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Online RE

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Requiem for an Automobile
« on: October 14, 2017, 05:13:03 PM »


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Published on The Doomstead Diner October 14, 2017



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Discuss this article at the Frostbite Falls Table inside the Diner



So I am working as my friend Brian's "Property Manager" for the apartments he rents up here, which basically amounts to showing the place to prospective tenants.  Only two of them fortunately in a McHovel he converted to a an upstais/downstairs set of apartments.  Rented out the top one a few months ago, the bottom one has been vacant a few months.  I have shown it to half a dozen prospective tenants, so far no takers.  Brian hasn't kept up on the maintenance and it needs a fair amount of work.



Anyhow, I had an appointment to show it today at 1PM, and I head out to my cars around 12:45.  The place is only around 2 miles away.  I decide I will give the Mazda a little workout to freshen up the battery since I hardly ever drive it.  As usual, she fires up just fine, an amazingly dependable vehicle the entire decade I have owned her.  I am not halfway out of the parking spot when I hear POW! and the car lists to the right.  I figure SHIT, I got a blowout!  So I back the car back into the spot and get out to have a look.  No, it's not a blowout, the tire is fine.  THE FUCKING STRUT GAVE OUT!









It's the Finger of God this happened when & where it did.  If this happened while I was driving at any speed at all, if I could keep control of the vehicle to avoid an accident that also would be Finger of God material.  As it was, it was only a minor inconvenience, after re-parking the car I went over to my Ford Explorer and took that over to the rental apartments to show them.  I wasn't even late for the appointment.  Havng spare carz around comes in handy at times like these.  Usually though, 3 carz is a bit of overkill, 2 is enough.



Now, I can't say I wasn't warned about this.  The last time I brought her in for an oil change (over a year ago), the Mechanic Jockey told me the struts were about rusted through and driving on them was dicey and I should replace them.  However, price tag on that was over $1000 and I only paid $900 for the car to begin with 10 years ago!  So I took a pass on getting the job done, kind of thinking maybe the Mechanic Jockey was just trying to get me to fork over for a big repair job.  Turns out of course here he was telling the truth.



So I get back home after the McHovel showing, and have another look and take the above pics.  It's DECISION time on the Mazda.  Do I have her towed to the Repair Shop or to the Junkyard?



I know it makes CFS to send the Mazda to the Land of Away for many reasons.  First off, the car is a 1989 with plenty of rust on it, I bought it for $900 10 years ago and even fully working I probably could not get more than $500 for it today.  Second, I currently have 3 vehicles in the parking lot, and according to community rules the max you are supposed to have is 2 per unit.  Third, keeping 3 vehicles all battery charged and working through the winter if you don't drive them every day is almost a daily maintenance task once it gets really cold.  Fourth, I only have one spot with a carport, which means when it snows I have to clear the snow off 2 carz to drive them.  This is a pain in the ass even if you are not crippled.



Unfortunately though, I am Emo about the Mazda.  I think of her kind of like the Racehorse John Henry.  He didn't win the Kentucky Derby, but he raced a LONG time and he won a LOT.




His final race record stood at 83 starts, 39 wins, 15 seconds, and 9 thirds with $6,591,860 in earnings. He was twice voted the Eclipse Award for Horse of the Year in 1981 and 1984, of which his 1981 election is notable in that it was the first in which the victor received all votes cast for that award. That feat has since been matched only by Triple Crown winner American Pharoah in 2015.[4]




https://static.americasbestracing.net/s3fs-public/styles/large_hero_16_9/public/article/JohnHenry81%20Million.jpg?94_5rM7JMzGCliZJv1uYgrn05WNnoGPh&itok=Lt_LZ2D7&c=696016bff735ed5f3d02ad74bf8fc72b



The Mazda also raced along the roads of the Eisenhower Interstate a long time, almost 30 years through the Age of Oil, 10 of them with me as the Car Jockey.  She was amazingly dependable through all the Alaskan Winters, the 4WD was necessary on many occasions.  No repairs necessary EVAH except to get new battery and tires.  Still runs great to this day, except of course now she has a Broken Leg. When a horse has a broken leg, the best and most humane thing to do is to put her down, aka KILL her.  But Putting Down the Mazda is hard.  The car gave me 10 excellent years of service up here on the Last Great Frontier. I know how the owners of John Henry must have felt when they had to put him down.




John Henry was euthanized at 7:05 pm EDT (2305 UTC) on October 8, 2007, at the age of 32. He had developed serious kidney problems in August 2007, while Central Kentucky was experiencing a heat wave. On October 6, he stopped responding to veterinary treatment, and the decision was made to put him down. Many who worked with him had the chance to say their goodbyes, including McCarron, who was notified of the decision to euthanize at 4:30 pm, arrived at the park at 5:30, and stayed with him until shortly before the veterinarian arrived.[5]




For now, the Mazda sits in her spot in the parking lot while I empty out more of the flotsam and jetsam of my own life that resides inside her.  I will get the shit out of her the rest of today and tomorrow, assuming we have a break from the constant rain we have been getting up here for the last few weeks.  Monday I will go over to my Mechanic Jockey and see what he will give me for the hulk.  The tires are practically brand new, I bought them 2 years ago but hardly drive the car at all.  The Battery also quite new.  Engine and tranny, both good.  Also has a full tank of gas, I recently filled it.  I at least hope to recoup the towing costs in selling it for junk.



Dust in the Wind.  All we are is Dust in the Wind.  Carz too.




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Offline azozeo

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Re: Requiem for an Automobile
« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2017, 05:37:03 PM »
Make it go, make it stop, make it light up.
Craigslist the trusty steed.

Struts should be no more than $500 for both + labor rate up there. Book should call for roughly 2 hrs.

See if there's a gear head with Asian car knowledge that will mobile mech. the job or have it tow'd
to a reputable bizness.
Angie's list & or Craigslist can help.

If it fly's, floats or fuq's, open your wallet.
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: Requiem for an Automobile
« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2017, 06:00:39 PM »
Ah Yes,  John Henry, that was a race horse.

Bet him whenever I could, that horse was sure named correctly.

He was made out of iron.

                                 

John Henry was euthanized at 7:05 pm EDT (2305 UTC) on October 8, 2007, at the age of 32. He had developed serious kidney problems in August 2007, while Central Kentucky was experiencing a heat wave. On October 6, he stopped responding to veterinary treatment, and the decision was made to put him down. Many who worked with him had the chance to say their goodbyes, including McCarron, who was notified of the decision to euthanize at 4:30 pm, arrived at the park at 5:30, and stayed with him until shortly before the veterinarian arrived.[5]

John Henry was buried on the night of his death in front of the Hall of Champions at a spot in front of his paddock. A memorial service was held at the park on October 19.[7]

Above the grave is a stone inscribed with the poem of "If tears could build a stairway, and memories a lane, I'd walk right up to Heaven, and bring you home again." There is also a statue of him standing. Engraved under it are the words "John Henry, A Lasting Legend."

                             

John Henry overcame numerous well-known obstacles throughout his career, and colic surgery in 2002. His talent, determination, tenacity and toughness inspired thousands of people who didn’t even see him race, but became aware of him many years after his retirement. Some of his fans visited him at least once a month from Toledo, Indianapolis, and other cities in the Midwest, while others made annual pilgrimages to his barn from California, Texas and around the world. When it recently became public knowledge that his health was in a state of decline, many of his fans immediately came to the park to thank their beloved champion for the memories, and to whisper their personal, final farewells to the horse who inspired great respect and ardent devotion.

John Henry’s race record included more than $6.5 million in earnings, 39 wins including 30 stakes wins (16 Grade 1 stakes wins) and seven Eclipse Awards, including two Horse of the Year titles. He equaled a world track record for 1 ½ miles in 2:23 at Santa Anita and was the only horse to win Horse of the Year more than once in nonconsecutive years, and the oldest horse ever to win that title - at age nine. John Henry was voted Racehorse of the Decade for the 1980s, and was inducted into Racing's Hall of Fame in 1990.

Sired by Ole Bob Bowers out of Once Double, by Double Jay, John Henry was foaled on March 9, 1975 at Golden Chance Farm in Paris, Kentucky.

After having passed through several owners and trainers, John Henry finally blossomed under the careful tutelage of trainer Ron McAnally, and with his owner, Sam Rubin. McAnally, who brought out the best in the horse with “carrots, apples and love,” visited John Henry many times during the horse’s retirement and had just seen him again as recently as September, and brought John’s favorite cookies and carrots to his aging protégé. Lewis Cenicola, John Henry’s exercise rider for six years, also visited the horse in September.

Tom Levinson, stepson of the late Sam Rubin said, “John always had fire in his eyes as he circled his opponents in the paddock while they pranced, his eyes glazed with the determination to win. Certainly he was the people’s hero… Sam and Dorothy loved sharing John’s victories with his adoring fans and we appreciate their devotion even to this sad day… We are sure that if Sam Rubin were here today, he and my mother Dorothy would agree that their wish would be for John Henry to be remembered as the mighty, cantankerous champion we all loved.”

Chris McCarron rode John Henry in 14 of his last races and has spent many hours with the horse during his 22 years at the park. Regarding the great horse’s passing, he observed, “What can I say about the legendary John Henry that has not already been said? John meant the world to my family and me. Everywhere he raced, his presence doubled the size of a normal race track crowd. He did so much for racing, even after he retired, that he will be impossible to replace. He will be sorely missed but forever in our hearts.”

A public memorial service will be held and will be announced by the park upon completion of the arrangements. Plans will be posted on the park’s website, www.kyhorsepark.com under News & Media and the Calendar of Events. John Henry will be buried near his paddock at the Hall of Champions. Other Thoroughbred champions buried at the park include Man o’ War, War Admiral, Forego, Bold Forbes, Allez France, Peteski and Jay Trump.

Recent photos and video of John Henry can be seen at "Hoofing It with John Henry.” A new documentary, "John Henry: An American Hero," produced by Open Sky Entertainment (Producer: Rebecca Gebhard, Directors: Chris Koby and Cameron Duddy) is expected to be completed by the end of the year, with the release date to be announced.

One of his legions of admirers, Howard McClurkin from Weatherford, Texas, summarized his and many fans’ devotion this way, “John Henry is an anchor in one’s life. When things are not going well and one needs inspiration or perhaps one just wants a moment of happiness by thinking of extraordinary accomplishments arising from such a painfully humble beginning, the thought and image of John Henry are readily at hand. He started in a hole. He started with zero and went on to lasso the stars.”

John Nicholson concluded, “The next few days will be terribly difficult for his fans, but especially for the people here at the park who have worked with him and loved him for so long. It was our unparalleled privilege to have John Henry living at the Kentucky Horse Park for the past 22 years.”


                                          <a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/pzPAMVZ5m-w" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/pzPAMVZ5m-w</a>


                                         
                                                  John Henry's Grave and Tombstone

Online RE

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Re: Requiem for an Automobile
« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2017, 06:03:22 PM »
Make it go, make it stop, make it light up.
Craigslist the trusty steed.

Struts should be no more than $500 for both + labor rate up there. Book should call for roughly 2 hrs.

See if there's a gear head with Asian car knowledge that will mobile mech. the job or have it tow'd
to a reputable bizness.
Angie's list & or Craigslist can help.

If it fly's, floats or fuq's, open your wallet.

Double that.  I need all four struts, all the way round.  The entire under carriage is in the same condition.  This is a 28 year old vehicle, and who knows what else will go next and need a fixup?  Then after dropping $1000 on fixing this up, I'll feel obligated to fix the next problem.  Plus, I don't really NEED this vehicle.  I have 3 now sitting in the parking lot, and I am really only supposed to have no more than 2.  Nobody is going to buy this off Craig's List for anything more than $200, and I doubt I could get that.  I won't buy any vehicle I can't drive off, and Car Restoration on 1989 Mazdas is not a big thing.  It's not like this is a 1969 Dodge Superbee.

She's going to the Land of Away.

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Offline Nearingsfault

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Re: Requiem for an Automobile
« Reply #4 on: October 14, 2017, 07:38:03 PM »
If you could still do it yourself I would say repair it but if the struts have rusted through to the point of snapping every other under carriage component is in the same shape just waiting for the next bump or hard corner. Understand that this pains me to say but the scrap yard beckons...
If its important then try something, fail, disect, learn from it, try again, and again and again until it kills you or you succeed.

Online RE

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Re: Requiem for an Automobile
« Reply #5 on: October 14, 2017, 07:52:31 PM »
If you could still do it yourself I would say repair it but if the struts have rusted through to the point of snapping every other under carriage component is in the same shape just waiting for the next bump or hard corner. Understand that this pains me to say but the scrap yard beckons...

She's finished.  I have her emptied out now, the only things now are to negotiate a deal with my Mechanic Jockey and a Tow Driver.  I want to get at least $200.  The tires by themselves cost me $350.  The battery was $80.  $30 worth of gas in the tank.  Engine runs GREAT.  Tranny operates GREAT.  This is a great Spare Parts vehicle.

If I hadn't bought SaVANnah this summer, I probably would have fixed her up.  But 3 vehicles is really more backup than I need, and she is the oldest and I have to let her go.  I will put her down.

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Offline Surly1

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Re: Requiem for an Automobile
« Reply #6 on: October 15, 2017, 05:19:16 AM »
Ah Yes,  John Henry, that was a race horse.

Bet him whenever I could, that horse was sure named correctly.

He was made out of iron.

                                 

Enjoyed this immensely.

Did you know that John Henry had Man O'War in his bloodline, five generations back? Neither did I.
http://www.pedigreequery.com/john+henry

JOHN HENRY (USA) br. G, 1975 {8-c} DP = 13-4-9-2-0 (28) DI = 3.31 CD = 1.00 - 83 Starts, 39 Wins, 15 Places, 9 Shows Career Earnings: $6,591,860
OLE BOB BOWERS (USA)
b. 1963
PRINCE BLESSED (USA)
br. 1957
PRINCEQUILLO (IRE)
b. 1940 [IS]
PRINCE ROSE (GB)
b. 1928 [C]
ROSE PRINCE (FR) b. 1919
INDOLENCE (GB) b. 1920
COSQUILLA (GB)
b. 1933
PAPYRUS (GB) br. 1920
QUICK THOUGHT (IRE) b. 1918
DOG BLESSED (USA)*
br. 1941
BULL DOG (FR)
br. 1927 [B]
TEDDY (FR) b. 1913 [S]
PLUCKY LIEGE (GB) b. 1912 *
BLESSED AGAIN (USA)*
br. 1932
BLUE LARKSPUR (USA) b. 1926 [C]
CLONASLEE (IRE) b. 1922 *
BLUE JEANS (USA)
b. 1950
BULL LEA (USA)
br. 1935 [C]
BULL DOG (FR)
br. 1927 [B]
TEDDY (FR) b. 1913 [S]
PLUCKY LIEGE (GB) b. 1912 *
ROSE LEAVES (USA)*
br. 1916
BALLOT (USA) ch. 1904
COLONIAL (GB) br. 1897 *
BLUE GRASS (USA)
b. 1944
BLUE LARKSPUR (USA)
b. 1926 [C]
BLACK SERVANT (USA) br. 1918
BLOSSOM TIME (USA) br. 1920
CAMELOT (USA)
b. 1935
SIR GALLAHAD (FR) b. 1920 [C]
CROSS OF GOLD (GB) b. 1926
ONCE DOUBLE (USA)
dkb/br. 1967
DOUBLE JAY (USA)
blk/br. 1944 [B]
BALLADIER (USA)
blk. 1932
BLACK TONEY (USA)
br. 1911 [BI]
PETER PAN (USA) b. 1904 [B]
BELGRAVIA (USA) br. 1903
BLUE WARBLER (USA)
ch. 1922
NORTH STAR (GB) ch. 1914
MAY BIRD (GB) ch. 1913
BROOMSHOT (USA)
blk/br. 1926
WHISK BROOM (USA)
ch. 1907
BROOMSTICK (USA) b. 1901 [I]
AUDIENCE (USA) ch. 1901 *
CENTRE SHOT (USA)
br. 1905
SAIN (GB) br. 1894
GRAND SHOT (USA) b. 1900
INTENT ONE (USA)
ch. 1955
INTENT (USA)
ch. 1948
WAR RELIC (USA)
ch. 1938
MAN O' WAR (USA) ch. 1917 [S]
FRIARS CARSE (USA) ch. 1923 *
LIZ F. (USA)*
ch. 1933
BUBBLING OVER (USA) ch. 1923
WENO (USA) blk. 1922
DUSTY LEGS (USA)
ch. 1945
MAHMOUD (FR)
gr. 1933 [IC]
BLENHEIM (GB) br. 1927 [CS]
MAH MAHAL (GB) gr. 1928 *
DUSTEMALL (USA)
br. 1927
CHICLE (FR) b. 1913
MISS WHISK (USA) ch. 1921 *

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: Requiem for an Automobile
« Reply #7 on: October 15, 2017, 05:46:52 AM »
Ah Yes,  John Henry, that was a race horse.

Bet him whenever I could, that horse was sure named correctly.

He was made out of iron.

                                 

Enjoyed this immensely.

Did you know that John Henry had Man O'War in his bloodline, five generations back? Neither did I.
http://www.pedigreequery.com/john+henry





No Surly, a revelation to me. My studies of pedigree on a horse only go as far back as the Daily Racing Form publishes in it's past performances.

 I think you will find most thoroughbreds are related to him if you go back far enough. Man"O War was considered a god among horses and was retired from his racing career early to retire for stud duty.

Nice work if you can get it. :icon_mrgreen: :icon_sunny: :emthup: :emthup: :emthup:

                        Man o' War (March 29, 1917 – November 1, 1947) was an American Thoroughbred who is widely considered one of the greatest racehorses of all time. During his career just after World War I, he won 20 of 21 races and $249,465 in purses. He was the unofficial 1920 American Horse of the Year and was honored with Babe Ruth as the outstanding athlete of the year by The New York Times. He was inducted into the National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame in 1957. On March 29, 2017, the museum opened a special exhibit in his honor, "Man o' War at 100".

In 1919, Man o' War won 9 of 10 starts including the Hopeful Stakes and Belmont Futurity, then the most important races for two-year-old horses in the United States. His only loss came at Saratoga Race Course, later nicknamed the Graveyard of Champions, where he had a poor start and was beaten by a colt fittingly named Upset.

Man o' War was not entered in the 1920 Kentucky Derby because his owner, Samuel Riddle, did not believe in racing at the distance of 10 furlongs so early in a young horse's career. Instead, Man o' War made his three-year-old debut in the Preakness Stakes where he defeated Upset by  1 1⁄2 lengths. Man o' War later won the Belmont Stakes by 20 lengths while setting a world record. Throughout the summer and fall, he continued to dominate his fellow three-year-olds, setting multiple records while conceding large amounts of weight to his rivals. The only time he faced older horses was in the final race of his career in a match race against Sir Barton, who had won what would later be known as the American Triple Crown in 1919. Man o' War won by seven lengths in the first race to be filmed in its entirety.

Riddle originally intended to race Man o' War in 1921 but decided against it because Man o' War would have been assigned record weights in the handicap format used in races for older horses. Instead, Man o' War was retired to stud, where he became a leading sire whose multiple champions included Triple Crown winner War Admiral.
Through his sons and daughters, Man o' War is found in almost all modern American pedigrees.


                               
                                       Man o' War after winning the Belmont Stakes


                                   


                                     
« Last Edit: October 15, 2017, 05:50:20 AM by Golden Oxen »

Offline Surly1

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Re: Requiem for an Automobile
« Reply #8 on: October 15, 2017, 06:22:14 AM »
Quote from: GO
I think you will find most thoroughbreds are related to him if you go back far enough. Man"O War was considered a god among horses and was retired from his racing career early to retire for stud duty.

When you think about the arithmetic, that makes perfect sense. I read somewhere that almost everyone in the western world can trace their lineage back to Charlemagne.

Quote from: GO
Nice work if you can get it. :icon_mrgreen: :icon_sunny: :emthup: :emthup: :emthup:

Upon reflection, "Retired to stud, where he became a leading sire of multiple champions" would itself make a hell of an epitaph. :icon_mrgreen: :icon_mrgreen:

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Eddie

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Re: Requiem for an Automobile
« Reply #9 on: October 15, 2017, 08:13:08 PM »
It's easy to get attached to a faithful car. I've had several such, the best of which was my 95 Toyota T100 4WD, which took me nearly 300,000 miles with minimal maintenance.  I only recently let it be hauled away. The missus took a photo of it sitting on the back of the tow truck. It was in my backyard for several years, including when you guys dropped in for the 1st convo.

I get attached to motorcycles too.

Said James, "In my opinion, there's nothing in this world
Beats a '52 Vincent and a Redheaded girl.
Now Nortons and Indians and Greavses won't do.
Oh, they don't have a Soul like a Vincent '52."

Well he reached for her hand and he slipped her the keys.
He said, "I've got no further use...for these.
I see Angels on Ariels in leather and chrome,
Swoopin' down from Heaven to carry me home."

And he gave her one last kiss and died.
And he gave her his Vincent.
To Ride.


Richard Thompson ---'52 Vincent Black Lightning

You guys read Sea Biscuit? Talking about race horses, that's one of my favorite books. If you haven't yet read it, I highly recommend it.

My father was very good on horseback. He grew up at a time when horses, and especially mules, were part of daily life. I grew up around horses, but I never had his total fearlessness, and horses can sense fear instantly. I am lucky to be alive, having been thrown, stomped, kicked, dragged and even once had a horse that rolled completely over me on a paved road. The worst thing that ever happened was a lost toenail.

Karma.

« Last Edit: October 15, 2017, 08:30:29 PM by Eddie »
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Eddie

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Re: Requiem for an Automobile
« Reply #10 on: October 15, 2017, 08:39:41 PM »
And bitten. Horses can bite the shit out of you. How could I forget that one.

I never really loved a horse, in the way you read about. I guess it's usually girls who fall in love with their horses, anyway....but I have loved many dogs, and a few cats. I had a half dozen horses at least, and then once worked for a year mucking stables on a farm that raised beautiful Arabians. But I am not, at heart, a horse person.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Eddie

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Re: Requiem for an Automobile
« Reply #11 on: October 15, 2017, 08:43:57 PM »
Sea Biscuit and War Admiral, 1938. One for the ages.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/WVT2MPNCqgM&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/WVT2MPNCqgM&fs=1</a>
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Online RE

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Re: Requiem for an Automobile
« Reply #12 on: October 15, 2017, 08:55:20 PM »
It's easy to get attached to a faithful car. I've had several such, the best of which was my 95 Toyota T100 4WD, which took me nearly 300,000 miles with minimal maintenance.  I only recently let it be hauled away. The missus took a photo of it sitting on the back of the tow truck. It was in my backyard for several years, including when you guys dropped in for the 1st convo.

My favorite was probably my 1989 Toyota Tercel 4WD Wagon, which took me all through my trucking years and also around the country as I drifted from one coaching job to another.  I had the thing loaded up in the back to the roof, and then more shit on top on the roof rack, which I used old shower curtains and air matresses to waterproof with bungees holding everything down.  I was certainly way over-weight for what the vehicle was supposed to carry, but it never let me down, not even in the mountains.  It had a 5-speed transmission, and low gear was REALLY low, so even though it was only a 4 cylinder, it would pull the hills just fine.

Sadly, I have no pictures remaining of that car.  But here is the model.


Mine was Blue and had more rust around the wheel wells, but not too bad.

I junked her for $50 when the tranny gave out after around a decade of service to me.  She was followed by the Jeep Grand Cherokee LTD, still siting in a storage unit in Springfield, MO.

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Offline Eddie

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Re: Requiem for an Automobile
« Reply #13 on: October 15, 2017, 09:07:43 PM »
I met my wife while she was changing the oil in her 1974 Toyota Corolla wagon. We drove it the first year I was back at college after my drop out years. I later wrecked that car, and we ended up with her brother's 1976 Toyota Corolla wagon, which was the best year for the single cam Corollas. It had a 5 speed. It lasted until residency and beyond. I used to pull an 18 ft sailboat with that car. We finally sold it to a friend who drove it through 4 years of med school. When the kids were born, my MIL bought us a 3rd new Toyota wagon, an '82 with the badass double overhead cam 4 cylinder, the best engine Toyota ever came up with. We drove that one until we went to mini-vans around 1990. We then bought a cool 4WD Toyota Previa van with 5 speed, which also went more than 200K. All our Toyotas were excellent cars.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: Requiem for an Automobile
« Reply #14 on: October 16, 2017, 03:50:19 AM »
It's easy to get attached to a faithful car. I've had several such, the best of which was my 95 Toyota T100 4WD, which took me nearly 300,000 miles with minimal maintenance.  I only recently let it be hauled away. The missus took a photo of it sitting on the back of the tow truck. It was in my backyard for several years, including when you guys dropped in for the 1st convo.
My favorite was probably my 1989 Toyota Tercel 4WD Wagon, which took me all through my trucking years and also around the country as I drifted from one coaching job to another.  I had the thing loaded up in the back to the roof, and then more shit on top on the roof rack, which I used old shower curtains and air matresses to waterproof with bungees holding everything down.  I was certainly way over-weight for what the vehicle was supposed to carry, but it never let me down, not even in the mountains.  It had a 5-speed transmission, and low gear was REALLY low, so even though it was only a 4 cylinder, it would pull the hills just fine.

Sadly, I have no pictures remaining of that car.  But here is the model.


Mine was Blue and had more rust around the wheel wells, but not too bad.

I junked her for $50 when the tranny gave out after around a decade of service to me.  She was followed by the Jeep Grand Cherokee LTD, still siting in a storage unit in Springfield, MO.

RE

Strange how our cars are as different as us, as is their burial places.

Mine is in a Hollywood museum.  :icon_mrgreen: :laugh: :exp-grin: :exp-grin:

                                       

                                       


                                       

                                     

                                       

My new one is Okay, don't get me wrong but I miss the old jalopy.

Fond memories of porking Pussy in the back while Oddjob was doing the driving.

Ahh The Good Old Days, where did the time go? :icon_scratch:

                                 


                                                   

 

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