AuthorTopic: And So it Begins... Global Income for Life  (Read 4161 times)

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 39413
    • View Profile
Re: And So it Begins... Global Income for Life
« Reply #75 on: September 04, 2019, 05:39:56 PM »
This is a good idea and should be paid for by taxing the living shit out of anyone making more than $100K/yr.

RE


What is the tax rate of a hundred G's on the books currently ? 30%  :icon_scratch:

No idea.  My tax rate though is 0%.  :icon_sunny:

RE
Save As Many As You Can

Offline azozeo

  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 9508
    • View Profile
Re: And So it Begins... Global Income for Life
« Reply #76 on: September 05, 2019, 06:31:50 AM »
This is a good idea and should be paid for by taxing the living shit out of anyone making more than $100K/yr.

RE


What is the tax rate of a hundred G's on the books currently ? 30%  :icon_scratch:

No idea.  My tax rate though is 0%.  :icon_sunny:

RE


Cellar dweller, I'm there as well.

Bottom feeder has it's distinct advantageous......
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 39413
    • View Profile
💵 $500 a month for free: Data show how people spent the money
« Reply #77 on: October 04, 2019, 01:03:08 AM »
We get our PFD here in AK tomorrow!  $1600 this year just for being able to fog a mirror and live in Alaska!  :icon_sunny:  Only once a year though, not every month.  :(

RE

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/universal-basic-income-data-show-how-people-spent-the-500-a-month-they-got-for-free/

$500 a month for free: Data show how people spent the money


October 3, 2019 / 5:38 PM / AP

The first data from an experiment in a California city where needy people get $500 a month from the government shows they spend most of it on things such as food, clothing and utility bills.

The 18-month, privately funded program started in February and involves 125 people in Stockton. It is one of the few experiments testing the concept of "universal basic income," an old idea getting new attention due to Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang.

    125 residents of this city got hundreds a month in free money — here's what happened
    Andrew Yang offered $1,000 a month to 10 random families. Is that legal?

Stockton Mayor Michael Tubbs has committed to publicly releasing data throughout the experiment to win over skeptics and, he hopes, convince state lawmakers to implement the program statewide. The demonstration was spearheaded by the Economic Security Project, a network focused on basic income in the U.S.
Trending News

    The U.S. economy's most important sector is weakening
    U.S. to hit Irish whiskey and other EU products with tariffs
    MGM to pay up to $800 million in mass shooting settlement
    AdvoCare fined $150 million as FTC calls it a pyramid scheme

"In this country we have an issue with associating people who are struggling economically and people of color with vices like drug use, alcohol use, gambling," he said. "I thought it was important to illustrate folks aren't using this money for things like that. They are using it for literal necessities."

By contrast, critics say the experiment likely won't provide useful information from a social science perspective given its limited size and duration.

Matt Zwolinski, director of the Center for Ethics, Economics and Public Policy at the University of San Diego, said people aren't likely to change their behavior if they know the money they are getting will stop after a year and a half. That's one reason why he says the experiment is "really more about story telling than it is about social science."

Plus, he said previous studies have shown people don't spend the money on frivolous things.

"What you get out of a program like this is some fairly compelling anecdotes from people," he said. "That makes for good public relations if you are trying to drum up interest in a basic income program, but it doesn't really tell you much about what a basic income program would do if implemented on a long-term and large-scale basis."

The researchers overseeing the program, Stacia Martin-West at the University of Tennessee and Amy Castro Baker at the University of Pennsylvania, said their goal is not to see if people change their behavior, but to measure how the money impacts their physical and mental health. That data will be released later.

People in the program get $500 each month on a debit card, which helps researchers track their spending. But 40% of the money has been withdrawn as cash, making it harder for researchers to know how it was used. They fill in the gaps by asking people how they spent it.

Since February, when the program began, people receiving the money have on average spent nearly 40% of it on food. About 24% went to sales and merchandise, which include places like Walmart and discount dollar stores that also sell groceries. Just over 11% went to utility bills, while more than 9% went to auto repairs and fuel.

The rest of the money went to services, medical expenses, insurance, self-care and recreation, transportation, education and donations.
Paying the bills

Of the participants, 43% are working full or part time while 2% are unemployed and not looking for work. Another 8% are retired, while 20% are disabled and 10% stay home to care for children or an aging parent.

"People are using the money in ways that give them dignity or that gives their kids dignity," Castro-Baker said, noting participants have reported spending the money to send their children to prom, pay for dental work and buy birthday cakes.

Zhona Everett, 48, and her husband are among the recipients. When the experiment started she was unemployed and her husband was making $110 a day as a truck driver. They were always late paying their bills, and the pressure caused problems with their marriage.

Once she got the money, Everett set it up to automatically pay bills for her electricity, car insurance and TV. She's also paid off her wedding ring, donates $50 a month to her church and still has some left over for an occasional date night with her husband.

She said she and her husband now both have jobs working at the Tesla plant in Fremont.

"I think people should have more of an open mind about what the program is about and shouldn't be so critical about it," she said.

First published on October 3, 2019 / 5:38 PM
Save As Many As You Can

Offline azozeo

  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 9508
    • View Profile
Re: 💵 $500 a month for free: Data show how people spent the money
« Reply #78 on: November 20, 2019, 10:47:13 AM »
We get our PFD here in AK tomorrow!  $1600 this year just for being able to fog a mirror and live in Alaska!  :icon_sunny:  Only once a year though, not every month.  :(

RE

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/universal-basic-income-data-show-how-people-spent-the-500-a-month-they-got-for-free/

$500 a month for free: Data show how people spent the money


October 3, 2019 / 5:38 PM / AP

The first data from an experiment in a California city where needy people get $500 a month from the government shows they spend most of it on things such as food, clothing and utility bills.

The 18-month, privately funded program started in February and involves 125 people in Stockton. It is one of the few experiments testing the concept of "universal basic income," an old idea getting new attention due to Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang.

    125 residents of this city got hundreds a month in free money — here's what happened
    Andrew Yang offered $1,000 a month to 10 random families. Is that legal?

Stockton Mayor Michael Tubbs has committed to publicly releasing data throughout the experiment to win over skeptics and, he hopes, convince state lawmakers to implement the program statewide. The demonstration was spearheaded by the Economic Security Project, a network focused on basic income in the U.S.
Trending News

    The U.S. economy's most important sector is weakening
    U.S. to hit Irish whiskey and other EU products with tariffs
    MGM to pay up to $800 million in mass shooting settlement
    AdvoCare fined $150 million as FTC calls it a pyramid scheme

"In this country we have an issue with associating people who are struggling economically and people of color with vices like drug use, alcohol use, gambling," he said. "I thought it was important to illustrate folks aren't using this money for things like that. They are using it for literal necessities."

By contrast, critics say the experiment likely won't provide useful information from a social science perspective given its limited size and duration.

Matt Zwolinski, director of the Center for Ethics, Economics and Public Policy at the University of San Diego, said people aren't likely to change their behavior if they know the money they are getting will stop after a year and a half. That's one reason why he says the experiment is "really more about story telling than it is about social science."

Plus, he said previous studies have shown people don't spend the money on frivolous things.

"What you get out of a program like this is some fairly compelling anecdotes from people," he said. "That makes for good public relations if you are trying to drum up interest in a basic income program, but it doesn't really tell you much about what a basic income program would do if implemented on a long-term and large-scale basis."

The researchers overseeing the program, Stacia Martin-West at the University of Tennessee and Amy Castro Baker at the University of Pennsylvania, said their goal is not to see if people change their behavior, but to measure how the money impacts their physical and mental health. That data will be released later.

People in the program get $500 each month on a debit card, which helps researchers track their spending. But 40% of the money has been withdrawn as cash, making it harder for researchers to know how it was used. They fill in the gaps by asking people how they spent it.

Since February, when the program began, people receiving the money have on average spent nearly 40% of it on food. About 24% went to sales and merchandise, which include places like Walmart and discount dollar stores that also sell groceries. Just over 11% went to utility bills, while more than 9% went to auto repairs and fuel.

The rest of the money went to services, medical expenses, insurance, self-care and recreation, transportation, education and donations.
Paying the bills

Of the participants, 43% are working full or part time while 2% are unemployed and not looking for work. Another 8% are retired, while 20% are disabled and 10% stay home to care for children or an aging parent.

"People are using the money in ways that give them dignity or that gives their kids dignity," Castro-Baker said, noting participants have reported spending the money to send their children to prom, pay for dental work and buy birthday cakes.

Zhona Everett, 48, and her husband are among the recipients. When the experiment started she was unemployed and her husband was making $110 a day as a truck driver. They were always late paying their bills, and the pressure caused problems with their marriage.

Once she got the money, Everett set it up to automatically pay bills for her electricity, car insurance and TV. She's also paid off her wedding ring, donates $50 a month to her church and still has some left over for an occasional date night with her husband.

She said she and her husband now both have jobs working at the Tesla plant in Fremont.

"I think people should have more of an open mind about what the program is about and shouldn't be so critical about it," she said.

First published on October 3, 2019 / 5:38 PM


Have you pissed away your free dinero's on hookers & blo yet ?  :icon_mrgreen:

I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline azozeo

  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 9508
    • View Profile
Australia, Brisbane: BIEN Con 2020 (free money)
« Reply #79 on: November 20, 2019, 10:49:41 AM »
Next year 20th Basic Income Earth Network (BIEN) Conference will be held in Brisbane, Australia, jointly hosted by Basic Income Guarantee Australia (BIGA), The School of Social Science and Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences (University of Queensland) and The School of Public Health and Social Work (Queensland University of Technology).

The event will occur on Monday 28th to Wednesday 30th of September 2020, and is entitled “Basic income, the ecological crisis and a new age of automation”. Submission of abstracts can be done until Friday January 31th, 2020, considering the following main themes / questions:

Can basic income play a role in tackling the multifaceted ecological and social crises confronting the world today?

As climate change and the ‘new age’ of automation continue to re-shape the globe, can and should basic income form part our answer to these challenges?

Can basic income be part of a Green New Deal or is a Job Guarantee a better way forward?

Can basic income promote ‘de-growth’ and genuine sustainability?

Should automation and digitisation be used as a justification for basic income?

What is the evidence regarding the impact of these technological processes on the availability of jobs?

Is basic income an adequate replacement for any technological unemployment that may occur (now or in the future)?


https://basicincome.org/news/2019/11/australia-brisbane-bien-conference-2020/
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
Universal Basic Income

Started by RE « 1 2 3 4 5 » Economics

66 Replies
22048 Views
Last post April 22, 2013, 10:55:27 AM
by agelbert
0 Replies
382 Views
Last post September 05, 2016, 10:44:59 PM
by RE
0 Replies
447 Views
Last post October 14, 2016, 02:29:35 AM
by Guest