AuthorTopic: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature  (Read 38678 times)

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 38901
    • View Profile
Re: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature
« Reply #555 on: September 12, 2019, 07:39:25 AM »
I'm fine folks. Strangely, no damage to report. Just loss of electricity and internet for 4 days. White people problems. Our solar panels handled the freezers no problem. I'l put an update on that post a bit later.

The update is now up if you want more    https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.wordpress.com/2019/09/07/c5-vs-hurricane-dorian/

I added the update to the Diner blog.

What about cell phone service?  When did that come back on?

RE
Save As Many As You Can

Offline cernunnos5

  • Waitstaff
  • ***
  • Posts: 320
    • View Profile
Re: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature
« Reply #556 on: September 12, 2019, 08:20:59 AM »
I'm fine folks. Strangely, no damage to report. Just loss of electricity and internet for 4 days. White people problems. Our solar panels handled the freezers no problem. I'l put an update on that post a bit later.

The update is now up if you want more    https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.wordpress.com/2019/09/07/c5-vs-hurricane-dorian/

I added the update to the Diner blog.

What about cell phone service?  When did that come back on?

RE
No idea. I dont have a self paid for tracking device. The landline stayed on though, even without power.
The news said cell towers and internet was a big problem though. People couldnt even get the emergency news because, get this, they were told to go to a government web page. Facepalm. The only news was from the radio. Keep that in mind. Worse, most radio stations only had pre programed music, not news. Probably because they lost any ability to do so. Lets here it for CBC.

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 38901
    • View Profile
Re: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature
« Reply #557 on: September 12, 2019, 08:33:21 AM »
I'm fine folks. Strangely, no damage to report. Just loss of electricity and internet for 4 days. White people problems. Our solar panels handled the freezers no problem. I'l put an update on that post a bit later.

The update is now up if you want more    https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.wordpress.com/2019/09/07/c5-vs-hurricane-dorian/

I added the update to the Diner blog.

What about cell phone service?  When did that come back on?

RE
No idea. I dont have a self paid for tracking device. The landline stayed on though, even without power.
The news said cell towers and internet was a big problem though. People couldnt even get the emergency news because, get this, they were told to go to a government web page. Facepalm. The only news was from the radio. Keep that in mind. Worse, most radio stations only had pre programed music, not news. Probably because they lost any ability to do so. Lets here it for CBC.

Time to invest in your own satellite uplink.  ;D

RE
Save As Many As You Can

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 38901
    • View Profile
🌀 2,500 people are listed as missing nearly two weeks after Hurricane Dorian hi
« Reply #558 on: September 12, 2019, 09:00:06 AM »
I'll bet that number of Dead People is an underestimate.

RE

https://www.cnn.com/2019/09/12/americas/bahamas-dorian-thousands-missing-thursday/index.html

2,500 people are listed as missing nearly two weeks after Hurricane Dorian hit the Bahamas
Chandler Thornton

By Faith Karimi and Chandler Thornton, CNN

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/hvCQtLWW-y4" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/hvCQtLWW-y4</a>

Updated 5:40 AM ET, Thu September 12, 2019
great guana cay abacos islands bahamas newton pkg vpx_00023408

Wealthy patrons chip in to help a Bahamas community heal 02:54

(CNN)An estimated 2,500 people are listed as missing in the Bahamas after Hurricane Dorian crashed ashore nearly two weeks ago, the government said.
Dorian flattened homes after it made landfall on September 1, killing at least 50 people, officials said. The death toll is expected to go up as search-and-rescue crews scour through the ruins in Grand Bahama and Abaco islands.
The list is preliminary and all the names have not been confirmed against government records and evacuees, said Carl Smith of the Bahamas' National Emergency Management Agency.
He urged people to continue submitting missing persons through the hotline or visiting the social services office, which is handling the missing people register.

"As we are able to cross-reference our data sets, we will be able to inform family members and reunite survivors with loved ones," he said.
Hurricane Dorian tore though the islands as a Category 5 -- the strongest hurricane ever to make landfall in the Bahamas.
The first sweep of hard-hit northern islands -- where some 70,000 people have lost almost everything -- has been completed, including at least a first check for anyone in need of rescue, food or water and an assessment of damage and sanitation needs, said Daniel Gajewski of Fairfax County, Virginia's Urban Search and Rescue team.
"Lately it has been a lot of reconnaissance, a lot of building structures, and then from there we're getting a pulse on the locals," said Gajewski, who was deployed through the US Agency for International Development, or USAID.

Dorian's official death toll in the Bahamas now stands at 50, police said, though the grim number is expected to rise.
Bahamian Prime Minister Hubert Minnis said the government is working to set up temporary housing for those who lost their homes, adding that he visited shelters in New Providence that are providing temporary housing to evacuees from Abaco and Grand Bahama. He warned against re-circulating "false information" that was spreading discord in the community.
Save As Many As You Can

Offline azozeo

  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 9164
    • View Profile
Re: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature
« Reply #559 on: September 12, 2019, 10:32:33 AM »
I'm fine folks. Strangely, no damage to report. Just loss of electricity and internet for 4 days. White people problems. Our solar panels handled the freezers no problem. I'l put an update on that post a bit later.

The update is now up if you want more    https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.wordpress.com/2019/09/07/c5-vs-hurricane-dorian/

I added the update to the Diner blog.

What about cell phone service?  When did that come back on?

RE
No idea. I dont have a self paid for tracking device. The landline stayed on though, even without power.
The news said cell towers and internet was a big problem though. People couldnt even get the emergency news because, get this, they were told to go to a government web page. Facepalm. The only news was from the radio. Keep that in mind. Worse, most radio stations only had pre programed music, not news. Probably because they lost any ability to do so. Lets here it for CBC.


The hams are your best bet in a SHTF scenario.
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 38901
    • View Profile
A little icing on the cake.

RE

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/bahamas-ravaged-hurricane-dorian-brace-second-hit-tropical-storm-approaches-n1053421

Bahamas, ravaged by Hurricane Dorian, brace for second hit as tropical storm approaches


The U.S. National Weather Service issued an advisory Thursday, less than two weeks after Dorian, warning of tropical storm conditions by late Friday.
Image: Tropical Depression forecast, NOAA

Sept. 12, 2019, 3:42 PM AKDT
By Doha Madani

A tropical storm warning was issued Thursday for the Bahamas, less than two weeks after Hurricane Dorian devastated the commonwealth's northwest region as a Category 5 hurricane.

The U.S. National Weather Service issued an advisory warning that tropical storm conditions are expected in the northwest Bahamas, including the Abaco Islands, by late Friday. No significant storm surge is anticipated as the storm is only predicted to give off two to four inches of rain.

The Abaco Islands were pummeled earlier this month by Hurricane Dorian, a storm that wrecked boats and flipped-over cars in the streets. After the storm, the area was filled with flattened houses, crushed businesses and mangled playgrounds.
Recommended
Hurricane Dorian
In Abaco Islands, the letter D marks the site of a grim recovery effort
Weather
Tornado hits Sioux Falls, South Dakota, causes 'significant damage' to dozens of buildings

Hurricane Dorian's death toll in the Bahamas climbed to 50 on Monday as 1,300 others remain unaccounted for.

A Trump administration official told NBC New Wednesday that the U.S. will not grant temporary protected status to people from the Bahamas after the devastating storm.
Related
News
'One day at a time': Bahamians displaced by Dorian seek solace in South Florida

The status would have allowed Bahamians to work and live in the U.S. until it is deemed safe to return home. The same status is currently granted to over 300,000 people living in the U.S. from 10 countries, including the victims of Haiti’s 2010 earthquake.

Bahamians can still come to the U.S. temporarily, if they have the right travel documents, but will not be granted work permits.

As of Monday, 1,500 victims of Dorian had come to the U.S. after the hurricane swept through the Bahamas.
Save As Many As You Can

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 38901
    • View Profile
🌀 Six Named Storms at Once Ties Modern Record
« Reply #561 on: September 19, 2019, 01:19:40 AM »
ANOTHER RECORD!!!   :emthup:

RE

https://weather.com/storms/hurricane/news/2019-09-18-six-named-storms-ties-record-atlantic-eastern-pacific

Six Named Storms at Once Ties Modern Record
Meteorologist Danielle Banks explains this active time in the tropics


At a Glance

    There are six named storms currently active in the Eastern Pacific and Atlantic basins.This appeared to tie a record number of active storms at once in the two basins combined.Four of these tropical cyclones developed on Tuesday alone.September is the peak month in the Atlantic Basin, and is typically very active in the Eastern Pacific.The Atlantic Basin is expected to remain active through the end of the month, perhaps into early October.

Six named storms are currently active in the Atlantic and Eastern Pacific basins, which appears to have tied a record number of combined storms at once in those two areas.

While Humberto and Kiko were spinning in the Atlantic and Eastern Pacific, four new tropical cyclones formed Tuesday: Imelda and Jerry in the Atlantic Basin, and Mario and Lorena in the Eastern Pacific Basin.

After checking with colleagues, veteran National Hurricane Center forecaster Eric Blake tweeted that this combined number of active storms in both basins was believed to tie a modern record from September 1992.

"They are forming like roaches out there," Blake tweeted Tuesday afternoon.

Three of those Tuesday newcomers formed at roughly the same time – around 11 a.m. EDT. About two hours later, the NHC initiated advisories on Tropical Depression Eleven near the upper Texas coast. Ninety minutes after that, it made landfall as Tropical Storm Imelda.

This made for a very busy Tuesday at the NHC.

As Neal Dorst of NOAA's Hurricane Research Division pointed out, September is a peak month not only in the Atlantic Basin, but is also part of a broad peak of activity in the Eastern Pacific.

In September, ocean temperatures are nearly at their yearly peak, and shearing winds that can rip apart tropical storms and hurricanes are typically at their lowest.

There are two other factors contributing to this active period.

One is a large-scale wave in the atmosphere known as a convectively coupled Kelvin wave (CCKW), which has already tipped the Atlantic Basin into a favorable state for tropical development, as noted Tuesday by Michael Ventrice at The Weather Company, an IBM Business.

"This is the very same Kelvin wave that passed the Atlantic Basin back in the third week of August, aiding in the genesis of Hurricane Dorian," Ventrice told weather.com.

Ventrice said these stronger Kelvin waves can circle the globe multiple times.

"It's stronger passing the Pacific than it was back in the front half of August."

Another large-scale atmospheric disturbance known as the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) is moving into a favorable configuration to give a boost to tropical development in the Atlantic Basin, and is forecast to remain in that favorable state into early October.

In the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico, hurricanes are four times more likely when the MJO is in a favorable phase compared to when it is unfavorable, researchers have found.

According to the National Hurricane Center, there have been as many as five active Atlantic tropical cyclones at once, which occurred Sept. 10-12, 1971. No more than two of those were hurricane strength at any one time.

Four simultaneous Atlantic hurricanes were documented both on Aug. 22, 1893, and Sept. 26-27, 1998.
Infrared satellite image of four hurricanes at once in the Atlantic Basin on Sep. 26, 1998. (Credit: NOAA)
Infrared satellite image of four hurricanes at once in the Atlantic Basin on Sept. 26, 1998.
(Credit: NOAA)

On Aug. 26, 1974, there were five simultaneous named storms of at least tropical storm strength in the Eastern Pacific Basin east of the international date line, Phil Klotzbach, a tropical scientist at Colorado State University, told weather.com in 2015.
Five active tropical cyclones in the eastern Pacific Ocean at 5 a.m. PDT on August 26, 1974. Tropical Depression Dolly near Guam was the sixth active Pacific tropical cyclone that day.
Five active tropical cyclones were active in the eastern Pacific Ocean at 5 a.m. PDT on Aug. 26, 1974.
(Data: Phil Klotzbach, NHC)

Klotzbach said in a tweet that this was the first time there were three named storms with winds of at least 60 mph simultaneously in the Eastern Pacific Basin in five years.
The Weather Company’s primary journalistic mission is to report on breaking weather news, the environment and the importance of science to our lives. This story does not necessarily represent the position of our parent company, IBM.
Save As Many As You Can

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 38901
    • View Profile
🌀 Imelda Causing 'Major, Catastrophic Flooding' In Southeast Texas, Forecasters
« Reply #562 on: September 19, 2019, 08:49:31 AM »
https://www.npr.org/2019/09/19/762301674/major-catastrophic-flooding-in-southeast-texas-from-imelda-weather-service-warns

Imelda Causing 'Major, Catastrophic Flooding' In Southeast Texas, Forecasters Warn

September 19, 201911:05 AM ET
Bill Chappell


Parts of eastern Texas could see nearly 3 feet of rain through Friday, forecasters say, warning of potential flash floods from Tropical Depresion Imelda. Here, Angel Marshman walks through floodwaters in Galveston after trying to start his flooded car Wednesday.
David J. Phillip/AP

"Major, catastrophic flooding is occurring across much of southeast Texas," the National Weather Service says, warning that Tropical Depression Imelda is producing extreme rainfall. With more intense rain in the forecast, the agency says some areas could see rain totals of 25 to 35 inches through Friday.

The storm forced Houston's George Bush Intercontinental Airport to order a full ground stop around 9:30 a.m. local time Thursday.

In a combination that's proving to be disastrous, Imelda is creeping along at just 5 mph as it drops massive amounts of rain onto eastern Texas and western Louisiana. The warnings of new threats come a day after floodwaters from Imelda already covered streets in Galveston and other coastal areas.

Torrential rains ravaged the town of Winnie, between Houston and Beaumont, filling roadways with water Thursday morning. The communities of Aldine, Kingwood and Conroe were also hit by floods.

The Cajun Navy says its volunteers are currently carrying out water rescues in Vidor and Beaumont. The Louisiana-based nonprofit rescue group has issued a call for volunteers to help people stranded by the storm, urging anyone with a "surface drive boat/gatortail" boat who can reach the affected areas to get in touch.
Sign Up For The NPR Daily Newsletter

Catch up on the latest headlines and unique NPR stories, sent every weekday.
E-mail address

By subscribing, you agree to NPR's terms of use and privacy policy.
This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

The Coast Guard says it has staged emergency response teams in Jefferson County, Harris County and Houston to help people threatened by the flooding. It adds that shallow-water rescue teams from a Marine Safety Unit in Baton Rouge and helicopters from Air Station Houston are also standing by to help.

"People in distress should use 911 to request assistance," the Coast Guard says, adding that in the intense time-frame of an emergency, social media messages can't be monitored on all platforms and accounts.

The worst rain is forecast for coastal and southeast Texas, where an additional 5-10 inches is expected to fall through Friday, the NWS says. Parts of southwest Louisiana should expect an additional 3-5 inches, with isolated totals of 10 inches.

As of 4 a.m. local time, the storm's center was roughly 110 miles north of Houston. Northeast of the city, large parts of Harris and Jefferson Counties were alerted to a flash flood emergency Thursday morning, as officials urged residents of Port Arthur, Beaumont and nearby areas to seek higher ground and avoid driving or walking through floodwaters.

In addition to rain, the storm is bringing maximum sustained winds of near 30 mph, with higher gusts.

"Extremely persistent thunderstorms on the southern flank of the system are producing prolific rainfall and dangerous flash flooding across portions of southeast Texas Thursday morning," the National Weather Service says in its short-range forecast.
YouTube

Rainwater inundated streets, cars and yards in part of Beaumont, Texas, Thursday as shown in a stunning video shot by a Live Storms Media drone. The early-morning footage shows water nearly covering the wheel wells of cars that were parked just outside of houses, in an apparent attempt to keep them safe on high ground.

As seen in the drone video's survey of the stricken neighborhood, rain continues to fall and lightning flashes from Imelda's thunderstorms.

Four inches of rain fell on Cedar Bayou in just an hour, the Harris County Flood Control District reports.
Save As Many As You Can

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 38901
    • View Profile
🌀 Texas Is Drowning Under One of the Wettest Storms in US History
« Reply #563 on: September 20, 2019, 08:46:35 AM »
https://www.livescience.com/imelda-catastrophic-flooding-texas.html

Texas Is Drowning Under One of the Wettest Storms in US History

By Mindy Weisberger - Senior Writer 18 hours ago Planet Earth
The last of these monster 1,000-year-storms was just two years ago.


A postman walks through streets flooded by the tropical storm Imelda, as he delivers mail in Galveston, Texas. A postman walks through streets flooded by the tropical storm Imelda, as he delivers mail in Galveston, Texas.
(Image: © David J Phillip/AP/Shutterstock)

Record-breaking rainfall from the tropical storm Imelda is soaking southeastern Texas. Some areas have been swamped with 20 to 42 inches (51 to 107 centimeters) of rain over just three days, causing catastrophic flooding that is among the worst in U.S. history. 

Imelda, the first named storm to strike this part of Texas since 2017's devastating Hurricane Harvey, is currently the fifth-wettest tropical storm to drench the contiguous U.S., The Weather Channel tweeted today (Sept. 19). Storms that drop this much rain are estimated to appear once in a millennium, according to precipitation models created by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). But the last 1,000-year-rainfall to inundate Texas was Hurricane Harvey — which slammed the state just two years ago.

The unrelenting rain caused "significant and life-threatening flash flooding," the National Hurricane Center (NHC) reported this morning, leading Texas Gov. Greg Abbott to declare a state of disaster in 13 counties.

Related: In Photos: Hurricane Harvey Takes Aim at Texas

    video playing
    Science and Sci-Fi at the Movies, with Live Science and Space.com
    Slime Made Simple! Live Science Shows You How
    10/08/17
    Slime Made Simple! Live Science Shows You How
    The Strangest Science News of 2018
    24/12/18
    The Strangest Science News of 2018
    Don't Fear The Dark Matter Hurricane
    16/11/18
    Don't Fear The Dark Matter Hurricane
    80 Years Ago, 'News' of an Alien Invasion...
    01/11/18
    80 Years Ago, 'News' of an Alien Invasion Terrified Radio Audiences
    Cold Contact Case Solved!...28 Years Later
    17/08/18
    Cold Contact Case Solved!...28 Years Later

To put this quantify of rain into perspective, 41 inches (104 cm) over a two-month period would be considered exceptional in this part of Texas, said meteorologist Eric Holthaus in a tweet. Such an event would happen about once in a century "in a stable climate," Holthaus said. But recent and accelerating climate change is thought to foster conditions that make seasonal tropical storms wetter, windier and potentially more destructive, Live Science previously reported.

Photos and videos shared on social media show grim scenes of the historic flooding: highways completely submerged under choppy waves and search-and-rescue operations to save people trapped by the floods. In a video tweeted by Katherine Marchand, a reporter with ABC-13 Houston, a man floats down U.S. Highway 59 South, clinging to a pool noodle.

    “GOTTA MAKE THE BEST OF IT”: Guy using a pool noodle to float down the 59S feeder road#floods #Texas #abc13 #imelda #houstonweather https://t.co/UD7dvMlA5A pic.twitter.com/ttwoNBSrvYSeptember 19, 2019

Other images shared on Twitter by Rachel Keller, an anchor with 12News Now, showed  cars abandoned on a flooded road, a newsroom with inches of water covering the floor and an alligator swimming near someone's porch, purportedly snapped from the porch of a home.

    A gator is loose in Fannett TX just west of Port Arthur. Port Arthur native David Edwards says he took this photo from his friend’s porch #Imelda @12NewsNow pic.twitter.com/pjWcPlAnmASeptember 19, 2019

In 2017, Harvey left southeastern Texas reeling under flood levels that exceeded predictions for 500,000 years, Live Science previously reported. By the time Harvey was done, it had dropped more than 51 inches (130 cm) of rain in some parts of the state, making Harvey the wettest tropical storm to ever make landfall in the contiguous U.S. But Imelda has submerged some areas that were left untouched by Harvey, according to The Weather Channel. For now, the extent of the damage the storm will do remains to be seen.

    Hurricane Season 2019: How Long It Lasts and What to Expect
    Hurricanes from Above: Images of Nature's Biggest Storms
    Photos: Hurricane Michael Toppled Over Trees and Uprooted 19th Century Artifacts

Originally published on Live Science.
Save As Many As You Can

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 38901
    • View Profile
🌀 Fifth death in Texas following flooding caused by remnants of tropical storm
« Reply #564 on: September 21, 2019, 08:49:47 AM »
https://www.nbcnews.com/news/weather/fifth-death-texas-following-flooding-caused-remnants-tropical-storm-n1057241

Weather
Fifth death in Texas following flooding caused by remnants of tropical storm
The two deaths reported Friday bring the total to five related to the storm, which caused massive flooding in Texas.
Imelda aftermath: 5th person dies in Texas after catastrophic rainfall

Sept. 20, 2019, 9:24 PM AKDT / Updated Sept. 21, 2019, 3:56 AM AKDT
By Phil Helsel

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/mVB63BGhE_8" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/mVB63BGhE_8</a>

For the second time in as many years, some residents in parts of Houston and southeastern Texas on Friday were waiting for heavy flooding to recede and were assessing water damage to homes and property, as the death toll from Tropical Storm Imelda climbed to five.

Parts of the area hit by Imelda, which made landfall in Freeport on Tuesday and dumped massive amounts of rain, were also flooded by Hurricane Harvey in 2017 — a storm that dropped more than 60 inches of rain in southeastern Texas and was blamed for the deaths of 68 people.

Some residents suffered flooding this week from both storms. “We moved everything we could upstairs, but you can't put your whole first floor upstairs," Cynthia Watson, of Huffman northeast of Houston, told NBC affiliate KPRC of Houston.

When Harvey hit, 4 ˝ feet of water flooded Watson’s home, she told the station. “We lived here for 30 years with no water, and the last two years — the second time, so it's heartbreaking," she said.

Another resident, Erika Muzyka, told the station: “We really didn't think it was going to happen again. I mean, we were incredulous.”

"We're going to have to stay with family, and we're just going to do everything over again,” Muzyka said. "Rip out the sheetrock. Replace the floors."
Widespread flood devastation in Texas after historic rainfall
Sept. 20, 201901:41

As floodwaters began to recede in some areas of Texas on Friday, authorities reported two more deaths in and near the city of Beaumont.

The grim discoveries in a canal in Beaumont, a city of around 118,000 east of Houston, and on Interstate 10 in Jefferson County bring the total number of storm-related deaths to at least five. Imelda, which was a tropical storm when it made landfall on Tuesday, and its remnants, dumped feet of rain on some parts of the region and resulted in hundreds of high-water rescues.

Malcolm Foster, 47, was found dead inside a Toyota Prius in a canal after floodwaters receded in Beaumont Friday morning, the city said in a statement.

Thursday evening on I-10 around 3 miles west of the city, officers were called to a stalled vehicle and found the body of 52-year-old Mark Dukaj, 52, of Florida, the Texas Department of Public Safety said. The agency believes that the pickup truck was stalled during massive flooding in the area.
A truck drives through a flooded highway as flooding from the remnants of Tropical Storm Imelda continues in Southeast Texas in Mauriceville, Texas on Sept. 20, 2019.Jon Shapley / Houston Chronicle via AP

Cory Stottlemyer, spokesman for Houston's Office of Emergency Management, said floodwaters in the city Friday were receding and that fewer 911 calls were being made, the Associated Press reported. But even as the intensity of the storm weakened, Harris County officials warned that some of their 4.7 million residents might not see high waters recede in their neighborhoods until the weekend.

In addition to the two deaths reported Friday in and near Beaumont, three other deaths had been attributed to the storm.

Hunter Morrison, 19, was moving his horse from flooded waters to higher ground when an electrical storm hit, the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office has said. Morrison’s family said he was electrocuted and drowned.
Recommended
Weather
Imelda begins dumping rain on Texas as Hurricane Humberto is upgraded to Category 3
video
Tropical Depression Imelda brings heavy rain, flooding to Texas

Harris County Sheriff Ed Gonzalez said Thursday night that rescue crews there pulled a man from a van submerged in 8 feet of water in Houston, and he was pronounced dead at a hospital; and the sheriff said Friday that another man last seen walking during the storm was found dead in a ditch, and investigators believe the he likely drowned.

In parts of Vidor, Texas, a city of around 10,500 northeast of Beaumont, floodwaters reached near the roofs of homes.

Part of a major freeway in the Houston area, Interstate 10, was closed after the bridge over the San Jacinto River was struck by loose barges, officials said. The barges are intact and there is no evidence of pollution, but Thursday afternoon the current was still too swift to remove them, officials said.

"Everybody needs help, and everybody’s devastated," Linda Richardson in Huffman said. "They didn’t expect this."

The storm is called one of the wettest tropical cyclones in U.S. history, and it dumped more than 40 inches of rain near the Louisiana border, the AP reported. Hundreds of people have been displaced from their homes.
Aerials show extent of Imelda flooding in Texas
Sept. 20, 201901:57

The sheriff’s office of Harris County, which includes Houston, tweeted Friday that there had been 425 high-water rescues and more than 360 stranded vehicles. Houston police said that as of 10 a.m. Friday more than 1,600 vehicles had been towed from city roads due to the storm.

The Chambers County Sheriff’s Office said Thursday that the community of Winnie, population around 3,200 and which is between Houston and Beaumont, was "being devastated" by flooding there.

Preliminary estimates indicated around 800 homes and businesses suffered some level of damage from floodwaters, and about 400 people were rescued, county spokesman Ryan Holzaepfel said.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott on Thursday declared a state of disaster in the counties of Brazoria, Chambers, Galveston, Hardin, Harris, Jasper, Jefferson, Liberty, Matagorda, Montgomery, Newton, Orange and San Jacinto. The declaration ensured state resources were available to local government agencies.

While floodwaters in the Houston area were reported to be receding, there were still flood warnings in place for rivers east of the city, including in the Beaumont area, Friday night, according to the National Weather Service.

The flood warning for the Beaumont area was expected to continue until 5:30 a.m. local time Saturday.
Phil Helsel

Phil Helsel is a reporter for NBC News.
Associated Press contributed.
Save As Many As You Can

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 38901
    • View Profile
The Miracle already happened.  He lived through it.

RE

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/hurricane-dorian-grand-bahama-recovery_n_5d8e0892e4b0ac3cdda74d21

‘Hoping For A Miracle’: Weeks After Dorian Swallowed Grand Bahama, An Apocalyptic Scene

 

 

‘Hoping For A Miracle’: Weeks After Dorian Swallowed Grand Bahama, An Apocalyptic Scene

Residents of this island of 50,000 people have met total devastation with strength and resilience.
09/28/2019 08:00 am ET

Photos by Maria Alejandra Cardona

GRAND BAHAMA ISLAND, Bahamas ― Philip Thomas Sr. had tried to convince his oldest son to bring his wife and three children to Thomas’ house in McLean’s Town, a fishing village on the eastern end of Grand Bahama. Hurricane Dorian had already zeroed in on the northern Bahamas, and Thomas, a boat captain, felt it would be best if they all rode out the storm together.

 
 
REAL LIFE. REAL NEWS. REAL VOICES.
Help us tell more of the stories that matter from voices that too often remain unheard.

But Philip Jr., a fishing guide and harbor pilot, decided to stay at their house on the other end of the village. When the surging waters brought in with the Category 5 storm inundated the town, the family, including Philip Jr.’s wife and 16-, 8- and 6-year-old children, attempted to escape by boat and was ultimately swept away. 

“I guess it was too late,” Thomas said this week as he stood in his driveway against a backdrop of splintered homes and calm turquoise water. His oldest son and grandchildren are presumed dead.

Phillip Thomas Sr. stands in front of his home in McLean's Town, Grand Bahama, where he stayed during Hurricane Dorian. His s
Maria Alejandra Cardona for HuffPost Phillip Thomas Sr. stands in front of his home in McLean’s Town, Grand Bahama, where he stayed during Hurricane Dorian. His son and three grandchildren are among those still missing after the storm.

The details of what happened aren’t entirely clear. On a GoFundMe page created for Barri that has brought in more than $100,000, Matthew Arnold, a friend and former classmate, wrote that her husband “fought to rescue his family, but only succeeded in saving his wife, before heading into the sea after his children.” 

Philip Jr.’s wife, Barri, was found after the storm in another village several miles away, Thomas said. She survived ― miraculously ― and was flown to a hospital in the capital city of Nassau to be treated for injuries. 

Thomas  and his younger son spent the storm hunkered down in a walk-in closet as the water rushed in. It reached three and a half feet inside the home. The sound of the wind, which reached as much as 185 miles per hour, was deafening. 

Three weeks after the storm, Thomas was one of a handful of locals working to put things back together in the obliterated village of McLean’s Town. He’s been busy cleaning out his flooded, crumpled home and keeping an eye out for looters, even as he struggles with the loss of four family members.

“I stay busy. I trust in God. That’s all I can do,” he said. 

Through a broken window, homes are seen being covered up by their residents and trash being thrown to the front of the house
Maria Alejandra Cardona for HuffPost Through a broken window, homes are seen being covered up by their residents and trash being thrown to the front of the house to help clear the inside of the structures in East End, Grand Bahama.

Dorian walloped the island of Grand Bahama with such force that residents here have a hard time grasping what they witnessed. After making landfall Sept. 1 on the nearby Abaco Islands, the storm ― the most powerful on record in the Bahamas ― stalled over Grand Bahama for some 30 hours. An astonishing 70 percent of Grand Bahama, where 50,000 people live, was under water. 

The storm, said Terrence Williams, 53, “had a mind of its own.” Williams was outside a supply distribution point in High Rock, one of the communities on the island’s east side that the storm hit hardest. At least 17 people from the town are missing and feared dead, according to Williams and other residents. Williams is related to eight people that all went missing from a single house, he said.

“A lot of people refused to run,” he said. “They got to face death.”

A bookshelf was one of the last things that remained intact at this home in Pelican Point, Grand Bahama, after Hurricane Dori
Maria Alejandra Cardona for HuffPost A bookshelf was one of the last things that remained intact at this home in Pelican Point, Grand Bahama, after Hurricane Dorian.

Climate scientists say above-average ocean temperatures fueled Dorian, which is “a preview of the climate crisis to come.” Residents HuffPost interviewed on Grand Bahama agreed that this storm was a monster, different from the many that have impacted the island in recent decades. 

As of Thursday, the official fatality count stood at 53, including 45 on Abaco and eight on Grand Bahama, but the consensus from people on the ground is that the number is drastically higher. Property damage is estimated at $7 billion and tourism, an industry that accounts for roughly 50% of the country’s gross domestic product, has taken a serious hit. Recovery will likely take years and the island nation is calling on foreigners to visit unaffected islands so it has the revenue to rebuild. 

The east end of Grand Bahama is like something out of an apocalyptic movie. The storm crumpled cell phone towers like candy wrappers and snapped trees and telephone poles in half, felling their tops to the south. The trees that are still  standing have sections of bark ripped from their trunks at uniform heights, which creates a bizarre visual for those driving past the splintered forest. Furniture, roofing materials, boats and other debris litter the landscape. Plastic bags and tarps hang from trees and fences. A giant steel barge once anchored at Deep Water Cay was swept away in the 20-plus foot surge and now rests next to homes 10 miles away in Pelican Point.

Oil covers a tank at Equinor's oil storage and shipping terminal in South Riding Point, Grand Bahama on Sept. 24, 2019.
Maria Alejandra Cardona for HuffPost Oil covers a tank at Equinor’s oil storage and shipping terminal in South Riding Point, Grand Bahama on Sept. 24, 2019.

At an oil storage and shipping terminal at Riding Point, dozens of workers in plastic jumpsuits attempted to mop up thousands of gallons of oil that the hurricane sucked out of giant tanks and spewed across the facility and a vast swath of trees to the northeast. The smell of crude oil hung heavy in the sweltering afternoon heat. Several miles from the spill, clouds of white smoke billowed from a wildfire that raged alongside the only road in and out of the island’s eastern settlements. 

In the tiny community of Pelican Point, a church was reduced to nothing but a few standing walls, the exposed interior resembling a box of discarded matchsticks. At one home, only a toilet and a few cinder blocks remained on the foundation. Another was sliced in half by the angry ocean, leaving waterlogged books still standing in perfect rows on a bookshelf. A third home with its roof blown off featured a sign on the front window that read: “Just another day in paradise.”

Rachel Rolle stands inside what remains of her home in McLean's Town, Grand Bahama, on Sept. 22, 2019.
Maria Alejandra Cardona for HuffPost Rachel Rolle stands inside what remains of her home in McLean’s Town, Grand Bahama, on Sept. 22, 2019.

Rachel Rolle, a 59-year-old resident of McLean’s Town and a nurse for the communities on the east end of the island, evacuated to Freeport before the hurricane and encouraged many of her neighbors to do the same. She returned home Sept. 5, four days after landfall, to find total devastation. On Sunday afternoon, Rolle was removing debris from what remains of her oceanside home, a dust mask dangling from her neck and her hands covered in dirt.

Many McLean’s Town residents have yet to return home, in part because Rolle has urged some not to. 

“Ain’t nothing to see,” she said. “I tell ’em, ‘If your heart ain’t good and your heart can’t take tragedy, don’t come.’”

Facing the destruction and an uncertain future has taken a toll on Rolle. She has a pacemaker and fell ill in the days after the storm. She’s struggled to sleep. And with few building supplies making their way to the island, she has no idea when her home will be habitable again. Like 50% of all homeowners on Grand Bahama, Rolle has no home insurance, meaning she’ll have to find a way to rebuild on her own.

“Before it’s all over, we’re all going to need psychiatric evaluations,” she said. 

Debris and furniture piled outside of businesses and homes in Freeport, Grand Bahama on Sept. 21, 2019.
Maria Alejandra Cardona for HuffPost Debris and furniture piled outside of businesses and homes in Freeport, Grand Bahama on Sept. 21, 2019.

In Freeport, the island’s only major city, furniture, drywall and mounds of ruined clothes were piled outside hundreds of homes and businesses. Desks and waterlogged textbooks sat forlornly outside schools that have yet to reopen. The putrid smell of rotting food emanated from a grocery store. 

At Grand Bahama International Airport, the surge ripped through buildings and tossed small planes like toys. Passengers flying out of the airport now wait for their flights in tents. Electricity remains down in much of Freeport and communities to the east.

East of the airport sits the quiet oceanside community of Queen’s Cove, a few dozen homes sprinkled in a maze of mostly empty streets. Raymond Simozne, a local pastor, and his wife bought their home here in 2002. It is a place of tranquility ― “heaven on Earth,” he said ― that for years also served as Simozne’s ministry. 

But repeated flooding has plagued the property. With each major hurricane, the sea swelled and inundated the family home.

Pastor Raymond Simozne stands in his demolished home in Freeport, Grand Bahama on Sept. 24, 2019.
Maria Alejandra Cardona for HuffPost Pastor Raymond Simozne stands in his demolished home in Freeport, Grand Bahama on Sept. 24, 2019.

“Every time it floods, it continues to get worse and worse,” Simozne said.

The couple has rebuilt five times, but Dorian appears to have delivered a final blow.

“I think emotionally it would be too much for my wife,” said Simozne, 54, holding back tears. “She went through this now six times. I don’t know if I could carry her through the next one.”

The couple met HuffPost at their ravaged home on Monday afternoon. At one point, the surge reached above the roofline. It ripped apart the walls and ceilings and sucked furniture out of windows and a gaping hole in the back of the house. A giant tree pierced a side window and was left inside the gutted home. The family’s three minivans, which had been parked across the street when the storm hit, are now mangled in the front yard.

The couple has no insurance and 10 years left on their mortgage. After hurricanes Frances and Jeanne in 2004, insurance companies refused to cover homes in Queen’s Cove, Simozne said. Now nearing retirement age, he can’t imagine taking on a second mortgage. 

“We are hoping for a miracle right now,” he said. 

Crumpled vehicles sit outside Pastor Raymond Simozne's home in Freeport, Grand Bahama,.
Maria Alejandra Cardona for HuffPost Crumpled vehicles sit outside Pastor Raymond Simozne’s home in Freeport, Grand Bahama,.

Many residents of Grand Bahama, particularly those in rural towns, are frustrated with the government’s response. They say the vast majority of aid had come from U.S. organizations and volunteers going door to door. Officials have swung back at criticism.

Aside from a large National Emergency Management Agency relief event Saturday in Freeport, HuffPost saw little government presence in the communities Dorian hit hardest.

At the U.N. General Assembly in New York on Friday, Prime Minister Hubert Minnis, who early on said the storm is “the greatest national crises in our country’s history” and will require a massive and prolonged response, called on world leaders to take urgent action to combat the global climate crisis. 

The Bahamas and other island nations, he said, “are on the frontlines of being swallowed into an abyss created initially by human activity and increasingly by inaction.”

The residents of Grand Bahama say they will do what they can to be resilient ― clearing debris, checking in on one another and, once again, starting to rebuild. 

Many said they were simply grateful to be alive. 

“It’s a strong community. We will survive,” said 51-year-old Yvette Patton as she stood in front of her flooded Freeport home. “We’re going to pull through. We’ve done it again and again and again.”

Save As Many As You Can

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 38901
    • View Profile
🌀 Historic Hurricane Lorenzo Becomes A Category Five In The Atlantic Ocean
« Reply #566 on: September 29, 2019, 02:37:04 AM »
Hope Hepp has some plywood for his windows in Cornwall!

RE

https://www.forbes.com/sites/dennismersereau/2019/09/28/historic-hurricane-lorenzo-becomes-a-category-five-in-the-atlantic-ocean/#701735be344a

28,238 viewsSep 28, 2019, 11:06pm
Historic Hurricane Lorenzo Becomes A Category Five In The Atlantic Ocean
Dennis Mersereau


An infrared satellite view of Hurricane Lorenzo on September 28, 2019.College of DuPage

Hurricane Lorenzo rapidly strengthened into a scale-topping category five hurricane on Saturday evening, with maximum sustained winds reaching an incredible 160 MPH. This breaks the record for both the easternmost and northernmost category five hurricane ever recorded in the Atlantic Ocean; before this sudden strengthening, Lorenzo was already the strongest storm ever recorded so far east in the Atlantic. The hurricane, which poses no threat to the United States, will approach the Azores Islands and possibly the British Isles next week as a much weaker storm.

This is the second spike in Lorenzo’s strength in the past couple of days. The hurricane’s first peak on Thursday night saw maximum sustained winds climb up to 145 MPH. It’s incredibly rare to see such a strong storm so far east in the Atlantic Ocean; the last storm to grow so strong achieved its peak intensity hundreds of miles to Lorenzo’s west.
An infrared satellite image of Hurricane Lorenzo as it became a category five.

A close-up infrared satellite image of Hurricane Lorenzo as it reached category five intensity.Tropical Tidbits

After some brief weakening, and against all odds, Lorenzo’s eyewall became very well organized on Saturday evening and the storm rapidly strengthened into a category five hurricane. The above infrared satellite image (via Tropical Tidbits) shows that classically symmetrical appearance to the hurricane’s core, complete with extremely cold cloud tops in the immediate eyewall. Bitterly cold cloud tops are a sign of intense thunderstorm activity, which is necessary for a hurricane to intensify.
Today In: Innovation

Lorenzo is the second category five hurricane we’ve seen in the Atlantic Ocean so far this year, and the sixth such storm to form in the Atlantic in the last four years.

This hurricane would be an impressive sight anywhere on Earth, but especially so for this part of the Atlantic Ocean. Lorenzo is seriously out of place for such a large and intense hurricane. The previous easternmost category five on record, according to meteorologist Eric Blake, occurred 30 years ago when Hurricane Hugo topped the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale about 600 miles west of where Lorenzo peaked.
PROMOTED
T-Mobile BrandVoice
How Next-Gen Mobile Networks Will Transform Transportation Infrastructure
ExtraHop BrandVoice
Five Quantifiable Reasons To Integrate Security And IT
Civic Nation BrandVoice
Here’s A YouTube Series To Help Students Get Through Their First Year Of College
The NHC's forecast track for Hurricane Lorenzo at 11:00 PM EDT, September 28, 2019.

The National Hurricane Center's forecast for Hurricane Lorenzo at 11:00 PM EDT on September 28, ...
  • National Hurricane Center


A large ridge of high pressure over the western Atlantic blocked the storm from tracking west toward the United States, forcing it instead to move north-northeast toward the Azores Islands. The latest forecast from the National Hurricane Center indicates that the storm could approach the Azores on Tuesday and Wednesday as a hurricane. Hurricane Lorenzo has a large wind field; even if the center of the storm misses a direct landfall in the Azores, it’s likely that tropical storm conditions will affect at least some of the islands as the hurricane passes off to the west.

Lorenzo should lose its tropical characteristics by the end of the week as it approaches the British Isles, transitioning into an extratropical cyclone, or a storm that features frontal boundaries and derives its energy from the jet stream instead of thunderstorms around the low-pressure center. A storm’s wind field tends to expand during extratropical transition, which could expose Ireland and Great Britain to a period of dangerous winds and heavy rain on Friday and Saturday.
Follow me on Twitter. Check out my website.

Dennis Mersereau

I'm a writer who focuses on the weather and everything related to it, from sprawling storms that span continents to the interpersonal issues we encounter when trying to ...
Save As Many As You Can

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 38901
    • View Profile
🌀 Two dead as Typhoon Hagibis hits Japan
« Reply #567 on: October 12, 2019, 04:51:45 PM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/VsEpyRKAn5U" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/VsEpyRKAn5U</a>
Save As Many As You Can

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 38901
    • View Profile
Fuck-U-Shima is leaking more too!

The Nips are Sushi.

RE

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/rsfog-x0BNs" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/rsfog-x0BNs</a>
Save As Many As You Can

Offline Surly1

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 16315
    • View Profile
    • Doomstead Diner
Fuck-U-Shima is leaking more too!

The Nips are Sushi.

RE

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/rsfog-x0BNs" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/rsfog-x0BNs</a>

To your point:

2,667 radioactive bags from Fukushima nuke disaster unleashed by Typhoon Hagibis
Thousands of bags filled with radioactive waste from Fukushima nuclear disaster washed away by Typhoon Hagibis




By Keoni Everington, Taiwan News, Staff Writer2019/10/14 12:51

(By Associated Press)
TAIPEI (Taiwan News) — As Typhoon Hagibis hammered Japan on Saturday (Oct. 12), thousands of bags containing radioactive waste have reportedly been carried into a local Fukushima stream by floodwaters, potentially having a devastating environmental impact.

According to Asahi Shimbun, a temporary storage facility containing some 2,667 bags stuffed with radioactive contaminants from the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster was unexpectedly inundated by floodwaters brought by Typhoon Hagibis. Torrential rain flooded the storage facility and released the bags into a stream 100 meters away.

Officials from Tamara City in Fukushima Prefecture said that each bag is approximately one cubic meter in size. Authorities were only able to recover six of the bags by 9 p.m. on Oct. 12, and it is uncertain how many remain on the loose while the possible environmental impact is being assessed.

原発事故の除染ゴミが川に流出、保管場浸水 福島・田村 asahi.com/articles/ASMBF 除染で出た草木など廃棄物が入った袋(フレコンバッグ)が、仮置き場から川に流出。現場には2667個が保管されており、市はすでに6個を回収したが、他にも流出したものがあるとみて確認を進めている。 #台風#福島
Decontamination waste from the nuclear accident leaked into the river, flooding the storage area Fukushima / Tamura asahi.com/articles/ASMBF Bags containing waste materials such as vegetation from decontamination (flexible bags) flowed from the temporary storage area into the river. There are 2,667 items stored at the site, and the city has already recovered six items, but is confirming that there are other spills. #台風#福島
Image
4:26 AM · Oct 13, 2019Buffer
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
114 Replies
42338 Views
Last post June 06, 2015, 10:27:42 AM
by azozeo
0 Replies
5343 Views
Last post October 15, 2013, 10:36:12 PM
by steve from virginia
0 Replies
844 Views
Last post June 03, 2016, 07:21:58 AM
by Guest