AuthorTopic: The Strafing Run of Mother Nature  (Read 58289 times)

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 41795
    • View Profile
Not quite a Sandy event.

RE

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/RQ3wlz0A6tw" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/RQ3wlz0A6tw</a>
Save As Many As You Can

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 41795
    • View Profile
https://baltimore.cbslocal.com/2020/08/04/maryland-weather-tropical-storm-isaias-latest/

Tropical Storm Moves Out Of Maryland, Leaving Behind Damage, Power Outages
CBS Baltimore

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/zwyjJeNwjrY" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/zwyjJeNwjrY</a>

84°
Maryland Weather: Tropical Storm Isaias Triggers Tornadoes, Strong Winds; At Least One Person Killed
By Chelsea Ingram
August 4, 2020 at 6:30 pm
Filed Under:flash flooding, Isaias, Local TV, Maryland Weather, Talkers, Tropical Storm Isaias

BALTIMORE (WJZ) — Tropical Storm Isaias moved out of Maryland early Tuesday afternoon, leaving behind storm damage and power outages in its wake.

One person died as a result of the storm when a tree fell on a moving car in St. Mary’s County.

The storm brought strong winds and heavy rains across the state, triggering tornado warnings and watches — which have since been canceled — but not before several tornadoes were reported around the state.

One tornado touched down in Mardela Springs in Wicomico County, uprooting a home just after 6 a.m. A second tornado touched down just north of Girdletree, Maryland, at 7:20 a.m.

RELATED STORIES:

    2 Rescued After Cars Swept Away By Floodwaters In La Plata During Isaias Storms
    Maryland Weather: Power Outages, Storm Damage Reported As Isaias Leaves Maryland
    2 Tornadoes Landed On Lower Eastern Shore Early Tuesday, NWS Confirms
    1 Killed After Tree Falls On Moving Vehicle In St. Mary’s County As Tropical Storm Isaias Blew Through Maryland

Officials around Maryland warned residents about flash flooding and asked motorists to stay off the roads.

In Cecil County, crews had to rescue people from their cars in North East. Flooding was also reported in Perryville, Elkton and Rising Sun.

Trees were reported down around Maryland and waters rose in waterways like the Jones Falls in Baltimore as heavy rains fell, but most areas were largely spared from major flooding. Ellicott City, where the historic Main Street significantly flooded twice in recent years, was also spared from any major damage.

Although the tropical storm has moved north of Maryland, there are still some concerns. Meteorologist Chelsea Ingram noted that water runoff and flooding could remain an issue and it’ll be breezy behind the system.

Ingram also said dangerous rip currents could be a concern through Wednesday.

WJZ Meteorologist Tim Williams said that this hurricane season has already been a particularly active one with nine named storms already. It’s the earliest in recorded history that we’ve seen that many named systems.
Save As Many As You Can

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 41795
    • View Profile
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/6RFrxlG7Rmk" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/6RFrxlG7Rmk</a>
Save As Many As You Can

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 41795
    • View Profile
There are 26 letters in thew Latin Alphabet.  Why do they need to go to the Cyrrilic Alphabet after only 24 Hurricanes?  ???   :icon_scratch:

RE

https://www.wfla.com/weather/tracking-the-tropics/tracking-the-tropics-experts-update-hurricane-season-forecast-to-extremely-active-with-24-named-storms/

Tracking the Tropics: Experts update hurricane season forecast to ‘extremely active’ with 24 named storms


by: Amanda Holly
Posted: Aug 5, 2020 / 12:46 PM EDT   / Updated: Aug 5, 2020 / 02:59 PM EDT   
AddThis Sharing Buttons
Share to Facebook
Share to TwitterShare to WhatsAppShare to SMSShare to EmailShare to More

TAMPA, Fla. (WFLA) — Colorado State University released an updated forecast for the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season this week. The forecast now calls for an “extremely active” season with a total of 24 named storms, which include the nine storms already named this year.

The forecast calls for 24 named storms and 12 hurricanes, five of which are expected to be major – meaning they would reach Category 3 strength or higher.

If we do get 24 named storms, that would use every name on the 2020 list and three letters of the Greek alphabet.

The previous forecast released by Colorado State University before the start of the season only predicted a slightly above-average season with 16 named storms and eight hurricanes.

One of the main reasons for the jump in the forecast is warmer than normal sea-surface temperatures. According to meteorologist Philip Klotzbach, the current temperatures rank as the fourth warmest on record since 1982.

Another reason Klotzbach’s forecast calls for an above-average season is due to stronger tropical waves coming off the coast of Africa due to an active West African Monsoon. This can lead to more conducive upper-level winds for hurricane development.

Vertical wind shear has been extremely low and a lack of El Nino are also contributing factors. You can read the full updated report on the Colorado State University website.

Tracking the Tropics is keeping you informed this hurricane season. Our team of meteorologists provides a live update every Wednesday at 2 p.m. ET.


More Tracking the Tropics Stories
Tropic storm Isaias whips up eastern US, killing at least 6
by The Associated Press / Aug 5, 2020   

WINDSOR, N.C. (AP) — At least six people were killed as Tropical Storm Isaias spawned tornadoes and dumped rain Tuesday along the U.S. East Coast after making landfall as a hurricane in North Carolina, where it caused floods and fires that displaced dozens of people.

Two people died when Isaias spun off a tornado that struck a North Carolina mobile home park. Another person died in Pennsylvania when their vehicle was overtaken by water and swept downstream. Two others were killed by falling trees toppled by the storm in Maryland and New York City, and a sixth person died in Delaware when a tree branch fell on them, authorities said.
Save As Many As You Can

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 41795
    • View Profile
🌀 Tropical Storm Isaias slams East Coast
« Reply #604 on: August 05, 2020, 07:21:19 PM »
And we are only up to "I" in the Alphabet!   :o

RE

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/-fkchiaTRqQ" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/-fkchiaTRqQ</a>
Save As Many As You Can

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 41795
    • View Profile
Don't mess with Mother Nature.  You will LOSE that battle.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/ijVijP-CDVI" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/ijVijP-CDVI</a>

RE

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/eZlpiWNKTis" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/eZlpiWNKTis</a>
Save As Many As You Can

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 41795
    • View Profile
🌀 Aftermath of storm Isaias
« Reply #606 on: August 08, 2020, 02:35:25 AM »
Look at the upside.  We only have another 15 or so to go this season based on the predictions by the Meteorologists Weathermen.  ::)

RE

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/2HmcwwRJByE" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/2HmcwwRJByE</a>
Save As Many As You Can

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 41795
    • View Profile
🌀 DANGEROUS! - Derecho Wind Storm Now Approaching Chicago
« Reply #607 on: August 10, 2020, 04:48:05 PM »
Nice day to fly a kite!

RE

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/bgcmcZCNNDo" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/bgcmcZCNNDo</a>
Save As Many As You Can

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 41795
    • View Profile
🌀 Josephine forms in the Atlantic, adding another record to this historic
« Reply #608 on: August 14, 2020, 06:27:51 AM »
This one looks like a dud.

RE

https://www.cnn.com/2020/08/13/weather/tropical-storm-josephine-forecast-record/index.html
.
Josephine forms in the Atlantic, adding another record to this historic hurricane season

By Judson Jones, CNN Meteorologist

Updated 5:57 PM ET, Thu August 13, 2020


(CNN)Tropical Storm Josephine has formed in the Atlantic, continuing this hurricane season record setting pace.
What was tropical depression eleven increased in intensity on Thursday morning with winds of 45 mph and may become stronger through Friday night, said the National Hurricane Center in their 5 p.m. EDT advisory.
This increased intensity was strong enough for the NHC to call it a tropical storm and give it a name, making it the earliest "J" named storm to form in the Atlantic ever.
The previous record-holder was Jose, which formed on August 22 during the historic 2005 hurricane season.

Josephine -- pronounced JOH-seh-feen -- is located about 865 miles east-southeast of the Leeward Islands and is tracking to the west-northwest.
"The storm will likely continue to strengthen but is expected to track north of the Leeward Islands, Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico over the weekend," CNN meteorologist Dave Hennen says.
Josephine will begin to encounter an unfavorable environment over the weekend. It will likely weaken to a depression as it turns north into the Atlantic's open waters next week.
2020 Atlantic hurricane season will be &#39;extremely active,&#39; NOAA says in updated forecast
2020 Atlantic hurricane season will be 'extremely active,' NOAA says in updated forecast
This storm comes on the heels of NOAA's updated forecasts for the season. They are now predicting up to 25 named storms -- something they have never done before.

An average season produces 12 named storms.
Josephine is the 10th named storm, and we are only two months and 13 days into the 6-month season.
Save As Many As You Can

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 41795
    • View Profile
🌀 Scared in the Dark: Iowa Pleads for Feds 6 Days After Shock Storm
« Reply #609 on: August 17, 2020, 08:27:51 AM »
https://www.thedailybeast.com/iowa-pleads-for-federal-help-6-days-after-shock-derecho-storm

Scared in the Dark: Iowa Pleads for Feds 6 Days After Shock Storm
IS THIS THING ON?

As residents were still without power and watching their food go bad, some couldn’t help wonder what was taking so long.

Paige Godden
Updated Aug. 16, 2020 10:01PM ET / Published Aug. 16, 2020 9:06PM ET


CEDAR RAPIDS, Iowa—Jessica Tennyson, 34, stays inside her apartment on the southeast side of town as long as she can at night.

Eventually, though, the heat is too much for her to bear, and she has to step out into the pitch-black street.
ADVERTISING

“I’m always afraid that one of these times I’m going to be sitting out on my porch and somebody’s just going to go bang, bang bang,” Tennyson told The Daily Beast as she held up her fingers in a way that mimicked a gun. “And I can’t see where I’m going or where I can run.”

Tennyson’s neighborhood hasn’t had power since a powerful derecho, a line of fast-moving windstorms, brought hurricane-force winds into the middle of the country on August 10. Six days after the storm erupted, some Iowa residents said it was taking far too long for the feds to come to the rescue in a region where massive damage to corn crops could wreak long-term havoc.

Others were just trying to get used to their new normal.

The local police department patrols Tennyson’s neighborhood regularly, passing by her house every ten minutes or so between 10 p.m. and daylight, since there’s a city-wide curfew in place.

“They’re trying to enforce the curfew, but at the same time, when you see their car lights on it's a very eye-opening situation where they feel they have to patrol every 10 minutes,” she said. “It puts me on edge. And I know they're there to protect their best interest, but it can be unnerving.”

Cedar Rapids residents only had about an hour to prepare for the storm after it knocked out power in Des Moines Monday morning. A derecho is rare enough in Iowa that many residents say they’d never heard the word until after the storm.
ADVERTISING

Jerry W. Frajman, a 66-year-old who lives about a mile from downtown Cedar Rapids, was watching the second episode of the old TV show The Beverly Hillbillies when the wind started blowing at speeds that topped 100 mph.

“Everything started flickering,” Frajmin recalled. “And then the power went off and it has been off ever since.”

More than 135,000 people were without power in Linn County after the storm hit Monday, and according to poweroutage.us, as of Sunday evening, at least 46,000 residents were still waiting to get their power restored.

Gary Watson, 40, who was in his ground-level apartment building when the storm swept through, was sitting outside his apartment door Sunday afternoon. He said his building has technically been deemed unsafe, since the siding was ripped off and smelly storm water has been dripping in all week.

He said he had nowhere else to go.

All of his perishable food has spoiled and he hasn’t been eating much, even though he’s been offered plenty of food from local volunteers, Watson said. He hasn’t been hungry because of all the stress.

“It’s probably not good because I’m a Type 2 Diabetic,” Watson added.

He’s hopeful his power will be back on in the next three days, since Alliant Energy has been telling residents most of the city’s power should be returned by Tuesday.

Until then, Watson planned to spend most of his days sitting outside on his red fold-up lawn chair.

Some residents were skeptical that the power would return that quickly. Power lines were still hanging down in the middle of some city streets, and massive trees still collapsed on top of others.

Joe Hendryx, 38, said his parents had been without power all week. He’s been bringing them food and cold water and things to keep them busy since they can’t leave their home due to fears of infection from COVID-19.

On Thursday, State Senator Liz Matthis, of Cedar Rapids, announced during a news conference that 100 national guard members would help the town with cleanup. And on Sunday evening, Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds formally requested an expedited Presidential Major Disaster Declaration. According to a news release from the governor’s office, the state requested nearly $4 billion to recover from the storms, which some estimates suggested had endangered a third of the state’s corn crop.

“I don’t know why we’re waiting to determine we need help,” Hendryx said. “What more proof do people need to see that we need help. It has been frustratingly slow.”

By Sunday, FEMA had already approved Iowa’s request to take part in the Lost Wages Program, which will give Iowans who were receiving unemployment benefits an additional $300 each week after a $600 pandemic benefit created by Congress expired. But it was hard for some residents to shake the feeling that they were being left out to dry.

“I think it’s been amplified because of this whole COVID thing because we already felt bored and restless and listless,” Hendryx said. “I just feel like there’s got to be so many things that I can do—and that should be done.”
Paige Godden
@PaigeGodden

Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast here.
READ THIS LIST
White House Aides Pissed at Top Official—for Wearing a Mask
Erin Banco, Asawin Suebsaeng
Diamond & Silk Suggest Fox News ‘Ordered a Hit’ on Them
Lachlan Cartwright, Andrew Kirell
Epstein Victim: He Showed Me Off to Trump When I Was 14
Kate Briquelet
The Mysterious Brutal Murder of a Millionaire Beer Heir
Nick Schager
Why Do Democrats Prefer Never-Trumpers to the Squad?
Max Burns
White House Staffers Pissed at a Top National Security Aide—for Wearing a Mask in Front of Trump
LONE RANGER

Deputy National Security Adviser Matt Pottinger has been way out front on the coronavirus. Too out front for some colleagues.
Erin Banco

National Security Reporter
Asawin Suebsaeng

White House Reporter
Updated Aug. 17, 2020 8:58AM ET / Published Aug. 17, 2020 4:53AM ET

In May, all West Wing staff were briefly ordered to wear masks at work. To this day, many continue to do so by choice, for their safety and health, with one senior Trump official telling The Daily Beast that they wear one because “I’m not a moron.” So you’d think the first high-ranking official to put one on might get some credit from his colleagues.

But this is the Trump White House, where logic isn’t always king and petty personal beefs can easily turn national policy on its head. A select group of officials have grown increasingly frustrated with Deputy National Security Adviser Matt Pottinger—for putting on a mask shortly after the coronavirus outbreak was declared a pandemic.

Months later, these senior officials still trash Pottinger behind closed doors for his decision to wear a mask at a time when their boss, President Donald Trump, and other senior administration officials chose to avoid wearing face coverings, according to three senior officials and one former official. Some of those close to Trump viewed Pottinger’s mask-wearing as an indication that the deputy national security adviser was publicly challenging the president, one of those senior officials said.

“That was something that angered and confused a bunch of people,” said one of the officials familiar with the matter. “The thinking was, ‘We are getting tested all the time, what is the point?’ [Some officials] warned him that this was something that could risk pissing off the president. But Matt did not care.”

Last month, Pottinger’s boss, National Security Adviser Robert O’Brien, tested positive for the virus.

The president and his allies have gone back and forth on whether he agrees that wearing a mask is truly needed to help contain the virus. On July 17, Trump said during a Fox News interview that he disagreed with Centers for Disease Control Director Robert Redfield that everyone should wear masks to bring the virus to heel. “I don’t believe in that, no,” Trump told Wallace. “I don’t agree with the statement that if everybody would wear a mask, everything disappears.”

Just a few days later, Trump posted a photo of himself to Twitter with a mask and said: “Many people say that it is Patriotic to wear a face mask when you can’t socially distance. There is nobody more Patriotic than me, your favorite President!”
“Trump has joked that he’s not sure if the deputy national security adviser ever takes the mask off, one senior administration official said. ”

Behind closed doors, Trump has teased Pottinger behind his back for wearing a mask in front of him. Trump has joked that he’s not sure if the deputy national security adviser ever takes it off, one senior administration official said.

Such mockery from the president on down has been a kiss of death for other officials. In 2017, for example, then-White House chief strategist Steve Bannon’s professional fate was sealed when the president started going around the West Wing gossiping about how much of a “leaker” he thought Bannon was.

But Pottinger continues to play a prominent role in Trump’s biggest priority: punishing Beijing.

In the lead-up to the 2020 presidential election, some of Trump’s top advisers are pushing ahead with plans to secure major foreign policy wins as a way to bolster the president’s chances of winning in November. As part of those efforts, national security officials have zeroed in on revamping the White House’s approach to dealing with the Chinese government.

In the last several months as the coronavirus spread across the world, Trump’s trade deal with Beijing has begun to unravel. Some experts say the Chinese are tens of billions behind on their purchasing promises and the president’s closest China hawk confidants, including Peter Navarro, have urged Trump to pull out of the deal altogether. Now, officials are trying to course-correct and get ahead of any negative press about that phased deal crumbling by announcing new, tougher actions against Beijing before the election.

Pottinger, the deputy national security adviser and former Asia director at the National Security Council, is leading that campaign. Officials close to Pottinger say he has, perhaps more than any other official operating in the national security apparatus, contributed to the implementation of something approaching a comprehensive China policy that seeks to hold Beijing accountable for its cultural genocide in Xianjing, its wide-scale theft of intellectual property, and its clampdown on protests in Hong Kong—even as Trump himself appears uninterested in going after President Xi Jinping for such abuses.

At times, that’s put Pottinger at odds with the commander in chief and other top Trump administration figures. In February 2017 Trump told Xi that he would honor the One China policy, which asserts that Taiwan will one day be reabsorbed by the People’s Republic. (It’s a vision that Pottinger has vehemently opposed under the current authoritarian system in the mainland.) Meanwhile, the Commerce Department announced a slew of deals with China that on the surface seemed like an attempt to draw Beijing in as a strategic business partner—something Pottinger has adamantly fought against.

Most recently, Pottinger rang the alarm about the dangers posed by  the coronavirus while Trump and others were brushing off the possibility of a pandemic. Pottinger pushed the administration to denounce Beijing for its delayed communication about the virus’ existence and its origins. And he lobbied his bosses early on to publicly refer to COVID-19 as the “Wuhan virus” or the “China virus.”

Pottinger is respected by Republicans on Capitol Hill and is viewed inside the top national security echelons of the administration as “a soldier,” as one former official put it. (He’s actually a retired Marine and served as a military intelligence officer in Iraq and Afghanistan.)

The result has been multiple profiles in news outlets over the last six months for Pottinger, who worked as a reporter for The Wall Street Journal before his military career.  And that attention—along with the mask-wearing—irked certain individuals in the White House even more. One profile in particular sparked tensions with O’Brien, officials said. That article, in The Washington Post, described Pottinger as an official who wields “quiet but potent influence” and is a leader in “shaping the administration’s hard line posture” against Beijing. The piece even quoted an interview with O’Brien’s predecessor H.R. McMaster, who called Pottinger “central to the biggest shift in U.S. foreign policy since the Cold War, which is the competitive approach to China.” With increased attention on Pottinger, so too came scrutiny of his work on China, particularly by O’Brien, who viewed the dwindling trade deal as a problem in part brought on by his deputy.
“If he’s pushed out, who else is going to be able to do that job? No one.”

Supporters of Pottinger, officials who work with him in the administration and several in the Washington think-tank space, say any backlash is contained to a small cohort of officials. But these supporters underscored the risk such backlash could have on any effort to advance the administration’s China strategy in the weeks leading up to the election.

“If he’s pushed out, who else is going to be able to do that job?” one individual with knowledge of the situation said. “No one.”

One way Pottinger has helped ensure his own survival in a gossipy, backstabbing Trumpworld, an arena renowned for its rapid-fire turnover, is simple: He learned how to please the boss, and how to deal with his notoriously short attention span.

Early on in the administration, Pottinger developed a specific, succinct style of briefing Trump, finding ways to hold the president’s attention and not bore him, according to a former White House official who’s been in the room when Pottinger and Trump converse. He wasn’t known as someone who had flashy, ostentatious moments when talking in private with Trump and generally kept his head down during the tumult, scandal, and relentless palace intrigue of the administration’s early months. Although he was never considered a Trump loyalist, the fact that he was vouched for and initially tapped for a position by former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn gave Pottinger some “MAGA street cred” that helped shield him from rampant suspicion, this ex-official noted.

And though Pottinger is not as personally tight with the president as some of Trump’s other China hawks are, he was known to fly on Air Force One with the president, even on domestic flights, in the early years of the Trump era, specifically to brief him on China matters. But Pottinger’s recurring focus on human rights in China has often been left on the cutting-room floor, at least as far as the sitting president is concerned.

Three months after Pottinger, speaking Mandarin, delivered a speech in May that praised the “millions of Hong Kong citizens who peacefully demonstrated for the rule of law last year,” Trump went on a Fox Sports Radio show and shrugged at the crisis. According to the president, the crisis in Hong Kong is “a little bit tough from certain standpoints” because, “you know… it’s a part, when you look, I mean, take a look at a map. It’s attached to China.”
Erin Banco

National Security Reporter
Erin.Banco@thedailybeast.com
Asawin Suebsaeng

White House Reporter
@swin24
asawin.suebsaeng@thedailybeast.com
Save As Many As You Can

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 41795
    • View Profile
https://www.foxnews.com/world/hurricane-season-atlantic-ocean-tropical-wave-system-development-monitoring-weather

Hurricane center monitoring 2 systems brewing in Atlantic as season peak approaches
Two tropical waves in the Atlantic may develop later this week
By Adam Klotz, Travis Fedschun, Brandon Noriega | Fox News

National forecast for Tuesday, August 18

Fox News meteorologist Adam Klotz has your FoxCast.

As the busiest stretch of the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season approaches, forecasters on Tuesday are monitoring two areas of disturbed weather out over the ocean.


The U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC) in Miami said Tuesday morning that one tropical wave is located over the eastern Caribbean Sea, while the second system brewing at sea is located about 900 miles west-southwest of the Cabo Verde Islands.

These two tropical waves in the Atlantic basin will have the opportunity later this week to develop as we head into the historically most active two months of hurricane season.

ATLANTIC HURRICANE SEASON: WHERE DO TROPICAL STORMS FORM IN AUGUST?

The first system over the Caribbean Sea is producing what forecasters described as an area of "disorganized thunderstorms and gusty winds."
Forecasters are monitoring two areas for development across the Atlantic basin.

Forecasters are monitoring two areas for development across the Atlantic basin. (Fox News)

While significant development of this system is still unlikely during the coming days as it moves 20 mph westward across the eastern and central Caribbean Sea, changes may come by the weekend. According to the NHC, there's a 60% chance a tropical depression forms over the next five days.

The second, broad area of low pressure out over the Atlantic is producing a "concentrated area of showers and thunderstorm," where favorable conditions exist for development.

A tropical depression is likely to form within the next couple of days while the system moves westward to west-northwestward at 15 to 20 mph.

Forecasters said there's a 70% chance within the next 48 hours and a 90% chance within the next five days.

NEW YORK TREES TURNING BROWN AFTER TROPICAL STORM ISAIAS DUE TO 'INTERESTING PHENOMENON': FORECASTERS

If the system gets named it would be "Laura" and potentially set another record this year, according to Colorado State University's hurricane research scientist Phil Klotzbach

The current record for the earliest "L" storm is Luis, which formed on Aug. 29, 1995.

ISAIAS TRIGGERED DEADLY TORNADO OUTBREAK WHILE ROARING UP EAST COAST THAT BROKE RECORDS

Neither of these systems will have an immediate impact on the U.S. but will need to be monitored late this week into early next week as they approach land.

NOAA forecasters are now calling for up to 25 named storms with winds of 39 mph or higher; of those, seven to 10 could become hurricanes. Among those hurricanes, three to six will be major, classified as Category 3, 4, and 5 with winds of 111 mph or higher.
The updated 2020 Atlantic hurricane season forecast.

The updated 2020 Atlantic hurricane season forecast. (Fox News)

That's far above an average year. Based on 1981 to 2010 data, that is 12 named storms, six hurricanes, and three major hurricanes. So far this year, there have been 11 named storms, including two hurricanes.
The most active stretch of the hurricane season is from late August to early October.

The most active stretch of the hurricane season is from late August to early October. (Fox News)

The most active stretch of the hurricane season is from late August to early October when most storms and major hurricanes are seen.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE WEATHER COVERAGE FROM FOX NEWS

The 2020 Atlantic Hurricane Season runs from June 1 to Nov. 30 and includes the names: Arthur, Bertha, Cristobal, Dolly, Edouard, Fay, Gonzalo, Hanna, Isaias, Josephine, Kyle, Laura, Marco, Nana, Omar, Paulette, Rene, Sally, Teddy, Vicky and Wilfred.
The names for the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season.

The names for the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season. (Fox News)

As activity appears to be ramping up again in the Atlantic, the East Pacific off the coast of Mexico is dealing with Hurricane Genevieve, which rapidly intensified Tuesday morning into a Category 4 hurricane.
Hurricane Genevieve can be seen off the coast of Mexico on Aug. 18, 2020.

Hurricane Genevieve can be seen off the coast of Mexico on Aug. 18, 2020. (NOAA/GOES-East)

The worst of Genevieve will remain well offshore from Mexico and Cabo San Lucas, but tropical storm warnings are in effect for parts of the Baja California peninsula as wind gusts of over 40 mph and rain will be possible Wednesday night into Thursday morning.
Save As Many As You Can

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 41795
    • View Profile
🌀 Cometh the Double Hurricane!
« Reply #611 on: August 22, 2020, 04:19:48 AM »
Now Mother Nature is getting SERIOUS!   :o

RE

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/4xEajPB_r0g" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/4xEajPB_r0g</a>
Save As Many As You Can

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 41795
    • View Profile
🌀 Tracking Tropical Storms Laura, Marco
« Reply #612 on: August 23, 2020, 03:57:18 AM »
Here cometh the Double Whammy!  :o

RE

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/EcP1zkhOj5w" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/EcP1zkhOj5w</a>
Save As Many As You Can

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 41795
    • View Profile
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/YNpsFgwAmq0" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/YNpsFgwAmq0</a>
Save As Many As You Can

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 41795
    • View Profile
🌀 Tim Tracks the Tropics: Hurricane Marco, Tropical Storm Laura
« Reply #614 on: August 24, 2020, 06:30:17 AM »
It's SHOWTIME for the Twin Hurricanes!

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/aDm4L7gjYNs" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/aDm4L7gjYNs</a>

RE

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/v1p_Q_0FU1s" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/v1p_Q_0FU1s</a>
Save As Many As You Can

 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
114 Replies
45529 Views
Last post June 06, 2015, 10:27:42 AM
by azozeo
0 Replies
6037 Views
Last post October 15, 2013, 10:36:12 PM
by steve from virginia
0 Replies
1115 Views
Last post June 03, 2016, 07:21:58 AM
by Guest