AuthorTopic: 🔥 The New World of Wildfires  (Read 6442 times)

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 37339
    • View Profile
🔥 The 2018 Firestorms: There Is No Planet B
« Reply #90 on: December 05, 2018, 01:47:30 AM »
https://www.globalresearch.ca/2018-firestorms-no-planet-b/5661716

The 2018 Firestorms: There Is No Planet B

The 2018 Firestorms: There Is No Planet B

It takes only a spark, from a lightning or human ignition, to start a fire, but it involves high temperatures, a period of drought, a build-up of dry vegetation and strong winds to start a bush fire, such as is devastating Queensland and recently California. When all these factors combine firestorms ensue, enhanced by strong winds from the hot interior of the continent, overwhelming the desiccated bush and human habitats. This is the face of global warming, which on the continents has reached an average of 1.5oC (see this).

An overview of the cost of extreme weather events for the first half of 2018 (Figure 1A), prior to the California wildfires, estimates the cost as US $33billion. Some 3,000 people lost their lives in natural disasters during this period. The NatCatSERVICE database registered 430 relevant natural disasters in the first half of 2018, more than the long-term average (250) and the previous year (380). The rise in floods correlates with the rise in global temperatures (Figure 1B).

Figure 1A. The rise in extreme weather events 1980 – 2018. Munich Re-insurance (Source)

Figure 1B. Extreme weather events on the rise. (Source)

In 2018 widespread wildfires spread over multiple continents, including north of the Arctic Circle in Sweden, near the Barents Sea, Siberia, in British Columbia and California – where the most extensive fire on record destroyed largest areas in its modern history.   Table 1.1 indicates the severity of the 2018 wildfires around the world:

Major 2017-2018 fires

An independent report in 2012 from the International study the human and economic costs of climate change (DARA) linked direct and indirect[1] 250,000 deaths worldwide to climate change each year [see this and this] and is estimated to cost between $US 2-4 billion/year by 2030 [see this].

California: The 2018 California wildfires burnt the largest amount of acreage recorded in a fire season, as of 30.11.2018, causing $2.975 billion in damages, including $1.366 billion in fire suppression costs, becoming the largest complex fire in the state’s history. On August 4, 2018, a national disaster was declared in Northern California, due to the extensive wildfires burning. In November 2018, strong winds caused another round of large, destructive fires to erupt across the state, killing at least 88 and destroying more than 18,000 structures, becoming both California’s deadliest and most destructive wildfire on record (see this).

Figure 2. California fires October-November 2018 (Sources: A, B, C and D.)

Queensland:  As these lines are written the news from the Queensland wildfires read: “There is no immediate relief in sight for Queensland’s bushfire crisis as extreme heatwave conditions continue to grip the state on the first day of summer and a cyclone threat looms. Wildfires have raged across central Queensland this week and 110 are still burning throughout the state. That number could grow as heatwave spreads to the state’s south east corner in coming days with possible storms with damaging winds.” (See this)

Figure 2. Queensland bushfires, November-December 2018

A. NASA space image. end-November 2018 (See this)

B. BOM – Queensland and Northern Territory, 3-day heat wave forecast from 1.12.2018 (See this)

C. Frequency of extreme weather events, Australia 1915-2017 (See this)

D. Australia warming trend since 1910 consistent with surrounding oceans (See this)

With the continuing rise in global carbon emissions and temperatures, the fate of the world’s forests due to fires and logging is in doubt (see this and this). The correlation between the rise in catastrophic bush fires in California, Queensland and other parts of the world (Figure 1A) emphasizes the dangerous course the world is undertaking. The introduction of lumps of coal to parliament would hardly help (see this), nor would the opening of new coal mines in heat scorched Queensland where Adani has just announced the opening of a new coal mine (see this).

There is no planet B.

*

Note to readers: please click the share buttons above. Forward this article to your email lists. Crosspost on your blog site, internet forums. etc.

Dr Andrew Glikson, Earth and Paleo-climate science, Australia National University (ANU) School of Anthropology and Archaeology, ANU Planetary Science Institute, ANU Climate Change Institute, Honorary Associate Professor, Geothermal Energy Centre of Excellence, University of Queensland. He is a frequent contributor to Global Research.

Featured image is from Earther – Gizmodo

Save As Many As You Can

Offline AJ

  • Bussing Staff
  • **
  • Posts: 213
    • View Profile
Re: 🔥 The New World of Wildfires
« Reply #91 on: December 29, 2018, 02:45:41 PM »
So, as I sit here in the rain in the coastal mountains of Oregon, I'm still worrying about FIRE!! Summers coming (Game of Thrones got the seasons mixed up). I know C5 had some ideas that a shipping container would be your best above ground shelter from storms and fires? Any ideas (or web sites) anyone knows that backs that up. Anyone know of any plans to modify a small shipping container? I know if I moved to the middle of the desert I wouldn't have to worry about fire - only dying of heat and lack of water ;D. I could live with my house and some of my preps going up in flames but what do you do next. Imagine if you were "fully" prepared for a SHTF day and were living in Paradise (CA that is)(would you even be living there???). You lost everything, then what do you do (if you survive)? I think some reasonable prep to survive that and have a habitat might make sense. Savannah is a reasonable plan for RE, and I think he is covered if habitat becomes completely unlivable. I'm just thinking a modified shipping container might make sense??
AJ

You're going to want to berm it to insulate from the heat.


Also an air filtration system for the smoke, and for when the fire is passing straight over you, a separate air supply stored in SCUBA tanks.  The fire will consume all the oxygen in the area and a filtration system doesn't solve that problem.

RE
I can't give this thread up.  :o I'm paranoid about getting burned out and living in a parking lot at Walmart (like Paradise CA) while I wait to find somewhere to live.
So, I looked into the bermed shelters like RE proposed. There were a lot of people who tried this in the Australian bush fires some years back. They are called cremated remains now. There appeared to be a thriving business ripping folks off who wanted protection and now have bermed bunkers in the hillside that are worthless. I would build a true bunker but the cost (and my wife continuing to be married to me) make that a no go option. Plus such a bunker screams Prepper to anyone in the neighborhood (or passing by). I figured that the best course would be to run to run away if the fire came real close.
As you can see by the pictures I am surrounded by forest. Across the highway there are open fields.
 I plan on pulling something out into the neighbors field if it comes to that. I looked at cargo containers (I love C5's take on them). But they are too heavy and the trailer to pull them costs a fortune AND I would have to buy a newer bigger vehicle to pull it.
I was getting pretty depressed about this and then thought of travel trailers. From past experience I knew they almost all have membrane roofs. Further research shows that they almost all leak over time. Then I stumbled on Cargo Trailer conversions. They have metal roofs and you can trick them out inside and make them somewhat Stealth (like RE's Van).https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pTJithv5cgU
What does everybody think??
Nullis in Verba

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 37339
    • View Profile
Re: 🔥 The New World of Wildfires
« Reply #92 on: December 29, 2018, 03:30:57 PM »
I can't give this thread up.  :o I'm paranoid about getting burned out and living in a parking lot at Walmart (like Paradise CA) while I wait to find somewhere to live.
So, I looked into the bermed shelters like RE proposed. There were a lot of people who tried this in the Australian bush fires some years back. They are called cremated remains now. There appeared to be a thriving business ripping folks off who wanted protection and now have bermed bunkers in the hillside that are worthless. I would build a true bunker but the cost (and my wife continuing to be married to me) make that a no go option. Plus such a bunker screams Prepper to anyone in the neighborhood (or passing by). I figured that the best course would be to run to run away if the fire came real close.
As you can see by the pictures I am surrounded by forest. Across the highway there are open fields.
 I plan on pulling something out into the neighbors field if it comes to that. I looked at cargo containers (I love C5's take on them). But they are too heavy and the trailer to pull them costs a fortune AND I would have to buy a newer bigger vehicle to pull it.
I was getting pretty depressed about this and then thought of travel trailers. From past experience I knew they almost all have membrane roofs. Further research shows that they almost all leak over time. Then I stumbled on Cargo Trailer conversions. They have metal roofs and you can trick them out inside and make them somewhat Stealth (like RE's Van).https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pTJithv5cgU
What does everybody think??

Indeed, the best option is of course to GTFO of Dodge, and be ready to do it at 3AM when the firefighters come knocking on the dopr with the EVACUATION ORDER.

My recommendation on this is a Stealth Van like my SaVANnah pulling a 12-16' Cargo or Horse Trailer converted for living in.  You can put the whole Bugout arrangement together for less than $10K.  Keep it stocked and ready so the only things you need to pack up in a hurry are your important papers (passport, bank statements etc) and your dog.  At the right is a relatively compact arrangement with a light pickup and cargo trailer.

RE
Save As Many As You Can

Offline Eddie

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 17439
    • View Profile
Re: 🔥 The New World of Wildfires
« Reply #93 on: December 29, 2018, 04:01:58 PM »
I've actually seen a good number of those cargo trailer conversions that people have custom finished. Nice ones. Really superior to a camper. No camper is really built to high quality standards anymore, imho.



This one is probably too big, but i do like it. In the DFW area.

https://dallas.craigslist.org/ftw/rvs/d/burleson-2005-wells-cargo-40-custom-rv/6728368111.html
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline AJ

  • Bussing Staff
  • **
  • Posts: 213
    • View Profile
Re: 🔥 The New World of Wildfires
« Reply #94 on: December 30, 2018, 05:44:00 AM »
Thanks RE, Eddie,
RE's idea is more along the lines that I have been thinking. I had thought of a toy hauler but the one Eddie posted from DFW is way to big (like you said). Not stealthy enough and my wife would never go for the expenditure of that much money (she fits the stereotype of frugal Asians).
AJ
Nullis in Verba

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 37339
    • View Profile
🔥 PG&E files for bankruptcy as California wildfire liabilities loom
« Reply #95 on: January 30, 2019, 09:00:45 AM »
https://finance.yahoo.com/news/pg-e-corp-files-chapter-11-bankruptcy-protection-082001142--finance.html

PG&E files for bankruptcy as California wildfire liabilities loom


By Sharon Bernstein

SACRAMENTO (Reuters) - PG&E Corp, owner of the largest U.S. power utility, filed for bankruptcy protection on Tuesday in anticipation of liabilities in excess of $30 billion from the deadliest wildfires in California's history.

PG&E, which provides electricity and natural gas to 16 million customers in northern and central California and employs 24,000 people, vowed to keep the lights on and continue with critical investments it said were needed in its system's safety and maintenance.

"The power and gas will stay on ... We are not 'going out of business,' and there will be no disruption in the services you expect from us," interim Chief Executive John Simon said in a letter to customers.

PG&E faced no immediate cash crunch. Its decision to file for bankruptcy was driven by its assessment of upcoming legal liabilities. While state investigators cleared PG&E this month of liability in a 2017 wildfire in California's wine country, the company is expected to be found liable for a fire that killed at least 86 people in northern California in November.

The San Francisco-based company faces lawsuits from owners of homes and businesses that burned during that and other fires. Filing for bankruptcy temporarily shields PG&E from these claims, allowing it to negotiate settlements in bankruptcy court.

PG&E's bankruptcy attracted criticism from some California politicians, shareholders and wildfire victim advocates. California Senate President Toni Atkins called PG&E's decision disappointing and said the bankruptcy was not the optimum solution for Californians.

"That was PG&E's choice but it does not change my focus, which remains protecting the best interests of the people of California," Gavin Newsom, who took office as governor of California earlier this month, said in a statement.

BlueMountain Capital Management LLC, an investment firm that owns about 2 percent of PG&E, called the company's move "reckless" and detrimental to shareholders. It has vowed to launch a proxy contest next month to replace PG&E's board directors.

PG&E's shares jumped on Tuesday as investors speculated over how much equity holders will be able to recover.

PG&E listed assets of $71.39 billion and liabilities of $51.69 billion as of Sept. 30 in the voluntary Chapter 11 document filed in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Northern District of California, indicating that its equity would likely retain at least some of its value.

PG&E's shares were trading up 15.6 percent at $13.88 in afternoon trading, giving the company a market value of $7.1 billion. Still, the stock remains down close to 80 percent since October, before the latest round of wildfires broke out. PG&E had said earlier this month it was preparing for bankruptcy.

PG&E is seeking court approval for $5.5 billion in debtor-in-possession financing from J.P. Morgan, Bank of America, Barclays, Citi, and other banks, it said. The sum is roughly equal to PG&E's annual spending.

PG&E also carries a debt load of more than $18 billion. Company advisers expect that it may take two years or more to emerge from bankruptcy.


IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE

An arcane California legal rule, known as "inverse condemnation," exposes California utilities to liabilities from wildfires regardless of their negligence as long as their equipment is involved.

This has raised concerns among some PG&E investors that exiting bankruptcy could take longer if there were more wildfires, a real threat given that climate change has turned the blazes into an annual occurrence.

Investors in other utilities are fretting as well. Shares of Rosemead, California-based Edison International, for example, are down 20 percent since the November wildfires.

Another issue at stake is PG&E's contracts for renewable power. These are critical for California, which last year delivered 33 percent of its energy from renewable sources and has a goal to source 60 percent of its power from renewables by 2030. PG&E has more than 250 contracts for renewable power that represent $57 billion in investment, it said last month.

Federal energy regulators said on Friday they had joint jurisdiction with a bankruptcy court over requests to cancel or renegotiate power contracts by PG&E.
Save As Many As You Can

Offline AJ

  • Bussing Staff
  • **
  • Posts: 213
    • View Profile
Re: 🔥 The New World of Wildfires
« Reply #96 on: January 31, 2019, 02:32:37 PM »
Fellow Doomer (don't think he's on the Diner) writes the "Damm the Matrix" blog from outside Geeveston Tasmania. He is building a passive solar house and cross posts a lot of other's blogs. Seems he may get burned out from Tasmanian wildfires. Not in the news in the MSM in the US at all.
https://damnthematrix.wordpress.com/. Hopefully that's not me from Oregon next summer. We are having a nice drought winter - hardly any rain. :exp-shocked:
AJ
Nullis in Verba

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 37339
    • View Profile
Re: 🔥 The New World of Wildfires
« Reply #97 on: January 31, 2019, 02:47:51 PM »
Fellow Doomer (don't think he's on the Diner) writes the "Damm the Matrix" blog from outside Geeveston Tasmania. He is building a passive solar house and cross posts a lot of other's blogs. Seems he may get burned out from Tasmanian wildfires. Not in the news in the MSM in the US at all.
https://damnthematrix.wordpress.com/. Hopefully that's not me from Oregon next summer. We are having a nice drought winter - hardly any rain. :exp-shocked:
AJ

Cut some firebreaks, get a sprinkler system you can set on automatic when you GTFO of Dodge, and get some Aluminum Flashing to lay over the roof.  Then get in the Bugout Machine and run like HELL, because that is what it is.

Won't be cheap of course.  ::)


RE
Save As Many As You Can

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 37339
    • View Profile
🔥 If the Fire doesn't get ya, the Water will
« Reply #98 on: February 03, 2019, 03:15:46 AM »
Malibu is not looking like such a great place to own a $20M Mansion anymore...

RE

https://www.kcra.com/article/powerful-storm-southern-california-flooding-highways/26121312

Powerful storm hits Southern California, flooding highways


AP Updated: 7:15 PM PST Feb 2, 2019
CHRISTOPHER WEBER
Santa Barbara street flooding
by KCRA / KQCA US
-0:22
LOS ANGELES (KCRA)

The second in a string of powerful storms battered California on Saturday, shutting key highways after water and mud rushed into lanes from bare hillsides in wildfire burn areas where thousands of residents were under evacuation orders.

Flash flood warnings were issued for huge swaths of Southern California and forecasters said the system brought more than 4 inches of rain at lower elevations and several feet of snow in the mountains, where whiteout conditions closed roads.
Advertisement

A wind gust in Santa Barbara County topped 80 mph as the storm moved south and at one point dropped more than a half-inch of rain in five minutes. Trees and power lines were down across the region.

In Malibu, where the Woolsey fire last year destroyed homes and burned hillsides bare, officials closed Pacific Coast Highway and many other roadways after mud carried trees and rocks into lanes. Residents whose homes survived the flames barricaded their properties with sandbags to protect their properties from floodwaters.

Carol Cavella was evacuated during the November fire and again Saturday when the creek behind her house threatened to overflow and inundate her backyard.

The 86-year-old put her cat in the car and drove to a coffee shop on higher ground, her son-in-law, Warren Bowman said.

"She does not scare easily, but she got a little scared watching that water rise," Bowman said. He was trying to convince her to come to his house in Los Angeles but she said she'd rather wait to see if the waters recede and she can return home.

The California Department of Transportation said Saturday night in a tweet that the southbound lanes of U.S. 101, a vital route between Los Angeles and points north and west, have been reopened, while the northbound lanes of the highway remain closed from State Route 150 to Milpas.

Earlier Saturday, in the Montecito area of Santa Barbara County, several miles of U.S 101 were closed because of flooding.

Elsewhere in the county, evacuations were ordered or recommended for neighborhoods near the Thomas, Whittier and Sherpa fire scars.

"This is a dangerous situation," the National Weather Service said, warning that the high rates of rain could send boulders sluicing down denuded hillsides along with the mud and debris.

It has only been a little over a year since a downpour on the huge Thomas Fire burn scar unleashed a massive debris flow that destroyed or damaged hundreds of homes in the seaside community of Montecito. The disaster killed 21 people, and two others have never been found.

Rescue crews scrambled Saturday to pluck motorists from cars caught in rising waters, said Mike Eliason, a spokesman for the Santa Barbara County Fire Department. He urged drivers who come upon flooded intersections to find alternate routes.

"Turn around. Driving through is going to be a costly error in judgment," he said. "It's just not worth it."

Multiple accidents were reported on slick highways, including a crash on Interstate 5 that killed a volunteer member of a sheriff's search and rescue team, and injured several others.

The team from Ventura County was on its way to a training exercise when members stopped to help at the scene of a single-vehicle rollover crash.

A minivan carrying a family was traveling too fast for the wet conditions, lost control and plowed into members of the team, Los Angeles County fire Capt. Tony Imbrenda said. Nine people were transported to hospitals, including three members of the team. The victim, Jeff Dye, was a volunteer with the Fillmore Mountain Search and Rescue Team, the sheriff's department said.

"This is a very unfortunate situation that could've been avoided," Imbrenda said, warning motorists to slow down in the rain.

In the Holy Jim fire area southeast of Los Angeles, where an August blaze scoured tens of thousands of acres in the Cleveland National Forest, volunteers using heavy equipment removed debris and deepened a creek bed to help prevent flooding.

The National Park Service warned visitors to Yosemite National Park of possible road closures and advised drivers to bring tire chains in the event of snow or icy conditions.

Winter storm warnings were in place for the Sierra Nevada along with avalanche warnings on the Nevada side of the range. The Sierra is already loaded with snow from a series of storms in January. The weather service said areas could see accumulations of up to 10 feet over the next few days.

The weather service lifted flash-flood watches for areas burned by the Mendocino Complex, Camp and Carr wildfires in Northern California. About an inch of rain was recorded in the San Francisco Bay Area before the storm moved south early Saturday.

A weaker storm soaked much of the state on Thursday Two cold weather systems will follow on Sunday and Monday, bringing additional widespread showers and snow, forecasters said.
Save As Many As You Can

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 37339
    • View Profile
🔥 6 Months After Paradise Burned, Trauma Endures For Kids And Adults
« Reply #99 on: May 12, 2019, 12:00:06 AM »
https://www.npr.org/2019/05/11/721834022/6-months-after-paradise-burned-trauma-endures-for-kids-and-adults

6 Months After Paradise Burned, Trauma Endures For Kids And Adults
3:32

May 11, 20198:16 AM ET
Heard on Weekend Edition Saturday

Michelle Wiley


A homemade sign hangs on the fence surrounded Paradise Elementary School. The school was destroyed by the fire and the rubble is now being bulldozed and cleaned up.
Michelle Wiley/KQED

Six months ago, the deadly Camp Fire swept through Paradise, Concow, and Magalia, small communities all located in Butte County in Northern California. The wildfire killed 86 people and destroyed thousands of homes, schools, and businesses.

Now, mental health specialists working in Butte County schools say they're seeing a second wave of trauma from survivors. But there aren't enough counselors to help all of the students, teachers and staff dealing with this second wave of trauma.
After 2 Hurricanes, A 'Floodgate' Of Mental Health Issues In U.S. Virgin Islands
National
After 2 Hurricanes, A 'Floodgate' Of Mental Health Issues In U.S. Virgin Islands
Paradise, Calif., Water Is Contaminated But Residents Are Moving Back Anyway
National
Paradise, Calif., Water Is Contaminated But Residents Are Moving Back Anyway

"We have six schools that have requested help, and we can't bring help to them," said Roy Applegate, who coordinates Recovery Trauma Services for the Butte County Office of Education. "It's a little bit like rain in the desert in the summer: As soon as it hits the ground, it disappears. We can give our counselors as many hours as they need, and they're full up all the time. They're working to the max."

The trauma specialists working in Butte County schools knew they'd start seeing kids act out around six months after the deadly Camp Fire, since anniversaries are known to trigger survivors into reliving moments of the traumatic event.
Article continues after sponsor message

We can give our counselors as many hours as they need, and they're full up all the time. They're working to the max.

Roy Applegate, Butte County Office of Education

Different people are dealing with different levels of trauma depending on how stable they were before it started.

"It depends on whether or not they've secured some basic levels of need: housing, food, routine access to resources," said Dena Kapsalis, Director of Student Services for the Paradise Unified School District.

Finding housing has been particularly difficult. Butte County already faced a housing crisis before the fire swept through, and now, with nearly 20,000 more people who've been forced to relocate in nearby Chico, things have gotten even tighter.

Acting out as a form of communication

But regardless of their situation, all families may notice their kids exhibiting unusual behavior.

"We're seeing lots and lots of manifestations of trauma," Kapsalis said. "A lot of acting out, tiredness, inability to focus, shutting down, being unable to maintain relationships with adults or peers."

While it may be distressing for parents to see their kids struggling, Kapsalis says counselors try to view this acting out as a form of communication. And the fact that kids are even at school shows their resilience.

With adults it's much harder because they have all kinds of systems of coping that often disguise what's really going on with them.

Dena Kapalis, Paradise Unified School District

"The gift of being with kids is that they don't second-guess themselves typically. So we're afforded the ability to have more transparent responses and communication from them," Kapsalis said. "So they're communicating loss, they're communicating a need for help, a need for support."

Adults are harder

But it's much more difficult for support staff to determine teachers are coping many of them were also impacted by the Nov. 8 fire.

"With adults it's much harder because they have all kinds of systems of coping that often disguise what's really going on with them," Kapsalis said.

To better support their teachers, counselors have started setting up shop in common areas, including staff rooms, hallways and even near copiers, to encourage conversation and help connect them with services.

To fill the need for more counselors, the Butte County Office of Education has called several of their workers out of retirement to help out. Pamela Beeman had been retired for nearly five years when she got the call. "When I got the phone call, I said, 'Oh no, I really don't want to go back to work,' and they said, 'No, we really need you,' " she said. "You can't just say no to that."

Beeman is currently working as a fire recovery counselor at Spring Valley School, but she doesn't know how long she can continue.

"We're just getting started," Beeman said. "This is a long road, and some of the worst symptoms for survivors are starting to emerge. It's really easy to lose heart."
Save As Many As You Can

 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
0 Replies
509 Views
Last post June 18, 2016, 08:35:55 AM
by knarf
0 Replies
284 Views
Last post April 15, 2018, 04:18:56 AM
by RE
0 Replies
101 Views
Last post April 03, 2019, 05:26:58 AM
by RE