AuthorTopic: 🔥 The New World of Wildfires  (Read 8599 times)

Offline Surly1

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Re: 🔥 The New World of Wildfires
« Reply #105 on: August 21, 2019, 03:15:43 AM »


https://i.imgur.com/Z9l9aFk.jpg
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline RE

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Re: 🔥 The Amazon Rainforest Is BURNING DOWN
« Reply #106 on: August 21, 2019, 04:23:06 AM »

Sao Paulo at 3PM yesterday. Many pix like this the interwebz.

Brazil is Feijoada.

RE
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Offline RE

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🔥 HUGE Amazon Rainforest Fires, São Paulo in Brazil SMOTHERED in Smoke!
« Reply #107 on: August 21, 2019, 12:38:07 PM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/oy3KEZ8Ou9c" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/oy3KEZ8Ou9c</a>
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Offline RE

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Our local Alaska problems...

RE

https://www.ktuu.com/content/news/Matanuska-Susitna-Borough-officials-sign-a-disaster-emergency-declaration-557035641.html

"It's absolutely devastating" - Federal money is coming, but losses remain


Photo courtesy Robert Sheldon

By Derek Minemyer |
Posted: Tue 12:31 PM, Aug 20, 2019  |
Updated: Wed 3:10 PM, Aug 21, 2019

ANCHORAGE (KTUU) - Update 10:30 p.m.:

The McKinley and Deshka Landing fires are still roaring, with fire officials reporting little to no progress with containment. On Tuesday, the Mat-Su Borough signed a Disaster Declaration in an effort to handle the economic impacts of these fires.

Governor Dunleavy has accepted the borough’s declaration, which frees up federal disaster reimbursement funding, covering up to 75 percent of the borough's emergency response costs. It’s now a matter of waiting for that funding to come in. The governor will need to decide whether to initiate a proclamation of a state disaster emergency, which would free up state money and resources to respond to the fires.

"It doesn't look like we're getting rain anytime soon. So this is not over," Borough Mayor Vern Halter said to a crowded room of concerned residents in Willow Tuesday afternoon.

"The immediate trauma that fires cause, and the long-term trauma … I'm just sad for Willow, the Mat-Su Borough, and everything ... that we've got to go through this again,” Halter said, referring to the 2015 Sockeye Fire which burned over 7,200 acres in a nearby area.

Residents asked borough and fire officials questions about traffic wait times, and how to find out if their homes are okay; the short answer was they will have to wait at least another two days while crews assess the damage. Borough officials will contact families when the assessment is complete.

While some residents are currently evacuated and seeking refuge in shelters, others have remained safely outside of the fire's destructive path. Mary Fugate, who has lived in Willow for over ten years, says an event of this magnitude impacts everyone in Willow and the surrounding area.

"It's absolutely devastating and heartbreaking," Fugate said, standing outside Willow Elementary School with her young son strapped to her back.

She was 7-months pregnant when her family evacuated their home due to the Sockeye Fire. So far, her home is safe -- but other families and friends of hers have not been so fortunate.

"Firefighters that are fighting the fire right now, and their families, have been evacuated," Fugate said. "I've had friends that their dad has lost everything ... It's absolutely devastating, what's happening."

Fugate is pleading to the state to help her community by declaring a state disaster.

"I think that it's going to give us the necessary equipment and stuff that we need to get this fire out as soon as possible," Fugate said.

The Mat-Su Borough Assembly met Tuesday evening to discuss the disaster declaration. Borough Manager John Moosey says he's confident it will prompt both federal and state funding. If it doesn't, he says, wildfires are expensive.

“Without that reimbursement funding, a good portion of that falls on our local fire service areas,” Moosey said. “It would be a big burden."

The Office of the Governor confirmed Tuesday they're checking to see when a state disaster declaration might be made so they can get more resources aimed at these fires.
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Offline Surly1

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NASA Images Capture Worst Siberian Wildfires in 10,000 Years
« Reply #109 on: August 30, 2019, 03:47:41 AM »
NASA Images Capture Worst Siberian Wildfires in 10,000 Years



CARLY CASSELLA 30 JUN 2017
Every year, Siberia is struck by wildfires that destroy great swathes of boreal forest.  But climate change has caused wildfire activity in Siberia to increase radically over the past few decades.

The boreal forests in Siberia are burning at extraordinary rates, unheard of in at least 10,000 years, and climate change projections predict even more wildfires to come.

The current wildfires, which started in late June, have already burned roughly 538 square kilometres (133,000 acres) of forest in southern Siberia.

Climate change has been increasing temperatures across the globe, but northernmost regions, like Siberia, are experiencing temperature inclines at twice the rate.  Since November, temperatures in southern Siberia have been up 4°C (7.2°F) from the average.  And as the weather turns drier and warmer, the forests in the region become more and more prone to wildfires.

These wildfires are a direct threat to the role of Siberian forests in absorbing carbon emissions.


Credit: NASA Earth Observatory

Each year, the Russian forests absorb a net 500 million tonnes of carbon from the atmosphere.

Last Friday, two NASA satellites captured the destructive and widespread impact of these wildfires on the region.

The images from the Aqua satellite reveal a series of wildfires and towers of smoke, riddled across southern Siberia.

The second satellite, Suomi NPP, measured the air quality in the region and found the aerosol index reached over 19, indicating very dense smoke at high altitudes.

According to NASA Earth Observatory, scientists are also currently investigating three possible pyrocumulus cloud formations in the area, which can alter local climates by lofting ash and particles high into the atmosphere.

But the most devastating impact of these wildfires cannot be seen from a satellite.

Siberian boreal forests play a crucial role in the carbon cycle, making up nearly 10 percent of the planet's land surface and housing more than 30 percent of the carbon on Earth.

That means that when these forests burn, they are releasing vast quantities of carbon into the atmosphere. The loss of carbon absorption in combination with the release of carbon, creates a vicious cycle that leads to more global warming and, as a result, more wildfires.

Not to mention, these wildfires can also hasten the melting of Arctic ice, which is already disappearing at alarming rates. This occurs when the fires produce hordes of soot that fall on snow and ice, darkening their surface and causing them to absorb more sunlight.

And it's not just Siberia, either.

Over the past decade, global warming has caused a series of destructive wildfires in Canada and Alaska, too. Last year, a wildfire in Fort McMurray, Alberta became the costliest natural disaster in Canadian history.

And, according to Climate Central research, wildfire season in Alaska is 40 percent longer and large fires twice as common as they were 75 years ago.

Finding a way to stop these wildfires from occurring or from burning out of control will be pivotal in our fight against climate change.

Scientists have their work cut out for them.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline John of Wallan

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Re: 🔥 The New World of Wildfires
« Reply #110 on: September 07, 2019, 09:55:59 PM »
Northern NSW and Southern Queensland burning at the moment also.
Unheard of this early in spring, but very dry conditions over last few seasons has resulted in catastrophic fire conditions.
I am starting to prepare for this summer if what has happened in the Northern hemisphere is any indication of what we can expect down South this summer....\
Where I am still cool and wet. We expect plenty of spring growth to create summer fuel.
Not helped by state government predictions of power blackouts in summer peaks as we get hotter and more people install AC systems. I will make sure gen set, extension leads, electric pumps as well as my petrol backup pump, hoses and tanks are all prepared, full and tested.

These areas in SE Queensland and Northern NSW usually too green to burn this time of year.... Is is only the first week of Spring!
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-09-08/queensland-bushfires-continue-stanthorpe-applethorpe-binna-burra/11489304
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-09-08/nsw-bushfires-winds-forecast-to-ease/11489350

JOW

Offline RE

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Re: 🔥 The New World of Wildfires
« Reply #111 on: September 07, 2019, 11:00:51 PM »
I will make sure gen set, extension leads, electric pumps as well as my petrol backup pump, hoses and tanks are all prepared, full and tested.

PREP UP!

You CANNOT have too many preps!  It's an endless battle.  Every time I think I got EVERYTHING, I find another item I just GOTTA HAVE::)

RE
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Offline RE

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🔥 Alaska just had the most ridiculous summer. That's a red flag for the planet.
« Reply #112 on: September 10, 2019, 04:55:34 AM »
https://www.cnn.com/2019/09/09/weather/alaska-climate-crisis-summer-weir-wxc/index.html

Alaska just had the most ridiculous summer. That's a red flag for the planet.

By Bill Weir, CNN Chief Climate Correspondent
Updated 6:49 PM ET, Mon September 9, 2019



Lifeguard Luke Orot watches over swimmers at Jewel Lake on a hot July 4 in Anchorage.

Anchorage, Alaska (CNN)Alaska's summer of fire and no ice is smashing records.
With the Arctic warming twice as fast as the rest of the planet, America's "Last Frontier" feels like the first in line to see, smell and feel the unsettling signs of a climate in crisis.
There are the smoky skies and dripping glaciers, dead salmon and hauled-out walrus but scientists also worry about the changes that are harder to see, from toxic algae blooms in the Bering Sea to insects from the Lower 48 bringing new diseases north.

The head shaking among longtime locals really began on the Fourth of July, when at 90 degrees, Anchorage was hotter than Key West.
A dome of hot, dry air over the southern part of the state refused to budge. When lightning struck the Kenai Peninsula, it was just the beginning of a wilderness inferno unlike any other in memory.


Smoke from the Swan Lake fire blankets a hillside.

Like rainy clockwork, Alaska's fire season usually ends August 1 but the Swan Lake fire is still burning and only 37% contained. To the relief of exhausted fire crews and worried residents, September is bringing the first moisture in weeks but the most populous part of the state is still swallowing more smoke than ever.

"We've had more than twice as many smoky hours in 2019 than in any other season, and in fact, almost as many as all other years combined," says Brian Brettschneider, a climatologist at the University of Alaska.
Strolling in short sleeves atop the rapidly melting Spencer Glacier, Brettschneider lists one superlative after another, pulled from a century's worth of records that predate Alaskan statehood. "Eight of our top 13 warmest days on record are this year," he says. "We didn't just get a little bit past the old marks, we really blasted past them."


Climate scientist Brian Brettschneider looks at how far the Spencer Glacier has receded.
.
He points to the bare rock and dirt 150 feet above us where the glacier once stood. "This is half as thin as it was not very long ago." Every drip is headed to sea, which makes what is happening here directly relevant to New York, Miami, Dubai, Osaka, Hong Kong and countless beach towns in between. According to the European Space Agency, melting Alaskan ice has contributed more to sea level rise than Greenland, Antarctica or any other part of the world.
And then there are the fish, so vital to the economy. While Bristol Bay saw another epic salmon run this season, more and more streams are just too warm for the fish to spawn.
"We definitely have reports from around the state where we've found dead fish that have not made it to their spawning grounds," says Sue Mauger, science director for the nonprofit Cook Inletkeeper. "They still have the eggs inside and have not spawned. Those are just lost future generations."

Spencer Glacier
Nome
Anchorage
She has been measuring streams for almost two decades and while the warming trend was obvious, she is stunned by the speed. "The temperatures we saw this summer were what we expected for 2069 -- we're 50 years ahead of where we thought we would be for stream temperatures."
It's not just fresh water absorbing record amounts of heat. Over 500 miles away in Nome, a team of oceanographers from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration wobbles off the Ocean Star on sea legs, after weeks of gathering data in the warming Arctic. A generation ago, they might have needed a Coast Guard icebreaker to do their work but on this trip, saw only open water.
"There's always going to be ice up here in the winter," explains Ryan McCabe, physical oceanographer at the University of Washington. "But it's a much thinner ice. Single-year ice instead of multi-year ice."
Ryan McCabe, on board a NOAA research vessel, examines data from the warming Arctic seas.
Ryan McCabe, on board a NOAA research vessel, examines data from the warming Arctic seas.
Drastic changes to the ocean's heat exchange patterns could alter the timing of plankton blooms, which would ultimately cascade up the food chain to the biggest forms of life.

Migration timing for whales could be be thrown off, McCabe says. "They could show up after the blooms have already happened," leading to starvation.
For indigenous residents like 78-year-old Joe Kunnuk, there is no need for data from NOAA. "It changed so much over the years," he says while carving walrus ivory into the shape of an Inupiaq hunter in a tiny kayak. As a young man, their sea-ice hunting grounds off the coast of Nome would last through May or even June. This year it was gone by early March.
Joe Kunnuk remembers when you could catch walrus close to shore.
Joe Kunnuk remembers when you could catch walrus close to shore.
Today, the closest sea ice to any part of Alaska is over 125 miles offshore. Since hunting in open seas is much more difficult and expensive, Kunnuk says that the walrus he bagged five years back will most certainly be his last.
Meanwhile, in a suburb of Anchorage, Micah Hahn and her team are looking for change by dragging tattered white flags through the weeds. They are tick hunters from the Institute for Circumpolar Health Studies at the University of Alaska. As Lyme Disease spreads across a warming US, she's worried that Alaska might be next.
"If people are traveling to the lower 48, and they take their dog with them to visit family, and then they come back up, it's possible that they bring a tick with them," she explains.
A member of health researcher Micah Hahn&#39;s team looks for ticks that may now survive in Alaska.
A member of health researcher Micah Hahn's team looks for ticks that may now survive in Alaska.
Historically, that blood-sucking bug would not survive the Alaskan climate. Not anymore. "It's kind of like a Russian roulette," she says. "Eventually, a tick is going to come and it's going to be able to overwinter and then establish in our wildlife population up in Alaska."
Another study found that yellow jacket wasp queens are surviving the milder winters of Barrow, the northernmost American town, where emergency room visits for stings jumped over 600% in five years.
Interactive: Alaska at a crossroads

But after decades of seeing their warnings fall on deaf ears -- especially in a state funded by oil -- scientists like Brettschneider hope that the indisputable clues across a baked Alaska will inspire real action, from Juneau to Washington, DC.
The sun shines down on Spencer Glacier.
The sun shines down on Spencer Glacier.

"We've talked about these things occurring in decades or in centuries, but ... it's happening right now and it's visible right now and it's noticeable right now," the University of Alaksa climatologist says. "The opportunity to do things about it is right now and not decades down the road. So, in one sense, it's really bad, but people tend to kind of step up and do something about it when they feel a sense of urgency, and there really is a sense of urgency right now."
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Offline azozeo

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To save our forests, give them back to the people they were stolen from
« Reply #113 on: September 15, 2019, 04:21:19 AM »
In case anyone has forgotten after the media frenzy of the past few weeks: The Amazon rainforest is still on fire.

I had originally hoped to be writing this article about some of the optimistic takeaways from a recent article in Science magazine which laid out the potential benefits of planting large areas of the Earth with trees, and how it could help in the fight to curb climate change.

However, if we do not protect existing trees and forests from this kind of mass destruction mess, then that light of hope of replanting and reforesting grows very, very dim.

By time the Amazon rainforest fires came onto the public radar relatively recently, the thousands of fires in the area had already been burning for weeks and weeks.

It was only when the fires hit numbers not seen in decades, with almost twice as many burning as this same time last year, that the blazes started to garner global media attention. The world watched, tweeted, and waited anxiously to see what would happen. Then, unsurprisingly, as the fires raged on with no indication of dying out, social media attention has started to wane. But the fires have not. Thousands still rage on.


https://qz.com/1702472/indigenous-people-are-our-best-hope-for-saving-the-amazon-rainforests/
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline John of Wallan

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Re: 🔥 The New World of Wildfires
« Reply #114 on: September 15, 2019, 03:21:01 PM »
Must be major fires on every continent except Antarctica right now.
Europe, North America and Asia have unusual fires in Arctic circle Alaska, Siberia and in southern Europe such as Portugal.
Africa, South America and Australia have Congo, Amazon and still big fires here in Southern Queensland and Northern NSW.

Hmm. Nearly makes you think there is something strange going on with the weather..

JOW

 

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