and we’re always the last to get power,” she said.

High waters flood Market and Water streets as Hurricane Florence comes ashore in Wilmington, N.C., on Friday. (Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock)

Patricia Sullivan reported from Wilmington. Wax-Thibodeaux and Kevin Sullivan reported from Washington. Mark Berman, Brady Dennis and Abigail Hauslohner in Washington also contributed to this report.
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Offline RE

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🌀 The Rain in North Carolina falls mainly...EVERYWHERE!
« Reply #362 on: September 16, 2018, 01:10:22 AM »
Serious Rain Event!  :o

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Offline RE

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It's not the Wind, it's the Water
« Reply #363 on: September 16, 2018, 02:02:10 AM »


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Published on the Doomstead Diner on September 16, 2018






Discuss this article at the Environment Table inside the Diner



It's now a litle over 24 hours since the "landfall" of Florence, which hit Wrightsville Beach in North Carolina as a Cat 1 Hurricane, substantially below the earlier predicted landfall as a Cat 4.  PHEW! We dodged a bullet there!  Well, except for one problem…all that WATER!



When it comes to Weather Disiaster reporting with Hurricanes, the focus is almost entirely on where the cyclone comes in on the Saffir-Simpson scale, which strictly measures the wind speed around the eyewall.  It doesn't measure the overall SIZE of the cyclone or the amount of water it drags along with it to wherever it decides on going, which is also not all that predictable,  A Cat 4 which makes landfall in a low population zone is a major YAWN, but a Cat 2 which hits a major population zone like NOLA (Katrina) or NYC (Sandy) or Harvey (Houston) is newsworthy material!



So the critical point here is in terms of being "newz worthy" is "How many Homo Saps were affected by this event?"  When you look at it from this POV, what Category the cyclone rolled in with isn't very important.  Even with a really BIG ONE, the wind field of 100+ MPH winds is quite small, maybe 100 miles in diameter.  That neighborhood of course provides the best video for the Storm Chasers and "Meteorologists" (Weathermen) who go out to report on these things.  So in terms of newz reporting, this is what gets the coverage.  It's not a whole lot different than political or economic newz reporting, where you only really hear about the biggest and most disasterous occurence on any given day in the newz cycle.  A couple of days later, there is a new disaster to report on, and the prior one gets forgotten, at least by the media.  The people stuck in the location haven't forgotten about it though.



So in the current case of Florence, we have an ongoing disaster which is just going to get worse over the next week or so.  While she didn't come ashore packing the kind of winds predicted by the Meteorologists Weathermen, she DID bring with her an epic amount of rainfall, now approaching Biblical Proportions in quite a few neighborhoods around North Carolina, and it appears true for some neighborhoods in South Carolina too.




Florence already has set rainfall records and left tens of thousands of people in shelters and more than 1 million homes without power. Officials confirmed at least 11 deaths, including one Saturday in South Carolina.




While this is clearly a big problem for the locals, much like Puerto Rico in the aftermath of Maria, it's not likely to get a whole lot of coverage past next week.  If Flo had made landfall around Norfolk, a different story of course, because we have a big fucking Naval Base in Norfolk and a lot of Homo Saps live there!  Relatively speaking however, not a whole lot of people live in North or South Carolina, and as FSoA states go they are Piss Poor with a lot of Black People living there.  So if they go without electricity for a few weeks,it's no big fucking deal!  Does anyone here in the FSoA CARE that the Ricans are still without power in many neighborhoods a year after the landfall?  Of course not!  Much different story of course if Maria made landfall on Wall Street, as Sandy did.  WEEKS of Newz coverage there at the top of the Google Newz Search Engine!



In the grand scheme of things globally though as far as climate disasters go, does it really matter whether one of these cyclones hits a high population density neighborhood or a low one?  Not really, other than the obvious impact on Homo Saps living in the local neighborhood for such a landfall.  Not a place you want to be when it occurs.  Thing is though, numerous effects occur in the aftermath of a hurricane landfall and many of those effects impact on people whether they live near where it hit or not.



As with Harvey in Texas last year, Florence isn't a big wind event so focusing on the Saffir-Simpson scale to determine the severity of the storm is very misleading.  Florence is a RAIN even, not a WIND event, and the rain is dispersed over a much wider area.  Because like Harvey Florence has essentially "stalled", she's bringing wave after wave of rain bands into North Carolina, any many of the many rivers in that state will be cresting multiple feet over flood stage over the next week, perhaps even longer than that.



Unlike Puerto Rico though, despite being poor and well stocked with the descendants of slaves, North & South Carolina WILL be the beneficiaries of the largesse of The Donald, because they are states who elect CONgress Critters, and the Repugnants NEED the votes of the White Supremacists residing in those locations to have any hope of retaining control over the House and staving off an Impeachment after the mid-term elections.  So you can be sure copious new Dollars will be printed to assist in their recovery efforts.  The amount of money they will spend there likely triples the entire debt of Puerto Rico, but they won't have any trouble finding money for that, any more than they have trouble finding money to bomb Syria when they can't find money to fund Medicare.



So despite the ongoing innundation, I don't expect the lights to be off for all that long down in the Tar Heel state, certainly not as long as they have been off for in Puerto Rico.  They have slightly over a month before people will be going to the Polls in Wilmington, so I figure they'll get the lights switched back on in a couple of weeks there.  What will the real price tag on this disaster be though, and just how many more times can we restring those wires?  How many times can people in Wilmington afford to replace their drywall?






You basically have an entire STATE which is under water RIGHT NOW, and you don't need to wait for the sea level to rise by another foot for this to occur, repeatedly.  This because the weather systems do the job of lifting up the water from the ocean and then dropping it back down when they get over land.  Pretty much every state along the East Coast is vulnerable to this sort of innundation now, as are the states which line the Gulf of Mexico.  We're pretty certain to get a couple of these multi-billion dollar disasters occuring every year now as we move into the future.



It's not just Lights Out that is the problem here either, this same pile of water is innundating Pig Farms and Coal Mining plants all through the state, and do you really believe they can clean up that mess, no matter how much money they print here?  Of course they can't, all they can do is put Lipstick on the Pig and make it look a little better in time for the elections, but the pig will still be a pig after that and North Carolina will stink like a mouldy sewer into the forseeable future,  NC is just one of the Canaries in the Coal Mine here though, as Harvey was for Houston and Katrina was for New Orleans.



This is not a good time to be living in one of these coastal locations, frankly it's not even a good time to be lving on a sailboat in such a location either.  Many a Yachtie in Corpus Christie watched from the Marina Bar as his prized Seastead went to the bottom of Davey Jones Locker when Harvey made landfall, and many more will face the same problem this year from Cape Hatteras to Myrtle Beach.  The Yachties didn't do too good down in St. John's last year either.  There is nowhere safe left to run to anymore, nowhere to hide.  It's coming soon to a beach near you too.



Related image



Image result for harvey marina wrecked boats


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Offline RE

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🌀 Wilmington cut off by extreme flooding as Florence threatens Carolinas
« Reply #364 on: September 16, 2018, 12:36:13 PM »
Not a good day to quit injecting Heroin in Wilmington.

RE

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/wilmington-cut-extreme-flooding-florence-threatens-carolinas-still-more-rain-n910021

Wilmington cut off by extreme flooding as Florence threatens Carolinas with still more rain
"The storm has never been more dangerous than it is right now," North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper said Sunday.
by Jon Schuppe and Daniella Silva / Sep.16.2018 / 9:07 AM ET
Florence weakens to a tropical depression, but flood threats will remain for days
Sep.16.201801:59


WILMINGTON, N.C. — Rising floodwaters are now the major safety concern here after Florence, formerly a hurricane and now a tropical depression, knocked out power and left debris strewn across homes and streets. Driving through the city is like negotiating a maze, with portions of highways flooded, making the city essentially inaccessible by road from the rest of the state.

Rescues continued Sunday after crews plucked hundreds of people from their inundated homes in New Hanover County through the overnight hours, authorities said.

Most of Wilmington remains without power through the weekend while thousands of residents are stuck at home, hemmed in by downed trees and power lines. Countless homes are damaged but many homeowners who evacuated Wilmington are now unable to get back to see how bad the situation might be.

The local water utility has warned it may have to shut down, potentially leaving homes without drinkable water. Nearly all the businesses in this city of more than 117,000 are empty and closed.
Image: Hurricane Florence
A man walks past a Cadillac damaged by a fallen tree in Wilmington, North Carolina, on Sept. 16, 2018.Mark Wilson / Getty Images

Florence was downgraded to a tropical depression but continued to drench the Carolinas on Sunday, raising the threat for dangerous flash flooding and landslides. The storm has been blamed for at least a dozen deaths.

“Flash flooding and major river flooding will continue over a significant portion of the Carolinas,” the National Hurricane Center said late Sunday morning.

Here's the latest on Hurricane Florence:

    Parts of southeastern North Carolina and northeast South Carolina were expected to get an additional 3 to 6 inches of rain, with total accumulations of 30 to 40 inches likely, according to the hurricane center.
    Meanwhile, central and western North Carolina, far northern South Carolina and southwest Virginia were expected to get an additional 5 to 10 inches of rain, with total accumulations of 15 to 20 inches likely, elevating the risk of landslides, the center said.
    As of 9 a.m. Sunday morning, Florence had dropped nearly 24 inches of rain in Wilmington so far, creating a new record of yearly rainfall with more than three months left in the year, according to the National Weather Service’s Eastern Region.

The storm continued to hit much of North Carolina and northern South Carolina with "widespread heavy rains" on Sunday, according to the hurricane center.

"These rainfall amounts will produce catastrophic flash flooding and prolonged significant river flooding," the center said.

North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper said floodwaters were still raging across part of the state and "the risk to life is rising with the angry waters."
Image: Hurricane Florence Wimington
Wilmington residents stand in line outside Harris Teeter to buy groceries after Hurricane Florence, on Sept. 16, 2018.Jon Schuppe / NBC News

"The storm has never been more dangerous than it is right now," he said, adding that more than 900 people had been rescued from the waters by emergency responders so far.

Statewide, more than 703,184 people were without power statewide as of around 11 a.m. Sunday, according to the North Carolina's emergency management agency.

And the Cape Fear Power Utility Authority said it was in "critical need" of fuel to keep its water treatment plants running. If the utility does not get the fuel it needs within 48 hours, its customers would be without water and it would not be able to provide water services for public health and safety, according to a statement.
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Hurricane Florence made landfall early Friday on North Carolina's coast, bringing extreme winds and massive storm surges.

The power authority said it is unable to get fuel because roads into the city are cut off by extreme flooding.

"Now is a good time to begin filling up bathtubs and water jugs as a contingency to a loss of water delivery," the utility said.
Image: Hurricane Florence
A home is damaged after a large tree fell on it, on Sept. 16, 2018 in Wilmington, North Carolina.Mark Wilson / Getty Images

Christopher Ray, a resident of Jacksonville, North Carolina, said he and his wife woke up at 3 a.m. Saturday morning because their chihuahua was barking and found the dog "floating in her cage." He had to evacuate their home using a dinghy because of the rising floodwaters. His home flooded, destroying some of his property including a smart car, several TVs, laptops and a work trailer, he said.
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"It's going to be a big hit on us, a very big hit," he said after returning to his home and surveying the damage.

New Bern, North Carolina, Mayor Dana Outlaw told "Meet the Press" on Sunday that officials remained "very concerned" about additional flooding and trees still toppling.

"A lot of the creeks around New Bern are increasing by the hour," he said.
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Relentless rain, rising river threatens North Carolina agricultural town

Most of the deaths occurred in North Carolina, officials said. A woman and her infant were killed when a tree fell on their home in Wilmington; a woman died in Pender County after suffering a medical condition and large trees blocked roads to her home; two people died in Lenoir County; and three were killed in Duplin County in separate incidents when the cars they were in were washed away in high water, authorities said.

In South Carolina, a 61-year-old woman died after her car struck a downed tree on a highway in Union County Friday night, according to South Carolina Highway Patrol Capt. Kelley Hughes.

Two people in Horry County, South Carolina, died of carbon monoxide poisoning, the South Carolina Department of Public Safety tweeted Saturday night, and the department said that the deaths are being blamed on the storm.

One man drowned after a truck he was a passenger in overturned into a ditch that was over flowing with water in the early hours of Sunday morning, according to the Georgetown County Coroner. The driver and another passenger escaped.

Jon Schuppe reported from Wilmington, North Carolina. Daniella Silva reported from New York.
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Offline Eddie

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Re: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature
« Reply #365 on: September 16, 2018, 02:02:02 PM »
Two people in Horry County, South Carolina, died of carbon monoxide poisoning, the South Carolina Department of Public Safety tweeted Saturday night, and the department said that the deaths are being blamed on the storm.

You can't run a generator indoors without proper ventilation. These people died needlessly. An open window would have saved their lives, probably. You hate to hear about this sort of thing.

Doomers, you can learn something important here from someone else's fatal mistake.
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Offline RE

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🌀 Carolinas turn into an archipelago of island communities
« Reply #366 on: September 17, 2018, 12:07:08 AM »
https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/carolinas-turn-into-an-archipelago-of-island-communities-as-florences-rain-causes-widespread-flooding/2018/09/16/05f637f2-b9c7-11e8-9812-a389be6690af_story.html?utm_term=.30d03002b0fa

National
Carolinas turn into an archipelago of island communities as Florence’s rain causes widespread flooding
0:16 / 2:27
mute


The Post followed Aaron Sutton as he visited his home in Kinston, N.C., Sept. 16, as he saw the damage wrought by Florence for the first time. (Zoeann Murphy, Sarah Parnass/The Washington Post)
By Rachel Siegel ,
Patricia Sullivan ,
Steven Mufson and
Joel Achenbach
September 16 at 6:41 PM

KINSTON, N.C. — Communities across the Carolinas became cut off and turned into virtual islands Sunday as floodwaters blocked roads, ports remained closed and officials warily monitored damaged utility systems and 3,300 “hog ponds” loaded with manure. The rivers continue to rise, with some unlikely to crest for several more days.

The death toll from Hurricane Florence rose to at least 17 Sunday night as the remnants of the storm, downgraded to a tropical depression, slid into western North Carolina and the Appalachians. The coastal storm surge, which swamped towns along tidal rivers, has subsided, but now the river flooding is intensifying as the water from Florence’s record rainfall makes its way to the sea.

Of major concern are the flooded roads, some of them more dangerous than they might first appear to motorists. More than 600 roads are closed in North Carolina, and the state’s Department of Transportation said motorists should avoid the state altogether. Interstate 95, a crucial East Coast artery, is blocked in both directions in Lumberton, N.C., where the Lumber River on Sunday was already five feet above “major” flood stage.

First responders and the Coast Guard have rescued more than 900 people from the high water.

“This storm has never been more dangerous,” North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper (D) said at midday news conference.

A car drives through a flooded intersection in Latta, in eastern South Carolina, on Sunday. (Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post)

Cooper said approximately 20,000 people were staying in about 150 shelters across North Carolina. Local and federal officials were warning evacuees that it was not safe to return home.

“For those who have evacuated, please stay where you are,” said Bill Saffo, mayor of Wilmington, N.C.

The storm and the flooding have created numerous threats to life and health.

Officials in Gaston County, N.C., said a 3-month-old baby was killed Sunday when a tree fell through a family’s mobile home. The infant and his mother were taken to a hospital, where the baby died, said Maj. Jamie McConnell, of the county’s emergency medical services.

Officials said Sunday that a man and woman in their early 60s died in Horry County, S.C., from carbon monoxide poisoning caused by a generator inside their home. Two more South Carolinians died in car crashes, officials said. In Duplin County, N.C., officials said two people died Saturday when flash flooding overwhelmed roads.

At least 11 people in North Carolina and six in South Carolina have died as a result of the storm.

Here in the town of Kinston, hundreds of people woke Sunday for yet another day in the emergency shelter at Lenoir Community College.

For Clifton Jones and his girlfriend, Traci Vann, it was their fourth day of shelter living, and another day of wondering what would happen with the swollen Neuse River.

“You’re just kind of stuck here until you figure out where the water is going,” Jones said.

“We might be stuck on this island for a few weeks,” Vann said.

Jones said he doesn’t have flood insurance.

“If I flood, I’ve lost everything,” he said. “I don’t know how I’d overcome and start back over again.”

Ray Edwards, the shelter manager, said 300 staff members and guests were inside. Another shelter in Kinston had to divert people to the community college after it lost power and started to take on sewage.

As he spoke, his flip phone started to ring.

“Oh, food!” Edwards said. He was eager to dispatch trucks to pick up hot barbecue from a restaurant in Goldsboro.

“Where are you? How many meals you got?” he said into the phone.
Florence's deluge, in real time View Graphic

David Croom, 74, had come to the shelter asking for any information on when the electricity would come back on. His home in a nearby trailer park had been without power since Thursday. His wife needed ice to keep her insulin cool, and he needed electricity for a breathing machine. He was wary of bringing his wife and daughter to the shelter because they have panic attacks in large crowds, he said.
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His eyes welled up.

“I’m not worried about myself,” he said. “I’m worried about them.”

Some communities in North Carolina remain largely deserted, including Atlantic Beach. The sporting goods shop Pacific Superstore there was badly damaged, with no one in sight working on the cleanup. Store windows had been shattered, leaving tiny cubes of glass strewn across the parking lot. An inflatable kiddie pool still tethered to the ceiling dangled out the window frame.

In nearby Pine Knoll Shores, Tim Bowers-Young biked through a flooded street. He had defied a mandatory evacuation order.

“I’m not supposed to be walking in the street,” he said. “I think I’m breaking the law.”

John Hendren, 73, leads his horses to safety on Sunday after members of the U.S. Coast Guard helped cut down a fallen tree trapping the horses in a flooded field in Lumberton, N.C. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)

Resident Bill Stanley, who hadn’t left his home since Wednesday, grabbed his shears and started clipping downed branches. Residential neighborhoods look like an upside-down forest of snapped trunks and roots. Some of Stanley’s favorite trees are gone, including one he planted after his first Christmas in the house. That tree now leans at a 45-degree angle.

Stanley said he wasn’t sure what day it was. He squinted at his watch and decided it was Sunday.

He said he had been running his fridge and freezer on a generator, plugging each in for four hours at a time.

“I’m going through the gasoline pretty good, and that’s hard to get for a while,” he said.

In Florence County, S.C., Renee Matthews, 48, surveyed her family’s property along the Lynches River on Sunday. The river had risen by more than five feet over the weekend. She has stocked up on water and food and has a motorboat on standby for an emergency. Her mother is sick and her father is frail, and she needs to know when it’s time to get them out.

“These kinds of rain right here is what floods this area,” Matthews said, noting the steady precipitation. “Next week, it’ll be our problem. This river’s going to keep rising.”

Wilmington residents are coping with what amounts to island living. There’s virtually no way in or out of the city. Interstate 40, the biggest highway leading here, is flooded in many places.

The power remains out almost everywhere. Businesses are shuttered. Residents idle in cars in long lines at a few gas stations.

At 10:09 a.m. Sunday, the Cape Fear Public Utility Authority put out a desperate plea for fuel, saying that within 48 hours it could run out and would no longer be able to provide the public with drinking water.

“It is with a heavy heart that we share this information with our customers, however, we want to give you as much notice as possible,” the utility said on its website. “Please begin to make contingency plans for you and your family. Now is a good time to begin filling up bathtubs and water jugs as a contingency to a loss of water delivery.”

But three hours later, the situation had grown less ominous, with the utility posting a new notice saying it had found a reliable fuel source for the duration of the recovery.

A member of the North Carolina Task Force urban search-and- rescue team wades through a flooded neighborhood looking for residents who tried to sit out the storm in Fayetteville, N.C., on Sunday. (David Goldman/AP)

New Hanover County and Wilmington city officials Sunday asked the governor’s office for additional law enforcement personnel, including from the National Guard. Police arrested some looters overnight.

The floodwater is dirty and could get dirtier, depending on the hog ponds and other environmental hazards. By midday Sunday, 28 utility systems had issued boil-water orders, the Environmental Protection Agency said.

“If you can avoid contact with floodwaters, do so,” said Reggie Cheatham, director of the EPA’s Office of Emergency Management. Officials so far are “fairly confident,” Cheatham said, that farmers prepared adequately in advance of the storm to prevent the ponds from overtopping.

Cassie Gavin, an expert at the Sierra Club, said that it was too early to assess what was happening with hog farms and their waste lagoons. “In the 1990s, North Carolina went from 2 million to 10 million hogs virtually overnight, and with few regulations in place,” Gavin said.

Studies have found that some eastern North Carolina rivers that have factory farms in the watersheds contain high levels of fecal bacteria and nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus, Gavin added.

Another environmental hazard comes from coal ash. Environmentalists, Duke Energy and state officials are closely watching developments at the L.V. Sutton Steam Plant in Wilmington, where heavy rains from Florence damaged a coal-ash landfill, eroding a portion of the wall surrounding it.

Parts of a neighborhood are flooded in Latta, S.C. (Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post)

EPA officials said that about 2,000 cubic yards of material — the size of two-thirds of an Olympic-size swimming pool — collapsed into a ditch that leads to an on-site pond used for clean cooling water. Dozens of people from Duke Energy and a contractor were braving the weather with heavy equipment Sunday to construct earthen berms to reroute the coal-ash-contaminated ditch water and keep it from running into the cooling-water pond.

The cooling-water pond is separated from Lake Sutton by a narrow berm, and the Cape Fear River runs nearby.

On Sunday, Duke Energy, the facility operator and owner, played down the environmental threat. The situation comes against the backdrop of a regulatory change from the Trump administration that extended the lives of some existing coal-ash ponds from April 2019 to October 2020. The rule change will save the industry between $28 million and $31 million a year in compliance costs, the EPA said.

The EPA treats coal ash as a toxic substance, and Physicians for Social Responsibility says that it typically contains heavy metals such as arsenic, lead, mercury, cadmium and selenium, and that if consumed or inhaled, it could cause cancer and nervous system disorders.

Duke Energy owns all 31 coal-ash ponds in North Carolina and four more in South Carolina. Paige Sheehan, a Duke spokeswoman, said that “coal-ash is nonhazardous. The company does not believe this incident poses a risk to public health or the environment.”

Sullivan reported from Wilmington, N.C. Mufson and Achenbach reported from Washington. Kristine Phillips in Florence County, S.C., Sarah Kaplan in Lumberton, N.C., Kirk Ross in Chapel Hill, N.C., and Jason Samenow, Felicia Sonmez and Katie Zezima in Washington contributed to this report.


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Offline RE

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🌊 The Strafing Run: Carolinas Flooding Video
« Reply #367 on: September 17, 2018, 06:39:59 PM »
Check out how deep some of the trucks are driving into the water!   :o  Hard to believe the engine actually functions.

The insurance claims on the carz will be incredible.

RE

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/Y41EjZE5UBU" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/Y41EjZE5UBU</a>
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Offline RE

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🌀 Wilmington is starting to look like Puerto Rico
« Reply #368 on: September 18, 2018, 06:09:43 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/GcjmzHoiiGU" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/GcjmzHoiiGU</a>
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Offline Eddie

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Re: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature
« Reply #369 on: September 18, 2018, 07:09:06 AM »
What a fine mess. Looks like it's going to be bad for some time. Wow!
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

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Re: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature
« Reply #370 on: September 18, 2018, 07:41:54 AM »
What a fine mess. Looks like it's going to be bad for some time. Wow!

On the comparison scale, it will be interesting to see how quick they can get BAU up and running again in NC, compared to Puerto Rico.

I can't tell you how bad the trucking logistics are right now with huge stretches of both the I-40 and I-95 closed.  I must have driven both those roads 100 times at least, and working around them is an enormous re-route.  Besides that, fixing those roads won't be cheap, and you can't do it in a day or even a week.

RE
« Last Edit: September 18, 2018, 07:43:59 AM by RE »
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Offline Eddie

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Re: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature
« Reply #371 on: September 18, 2018, 08:10:36 AM »
I had to take a 20 minute detour this morning because the main road in front of my neighborhood was closed because someone clipped a telephone pole last night, or a utility pole fell, not sure of the circumstances. It's the main 4 lane into town from Bee Cave and vicinity.

I was one of the lucky ones, having left very early. Later, I'm sure it made people hours late to work. And if you didn't know the one open alternate (a back way through a neighborhood) you could have easily driven 50 miles to get to North Austin.

Now most people have those apps like WAYS (sp ?). I do not, of course.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Surly1

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Re: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature
« Reply #372 on: September 18, 2018, 08:19:06 AM »
I had to take a 20 minute detour this morning because the main road in front of my neighborhood was closed because someone clipped a telephone pole last night, or a utility pole fell, not sure of the circumstances. It's the main 4 lane into town from Bee Cave and vicinity.

I was one of the lucky ones, having left very early. Later, I'm sure it made people hours late to work. And if you didn't know the one open alternate (a back way through a neighborhood) you could have easily driven 50 miles to get to North Austin.

Now most people have those apps like WAYS (sp ?). I do not, of course.

WAZE. Get it.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Surly1

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Re: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature
« Reply #373 on: September 18, 2018, 08:36:22 AM »
What a fine mess. Looks like it's going to be bad for some time. Wow!

On the comparison scale, it will be interesting to see how quick they can get BAU up and running again in NC, compared to Puerto Rico.

I can't tell you how bad the trucking logistics are right now with huge stretches of both the I-40 and I-95 closed.  I must have driven both those roads 100 times at least, and working around them is an enormous re-route.  Besides that, fixing those roads won't be cheap, and you can't do it in a day or even a week.

RE

Enjoy this picture of the mighty Amazon as it wends it's way to the south Atlantic.

Uh, no.

That's Interstate 40 in North Carolina.


"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Eddie

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Re: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature
« Reply #374 on: September 18, 2018, 08:50:52 AM »
I had to take a 20 minute detour this morning because the main road in front of my neighborhood was closed because someone clipped a telephone pole last night, or a utility pole fell, not sure of the circumstances. It's the main 4 lane into town from Bee Cave and vicinity.

I was one of the lucky ones, having left very early. Later, I'm sure it made people hours late to work. And if you didn't know the one open alternate (a back way through a neighborhood) you could have easily driven 50 miles to get to North Austin.

Now most people have those apps like WAYS (sp ?). I do not, of course.

WAZE. Get it.

The missus has it on her iPad, but neither of us carries a smart phone. I don't intend to start carrying one either, unless I can't buy the old ones anymore.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

 

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