AuthorTopic: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature  (Read 38736 times)

Offline RE

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🌀 Tropical storm in gulf could bring Louisiana 18 inches of rain
« Reply #510 on: July 10, 2019, 09:26:00 PM »
https://www.al.com/weather/2019/07/tropical-storm-in-gulf-could-bring-louisiana-18-inches-of-rain.html

Tropical storm in gulf could bring Louisiana 18 inches of rain
Posted Jul 10, 1:36 PM


By The Washington Post

The National Hurricane Center is predicting the season’s first hurricane, named Barry, to develop over the Gulf of Mexico Saturday and strike the coast of Louisiana or northeast Texas over the weekend.

The storm is predicted to be a massive rainmaker, unloading double digit rainfall totals that will likely trigger serious inland flooding. Assuming it attains hurricane-strength, damaging wind gusts are likely near where it comes ashore as well as a dangerous storm surge, which is a rise in water above normally dry land along the coast which can inundate homes, roads, and businesses.

Tropical storm and storm surge watches have already been issued ahead of the developing storm in coastal eastern and central Louisiana. The storm surge watch includes New Orleans where levees protecting the city may be tested as the Mississippi River may rise to the height of these flood barriers protecting the city.
false

Late night update: Gulf storm ‘almost’ a tropical depression, hurricane center says

Forecasters increase rainfall projections to possibly 20 inches for parts of the Gulf Coast.

Tropical storm and hurricane watches are likely to be added farther to the west in Louisiana and possibly into Texas late Wednesday or early Thursday.

The responsible weather system originated over land, and drifted from the Southeast U.S. into the open waters of Gulf of Mexico Tuesday. It is currently centered about 100 miles offshore the Florida panhandle.

The warm Gulf waters are feeding the rapidly organizing storm system which is on the cusp of become a tropical depression. The Hurricane Center predicts the system to become a tropical storm on Thursday, earning the name Barry.

Even before earning a name, the developing storm is already unloading areas of heavy rain along the northern Gulf coast from eastern Louisiana to the eastern Florida panhandle. Thunderstorms associated with the system dumped half a foot of rain on New Orleans Wednesday morning, prompting a flash flood emergency for the city.

The areas affected by rainfall will persist into the weekend and expand westward. In addition to New Orleans, places like Mobile, Gulfport, and Baton Rouge are predicted to receive several inches of rain, at least.

Through the end of the weekend, places further inland like Montgomery, Jackson, and Shreveport are likely to see multiple inches of rain. Ultimately, some areas of Louisiana, near where the center of Barry is forecast to come ashore, could see up to 18 inches. This is not welcome news for places along the already-swollen and flooded Mississippi River.

Water, rather than wind, causes most of the fatalities in tropical weather systems.

Hurricane hunters flights are planned for today to investigate the system. If a closed surface circulation is found along with the already-present persistent strong thunderstorms, it would get upgraded to Tropical Depression 2. The Air Force will fly the first mission Wednesday afternoon, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration will fly a second mission in the evening. Such flights will continue until it dissipates and/or makes landfall.

The odds of Barry becoming the season's first hurricane have increased noticeably since Tuesday as models have come into better agreement on its intensity but there is a chance it peaks tropical storm strength. Models also agree on the storm's general timing: making landfall on Saturday, although heavy rain and storm surge flooding are likely to begin before that.

While models show a range of possible track forecasts, the most likely landfall point is along the central or western Louisiana coast, but eastern Texas is not off the hook yet.

Irrespective of exactly where the storm makes landfall, storm effects from heavy rain and strong winds will expand well to the north, east and west of its track. Along the coast, the predicted storm surge of 3 to 5 feet above normally dry land could also extend considerable distances away from the center on the east side.

Preparation, cancellations and Alan Sealls on Facebook: How Coastal Alabama is readying for storm
Updated Jul 10, 8:52 AM; Posted Jul 10, 7:40 AM
Areas in Louisiana and Texas could get the most rain from what could be a tropical depression later this week.

Areas in Louisiana and Texas could get the most rain from what could be a tropical depression later this week.
31 shares

By John Sharp | jsharp@al.com

Preparation along coastal Alabama is underway for an unpredictable weather system forming in the Gulf of Mexico that could make landfall sometime this weekend.
false

Evening update: No Barry yet, but hurricane watches up for part of the Gulf Coast

Storm's path is still uncertain but Louisiana still likely target.

From Orange Beach to rural Mobile County, emergency management officials are keeping an eye on up-to-date and “credible” weather services as they track the potential for a tropical depression forming either late Wednesday or early Thursday.

It’s an earlier-than-normal start to tropical weather in coastal Alabama, where residents are typically used to more alarming activity in the Gulf of Mexico from August to September.

But as weatherman Alan Sealls points out, Wednesday marks the 14th anniversary of Hurricane Dennis slamming into the Florida Panhandle in 2005.

“Dennis was the third tropical system to hit the Northern Gulf Coast that year,” said Sealls.

Some outdoor events have been called off already. The 2019 Blue Marlin Grand Championship sportfishing event at The Wharf in Orange Beach is canceled, and the Africatown Bridge Challenge race on Saturday has postponed until a later date.

The Pensacola Beach Air Festival, which kicks off today and goes on through the weekend and features the U.S. Navy Blue Angels, has not been canceled but organizers are monitoring weather in the Gulf of Mexico.

In Gulf Shores and Orange Beach, tourism officials are keeping visitors updated on weather patterns while answering questions about looming concerns over an algae bloom that has forced Mississippi’s 21 beaches to close.

“Everyone is teed up and they know their lane when it comes to supporting and assisting (emergency officials),” said Joanie Flynn, vice-president of marketing with Gulf Shores & Orange Beach Tourism. “We just don’t have enough surety with the forecast.”

City officials in Orange Beach and Gulf Shores are both staying updated on reports coming from the National Weather Service. Both cities are in the middle of their peak tourism season as July is typically the strongest month for condominium and hotel occupancy.

Grant Brown, spokesman with the city of Gulf Shores, said the city’s beach safety lifeguards are “on notice” for developments in the Gulf that may lead to a change in surf conditions. As of Tuesday afternoon, the conditions were listed as a “medium hazard.”

Orange Beach City Administrator Ken Grimes said that “normal storm prep” will begin today that includes securing outside furniture and surroundings.

“We encourage citizens and guests to stay tuned to official weather channels for updates,” he said.

Mike Evans, deputy director with the Mobile County Emergency Management Agency, said that local officials should know more about the weather’s direction later today. A webinar involving emergency management officials along the Gulf Coast is scheduled for this morning.

Evans said he’s also discussing the potential of opening storm shelters if weather forecasts determine there might be a need for one.

“It’s about being on standby and if we need to open shelters, it would give our public some place to go,” he said.

Evans also said it’s important for residents to stay tuned to reliable weather sources, such as the National Weather Service and local TV meteorologists.

“Don’t just use one source,” said Evans. Look at the National Weather Service, the National Hurricane Center and watch The Weather Channel. Be careful who you are getting your information from. In the era of social media, everyone can be in somewhat of a fashion, a journalist so to speak. Just because someone puts something out there, doesn’t mean it’s the best information at that point in time.”

    👋🌴New to the coast? Know anyone who is new to the area?

    👀 Check out our hurricane preparedness YouTube Playlist stocked with lots of #HurricanePrep information & tips https://t.co/rYu1ninRHd 🌀
    — NWS Mobile (@NWSMobile) July 9, 2019

Sealls, a longtime weatherman at WKRG-TV before leaving last month, is keeping his followers abreast of the storm’s activity with updates on his Facebook page.

Sealls said he plans on providing updates as often as he can throughout the hurricane season.

He suggested people stick with their trusted sources for weather reports, such as the NWS and the Hurricane Center.

“I always say, don’t go shopping around and making comparisons,” said Sealls. “Go with what you trust and use common sense.”
false

NWS in Mobile shares thoughts on could-be Barry and why you can’t ‘anchor’ with this one

Gulf system’s strength, track still highly uncertain at this point.

For now, Sealls said that coastal Alabama residents should be wary about heavy rainfalls and not necessarily the storm surge and high winds that could be associated with the storm.

“It will be drifting westward,” said Sealls. “Texas and Louisiana, they will really have to watch it because (weather conditions) give it time to strengthen.”
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https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/07/10/new-orleans-already-flooded-hurricane-on-way/1699836001/

New Orleans is already flooded — and the worst may be yet to come: Forecasters are predicting a hurricane
Vandana Ravikumar, USA TODAY Published 10:45 p.m. ET July 10, 2019 | Updated 10:46 p.m. ET July 10, 2019

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/arwbhmrX3zs" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/arwbhmrX3zs</a>

New Orleans is prepping for a hurricane. The flooding has already hit.

On the same day that a National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration report warned Americans of a "floodier" future, some streets in Louisiana's largest city, including in the famed French Quarter, looked more like rivers.

Lines of thunderstorms associated with a weather system that is predicted to develop into a hurricane by Friday struck New Orleans with as much as 7 inches of rain within a three-hour period Wednesday morning, forecasters said.

The city was engulfed with water, leaving residents to contend with swampy streets, overturned garbage cans and flooded vehicles. Some even paddled their way down the street in kayaks.

Chandris Rethmeyer said she lost her car to the flood and had to wade through water about 4 feet deep to get to safety.

Rethmeyer said she was on her way home after working an overnight shift when she got stuck behind a car accident in an underpass and the water began to rise.

“I was going to sit in my car and let the storm pass,” she said. “But I reached back to get my son’s iPad and put my hand into a puddle of water.”

And Valerie R. Burton woke up Wednesday to what looked like a lake outside her door.

“There was about 3 to 4 feet of water in the street, pouring onto the sidewalks and at my door," Burton said. "So, I went to my neighbors to alert them and tell them to move their cars."

The tides were reminiscent of sudden flooding that took the city by surprise in August 2017. That flood not only required major repair efforts, but also exposed significant problems within the agency overseeing street drainage and lead to personnel changes at the New Orleans Sewerage and Water Board.

Forecasters said that Louisiana could see up to 12 inches of rain by Monday, with some isolated areas receiving as up to 18 inches.

That heavy rain could push the swollen Mississippi River dangerously close to the top of the city's levees, officials cautioned.

A spokesman for the Army Corps of Engineers in New Orleans said the agency was not expecting widespread overtopping of the levees, but there are concerns for areas south of the city.

The river was expected to rise to 20 feet by late Friday at a key gauge in New Orleans. The area is protected by levees 20 to 25 feet high, he said.

Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards declared a state of emergency: "The entire coast of Louisiana is at play in this storm," Edwards said.
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Re: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature
« Reply #512 on: July 11, 2019, 03:23:26 AM »
Somewhere Black Swans are stretching their wings and preparing to fly. :evil4: Is is the Mississippi, the Straits of Hormuz or somewhere else? We live in interesting times.
AJ
Nullis in Verba

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Re: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature
« Reply #513 on: July 11, 2019, 03:57:03 AM »
Somewhere Black Swans are stretching their wings and preparing to fly. :evil4: Is is the Mississippi, the Straits of Hormuz or somewhere else? We live in interesting times.
AJ

If you can predict it, it's not a Black Swan.

RE
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Re: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature
« Reply #514 on: July 11, 2019, 03:44:11 PM »
I disagree. The vast majority (99.9999%) of the population will never see a Black Swan coming. If you or I use our brains we can maybe see what's coming down the pike. I would generally agree that a Black Swan would be in Rumsfeld's brilliant phrase "an known unknowns". But. . . . does that require that NO ONE can see it coming. If that is the definition then I would postulate that there are never any Black Swans because with some 7 billion of us someone will probably see what's coming??
AJ
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https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/tropical-storm-barry-headed-gulf-coast-could-drop-20-inches-n1028836

Tropical Storm Barry headed for the Gulf Coast, could drop up to 20 inches of rain
The town of Grand Isle, Louisiana, south of New Orleans, ordered a mandatory evacuation of residents Thursday.


Parts of Gulf Coast under hurricane watch

July 11, 2019, 9:36 AM AKDT
By David K. Li

Residents across Gulf Coast states Thursday braced for a tropical storm — and potential hurricane — that'll bring high winds and deadly, torrential rains.

Tropical Storm Barry was brewing in the Gulf of Mexico and could make landfall, somewhere between Louisiana and the Florida Panhandle by Friday morning, forecasters said.

"Barry is expected to produce total rain accumulations of 10 to 15 inches near and inland of the central Gulf Coast through early next week, with isolated maximum rainfall amounts of 20 inches across portions of eastern Louisiana and southern Mississippi," according to a National Hurricane Center bulletin issued at 10 a.m. CT.

Barry has the potential of becoming a hurricane by late Friday or early Saturday, with rainfall that could be deadly.
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"It's the water that's the most deadly part of these tropical systems — 90 percent of the fatalities in these tropical systems is the water," National Hurricane Center Director Ken Graham told WDSU, an NBC affiliate in New Orleans.

The town of Grand Isle, Louisiana, south of New Orleans, ordered a mandatory evacuation of residents at noon Thursday.

Plaquemines Parish, just southwest of New Orleans, had already started evacuating residents Wednesday afternoon.

"We're erring on the side of caution," Parish President Kirk Lepine said. "We want to make sure every resident is prepared and they're to understand that this government will take care of everybody in his parish."

And United Airlines announced Thursday that flights involving 13 Gulf Coast airports — including New Orleans; Jackson, Mississippi; Mobile, Alabama; and Panama City, Florida — between Thursday and Sunday, could be re-booked at no additional charge.
David K. Li

David K. Li is a breaking news reporter for NBC News
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Looks like NOLA is Ground Zero again.

RE

https://www.cnn.com/2019/07/11/us/storm-surge-louisiana-barry/index.html

Rising water poses the deadliest threat in major storms -- and New Orleans is already flooded
Nicole Chavez, associate writer CNN Digital

By Nicole Chavez, CNN

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/w79_mTk_Vkc" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/w79_mTk_Vkc</a>

Updated 8:33 PM ET, Thu July 11, 2019
Flooding hits Louisiana as residents brace for hurricane

Flooding hits Louisiana as residents brace for hurricane 01:22

(CNN)As Tropical Storm Barry continues spinning toward the Gulf Coast, authorities fear that a massive storm surge could destroy houses, flood cities and kill indiscriminately in Louisiana.
"There is a danger of life-threatening storm surge inundation along the coast of southern and southeastern Louisiana," the National Weather Service said.
Barry is expected to make landfall as a major storm on Saturday. As in past hurricanes, the greatest danger may not be the high-speed winds, but the water rushing in from the ocean.
What exactly is storm surge?
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The rise in water levels, known as storm surge, happens when winds from a fierce storm push water up and onto shore.
Storm surge can become several feet high, and forecasters have said Barry could bring up to 4-6 feet of storm surge to parts of Louisiana and through the Mississippi-Alabama border, the weather service said.
But that could change if the storm intensifies. Forecasters said the stronger the storm, the stronger the winds and the higher the storm surge will be.
After the ocean water crashes onto land, it can also exacerbate flooding. Rivers and streams that usually drain into the ocean can get clogged farther upstream, forcing water levels to rise. It typically leads to more flooding in rain-soaked areas.
Rising water is the deadliest part of a storm
When a big storm approaches, many people worry about wind and debris. But the water a storm brings kills the most people.
Water accounted for more than 75% of all hurricane-related fatalities in the US from 1963 to 2012, according to a report by the National Hurricane Center. About half of all deaths in hurricanes come from storm surge.
Wind was only responsible for 8% of all deaths.

More than 80% of storm-related fatalities in the past three years have been linked to inland flooding, according to Ken Graham, director of the National Hurricane Center.
"The data is very clear, it's water that's killing people," Graham told CNN affiliate KPLC. "Just because you're not on the coast doesn't mean you're immune to the dangers."

CNN's Dakin Andone, Steve Almasy and Holly Yan contributed to this report.
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🌀 Barry becomes a hurricane as it is moving onto the Louisiana coast
« Reply #517 on: July 13, 2019, 11:15:27 AM »
https://www.wdsu.com/article/barry-nears-louisiana/28383931

Barry becomes a hurricane as it is moving onto the Louisiana coast

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/wHP3Aq7H0mQ" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/wHP3Aq7H0mQ</a>

HURRICANE BARRY ARRIVES

WDSU Updated: 12:31 PM CDT Jul 13, 2019
NEW ORLEANS —

Barry has strengthened into a hurricane as it moves onto the Louisiana coast, threatening millions with heavy rains and a strong storm surge.

The National Hurricane Center said in its 11 a.m. Saturday advisory that Barry had reached maximum sustained winds of 75 mph, with higher gusts.
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Hurricane-force winds were measured some 45 miles to the east of the storm's center, which was located 40 miles south of Lafayette, Louisiana. It was moving northwest at 6 mph.

Weather forecasters said a hurricane warning is in effect for Intracoastal City to Grand Isle. Such a warning means that hurricane conditions are expected within the warning area.

The system's sluggish progression and more westward track was especially good news for the Mississippi River. The National Weather Service said the river is now projected to crest at 17.1 feet -- almost 2 feet below the previously projected 19 feet. Flood stage is 17 feet.

    National Weather Service Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service Mississippi River at #nola at 16.7 feet. @wdsu https://t.co/olG2PYjhKr
    — Margaret Orr (@MargaretOrr) July 13, 2019

Weakening is expected after Barry moves inland into the Mississippi Valley.

President Donald Trump on Thursday declared a State of Emergency ahead of Barry’s anticipated landfall. The declaration authorizes the Department of Homeland Security and Federal Emergency Management Agency to coordinate all disaster relief efforts.

Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards had asked the Trump administration in a letter earlier Thursday that the state receive supplementary federal resources as soon as possible should they be needed.

Edwards said it is necessary that critical pre-positioning be provided through federal assistance.
HURRICANE_SPAGHETTI
WDSU   

A Hurricane Warning is now in effect for the coast of Louisiana from Intracoastal City to Grand Isle.

A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for Lake Pontchartrain and Lake Maurepas, including metropolitan New Orleans; mouth of the Pearl River to Grand Isle; Intracoastal City to Cameron. A Storm Surge Warning is in effect for Lake Pontchartrain and Intracoastal City to Biloxi.
Hurricane_Track
WDSU   

Edwards said authorities don't expect the Mississippi River to overflow levees as the system moves toward the Gulf Coast. He said high water forecasts for the river have gone down slightly but a change in the storm's direction or intensity could renew the possibility of the levees being topped by a river already swollen by heavy rains and snow melt.

Impacts include heavy rain of 10 to 20 inches with isolated maximum rainfall of 25 inches. Flash flooding across the area is the biggest concern, according to the National Weather Service.

Entergy also reported that nearly 60,000 customers were without power by 11 a.m. Saturday.
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https://www.accuweather.com/en/weather-news/live-barry-strengthens-into-category-1-hurricane-gulf-coast-braces-for-impact/70008799

July 14, 2019
LIVE: Barry prompts new mandatory evacuation orders as floodwaters overtop multiple levees in Louisiana

By Chaffin Mitchell, AccuWeather staff writer
By Adriana Navarro, AccuWeather staff writer


Following a brief stint as a Category 1 hurricane, Barry weakened once again to a tropical storm on Saturday after making landfall along the central Louisiana coast.

As Barry moved inland, multiple reports emerged of levees overtopping in Terrebonne and Plaquemines parishes, with mandatory evacuations being ordered by Terrebonne Parish President Gordon Dove for all areas along Louisiana Highway 315.

AccuWeather Extreme Meteorologist Reed Timmer captured footage of water overtopping a levee in St Mary Parish. Mandatory evacuations were being put into effect for areas south of Highway 317 with sheriff's deputies going door to door to notify residents.


Around 10 a.m. CDT Saturday, Barry became the first hurricane of the 2019 Atlantic hurricane season and the fourth hurricane to ever make landfall on the Louisiana coast in the month of July. The storm's initial landfall occurred when the center of circulation moved across Marsh Island, followed by its final landfall near Intracoastal City, located about 160 miles west of New Orleans.

Since record-keeping began in 1851, only Hurricanes Bob in 1979, Danny in 1997 and Cindy in 2005, have made landfall on the Louisiana coast in July, according to Colorado State University meteorologist Philip Klotzbach.

Despite weakening, Barry will continue to slowly spread a widespread swath of flooding and torrential rain from Louisiana and western Mississippi to eastern Arkansas, according to AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Kristina Pydynowski.

"There can be an AccuWeather Local StormMax™ of 2 feet," she said.

(AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

Tyler Holland guides his bike through the water as winds from Tropical Storm Barry push water from Lake Pontchartrain over the seawall Saturday, July 13, 2019, in Mandeville, Louisiana.

(AP Photo/Matthew Hinton)

Barry Williams talks to a friend on his smartphone as he wades through storm surge from Lake Pontchartrain on Lakeshore Drive in Mandeville, Louisiana, as Hurricane Barry approaches Saturday, July 13, 2019.

(AP/Matthew Hinton)

Aimee Cutter, the owner of Beach House restaurant, walks through water surge from Lake Pontchartrain on Lakeshore Drive in Mandeville, Louisiana.

(AP/Rogelio V. Solis)

The flood wall near the Long-Allen Bridge in Morgan City, La., continues to protect residents and area businesses as the waters rose in the Atchafalaya River, Friday, July 12, 2019.

(AP/David J. Phillip)

A man in a wheelchair makes his way down Bourbon Street in the French Quarter Saturday, July 13, 2019, in New Orleans, as Tropical Storm Barry nears landfall.

(Twitter/ReedTimmerAccu)

Tree damage and power lines down across Morgan City, Louisiana from Hurricane Barry including this large tree crushing a vehicle.

(Twitter/Louis_P_IV)

Significant wind gust knocks down a tree in Old Metairie on Oaklawn and Service Road in Metairie, Louisiana.

(Twitter/Louis_P_IV)

Significant wind gust knocks down a tree in Old Metairie on Oaklawn and Service Road in Metairie, Louisiana.

(AP/David J. Phillip)

Workers board up windows in the French Quarter Friday, July 12, 2019, in New Orleans, ahead of Tropical Storm Barry. Barry strengthened to a hurricane on Saturday.

(AP/Matthew Hinton)

Wind blows through the trees as there was very little flooding from Lake Pontchartrain on Lakeshore Drive in New Orleans, Saturday, July 13, 2019 ahead of landfall of Tropical Storm Barry in the Gulf of Mexico.

(AP/Rogelio V. Solis)

A public works dump truck blocks the Morgan City, La., access to the Long-Allen Bridge in the background, ahead of Tropical Storm Barry, Saturday, July 13, 2019. High buffeting winds are sweeping the truss bridge that crosses over the Atchafalaya River between the communities of Berwick and Morgan City.

(AP/David J. Phillip)

Diana Moreno carries a sandbag to her vehicle Friday, July 12, 2019, in Baton Rouge, La., ahead of Tropical Storm Barry.

(AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

Martha Young, center, Patricia Plishka, left, and her husband Glen, right, battle the wind and rain from Hurricane Barry as it nears landfall Saturday, July 13, 2019, in New Orleans.

(AP/Matthew Hinton)

People check out the waves on Lakeshore Drive in New Orleans, Friday, July 12, 2019, as water moves in from Lake Pontchartrain from the storm surge from Barry.

(Twitter/@mzquitamichelle)

Amid the chaos of Barry, a tree toppled over onto a nearby house in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. There have been no reports of injury from this incident.

(AP/Matthew Hinton)

Crescent City Steaks Chef Frank Turner, left, and dishwasher Keith Brooks screw in storm protecters over the windows before landfall of Tropical Storm Barry from the Gulf of Mexico in New Orleans.

(AP/David J. Phillip)

A man rides a bicycle on Canal Street Saturday, July 13, 2019, in New Orleans, as Tropical Storm Barry nears landfall.

(AP/Matthew Hinton)

As rain bands cover the French Quarter, a green strip remnant of an old Mississippi River levee is nearly submerged as seen atop the current concrete covered Mississippi River levee in Algiers Point.

(Twitter/@NASA)

A NASA satellite captured this image of Tropical Storm Barry before it made landfall.

(Twitter/@LafourcheSO)

Lt. Ben Dempster, Sgt. Dave Thibodaux, and Capt. Aaron Arabie in Golden Meadow. Behind them water is washing over LA 1, which is closed to traffic.

(Twitter/@LafourcheSO)

LA 1 was closed between St. Charles Bypass Road and Lefort Bypass Road in Thibodaux, Louisiana, due to downed electrical poles and wires after Barry blew through. After a brief stint as a Category 1 hurricane, the storm downsized to a tropical storm.
1 / 22


Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards warned residents during a press conference that Barry would be a significant weather event, telling residents not to take the storm lightly. Edwards said the state and levees in New Orleans were ready for impact and should withstand the floodwaters.

"There have been NO levee failures in Plaquemines Parish. There are isolated issues of flooding that state and local officials anticipated and are actively addressing," Gov. Edwards said in a post on Twitter Saturday.

The United States Coast Guard had to conduct several water rescues in Terrebonne Parish.

By early Sunday morning, over 141,000 customers across Louisiana had lost power, according to PowerOutages.US.

People should not focus on Barry's wind speed, but instead be wary of the rain it will unleash across the region, AccuWeather forecasters cautioned.

"Our greatest concern is for torrential rain that would result in life-threatening flooding," AccuWeather Hurricane Expert Dan Kottlowski said.

Just east of where Barry made landfall, a tide gauge at Amerada Pass measured a storm surge of nearly 7 feet on Saturday afternoon, with tide levels reaching 8.23 feet, which exceeded levels measured during Hurricane Ike, 7.81 feet, from Sept. 12, 2008.

Storm surge began to inundate the coast of Louisiana as early as Friday morning as Barry gained strength in the Gulf of Mexico. Timmer reported from just outside of Chauvin, Louisiana, about an hour south of New Orleans.

barry landfall satellite


Louisiana declared a state of emergency in advance of Barry's arrival as residents and crews work to brace the city for impact. Residents were told to shelter in place by 8 p.m. CDT Friday.

Voluntary evacuations were issued across New Orleans for areas that are not protected by the levees.

Every flood gate has been closed along Lake Pontchartrain due to the anticipated flooding. The city of New Orleans did not offer any sandbags ahead of the storm, but businesses and residents stepped up to provide sandbags for people in town. AccuWeather National Reporter Jonathan Petramala captured video of dozens of residents pitching in to fill up sandbags ahead of Barry.

Not only have flights been canceled in New Orleans, but so has this weekend's Rolling Stones concert. Mick Jagger and the rest of the Rolling Stones were set to perform in the Superdome on Sunday, but the concert has been moved to Monday due to Barry. The date of the concert could change again due to the lingering impacts from Barry.

Impacts from Barry were felt along the Florida Panhandle as well. On Friday, a law enforcement officer was treated for facial cuts after a powerful wave churned up by Barry broke the windshield of a boat near Destin, Florida, about 50 miles east of Pensacola, according to the Okaloosa County Sheriff's Office Twitter page.

Download the free AccuWeather app to stay alert to any tropical advisories, watches and warnings. Keep checking back for updates on AccuWeather.com and stay tuned to the AccuWeather Network on DirecTV, Frontier and Verizon Fios.

RELATED:
Dangerous seas, rip currents to threaten areas hundreds of miles away from Barry
Barry continues to weaken but significant flood risk remains for lower Mississippi Valley
Gas prices could 'spike' as a result of Barry
What the ‘big, big lessons’ learned from Hurricane Katrina mean now for New Orleans as Barry moves inland

Additional reporting by Reed Timmer, Jonathan Petramala, Brian Lada and Kevin Byrne.

2:00 a.m. CDT Sunday: Barry remains a tropical storm with maximum sustained wind speeds of 45 mph, according to the latest update released by the National Hurricane Center. The storm is moving to the north-northwest at around 8 mph. A turn to the north is expected later Sunday.

The Tropical Storm Warning, Wind Advisory and Storm Surge Warnings for southeastern Louisiana and portions of Mississippi have been canceled as of 1 a.m. CDT.

The National Weather Service office in New Orleans cautioned residents to not let their guard down, however. "Flash flooding still remains a threat today. Stay alert for possible flooding under rain bands," they said on Twitter.

12:30 a.m. CDT Sunday: The National Weather Service Storm Prediction Center has issued a discussion regarding the potential for the threat of tornadoes to continue overnight.

"A brief tornado cannot be ruled out over the next couple of hours across parts of southern and central Mississippi into far southeastern Louisiana. This threat still appears quite isolated," the discussion read.

There have been several tornado warnings in the past few hours across Mississippi, but no confirmed tornadoes have been reported at this time.

Meanwhile, the Louisiana Department of Transportation reports that restrictions remain in effect on the Lake Pontchartrain Causeway Bridge.


10 p.m. CDT Saturday: At 10 p.m. CDT Barry was moving north-northwest across Louisiana at a speed of 8 mph with maximum sustained winds of 60 mph. The tropical storm was located about 90 miles northwest of Lafayette, Louisiana.

A Twitter post from the Flood Protection Authority shows crews opening a floodgate in Louisiana.


9 p.m. CDT Saturday: The Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement has released statistics regarding the offshore oil and gas operators in the Gulf of Mexico.

As of data from 11:30 a.m. CDT on Saturday, 42.3% of all personnel have been evacuated from the managed production platforms in the Gulf of Mexico.

The BSEE also estimates about 69.97% of the current oil production and 55.56% of the natural gas production has been shut in. This procedure involves closing sub-surface safety valves below the surface of the ocean floor to prevent the release of oil or gas.

8 p.m. CDT Saturday: With Barry continuing to move farther inland and dumping buckets of rain on already inundated communities, Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant told AccuWeather in an interview that the state will be seeking relief from federal agencies.

Barry has caught the state at a time when residents and farmers of the Mississippi Delta are trying to recover from months of previous flooding. From beach entertainers for to large casino resorts, Bryant said that many businesses across the state are suffering due to the pattern of rain and now the additional rain from Barry.

"Normally, every hotel would be packed, every restaurant would be packed, the beaches would be covered with people enjoying themselves, and now this storm has taken all of that away," Bryant said.

He noted that problems with blooming algae have also forced the state to close most of the beaches this summer.

"This has been a devastating tourist season for the Mississippi Gulf Coast," Bryant said. "Every business there has suffered, and it has been troubling, and [there is] almost nothing we can do just now about it."

Barry and the persistent rain have also dealt a blow to the environment. Bryant notes that all of the fresh water that has been interfused into the Mississippi Sound has been killing creatures from the oyster crop and shrimp to bottlenose dolphins.

"This has been a devastating event that has taken place since the Bonnet Carré Spillway has been opened, allowing fresh water to inundate the Gulf Coast," Bryant said.

Back in late February, the Bonnet Carré Spillway was partially opened to keep the Mississippi River from flooding New Orleans.

7 p.m. CDT Saturday: After the levees in the Myrtle Groves and Pointe Celeste were overtopped, water began to encroach on Highway 23 in Louisiana around 6 p.m., CDT. The highway is the primary route of transportation through Plaquemines Parish.

City officials continue to warn people to not drive through floodwaters.

769f712f-cb67-45e4-aca0-5def453cfa5b.jpg


A flash flood warning will remain in effect for portions of southeast Louisiana and Mississippi, including New Orleans, until Sunday, 7 p.m. CDT.

Barry continues to move inland with maximum sustained winds of 60 mph and was located about 80 miles northwest of Lafayette, Louisiana around 7 p.m. CDT. The storm is trudging through the state at about 8 mph.

4:26 p.m. CDT Saturday: At 4 p.m. CDT, Barry was moving inland with maximum sustained winds of 65 mph and was located about 20 miles west-southwest of Lafayette, Louisiana.

AccuWeather meteorologists say continued storm surge over coastal Louisiana will wind down as Barry pushes inland. Flooding near the coastline will decrease through the afternoon and evening.

The hurricane warning for the Louisiana coast has been changed to a tropical storm warning.

barry 5 pm edt location


2:48 p.m. CDT Saturday: Terrebonne Parish President Gordon Dove issued mandatory evacuation orders for all areas along Louisiana Highway 315 and Brady Road south or south of Falgout Canal due to water overtopping the Lower Dularge East Levee.

AccuWeather National Weather Reporter Jonathan Petramala is on the ground in Plaquemines Parish, where there has also been a report of water overtopping a levee.


Over 260 flights have been canceled Saturday at Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport.

12:58 p.m Saturday: Following a brief stint as a Category 1 hurricane, Barry has weakened to a tropical storm after making landfall near Intracoastal City, Louisiana.

The storm currently is packing 70-mph winds, and despite weakening, will continue to produce life-threatening impacts across the central Gulf Coast.

New Barry track July 13

12 p.m. CDT Saturday: The number of customers without power in Louisiana is just shy of 100,000.

AccuWeather Extreme Meteorologist Reed Timmer reports tree and power line damage in Morgan City, Louisiana.


11 a.m. CDT Saturday: A levee in Myrtle Grove, which is in lower Plaquemines Parish, has been overtopped, according to Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana's Office of Homeland Security & Emergency Preparedness.

Highway 23 is currently open, but the highway may take on water, which will likely impact travel between Phillips 66 Refinery to Venice. If Highway 23 floods, residents will not be able to utilize the River Levee to evacuate south of Phillips 66. Residents who did not evacuate may experience limited emergency services.

Residents are encouraged to come north of the flood wall, if they can do so safely. Otherwise emergency officials encourage you to shelter in place.


For additional storm reports of Barry's impacts in Louisiana and elsewhere, click here.
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Offline RE

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Re: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature
« Reply #520 on: July 14, 2019, 02:39:55 PM »
Just let me know when it goes over the top at the Old River Control Structure and the Mighty Mississippi heads for Morgan City. Then I'll make my last run to civilization for food and liquor, because that will be the end of the old USA.
AJ
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Re: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature
« Reply #521 on: July 14, 2019, 02:52:41 PM »
Just let me know when it goes over the top at the Old River Control Structure and the Mighty Mississippi heads for Morgan City. Then I'll make my last run to civilization for food and liquor, because that will be the end of the old USA.
AJ

That would be a major event for sure but I don't think by itself it would spell the end of the FSoA or of Industrial Civilization instantaneously.

RE
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Offline azozeo

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Re: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature
« Reply #522 on: July 14, 2019, 03:12:46 PM »
Just let me know when it goes over the top at the Old River Control Structure and the Mighty Mississippi heads for Morgan City. Then I'll make my last run to civilization for food and liquor, because that will be the end of the old USA.
AJ

That would be a major event for sure but I don't think by itself it would spell the end of the FSoA or of Industrial Civilization instantaneously.

RE



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Offline RE

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🏞️ The Mississippi Is Bringing A Lot More Than Just Water To The Gulf
« Reply #523 on: July 16, 2019, 02:05:22 PM »
https://www.forbes.com/sites/trevornace/2019/07/16/the-mississippi-is-bringing-a-lot-more-than-just-water-to-the-gulf/#71f236f41130

15,500 views Jul 16, 2019, 11:25am
The Mississippi Is Bringing A Lot More Than Just Water To The Gulf
Trevor Nace

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Science


bottlenose dolphin covered in lesions from Freshwater Institute for Marine Mammal Studies

As Tropical Storm Barry continues to weaken and move north, one might think New Orleans and the Gulf of Mexico are past the brunt of the damage. However, the combination of rainfall from Barry (as high as 24 inches) and continued flooding from upstream Mississippi River leaves much of Louisiana and the gulf still in danger.

While the danger and damage to Louisiana and New Orleans is quite visible there are increasing signs that the Mississippi River is doing long-lasting damage to the Gulf of Mexico it empties into.

The historic flooding of the Mississippi River is bringing unprecedented amounts of freshwater, fertilizers, pesticides, and waste into the Gulf of Mexico. The Mississippi River is the second-longest in the world and drains 32 states and two Canadian provinces all past New Orleans and into the Gulf of Mexico.

This tremendous river is heavily modified from its natural state with dams and levies controlling flow and the agricultural heartland of America adding fertilizers, pesticides and animal waste into the waterway.


Dolphin with suspected freshwater lesions.Institute for Marine Mammal Studies / NOAA

The deluge of freshwater laden with toxins is causing a whole host of issues in the Gulf of Mexico. One such example is the increased die-off of dolphins across the Gulf.

NOAA has declared an Unusual Mortality Event for bottlenose dolphins in the Gulf of Mexico, with 300 found dead since February 1, 2019. This is three times higher than normal and significantly higher than the mortality rate during the height of the BP oil spill in 2010.

The bottlenose dolphins are dying partially as a result of freshwater exposure, which creates lesions across the dolphin's body and eventually leads to death. There are numerous reports of dying dolphins floating nearby beaches and marshes along the coast.


The rate of Bottlenose dolphin strandings per month in 2019 compared to historical rates

Scientists estimate that the Gulf of Mexico dead zone this year will balloon to the size of Massachusetts. The dead zone is a result of fertilizers entering the Gulf of Mexico waters. As the fertilizer is dumped into the gulf it acts as "superfood" for algae, creating a massive algal bloom. The algae then dies and begins to decompose as it is eaten by bacteria in the water. This bacteria respires just like humans and effectively removes all the oxygen from nearby water. These dead zones are anoxic (without oxygen) water and cause widespread die-offs of fish as they suffocate.

The Army Corps of Engineers has a difficult task in balancing the health and safety of Gulf state residents as well as the Gulf of Mexico and its significantly weakened fisheries. The Corps is tasked with managing the outflow of water from the Bonnet Carre. As of July 15, the discharge rate into Lake Pontchartrain was 111,000 cubic feet per second.

As the Mississippi continues to flood there will be ongoing damage both to the land surrounding the river and the Gulf into which it empties, an all too familiar scenario for Gulf residents.
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🌀 Is the tropical Atlantic about to spring to life?
« Reply #524 on: August 14, 2019, 01:26:14 PM »
Action Season for Doomers!

RE

https://www.accuweather.com/en/weather-news/is-the-tropical-atlantic-including-the-gulf-of-mexico-about-to-spring-to-life/70009071

August 14, 2019
Is the tropical Atlantic, including the Gulf of Mexico, about to spring to life?
By Alex Sosnowski, AccuWeather senior meteorologist


AccuWeather meteorologists are monitoring the potential for changing conditions in the Atlantic basin that may lead to an uptick in tropical activity, including the Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico over the next couple of weeks.

"Indications are that inhibiting factors for tropical development, such as dry air, dust and strong wind shear over the Atlantic basin will start to relax during the week of Aug. 18-25," according to AccuWeather Hurricane Expert Dan Kottlowski.

There has been an extensive amount of dry air and wind shear, with flare-ups of Saharan dust in recent weeks. This pattern is anticipated to continue into this weekend.

Atlantic into this weekend


While this is not unusual during the middle of the summer, we are entering the period of the summer when moist air becomes more plentiful and the amount of dust and wind shear tends to diminish.

Tropical disturbances, or waves, move off the coast of Africa every few days during the summer and into the autumn. This is called the Cabo Verde season, which is named for the group of islands just off the west coast of Africa.

Tropical Atlantic Aug 14, 2019

This image taken on Wednesday, August 14, 2019, shows the tropical Atlantic with part of North and Central America to the left and Africa to the far right. The brown color in the middle of the image, over the middle of the Atlantic is dust from the Sahara Desert. The feature of interest for next week is barely recognizable with patchy aimless clouds to the right of the dust area. (NOAA / Satellite)


While waters are sufficiently warm enough to support development in this area from midsummer on, dry air, dust and wind shear keep most of these disturbances from developing into tropical depressions, tropical storms and hurricanes.

"How fast these inhibiting factors relax next week will determine if and when a particular disturbance develops," Kottlowski said.

RELATED:
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"For example, determining the amount of wind shear in a path of a potential tropical system several days out is challenging," Kottlowski said.

Like other factors in the weather, wind shear can vary significantly from day to day and shift over time as a budding tropical system approaches.

The disturbance, and others will continue to drift westward across the tropical Atlantic in the coming days.

Steering breezes are likely to cause these features to turn more to the northwest and north as they near Central America.

Tropical Development Next Week


Such a pattern may allow the feature to travel from the northwestern Caribbean, across Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, into the western Gulf of Mexico and perhaps toward the western or northern Gulf coast to end next week.

"If the wind shear drops off in the northwestern Caribbean or the Gulf of Mexico, the door may open for development later next week," Kottlowski said.

Waters are sufficiently warm in the region to support development should the shear ease up.

Interests from Belize and eastern Mexico to the western and northern Gulf coast in the United States, including petroleum operations in the Gulf of Mexico, should monitor the progress of this feature.

In absence of any organized feature, a surge in drenching downpours and locally gusty thunderstorms is possible late next week along the western and/or central Gulf coast.


Elsewhere over the Atlantic, a stalled swath of showers and thunderstorms along the upper Gulf coast and the southern Atlantic coast of the U.S. has a remote chance of generating a weak tropical disturbance into this weekend.

Since such a feature will be too close to land, development into a significant tropical system is not anticipated. However, even with or without a disturbance the region will be an unsettled focal point for locally heavy rain and the risk of urban flooding.

While the hurricane season extends from June 1 through Nov. 30, the period from the last part of August through October marks the prime time for tropical storms and hurricanes in the Atlantic basin.

Hurricane Frequency Atlantic


The sharpest increase in tropical storm and hurricane frequency occurs from Aug. 20 through Sept. 11.

AccuWeather is predicting a total of 12-14 named storms with five to seven hurricanes and two to four major hurricanes for the 2019 season.
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