AuthorTopic: 🔥 The New World of Wildfires  (Read 1840 times)

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Another new record!

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Mendocino Complex fire grows to become largest wildfire in California history
At more than 443 square miles, the Mendocino Complex fire surpassed the Thomas Fire in December as the state's largest in recorded history.
by Tim Stelloh / Aug.06.2018 / 7:04 PM ET / Updated Aug.06.2018 / 7:44 PM ET


Image: Mendocino Complex Fire
Alex Schenck carries a water bucket while fighting to save his home as the Ranch Fire tears down New Long Valley Road near Clearlake Oaks, California, on Saturday.Noah Berger / AFP - Getty Images

A wildfire burning through Northern California became the state’s largest on record on Monday, scorching more than 283,000 acres, officials said.

The Mendocino Complex blaze — a conglomerate of two separate fires burning through rural Lake, Colusa and Mendocino counties — overtook last year’s Thomas Fire, which scorched more than 1,000 buildings and killed two people across 440 square miles in Ventura and Santa Barbara Counties.

The fire began on July 27 and was spurred on Monday by an ominous high-pressure system that brought hotter, drier and windier weather to the area, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, or Cal Fire.

The fire has destroyed dozens of homes and other buildings, and more than 11,000 structures remained threatened, the department said.

Mandatory evacuations remained in effect across Mendocino, Lake and nearby Colusa counties, though some people were allowed to return home on Monday afternoon, Cal Fire said.
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Mendocino Complex fire the fifth largest in California history
Fire in Mendocino Complex the fifth largest in CA history

Nearly 4,000 fire personnel, including 441 fire fighters, were battling the wildfire.

It was unclear what caused the blaze, but the fire was one of more than a dozen burning amid record-setting heat waves in the drought-stricken state, according to Cal Fire. Tens of thousands of residents across California have been displaced by wildfires this season, Gov. Jerry Brown told reporters Saturday.

President Donald Trump declared a state of emergency in California on July 27, authorizing the Federal Emergency Management Agency to help firefighters working to respond to the disaster areas.2
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Never let a good disaster go to waste...

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http://www.latimes.com/business/hiltzik/la-fi-hiltzik-wildfires-20180808-story.html#

Trump's minions are using California wildfires as excuse to attack endangered species protections

By Michael Hiltzik
Aug 08, 2018 | 2:15 PM


Smoke from the Northern California fires drifts over land and sea in a view taken from space on Tuesday. (NASA)

Just two days after President Trump issued an utterly uninformed tweet about the causes of the California wildfires, his ulterior motives began to come into focus.

That happened through an order issued Wednesday by Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross to the National Marine Fisheries Service and its parent agency, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Both fall under Ross’ jurisdiction.
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The order directs the agencies to “facilitate access to the water needed to fight the ongoing wildfires affecting the State of California.” It then gives the game away by making specific reference to the federal Endangered Species Act: “Consistent with the emergency consultation provisions under the ESA, Federal agencies may use any water as necessary to protect life and property in the affected areas,” the order says.

Secretary Ross’s directive is nothing more than a smokescreen designed to weaken these protections...necessary to keep these native fish from going extinct.
Kate Poole, NRDC
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Environmental experts aren’t buying Ross’ statement.

“Secretary Ross’s directive is nothing more than a smokescreen designed to weaken these protections that NMFS’s scientists determined are necessary to keep these native fish from going extinct,” Kate Poole of the Natural Resources Defense Council said after the statement was issued. “It’s almost like the extinction of these creatures is their real goal, so that they no longer have to leave any water in rivers, but can divert it all to corporate agribusiness.”

Here’s the context: Trump on Monday issued what we called a “strikingly ignorant” tweet blaming the wildfires on “bad environmental laws which aren’t allowing massive amount of readily available water to be properly utilized.” We observed that this seemed to conflate two issues.

One is the long-term whining by growers in the Central Valley, a Republican stronghold, that environmental rules (including the Endangered Species Act) have forced the diversion of water they want for irrigation into rivers. The river flows are needed to protect fish and fisheries, and are required under federal law and in accordance with court rulings.

    Column

In a strikingly ignorant tweet, Trump gets almost everything about California wildfires wrong
Aug 06, 2018 | 10:35 AM

The other issue is water for fighting the wildfires. As numerous expert sources have made plain, there is no shortage of water for this purpose. Major reservoirs are fully accessible to the fire zones and they’re at or near historical capacities.

“At this point, water supply hasn’t affected any of our operations,” Mike Mohler, deputy director of the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, or Cal Fire, told me Wednesday. The key factors in the intensity and spread of the fires are, as before, “hot and dry weather conditions.”

Ross’ statement made specific mention of the Mendocino Complex fire, which he noted “has developed into the largest in the state’s history, consuming nearly 300,000 acres in Northern California.” But the Mendocino Complex fire is immediately adjacent to Clear Lake, a major reservoir. Mohler said fire fighters have been drawing water from Clear Lake without any limitations.


The Mendocino Complex fire nearly surrounds Clear Lake reservoir, raising questions about why the Trump administration thinks there's no water to fight the fire. (Jon Schleuss / Los Angeles Times)

The Commerce Department didn’t immediately respond to my inquiry about what Ross has in mind, or what actions could be taken by NOAA and the fisheries service to respond to the current emergency. But Ross’ reference to the Endangered Species Act strongly suggests that he intends to bootstrap the wildfires into serving the administration’s existing efforts to undermine the act for the benefit of its cronies in Central Valley agriculture.

    Column

California's salmon industry fears it will be wiped out by Trump
Aug 03, 2018 | 12:30 PM

It’s also plausible that the federal government is trying to circumvent regulations governing the storage of water in the federally-controlled Shasta Lake, the state’s largest reservoir. The rules are designed to protect salmon smolt in the Sacramento River, more than 95% of which were destroyed in 2014 and 2015 by releases of water that was too warm for them to survive.

Regulations put in place after that disaster required water to be held in storage to the end of the year, so more cold water is available for the young salmon. But that reduces the water available for irrigation during the fall. Conceivably, Ross’s order could allow the reservoir to release water now—a boon to farmers, but a calamity for the salmon fishery. Importantly, releasing water now would do nothing to assist fire fighters.

As we’ve reported, the Bureau of Reclamation, an Interior Department agency, has proposed changes in both state and federal water projects to “maximize water deliveries” to non-environmental users and consider “modifications to regulatory requirements” established by the biological opinions.

Meanwhile, the Interior and Commerce departments have jointly proposed changes in the federal Endangered Species Act that would shrink the roster of species granted legal protections and loosen the rules protecting those that remain on the list.

Ross’ order certainly looks like a transparent attempt to expand that campaign. Ross hinted as much. His order not only directed NOAA to “facilitate the use of water for this emergency,” but stated that “going forward, the Department and NOAA are committed to finding new solutions to address threatened and endangered species in the context of the challenging water management situation in California.”

That certainly sounds like plans to shrink protections for threatened and endangered species by invoking all aspects of the “water management situation” in the state — including serving the growers. Anyone concerned with trying to fashion rational water policy in the face of politically self-interested interference out of Washington should take heed. The Trump administration just signaled that it will stop at nothing, no matter how illogical.

3:05 p.m.: This post has been updated with comments from Cal Fire and Kate Poole of the NRDC.

5:44 p.m.: This post has been updated with information about wager releases from Lake Shasta.
Michael Hiltzik
Michael Hiltzik
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Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Michael Hiltzik writes a daily blog appearing on latimes.com. His business column appears in print every Sunday, and occasionally on other days. As a member of the Los Angeles Times staff, he has been a financial and technology writer and a foreign correspondent. He is the author of six books, including “Dealers of Lightning: Xerox PARC and the Dawn of the Computer Age” and “The New Deal: A Modern History.” Hiltzik and colleague Chuck Philips shared the 1999 Pulitzer Prize for articles exposing corruption in the entertainment industry.
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🔥 Holy Fire, Batman!
« Reply #17 on: August 10, 2018, 01:21:34 AM »

Go to the Link to see all the Vids.

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https://abc7.com/holy-fire-chars-10236-acres-near-lake-elsinore-corona-area/3914904/

Holy Fire chars 10,236 acres as it moves close to homes in Lake Elsinore-Corona area
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The Holy Fire exploded to more than 10,200 acres on Thursday and moves dangerously close to homes in Riverside County's Lake Elsinore-Corona area.
By John Gregory and Rob McMillan
Thursday, August 09, 2018 10:04PM
LAKE ELSINORE, Calif. (KABC) --
The Holy Fire exploded to more than 10,200 acres on Thursday and moved dangerously close to homes in Riverside County's Lake Elsinore-Corona area.

The brush fire, located in the Cleveland National Forest, remained at 5 percent containment on its fourth day.


Late Thursday evening, Gov. Jerry Brown declared a state of emergency for Orange and Riverside counties as the fire raged on and expanded in size. By 8 p.m., the fire went from 9,600 acres to 10,236 acres.

A smoke-filled sky blanketed communities in the Lake Elsinore area in the early morning hours. More than 1,000 firefighters remained on the front lines as the Holy Fire continued to burn toward Horsethief Canyon, Cow Canyon and McVicker Drainage, north of Lake Elsinore. Ten helicopters and seven fixed-wing aircraft assisted firefighters.

There's a possibility of monsoonal flow, which may contribute to an increase in relative humidity and cool temperatures slightly, according to fire officials. Although the weather is slightly more favorable than in the past three days, flames got closer to homes away from Orange County and more to the northeast.

A wall of Phos-Chek was painted for miles to protect houses near Crystal Ridge Court.

"It's got a nice, little pink tone to it. It actually looks a little better than it did when they originally dropped it. It was super red, but it's OK, I'd rather have to deal with this than have to rebuild an entire new house," said Lake Elsinore resident P.J. Rodriguez.

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Smoke and ash caused areas of the Temescal Valley to get really dark as the hillsides burned and threatened homes in the area.


In the McVicker Canyon area, firefighters worked quickly and hard to save dozens of homes as flames raced up the brush right against the backyard fences.

Firefighters and residents who remained in their homes at the last minute either fled or continued to hose down their homes.

Many residents said it's been rough watching the flames get so close to their home and even hearing the fire roaring through the vegetation.



Rudy, a Riverside firefighter who had just come off the frontlines, said he watched as the flames moved into his own backyard in the Temescal Valley.

"We do our due diligence to protect those homes, but being here there's nothing I can really do. I don't have my apparatus or my crew. But I do trust the local agencies, Cal Fire, OCFA doing their jobs, so I feel safe," he said.

He added that some manmade preventions such as a quarry and construction helps to keep the fire from quickly moving in.

Outbuildings, trailers and vehicles reportedly were damaged by flames in the Cow Canyon Area, which is west of Echo Canyon Court in Lake Elsinore.

Some homes appeared to sustain damage as well at the end of Towee Lane, near a Korean Church retreat.

Officials had lowered the acreage of the fire to 3,399 acres on Tuesday but raised it to 6,200 acres Wednesday afternoon. The size then exploded to 9,614 acres, Cleveland National Forest officials announced Thursday.

No major injuries have been reported. Twelve structures were destroyed on the Orange County side. So far, no homes have been destroyed on the Lake Elsinore-Corona side.

The official cause of the fire remains unknown but on Wednesday, authorities arrested 51-year-old Forrest Gordon Clark on suspicion of felony arson among other charges in connection to the blaze. He was charged Thursday morning and failed to appear in court.

The flames caused a smoke advisory to be issued for Orange and parts of Riverside and San Bernardino counties. Those who have not been forced to evacuate are being urged to limit outdoor activity.

Mandatory evacuations:

- McVicker Canyon, Rice Canyon, Horsethief Canyon, El Cariso, Rancho Capistrano, Blue Jay, Indian Canyon, Glen Eden, Sycamore Creek and Mayhew Canyon.

- All homes on the mountainside of Lake Street and southwest of Grand Avenue to Ortega Highway.

A care and reception center is available at Temescal Canyon High School, 28755 El Toro Rd Lake Elsinore CA 92532 for residents. There is also an evacuation center at the San Juan Hills High School, located at 29211 Stallion Ridge, San Juan Capistrano.

Voluntary evacuation warnings:

- Highway 74 (Ortega Highway) west from Lookout Restaurant to Nichols Institute and all connecting roads in the communities of Rancho Capistrano, El Cariso Village and Blue Jay. Residents are advised to exit west to Orange County to avoid fire equipment coming up on the Elsinore side.

-Highway 74 eastbound is also closed.

School closures:

-All Menifee Union District and Perris High School Union schools announced they would shut down Thursday, citing the poor air quality.

-Other schools that are closed are from the Lake Elsinore Unified School District School include: Luiseno School, Rice Canyon Elementary, Terra Cota Middle School and Withrow Elementary. District officials said they will be closed until further notice.

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The latest on evacuations and closures due to the Holy Fire near Riverside and Orange counties.


The fire has been burning since Monday, when it was first reported around 1:30 p.m. near Holy Jim Canyon and Trabuco Creek roads - across the main divide between Orange and Riverside counties.
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🔥 'Extreme' Delta Fire grows to 5,000 acres, forces I-5 closure
« Reply #18 on: September 06, 2018, 03:53:12 AM »
'Extreme' Delta Fire grows to 5,000 acres, forces I-5 closure

'Extreme' Delta Fire grows to 5,000 acres, forces I-5 closure
Steve Kiggins, USA TODAY Published 2:34 a.m. ET Sept. 6, 2018 | Updated 5:21 a.m. ET Sept. 6, 2018
Delta Fire next to I-5 near Redding


(Photo: Damon Arthur/Record Searchlight)
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A fast-moving wildfire in northern California forced the closure of dozens of miles of the Pacific Coast’s primary interstate in both directions and suspended Amtrak service into Oregon on Wednesday night.

The human-caused Delta Fire is burning on both sides of Interstate 5 north of Lakehead in California’s Shasta County, which, earlier this summer, was ravaged by the deadly Carr Fire near Redding. The fire, which had consumed 5,000 acres as of 9:58 p.m. PST, had gathered strength from “mixed conifer and decadent brush with no recent fire history and heavy dead and down surface fuels,” according to Inciweb.

Fire officials didn't say whether the blaze was arson or accidental.

Carr Fire: Aerial view of California fire destruction shows extent of devastation in Redding area

Related: Fireproof homes could be the answer to massive wildfires across the West

Truckers abandoned their vehicles as the fire gained momentum. In a video, a passenger in a vehicle screams: “Oh my God, I want to go!” as trees burst into flames and sheets of fire blaze on the side of the roadway.
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About 17 big-rigs were abandoned and at least four caught fire, Lt. Cmdr. Kyle Foster of the California Highway Patrol’s Mount Shasta office told the Los Angeles Times.

U.S. Forest Service workers helped the driver of one burning truck to safety and firefighters were among those who assisted other drivers.

“There’s vehicles scattered all over,” Brandon Vaccaro wit the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection told the Redding Record-Searchlight, part of the USA TODAY Network. “Whatever occurred here was probably pretty ugly for a while.”

The only continuous highway to touch the borders of Mexico and Canada, I-5 was shut down 10 miles north of Redding to a point south of Mount Shasta. There was no timetable, as of Wednesday night for the interstate’s reopening.

The fire, reported at 12:51 p.m., was zero percent contained on Wednesday night, with fire crews listing its behavior as "extreme."

While the Delta Fire was not an immediate threat to any of the area’s larger cities and towns, the wildfire had destroyed abandoned trucks and forced evacuations for residents adjacent to the interstate to the border of neighboring Siskiyou County, the Redding Record Searchlight reported.

The city of Dunsmuir was placed under an evacuation warning late Wednesday night, with the fire burning about 15 miles away, according to the Record-Searchlight.

In a Facebook Live video from near the fire, CHP Patrol Sgt. Tim Hinkson said, “It’s just going to be a mess out there on I-5.”

On the freeway’s closure, Hinkson said, “It’s just too dangerous to let cars go through there.”

Amtrak's Coast Starlight service, which runs from Sacramento to Klamath Falls, would resume when "conditions safely permit," a company spokesperson told the Record-Searchlight via email.

The Delta Fire sparked just six days after full containment of the Carr Fire, which killed eight people, destroyed more than 1,600 structures and burned nearly 230,000 acres over five weeks. The sixth-most destructive wildfire in Golden State history cost nearly $160 million in suppression efforts.

At one point, the Carr Fire jumped the Sacramento River and encroached on Redding, the region’s largest city, forcing mandatory widespread evacuations and knocking out power.
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🔥 Thousands evacuated as destructive Butte County wildfire grows
« Reply #19 on: November 09, 2018, 12:02:01 AM »
https://www.kcra.com/article/butte-count-wildfire-burns-20000-acres-thousands-evacuated-from-paradise/24838602

Thousands evacuated as destructive Butte County wildfire grows

Camp Fire grows to 18,000 acres
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KCRA Updated: 8:39 PM PST Nov 8, 2018
KCRA Staff
-1:41
Show Transcript
BUTTE COUNTY, Calif. (KCRA) —

Tens of thousands of people are forced to evacuate Thursday as a destructive wildfire continues to grow in Butte County.

The fire, called the Camp Fire, has destroyed several hundred structures in Paradise, California, and injured multiple people.
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"Pretty much the community of Paradise is destroyed, it's that kind of devastation," Cal Fire Capt. Scott McLean said late Thursday. "The wind that was predicted came and just wiped it out."

The wildfire ignited around 6:30 a.m. in the Camp Creek Road area near Highway 70 in the Feather River Canyon. As of 7 p.m., the fire was estimated to be 20,000 acres in size with no containment, Cal Fire said.

Windy conditions and low humidity caused the flames to to spread quickly, officials said.

The fire was moving toward a Paradise hospital on Pentz Road, the California Highway Patrol said. More than 60 patients were evacuated to other facilities, some buildings caught fire and were damaged, but the main facility, Adventist Health Feather River Hospital, was not, spokesperson Jill Kinney said.

Some of the patients were initially turned around during their evacuation because of gridlocked traffic and later airlifted to other hospitals, along with some staff, Kinney said.

Four hospital employees were briefly trapped in the basement and rescued by CHP officers, Kinney said.
EVACUATIONS

The town of Pulga and several areas of Paradise have been told to evacuate, according to the Butte County Sheriff's Office and CHP Oroville. If you need assistance evacuating, call 911.

Below is the latest list of evacuation orders:

   Town of Pulga

   Butte College

   Town of Paradise

   Magalia, Concow, Centerville and Butte Creek Canyon areas

   Cherokee from Highway 70 to the lake south to table mountain boulevard

   Oro Chico Highway from Durham Dayton north to Estates Drive

   Butte County has issued evacuation orders for the following zones: Nimshew Zone, Lower Clark Zone, Lower Skyway Zone, Lower Neal Zone, Upper Honey Run Zone, Carnegie Zone, North Pines Zone, North Fir Haven Zone, South Fir Haven Zone, South Pine Zone, Old Magalia Zone and South Coutelenc Zone

   All of Clark Road and all of Pentz Road south to Hwy. 70, everything west to 99 and south to 149

   Area of Hwy 70 from Pulga down to the West Branch Bridge on both sides of road including Yankee Hill

Don't know your evacuation zone? Look at the map below or CLICK HERE
KCRA-TV

An evacuation warnings are in place for:

   The Humbug Zone, Lovelock Zone and North Coutelenc Zone

   Area west of Hwy. 99 from Hwy. 149 north to Chico City Limits west to Midway

   Hwy 32 at Nople Avenue down to the Chico City Limits

   Skyway from Lower Paradise down the Skyway to the Chico City Limits

   Hwy 32 to Nople Avenue up to Butte County Line

There are currently no evacuation orders or warnings in the City of Chico due to the wildfire, the Chico Fire Department said.

EVACUATION SHELTERS

The evacuation center at the Neighborhood Church in Chico is full, Butte County officials tweeted. Room is still available in the following evacuation centers:

   Oroville Nazarene Church at 2238 Monte Vista Ave. in Oroville

   Butte County Fairgrounds at 199 E Hazel St in Gridley

   Chico Elks Lodge at 1705 Manzanita Ave in Chico (will be open by 8:30 p.m.)

Butte County officials are asking evacuees to register with on the Red Cross Safe & Well website. Concerned family and friends can also search for evacuees on the site through "Search Registrants."
INJURIES

Seven people have been injured so far, including two firefighters, according the Butte County Sheriff's Office.

CHP said it has aircraft working with Enloe Medical Center to treat patients.
BATTLING THE BLAZE

Officials were sending as many firefighters as they could, Cal Fire spokesman Rick Carhart said.

"Every engine that we could put on the fire is on the fire right now, and more are coming," he said. "There are dozens of strike teams that we're bringing in from all parts of the state."

Fire officials said the flames were being fueled by winds, low humidity, dry air and severely parched brush and ground from months without rain.

"Basically, we haven't had rain since last May or before that," said Read, the fire chief. "Everything is a very receptive fuel bed. It's a rapid rate of spread."

Acting California Gov. Gavin Newsom has declared a state of emergency for the area.

Butte County Sheriff Kory Honea confirmed reports that evacuees had to abandon their vehicles. Rescuers were trying to put them in other vehicles, he said.

"We're working very hard to get people out. The message I want to get out is: If you can evacuate, you need to evacuate," Honea said.

The National Weather Service issued red-flag warnings for fire dangers in many areas of the state, saying low humidity and strong winds were expected to continue through Friday evening.
ROAD CLOSURES

   Highway 99 is closed in both directions from Durham Pentz Road to Neal Road due to zero visibility

   Highway 99 closed in both directions from Southgate Avenue in Chico to junctions Hwy. 149

   Eastbound Highway 32 at Yosemite Drive is closed due to the flames jumping the canyon

   Highway 32 closed at junction with Highway 36 in Tehama County and at Canyon Shadows in Butte County

   Highway 191 closed at the junction of Highway 70

   Highway 70 closed at eastbound and westbound connectors to northbound Highway 149

   Highway 70 closed from 4.6 miles east of the junction of Highway 191 at Pentz Road to the north junction of Highway 89
POWER OUTAGES

About 14,000 PG&E customers are without power in Butte and Plumas counties.

PG&E has shut off power in the surrounding area of the blaze at firefighters' request. No proactive power shutoffs were initiated, the company said.

Other outages in the area were caused by the fire.
CAL FIRE MAP

Can't see the map? CLICK HERE

No other details have been released.

Stay with KCRA for updates.
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🔥 Paradise goes up in flames
« Reply #20 on: November 09, 2018, 03:25:34 AM »
https://www.yahoo.com/news/evacuations-ordered-northern-california-wildfire-grows-171906424.html

Wildfire devastates California town of Paradise
[Associated Press]

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DON THOMPSON and NOAH BERGER
,Associated Press•November 8, 2018
Scroll back up to restore default view.

PARADISE, Calif. (AP) — Tens of thousands of people fled a fast-moving wildfire Thursday in Northern California, some clutching babies and pets as they abandoned vehicles and struck out on foot ahead of the flames that forced the evacuation of an entire town and destroyed hundreds of structures.

"Pretty much the community of Paradise is destroyed, it's that kind of devastation," said Cal Fire Capt. Scott McLean late Thursday. "The wind that was predicted came and just wiped it out."

McLean estimated that a couple of thousand structures were destroyed in the town of 27,000 residents about 180 miles (290 kilometers) northeast of San Francisco, where residents scrambled to flee. The extent of the injuries and specific damage count was not immediately known as officials could not access the dangerous area.

Butte County CalFire Chief Darren Read said at a news conference that two firefighters and multiple residents were injured.

As she fled, Gina Oviedo described a devastating scene in which flames engulfed homes, sparked explosions and toppled utility poles.

"Things started exploding," Oviedo said. "People started getting out of their vehicles and running."

An Associated Press photographer saw dozens of businesses and homes leveled or in flames, including a liquor store and gas station.

"It's a very dangerous and very serious situation," Butte County Sheriff Kory Honea said. "I'm driving through fire as we speak. We're doing everything we can to get people out of the affected areas."

The blaze erupted as windy weather swept the state, creating extreme fire danger. A wind-whipped fire north of Los Angeles in Ventura County burned up to 15 square miles and at least one home in a matter of hours. It threatened thousands of homes and prompted evacuations of a mobile home park, a state university campus and some neighborhoods. A nearby blaze was smaller at about 2 square miles but moving quickly.

Acting California Gov. Gavin Newsom declared a state of emergency for the fire-stricken area in Northern California and requested a presidential disaster declaration, saying that dangerous weather conditions were expected to last several days.

Shari Bernacett said her husband tried to get people to leave the Paradise mobile home park they manage. He "knocked on doors, yelled and screamed" to alert as many residents as possible, Bernacett said.

"My husband tried his best to get everybody out. The whole hill's on fire. God help us!" she said before breaking down crying. She and her husband grabbed their dog, jumped in their pickup truck and drove through flames before getting to safety, she said.

Terrifying videos posted on social media showed cars driving along roads that looked like tunnels of fire with flames on both sides of the road.

Concerned friends and family posted frantic messages on Twitter and other sites saying they were looking for loved ones, particularly seniors who lived at retirement homes or alone.

Among them was Kim Curtis, who was searching for her grandmother, who told family at 8 a.m. Thursday that she would flee her Paradise home in her Buick with her cat. Her grandmother, who is in her 70s and lives alone, never showed up up at a meeting spot in Chico, though.

"We've just been posting all over social media. And just praying for a miracle, honestly," said Curtis, who lives in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Officials were sending as many firefighters as they could, Cal Fire spokesman Rick Carhart said.

"Every engine that we could put on the fire is on the fire right now, and more are coming," he said. "There are dozens of strike teams that we're bringing in from all parts of the state."

The sheriff confirmed reports that evacuees had to abandon their vehicles. Rescuers were trying to put them in other vehicles, he said.

"We're working very hard to get people out. The message I want to get out is: If you can evacuate, you need to evacuate," Honea said.

The wildfire was reported around daybreak. Within six hours, it had grown to more than 26 square miles (69 square kilometers), Gaddie said.

Thick gray smoke and ash filled the sky above Paradise and could be seen from miles away.

Fire officials said the flames were being fueled by winds, low humidity, dry air and severely parched brush and ground from months without rain.

"Basically, we haven't had rain since last May or before that," said Read, the fire chief. "Everything is a very receptive fuel bed. It's a rapid rate of spread."

At the hospital in Paradise, more than 60 patients were evacuated to other facilities and some buildings caught fire and were damaged. But the main facility, Adventist Health Feather River Hospital, was not, spokeswoman Jill Kinney said.

Some of the patients were initially turned around during their evacuation because of gridlocked traffic and later airlifted to other hospitals, along with staff, Kinney said.

Four hospital employees were briefly trapped in the basement and rescued by California Highway Patrol officers, Kinney said.

The National Weather Service issued red-flag warnings for fire dangers in many areas of the state, saying low humidity and strong winds were expected to continue through Friday evening.

___

Associated Press writers Paul Elias, Jocelyn Gecker, Janie Har, Daisy Nguyen, Olga R. Rodriguez, Sudhin Thanawala and Juliet Williams in San Francisco, Sophia Bollag in Sacramento and Jennifer Sinco Kelleher in Honolulu contributed to this report.
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🔥 Santa Ana Winds Could Push Hill Fire All the Way to the Pacific Ocean
« Reply #21 on: November 09, 2018, 04:49:04 AM »
This one looks like it will make it to LA.  Big Motherfucker.  Collapse has arrived for another 40,000 or so Californicators.

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Santa Ana Winds Could Push Hill Fire All the Way to the Pacific Ocean, Ventura County Fire Official Says
Posted 3:05 PM, November 8, 2018, by Marissa Wenzke, Melissa Pamer, Erin Myers and Chris Wolfe, Updated at 04:25AM, November 9, 2018

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A quick-moving wildfire that started Thursday afternoon in the Santa Rosa Valley jumped the 101 Freeway and is likely to head all the way to the Pacific Ocean amid high winds, the Ventura County incident commander said.

The Hill Fire has prompted mandatory evacuations affecting at least 1,200 homes  – and forced the closure of the busy 101 Freeway, which is likely to remain off-limits to traffic overnight. Naval Base Ventura County Point Mugu was under a mandatory evacuation order.

The Hill Fire was burning just a few miles from the site of mass shooting that also brought out Ventura County first responders Thursday at the Borderline Bar & Grill in Thousand Oaks.

The blaze started in a steep, rocky area about 2 p.m. near Hill Canyon and Santa Rosa roads and, driven by winds of 25 to 30 mph, burned toward Newbury Park. Within 12 to 15 minutes, it jumped the 101 Freeway and continued burning on the south side, authorities said.

“Santa Ana winds outpaced our firefighting resources,” Ventura County Fire Department Assistant Chief Chad Cook said.

Firefighters were able to help motorists who were stranded on the freeway shelter in place in their vehicles as they faced “direct flame impingement,” Cook said. Fixed-wing aircraft dropped retardant along the freeway corridor from a high altitude – where pilots needed to fly to avoid power lines in the area, he said.

The easterly winds continued pushing the blaze toward the area burned by the devastating 2016 Springs Fire, where vegetation is less abundant than where the Hill Fire began. That slowed the spread, Cook said.

About 1 1/2 hours after the Hill Fire began, the Fire Department estimated it had grown to 8,000 to 10,000 acres. But by about 8 p.m., Cook said at a news conference that it was more like 5,000 to 7,000 acres. Daylight will bring better mapping and a more accurate measurement, Cook said.

Meanwhile, another blaze – the Woolsey Fire in eastern Ventura County – was burning in the Simi Hills near the former Rocketdyne facility, prompting mandatory evacuations in Bell Canyon and surrounding neighborhoods, as well as voluntary orders in other areas nearby.

The Hill Fire has “greatly taxed our resources,” Cook said, but more firefighters were en route to Ventura County and he was confident the department could handle the two blazes overnight. Four hundred to 500 firefighters are working the Hill Fire. Los Angeles city and county firefighters are helping on the Woolsey Fire.

A fire engineer received a minor injury in the Hill Fire, the assistant captain said.

Ventura County has four firefighting helicopters capable of working water drops overnight, and they were equipped to continue doing so, Cook said.

The winds were expected to pick up again after midnight and into morning. Ridge tops could see winds of 40 to 50 mph, and that could push the blaze some 5 to 6 miles toward the Pacific Ocean, similar to the path of the Springs Fire, Cook said.

A red flag warning for Santa Ana winds is in effect Thursday and Friday for Ventura and Los Angeles counties. The strongest winds should occur Thursday night, and relative humidity will drop into the single digits, according to the National Weather Service.

About 2 1/2 hours after the Hill Fire broke out around 2 p.m., a home, trucks and trailers appeared to be burning in the area of Old Conejo Road and Vista Conejo on the western end of Thousand Oaks, aerial video from Sky5 showed.

Cook said only some outbuildings and RVs had burned – no residential or commercial structures. Steel transmission towers for power lines that were in the path of the fire are “robust,” he added.

Evacuation orders, road closures

Residents in the Camarillo Springs area and Vicieto Trailer Park are facing mandatory evacuations, as are the California State University Channel Islands, Dos Vientos areas, the Ventura County Fire Department said on Twitter.

For the Dos Vientos and Camarillo Springs areas, some 1,200 homes were evacuated, the Fire Department said.

Evacuated residents were directed to the Borchard Community Center in Newbury Park, located at 190 Reino Road, as well as the Camarillo Community Center, 1605 East Burnley Street, officials said. Both were accepting small animals.

The Ventura County Fair Grounds, 10 W. Harbor Blvd. in Ventura and Pierce College , 7100 El Rancho Drive in Woodland Hills, were accepting large animals, while the Ventura County Animal Shelter, 600 Aviation Drive in Camarillo, was available to house small animals, authorities said.

On the eastern edge of Camarillo, residents were preparing for evacuation.

“It’s just insane, burning right up into our backyard. It’s never been this close to our actual home before,” said Chris Piantino. “We’re going to stay as long as possible, until we need to get out, then I’ll get my kinds, my grandkids, my wife, all the pets, and load them up.”

Lots of local families in the area are feeling heartache due the fires and the mass shooting, he noted.

“It’s just sad to see the whole county going through such devastation at the moment,” Piantino said.

The northbound 101 Freeway is closed at State Route 23, with traffic being diverted onto northbound State Route 23, Caltrans said. The southbound 101 Freeway is closed at Pleasant Valley Road.

Officials also said Moorpark Road is closed from the 101 Freeway to Los Padres Drive. North and south off-ramps for the freeway at Moorpark Road are also closed.

Thursday evening, the Pleasant Valley School District announced all schools would be closed on Friday. Conejo Valley Unified schools were also set to be closed, as were Las Virgenes Unified schools and Simi Valley Unified School District campuses. Find a full list of school closures at the Ventura County Office of Education website.

Related stories

    Small Plane Makes Emergency Landing on 210 Freeway in Upland; No Reported Injuries
    Woolsey Fire: 75,000 Homes Evacuated Along Ventura-L.A. County Line as Massive Wind-Driven Blaze Rages
    13 Dead, Including Sheriff’s Sergeant and Gunman, in Mass Shooting at Thousand Oaks Bar

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Re: 🔥 Santa Ana Winds Could Push Hill Fire All the Way to the Pacific Ocean
« Reply #22 on: November 09, 2018, 08:42:54 AM »
This one looks like it will make it to LA.  Big Motherfucker.  Collapse has arrived for another 40,000 or so Californicators.

RE
Santa Ana Winds Could Push Hill Fire All the Way to the Pacific Ocean, Ventura County Fire Official Says


This is unbelievable, and not in a good way. Wow.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

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Re: 🔥 Santa Ana Winds Could Push Hill Fire All the Way to the Pacific Ocean
« Reply #23 on: November 09, 2018, 08:58:23 AM »
This one looks like it will make it to LA.  Big Motherfucker.  Collapse has arrived for another 40,000 or so Californicators.

RE
Santa Ana Winds Could Push Hill Fire All the Way to the Pacific Ocean, Ventura County Fire Official Says


This is unbelievable, and not in a good way. Wow.

It's Climate Change you can believe in.

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https://ktla.com/2018/11/09/several-homes-burned-thousands-more-threatened-as-woolsey-fire-threatens-to-jump-101-freeway/

Woolsey Fire Explodes to 54 Square Miles, Threatens Tens of Thousands of Homes; Containment at 0%
Posted 5:23 AM, November 9, 2018, by Anthony Kurzweil, Eric Spillman, Ellina Abovian, Tracy Bloom and John Fenoglio, Updated at 05:09PM, November 9, 2018

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A destructive wildfire exploded in size to 35,000 acres as it raged out of control in L.A. and Ventura counties, threatening tens of thousands of homes and spurring new evacuation orders Friday afternoon.

The Woolsey Fire has already destroyed numerous homes and structures in areas such as Oak Park, Calabasas and Bell Canyon, with flames threatening to burn down more despite firefighters’ best efforts.

Los Angeles County Fire Chief Daryl Osby estimated that 100 structures have been lost, though he cautioned the total amount won’t be known until damage assessment teams are sent out, which won’t happen until Saturday.

Officials noted that flames remain “very active” in Westlake, Calabasas, Bell Canyon and the area south of the 101 to the Pacific Coast Highway in Malibu.

Meanwhile, fire movement in the north and west parts of Thousands Oaks has moderated, giving firefighters a chance to perform mop up operations and begin perimeter control.

The wildfire, which started near the Los Angeles/Ventura county border Thursday, was burning toward the Pacific Ocean on Friday after flames jumped the 101 Freeway in Agoura Hills.

By 12:30 p.m., the massive inferno threatened populated areas of Malibu, and city officials were urging all residents to leave their homes.

“Fire is now burning out of control and heading into populated areas of Malibu. All residents must evacuate immediately,” the city said in an alert.

A short time later, an evacuation order was issued for Hidden Hills, where residents were urged by the L.A. County Sheriff’s Department to leave right away. They were asked to take Valley Circle Boulevards toward Chatsworth.

Other areas being evacuated early Friday afternoon included Topanga Canyon, Monte Nido, Wood Ranch and Long Canyon.

Acting Gov. Gavin Newsom has declared a state of emergency due to the Woolsey and nearby burning Hill fires.

The Hill Fire was around 6,000 acres, however diminished activity has allowed officials to concentrate more on the Woolsey Fire, Ventura County Fire Chief Mark Lorenzen said during a morning news conference.

A number of structures were lost in the firefight overnight, Lorenzen said.

No estimate on the number of homes and structures lost was given.

A portion of Western Town on Paramount Ranch in Agoura Hills was among the structures lost, the Santa Monica Mountains tweeted.

The raging inferno also forced the closure of a stretch of the 101 Freeway just before 6 a.m., as flames from the Woolsey Fire stretched across lanes to the south side near Liberty Canyon Road, the Fire Department tweeted.

Ventura County Fire Department Captain Scott Dettorre told KTLA he was concerned that as the fire crossed the freeway “it will make its historic and typical run all the way down Pacific Coast Highway. Threatening more homes, more property, more lives.”

Mandatory evacuations in Malibu were issued a short time later.

As flames continue their march toward the ocean, residents attempting to evacuate were urged to head south toward Santa Monica before turning further inland.


Woolsey fire facts

-The fire began about 2:30 p.m. Thursday in Woolsey Canyon, east of Simi Valley.

-It has burned 35,000 acres as of 4:30 p.m. Friday.

-No injuries have been reported.

-More than 75,000 homes have been evacuated, said Los Angeles Fire Department spokesman Erik Scott.

-Roughly 200,00 residents have been evacuated, L.A. County Fire Department County Capt. Tony Imbrenda told KTLA.

-About 56,000 people are without power in L.A. and Ventura counties.

-A smoke advisory is in effect for portions of the western San Fernando Valley and parts of northwest coastal L.A. County.

-Winds are carrying ash and dust as far away as Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, and an advisory has been issued in for areas there.

-Fire crews are dealing with 40 mph wind gusts and more than 400 firefighters from Ventura County, Los Angeles County, the City of Los Angeles and Cal Fire were battling the brush fire.
Mandatory evacuations

Los Angeles County

    The entire City of Malibu
    All of Hidden Hills
    Monte Nido
    Topanga Canyon
    All residences off Parkway Calabasas, including The Oaks, Vista Point, Westridge, Calabasas Hills, Calabasas Park Estates and the Estates at the Oaks.
    Areas south of the 101 Freeway from the Ventura line to Malibu Canyon. Residents should use PCH to evacuate and avoid canyon roads.
    North of Kanan Road, west of Lindero Canyon to the 23 Freeway extending north of Sunset Hills Boulevard along Erbes Road to Olson Road.
    North of Sunset Hills Bloulevard, South of Olson Road and west of the 23 Freeway.
    South of 101 Freeway, north of Mulholland Highway, west of Las Virgenes Road, east of Westlake Boulevard.

Ventura County

    Saddlebow between Maverick Lane and Morgan Road in Bell Canyon, north of the 101 Freeway, south of Bell Canyon Road, west of Valley Circle, east of the 23 Freeway.
    Oak Park, entire community
    Wood Ranch (See map here)
    Long Canyon (See map here)
    Long Canyon Road to Valley Gate Road
    Thousand Oaks – Thousand Oaks Blvd. north to Sunset Hills, from Oak Park west to Highway 23
    West of Highway 23 – south of East Olsen Road, north of Pederson Road
    South of Bard Lake, east of Highway 23
    South of Highway 101, east of Reino Road, north of Potrero Road, east to the L.A. / Ventura County line
    Point Mugu Naval Base
    All areas of Camarillo Springs
    All areas of Vallecito Trailer Park
    All areas of California State University Channel Islands
    Parts of Dos Vientos (see map here)
    Parts of South Coast (see map here)

Voluntary evacuations

    Lake Sherwood and the area south of Highway 101 and north of Potrero Road between Westlake Boulevard and Wendy Drive in Thousand Oaks.

Updated information on evacuations and road closures can be found on VCEmergency.com and the L.A. County website.
Evacuation Centers

Evacuation centers are open Ventura and Los Angeles counties.

Borchard Community Center, Rancho Santa Susana Recreation Center, Camarillo Community Center, Thousand Oaks Teen Center, and Goebel Adult Community Center are open in Ventura County.

Taft High School and Pierce College are open to people in Los Angeles County. An evacuation center was also opened at Palisades High School, located at 15777 Bowdoin St, in Pacific Palisades.
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Re: 🔥 The New World of Wildfires
« Reply #25 on: November 09, 2018, 05:31:55 PM »
View from the office of a friend of mine--

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

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Re: 🔥 The New World of Wildfires
« Reply #26 on: November 09, 2018, 06:02:37 PM »
View from the office of a friend of mine--



Hell  :evil4: comes to Malibu.

Unlike poor neighborhoods, most of these folks have fire insurance.  The insurance tab is going to be phenomenal.

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Re: 🔥 The New World of Wildfires
« Reply #27 on: November 09, 2018, 06:14:24 PM »
View from the office of a friend of mine--



Hell  :evil4: comes to Malibu.

Unlike poor neighborhoods, most of these folks have fire insurance.  The insurance tab is going to be phenomenal.

RE

No kidding. Astronomical.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

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🔥 Malibu Burns as Lady Gaga, Kardashians Lead Celebrity Exodus
« Reply #28 on: November 10, 2018, 12:02:11 AM »
In this disaster, a little ray of Sunshine! Homeless Kardashians!  :icon_sunny:

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business
Malibu Burns as Lady Gaga, Kardashians Lead Celebrity Exodus
By Anousha Sakoui
November 9, 2018, 5:21 PM AKST


    Dozens of multimillion-dollar homes destroyed by wildfire
    Packing up art, pets as flames scorch Santa Monica Mountains

The Woolsey fire burns a home near Malibu Lake in Malibu on Nov. 9. Photographer: Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP Photo
LISTEN TO ARTICLE
4:19

Malibu resident Georgienne Bradley, a deep-sea diver and conservationist who’s known for swimming with sharks, packed her belongings and prepared to evacuate her beachfront home Friday when confronted with the deadlier threat of an uncontained wildfire.

“They say the winds are going to die down, but that’s all guesswork,” Bradley said as she packed paintings and her dog and two cats into her car. “I can’t really move on the Pacific Coast Highway, but I’m not going to just stand around and watch and then wish I had done things differently.”

In Southern California, two fires have consumed more than 40,000 acres in Los Angeles and Ventura counties. Malibu, the coastal enclave of the rich and famous, was evacuated after flames swept southwest across the Santa Monica Mountains toward the ocean. The Malibu blaze, dubbed the Woolsey Fire by officials, has burned 35,000 acres in the hills northwest of Los Angeles since it began Thursday afternoon and was still nowhere near being contained. Almost 150,000 homes have been ordered evacuated, including the residences of some of the wealthiest enclaves in the country.

The conflagration has destroyed dozens of those houses, including Caitlyn Jenner’s in Malibu, according to ABC7 News. Singer and actor Lady Gaga posted video of her evacuation from her $22.5 million ocean-view mansion. The Kardashian family, including Kim and Kourtney, posted photos of packed-up cars and updates on their movements. Scott Derrickson, director of Marvel’s “Doctor Strange” movie, said on Twitter that he lost his home to the wildfire.
Western Town Burns

The National Park Service said that Western Town, a faux village at Paramount Ranch in the Santa Monica Mountains north of Malibu used for movies and TV shows from “The Cisco Kid” to “Westworld,” had burned.

As celebrities and other residents fled, gasoline proved to be the thing they needed most. Mark Gondola, a manager at an ARCO gas station on the Pacific Coast Highway, pulled an all-nighter to help some of the evacuees fleeing the blaze. As traffic backed up along the few evacuation routes from the hilly, coastal community, many ran out of gas and came to buy more for their stalled cars.

“This is what happens when people aren’t prepared,” Gondola said as he helped customers fill red gas cans. “It’s been really crazy.”
‘Get Out’

Farther up the beach, Heather Jones, a physician at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, packed her dog into her Mini. About an hour after receiving the order to evacuate, she was dressed in jeans, flip flops and a tank top, ready to evacuate the property for the first time in the 10 years she has lived there, she said.

“I guess we are leaving,” Jones said. “It was pretty unclear whether this part of Malibu had to leave. My mom keeps texting asking if I’m OK, so I figured it’s better just to get out of here so she doesn’t have to worry.”

Some families traveled in a convoy to evacuate. Erica Phillipson, from Saddle Peak near Topanga Canyon, drove behind her husband, whose car was filled with suitcases and a bodyboard. With Phillipson were her two young children in child seats in the back row and the family dog.

The mayor of Thousand Oaks, California, said some of the people affected by Wednesday’s mass shooting at a country-and-western bar in the town north of Malibu have been asked to leave their homes. About 75 percent of the city is evacuated, Mayor Andy Fox said. No lives have been lost in the Southern California fires, he said. “Homes can be rebuilt, property can be reacquired,” Fox said.

The California Highway Patrol said it had closed traffic northbound on Pacific Coast Highway, allowing four lanes of vehicles to head south away from the conflagration. In Ventura County, north of Malibu, some firefighters were pulling people from burning homes, officials said. Los Angeles County Fire Chief Daryl Osby said his department had hoped to hold the fire to the north of the 101 freeway, but it jumped the highway in several locations because of high winds. He said he expected it to be windy Sunday as well.

At 35,000 acres, the Woolsey Fire is more than twice the size of Manhattan, which is about 15,000 acres. The fire has more than doubled in size from this morning. when officials said it was 14,000 acres. Hundreds of miles north of Malibu, in Northern Caifornia, a massive blaze burning near the town of Chico has been blamed for at least nine deaths.
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🔥 9 Dead in Wildfire: Most Destructive in California History
« Reply #29 on: November 10, 2018, 08:50:03 AM »
The insurance cost for this is going to be beyond belief.  THOUSANDS of $1,000,000  homes incinerated.

If you wanna live in Sunny CA, I suggest a Monolithic Dome.

RE

https://weather.com/news/news/2018-11-09-northern-california-wildfire-camp-fire-paradise/

News
9 Dead in Wildfire That Destroyed Northern California Town and Is Now the Most Destructive Fire in California History
By Pam Wrightless than an hour agoweather.com

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01:18
Tens of Thousands Evacuated as Deadly Wildfires Char California Towns
A wildfire known as the Camp Fire has now killed at least six people and burned numerous structures in Paradise, California.
At a Glance

    The town of Paradise was destroyed by the fire and nine people have lost their lives. The Camp Fire is now the most destructive fire in California history. Authorities confirmed several injuries and at least 6,700 structures destroyed in Butte County.

Nine people have died as a result of the Camp Fire, a fast-moving Northern California wildfire that has become the state's most destructive on record, officials said Friday night.

Butte County Sheriff Korey Honea said three people were found outside homes and four people inside vehicles. He said another victim was found outside near a vehicle.

All the victims were found in Paradise, a town of 27,000 that was evacuated as a result of the fire.

Authorities say they conducted numerous rescues Friday as they fought the flames, including using helicopters to rescue five people in the nearby community of Magalia.

An estimated 6,453 homes and 260 commercial structures have already been destroyed by the fire, according to CalFire. Another 15,000 remained threatened in the area.

An estimated 80 to 90 percent of Paradise was wiped out by flames Thursday night, the town mayor told the Sacremento Bee.

The sheriff says they have taken 35 reports of missing people.

Three firefighters have been injured, CalFire said Friday.

The Camp Fire, which started early Thursday morning, had grown in size to 156 square miles by Saturday morning and was 20 percent contained.

Pacific Gas & Electric Co. said in a one-paragraph summary filed Thursday with state utility regulators that it had experienced a problem on an electrical transmission line near the Camp Fire site 15 minutes before the blaze broke out, the Associated Press reported. The company said it later observed damage to a transmission tower on the line near the town of Paradise.

Capt. Scott McLean of the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection said crews basically gave up attacking the flames and instead helped people get out alive.

“There was really no firefight involved,” he said.

By Friday morning, the fire was encroaching on the nearby city of Chico, prompting new evacuations.

Capt. Scott McLean of the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection said flames from the blaze had reached the eastern side of Chico, a city of more than 90,000 residents.

The small communities of Stirling City and Inskip, north of Paradise, were also evacuated on Friday.

(MORE: Why California's Wildfires Are So Dangerous in Fall)

Officials confirmed told the Associated Press that some Paradise residents who attempted to escape the fire in their vehicles Thursday were forced to flee on foot – some holding pets and even babies in their grasp – as the flames drew closer. With few options out of Paradise, roads quickly became gridlocked, and abandoned cars left in the middle of the road only made problems worse.

"It is pure chaos up here," CHP public information officer Ryan Lambert told the Los Angeles Times.

Other towns evacuated included Centerville and Butte Creek, northwest of Paradise. Evacuations were also ordered in the nearby hamlets of Pulga and Concow.

"It’s bad," Honea told the Chico Enterprise-Record. "We’re trying to get as many people out as quickly as possible and save as many lives as we can."

In Concow, some residents, like Colton Percifield, were forced to drive through the flames and thick smoke just to survive.

"The hardest part was there was no visibility ... it was pitch black," he told The Weather Channel in a phone interview Thursday night. He also said many of the homes in his neighborhood were destroyed by the fire, but he was able to safely escape.

Feather River Hospital, a retirement home and Ponderosa Elementary School in Paradise were evacuated, the Enterprise-Record also said, and Butte College was closed.

Patients in the Feather River Hospital were rescued Thursday afternoon as the roof of the emergency room went ablaze.

The rapid growth of the fire took many residents by surprise. Shary Bernacett said she and her husband "knocked on doors, yelled and screamed" to alert as many of the residents of the mobile home park they manage in Paradise just minutes before the fire arrived, she told the AP.

"My husband tried his best to get everybody out. The whole hill's on fire. God help us!" Bernacett, in tears, told the AP.

The Bernacetts managed to escape the fire with their dog but had to drive through 12-foot-high flames before reaching safety on Highway 99.

(MORE: The Science Behind Santa Ana Winds)

At least 24,000 homes and businesses, or about half of all customers, remained without power Saturday morning in Butte County, according to PowerOutage.us. Those who have safely fled the wildfire were asked to register on the American Red Cross's Safe and Well page to let friends and family know they successfully evacuated.

Acting governor Gavin Newsom declared a state of emergency for Butte County, which will make more resources available for emergency responders.

A pair of blazes also raging in Ventura and Los Angeles counties in Southern California have forced the evacuation of thousands, including the entire city of Malibu. Statewide, more than 200,000 have been forced to evacuate because of wildfires, the California Governor's Office of Emergency Services said Friday.

President Donald Trump issued an emergency declaration providing federal funds for Butte, Ventura and Los Angeles counties, but in a Saturday morning tweet, the president threatened to withhold federal payments to California, saying the state's forest management is "so poor."

(MORE: Latest on the Southern California Wildfires)

Much of the Golden State had been warned about extreme fire danger because of the return of Santa Ana winds, but in Butte County, months of dry weather combined with the windy conditions created a recipe for disaster.

"Basically, we haven't had rain since last May or before that," Read told the AP. "Everything is a very receptive fuel bed. It's a rapid rate of spread."

– Information from the Associated Press was used in this report.

A home burns as the Camp Fire rages through Paradise, California, on Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

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A home burns as the Camp Fire rages through Paradise, California, on Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)
The Weather Company’s primary journalistic mission is to report on breaking weather news, the environment and the importance of science to our lives. This story does not necessarily represent the position of our parent company, IBM.
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