AuthorTopic: 🛬 Death of Aviation: Last Flight of the 747  (Read 5559 times)

Offline RE

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🛬 How Boeing’s first 747 took off — and changed the world forever
« Reply #15 on: February 24, 2019, 01:37:53 AM »
I didn't realize it actually launched before the 70s.

RE

https://nypost.com/2019/02/23/how-the-first-747-took-off-and-changed-aviation-forever/

How Boeing’s first 747 took off — and changed the world forever

By Eric Spitznagel
February 23, 2019 | 12:49pm | Updated


The first 747 is rolled out of Boeing's plant in Washington state for display in 1968. The plane finally took off in February 1969. Courtesy of Boeing

Fifty years ago this month, on Feb. 9, 1969, the Boeing 747 was officially introduced to the world. But as the wide-bodied jumbo jet taxied down the runway for its inaugural flight from Paine Field, just north of Seattle, not everybody in the crowd was convinced it would be a success.

The plane, which would soon be dubbed “Queen of the Skies,” was big — maybe too big. At twice the size of the Boeing 707, it was by far the largest civilian passenger jet ever conceived: 231 feet long with a 196-foot wingspan — enough room to play regulation basketball on each wing — and a tail as tall as a six-story building. Impressive to look at, but would it fly?

Even Joe Sutter, the engineering mastermind who dreamed up the 747 (he passed away in 2016) was apprehensive. “The real concern was landing something this large,” Sutter said at the time. “That was the challenge.”

One person who never had any doubt was Brien Wygle, the co-pilot on that historic flight — along with pilot-in-command Jack Waddell and engineer Jess Wallick.

“A few thousand people showed up to watch,” Wygle, now 94 years old, told The Post. “We knew some of them were wondering if we were going to pull it off.”


The original 747 team of co-pilot Jack Waddell, pilot Brien Wygle and engineer Jess Wallick (l-r).Courtesy of Boeing.

Even when they encountered a minor problem in the air — one of the plane’s wing flaps slipped off its track and wouldn’t retract — “we weren’t worried,” Wygle says. “It flew like a dream. We didn’t have hundreds and hundreds of engineers on the job for nothing. We knew ‘The Incredibles’ wouldn’t let us down.”

The Incredibles was the nickname Boeing President William Allen gave his team of 50,000 mechanics, engineers and administrators tasked with designing and building the 747 in just 28 months. (The usual time frame for building a new aircraft was 42 months.)

Why the rush?

Boeing had signed a $550 million contract with Pan American World Airways in 1966, promising that 25 of the ambitious jumbo jets — which, at the time, were little more than hypothetical sketches — would be delivered by the end of the decade.

When the deal was made, Boeing didn’t even have a production plant to build the new planes.

They bought 750 acres in Washington state and quickly cleared away the forest to make room.

By 1968, Boeing had $1.5 billion worth of contracts with 26 airlines for the 747, and the plane was being built in a factory so new it didn’t have a roof yet.

“They went into a lot of debt,” says Michael Lombardi, Boeing’s resident historian. “There were six or seven banks funding Boeing at the time, and if the 747 didn’t deliver as promised, it would’ve [bankrupted] the company.”

But after that 85-minute inaugural flight — not a minute more, according to Wygle’s detailed flight logbook, which he still has — even the naysayers were convinced. “All my worries evaporated,” Sutter wrote in his autobiography. “I knew we had a good airplane.”

It was far from just a “good” airplane. The Boeing 747 would come to redefine air travel in the late 20th century. With its four engines, it could travel farther and faster than other jets and, with a seating capacity of 550, carry three times as many passengers. The extra seats meant prices for international travel came down, and a golden age of global tourism for the masses was born.


The flight attendants on the luxurious planes were known for their beauty.Courtesy of Boeing.

Between 1970 and 2017, more than 3.5 billion people have flown on a 747, more than half the world’s population, according to the Smithsonian. 747s have carried Space Shuttles for NASA, been the choice for Air Force One since 1990 and was Richard Branson’s first plane when he launched Virgin Atlantic in 1984. There has never been a more iconic passenger plane, one that even casual travelers can recognize by sight, thanks to its teardrop-shaped “hump” above the main deck.

Its success is a little ironic, given that the 747 was created with the assumption of failure. In the late ’60s, supersonic airplanes like the Concorde, capable of cruising at more than twice the speed of sound, were widely predicted to be the future of commercial air travel.

“The thought was 747s would eventually be converted into cargo planes,” says Lombardi. “They would become freighters.”

So they designed it with cargo in mind, not passengers. By placing the cockpit above the fuselage on a second deck, creating that distinctive hump, the nose of the plane could become a front-loading door. The wide body design allowed for even more cargo room.

When the Concorde failed to take over — carriers like Pan Am and TWA weren’t interested in a plane that used 11 times more fuel while carrying a fraction of the passengers — the 747 became the jumbo jet of choice.

“Every airline had to have one,” says Bob van der Linden, a curator at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum. “It became a status symbol.”

Pan Am was the first airline to offer flights on the 747 — First Lady Pat Nixon helped christen the plane in January of 1970 with red, white and blue champagne — but soon every major carrier was clamoring to add at least one of the iconic jets to their fleet.

And with good reason. Passengers loved them. As Boeing promised in magazine ads in the early ’70s, “Welcome to the Spacious Age.” The 747’s twin aisles didn’t just come with extra legroom but also vertical sidewalls and high ceilings that made it easy to forget you were on a plane at 35,000 feet. “Boeing extensively studied the psychological effects of a cabin’s layout,” says Lombardi. “Just having the feeling of space and openness makes passengers feel instantly more relaxed.”

The upper deck, an extra area of space that had no real purpose in the initial design, turned into a first-class lounge, where first-class passengers walked up a spiral suitcase to be wined and dined. Jeffrey Ruthizer, 77, a former New Yorker (he now lives in Delray Beach, Fla.), remembers taking a 747 for a honeymoon trip to Paris with wife Monica in 1976. “It was all about caviar and foie gras and the finest filet mignons,” he says. “The stewardesses were beautiful and every single guy, and half the married guys, would be trying to grab one of them.”

Carriers went above and beyond to make their lounge area special. Continental had a fully stocked pub, including arcade games. United’s “Red Carpet Room” featured swivel chairs, wide-screen movies and over a dozen baby bassinets. American Airlines had a grand piano to keep passengers entertained. Frank Sinatra Jr. played a surprise show with his nine-piece band during a red-eye flight on American from Los Angeles to New York in 1971.


From the beginning, stewardesses loved the 747. That’s true even for Laura Brentlinger (inset), who was almost killed in 1989 when a hole tore open in the side of her jet. She survived by clinging to the spiral staircase.

The flight attendants talk about the 747 like they were mansions in the sky. “We had a formal dining room,” says Christa Keppel, who became a Pan Am stewardess in 1970. “Maxim’s of Paris did a lot of our catering. Dom Perignon was our Champagne of choice.”

Carole Tye, who flew with United during the ’70s and ’80s, says stewardesses would “put orchids throughout the cabin. We even dabbled in aircraft-approved ‘pyrotechnics,’ creating tiny volcanoes with dry ice and crème de menthe. It was all part of the pomp and circumstance that went along with flying the premier airplane of its day.”

Even Laura Brentlinger, a retired stewardess who nearly lost her life on a 747, has nothing but praise for the plane. In 1989, Brentlinger was working on United Flight 811 out of Honolulu, and the cargo door ripped open at 22,000 feet, pulling nine passengers out of the plane to their deaths. As Brentlinger was being sucked towards the aircraft’s hole, she grabbed onto the spiral staircase and says her feet “were flailing in the wind like a flag. Had it been any other airplane, I’m not sure I would have survived. She [the 747] saved my life. I cried when she was retired.”

Devastating accidents like Flight 811 have been the exception. Just 4 percent of the more than 1,500 Boeing 747s built since 1970 have been involved in crashes, and more than half of those had no loss of life. But as with all things 747, even their tragedies had to be the biggest. In 1977, two Boeing 747s collided on a foggy runway in Spain, killing 583 passengers. It remains the deadliest air disaster of all time.
see also
Say goodbye to the Boeing 747
Say goodbye to the Boeing 747

The 747 began to fall out of favor over the last few decades. “Carriers have started to turn to twin-engine jets like the Boeing 777 and Airbus 330 for transatlantic travel,” says Linden. Both burn less fuel and have substantially lower operating costs than a 747.

“A modern jet engine is more efficient and unbelievably reliable,” Linden says. “You just don’t need four of them anymore to get across an ocean.”

The last 747 commercial flight by a US airline happened in January 2018. It was Delta Flight 9771 carrying just 48 people from Atlanta to Arizona, and two of the passengers got married mid-flight. Today, there are more than 500 Boeing 747 jumbos in use around the world, on airlines like Korean Air, British Airways and Lufthansa, among others, but they’re slowly being phased out. Qantas, Australia’s biggest airline, plans to retire its six remaining 747s by 2020.

Even the White House may be joining the anti-747 tide. President Trump isn’t a fan of the jet’s “out of control” costs and in 2016 tweeted that he intends to “cancel order” for a “brand-new 747 Air Force One.”

But even as they disappear, the 747 remains a gold standard. Mark Vanhoenacker, a pilot for British Airways and author of the memoir “Skyfaring,” says the 747 is the reason he and many other young pilots wanted to fly at all.

He remembers one of his first (and last) trips on the famous jumbo jet with an equally enamored co-pilot. “We looked out those enormous 747 flight-deck windows,” Vanhoenacker says, “and one of us said to the other, ‘This is it. It doesn’t get any better than this.’ 
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Offline RE

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https://simpleflying.com/british-airways-747-retirement-plans/

When Will British Airways Retire Its Last 747 Now The Boeing 777X Is On Order?


Tom
February 28, 2019 2:21 pm


After speculation that British Airways would order the Boeing 777X amid the 747 retirement, today the news broke that it had gone ahead. The airline has placed an exceptional order of 18 B777-9 aircraft, with 24 more options. The list price per aircraft of the order is US$442.2 million. This equates to a list price of US$7.96bn for the entire 18 aircraft in the firm order.

The B777x order comes at a time when British Airways is looking to retired its fleet of B747 aircraft. The four-engined aircraft are seen as inefficient by many in a market where two-engined aircraft are thriving. In fact, the oldest of BA’s B747s, G-BNLN, was delivered to the airline 29 years ago back in 1990.


14 B747s will be replaced by the new B777-9s. Photo: British Airways
B747 Replacement

Simple Flying had previously reported that British Airways was due to replace its 35 Boeing 747 aircraft with new widebody aircraft. This was set to be made of 18 Airbus A350 aircraft, 12 Boeing 787-10 aircraft, and new B777-300 aircraft. This has, however, now changed such that the B777X order is predominately replacing the B747 fleet.

IAG, the owners of British Airways, told Simple Flying that 14 B777-9s will replace 14 B747s. The remaining 4 B777-9s in the firm order will replace four of the airline’s ageing B777-200 aircraft. The parent group confirmed that deliveries would take place between 2022 and 2025.
B747 Retirement

The B777-9s are due to be delivered between 2022 and 2025. Photo: IAG
Aircraft Surplus

With 14 of the new B777-9 order directly set to replace the B747 fleet, there will be a surplus of long haul aircraft in the British Airways fleet. Simple Flying was unable to confirm which of the 30 aircraft previously slated to replace the B747 will still be used to directly replace the remaining 21 aircraft in the fleet. IAG told us this would comprise of a mix of A350 and B787 aircraft, but declined to mention the exact ratio.
Amended Retirement Date?

Today’s B777-9 order came after the retirement plan for the B747 was previously announced. This was supposed to take place over the next 5 years, finishing in 2024. However, Today’s announcement from the IAG group mentioned that the B777-9s would be delivered between 2022 and 2025. As such, it is possible that one or two B747s could be kept around for slightly longer than originally planned.
B747 retirement


BA’s retro painted B747s will keep their livery until they are retired. Photo: Stuart Bailey/British Airways

Additionally, the last B777-9s to be delivered could be the ones allocated to replacing the four B777-200 aircraft. Finally, the surplus of widebody aircraft could fill any gap between the currently scheduled retirement of the B747 and the delivery of the new B777s.

Speaking of the new order IAG Cheif Executive, Willie Walsh, said: “The new B777-9 is the world’s most fuel efficient longhaul aircraft and will bring many benefits to British Airways’ fleet. It’s the ideal
replacement for the Boeing 747 and its size and range will be an excellent fit for the
airline’s existing network.”
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🛬 British Airways To Paint Boeing 747 In Their Iconic Landor Livery 2
« Reply #17 on: March 02, 2019, 01:32:05 AM »
https://simpleflying.com/british-airways-747-landor-livery/

British Airways To Paint Boeing 747 In Their Iconic Landor Livery 2
Tom

March 1, 2019 12:50 pm


Great news for Heathrow aviation spotters today, as British Airways announces the latest in their series of retro repaints. Today the airline announced that the latest repaint will consist of a Boeing 747 sporting the Landor livery. This was last seen on an aircraft back in 1997, preceding the current Livery.

This comes as British Airways celebrate their centenary year this year. Along with a number of events, the airline is recognising its heritage by recreating a number of liveries not seen for many years. In February, the first retro livery landed at British Airways’s main hub, Heathrow.


The next British Airways B747 to be repainted will receive the Landor livery. Photo: British Airways

4 Special Liveries

BA is set to repaint a total of four aircraft in retro liveries as part of the centenary celebrations. This started with a B747, registered G-BYGC, which received a BOAC livery. This landed in Heathrow for the first time sporting the new livery on February 18th.

The next aircraft set to receive the retro treatment is an A319, registered as G-EUPJ. That aircraft entered the paint shop back on 23rd February to recieve a BEA livery. British Airways is yet to reveal a date for the aircraft’s return.


A B747 wearing a special BOAC livery returned to service on 18th of February. Photo: Tom Boon – Simple Flying

Landor Next

The next aircraft to be repainted in a retro British Airways livery is another B747, this time registered as G-BNLY. This aircraft entered the paint shop in Dublin on Monday (25th February. It took two weeks to repaint the BOAC B747. As such, we are unlikely to see G-BNLY emerge before 11th March.

What makes the repaint of G-BNLY more significant than the other retro repaints is that this particular aircraft has previously worn the livery it is to be repainted in! When it previously wore the Landor livery, it was known as the “City of Swansea”, and as such will regain that name. G-BNLY will wear the Landor livery until it is retired in 2023. Yesterday British Airways purchased a number of B777-9 aircraft to replace the B747 fleet.


The Landor livery was last seen on a British Airways aircraft in 1997. Photo: Pedro Aragão / Wikimedia

Alex Cruz, the current chairman of British Airways, said: “We’re really thrilled to announce Landor as the latest iconic scheme to join the fleet as part of our centenary celebrations and we’re sure this excitement will be reflected around the world.”
What’s next?

While British Airways has confirmed that one more aircraft will receive a heritage livery, they haven’t confirmed anything beyond this. However, this hasn’t stopped rumours spreading on the internet. Many believe that the next and final livery to be painted will be the Negus livery. This was in service between 1974-1985, before the Landor livery. Again, it is expected that this will be applied to a B747. British Airways has confirmed that all new aircraft will be delivered in the current Chatham Dockyard livery.
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🛬 When Will The Airbus A380 Actually Retire From All Airlines?
« Reply #18 on: March 04, 2019, 12:26:57 AM »
https://simpleflying.com/airbus-a380-retirement/

When Will The Airbus A380 Actually Retire From All Airlines?
Andrea

March 4, 2019 3:34 am

As we all know, Airbus ended its A380 program last month. The last Airbus A380 is expected to leave the assembly line in 2021. Singapore Airlines has already started retiring some of its A380s, while a couple of airlines are still awaiting the delivery of the aircraft. With that being said, when will the Airbus A380 actually retire from all airlines?
ANA Airbus A380


ANA’s inaugural A380 flight is scheduled to take place on May 24th, 2019. Photo: Airbus.

Current Airbus A380 Operators

Let’s take a look at all airlines currently operating the Airbus A380. Here is the list:

    Air France
    ANA (to start service between Tokyo – Narita (NRT) and Honolulu (HNL) in May)
    Asiana Airlines
    British Airways
    China Southern Airlines
    Emirates
    Etihad Airways
    Hi Fly
    Korean Air
    Lufthansa
    Malaysia Airlines
    Qantas
    Qatar Airways
    Singapore Airlines
    Thai Airways

ANA and Emirates still have A380s on order. Additionally, Simple Flying reported last month that British Airways may buy used A380 aircraft to replace its aging fleet of Boeing 747s. Accordingly, even though some airlines are considering the retirement of their A380s, there is still demand from other airlines.
What are the A380 operators’ plans for their aircraft?

Most of the current A380 operators have not clearly communicated their plans for the aircraft. Singapore Airlines has retired four A380s so far; however, one of them is still in service for Hi Fly. The other two are being used for spare parts, and the fate of the fourth one is unknown.


Singapore Airlines was the first airline to retire one of its A380s. Photo: Wikipedia.

Qatar Airways has announced that it will start retiring its aircraft once they hit the 10-year mark. Accordingly, the airline will start the retirement of its 10 aircraft in 2024.

Air France will retire half of its 10 A380s beginning at the end of this year. The other five aircraft, however, will be upgraded to the tune of 45 million Euro per aircraft starting next year. It appears that Air France has plans to operate the five aircraft for several years to come; otherwise, the airline would most likely not invest this much money in them.
Air France A380-800
Air France had originally ordered 12 A380s. It converted two of the orders to orders for the A350 though. Photo: Wikimedia.

Emirates was originally planning on retiring its A380s after 12 years in service. The first aircraft entered service in 2008, so its retirement would be just around the corner. Nonetheless, the airline still has 14 A380s on order. It will most likely use these aircraft to replace the A380s it is retiring. The airline is scheduled to receive its last A380 aircraft in 2021. If it will also operate this aircraft for 12 years, it looks like the airline will fly the A380 until 2033.
Overall

At this time it is impossible to predict when the Airbus A380 will actually retire from all airlines. I would assume that the A380 will remain in service for at least another decade. There are most likely several factors that will influence this date, however. A sharp rise in the cost of fuel would almost certainly accelerate the retirement of the aircraft. Additionally, a lack of replacement parts and support for the aircraft would also lead to a faster retirement.

With that being said, I believe that we will see the Airbus A380 on some routes for years to come.

When do you think the Airbus A380 will actually retire from all airlines?
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🛬 Boeing to roll out 777X on March 13
« Reply #19 on: March 06, 2019, 01:08:45 AM »
A NEW White Elephant!  ::)

RE

https://www.airlineratings.com/news/boeing-roll-777x-march-13/

Boeing to roll out 777X on March 13
By
Geoffrey Thomas
March 05, 2019


Rendering 777-9X; 777-8X

One of the most anticipated roll-outs in recent aviation history will take place on March 13 when Boeing unveils its giant twin – the 777X.

In a tweet, Boeing has just announced the date.

Boeing is building two models of the 777X family: the 400-seat -9, which will be the first to roll out and the longer range -8, which can seat 350 passengers and has a range capability of more than 17,220 km.

SEE Video 777X takes to the sky in Germany

SEE Greenpoint’s luxury 777X interior.

The driving force behind the 777X is Emirates’ President Sir Tim Clark, whose airline is the lead buyer with an order for 150.

Sir Tim describes the 777X as “an absolute peach”.

Key to his enthusiasm is the aircraft’s economics and greater space — it is 20 percent more efficient per seat than the industry’s long-time benchmark the 777-300ER and its cabin is wider with bigger windows.

The Boeing 777X combines the best features of the current 777 with a longer fuselage, new engine and the composite wing design from the Boeing 787.

The photo below shows three 777X aircraft in the main production bay and the first rollout aircraft in the adjacent bay.


Other airlines that have ordered the 777X are Lufthansa, Etihad Airways, Qatar Airways, Singapore Airlines, Cathay Pacific Airways, All Nippon Airlines and last week British Airways.

Downunder Qantas and Air New Zealand are also evaluating the 777X along with its arch-rival the A350-1000.

Qantas’s competition, called “Project Sunrise” demands Sydney to London non-stop capability with 300 passengers.

Both Airbus and Boeing say they can meet the airline’s demands or “close to it.”

Qantas plans to add underfloor bunks to the winner of its competition because on ultra-long-haul flights the aircraft will carry virtually no cargo, just passenger’s bags.

Air New Zealand is going to accelerate the redesign of its interior offering at its Hangar 22 seating project after it decides on either the  Boeing 777X or A350 in April.


Air NZ chief executive Christopher Luxon told AirlineRatings.com at the inaugural of the airline’s first service to Chicago last year that the airline had been bringing customers through to experience mock-up cabin spaces in an attempt to learn their thinking about space, storage, and privacy.

“We’ve been running customers through a number of mock-ups that at this stage are quite primitive and quite conceptual but are giving them a feel about what they want to play back to us around that,” he said
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🛬 Aviation Article Avalanche
« Reply #20 on: March 09, 2019, 02:15:30 PM »
The number of articles on this topic and how long it has lasted is just amazing!  :o

RE

https://simpleflying.com/lufthansas-first-777x-is-nearing-completion-in-the-boeing-factory/

Lufthansa’s First 777X Is Nearing Completion In The Boeing Factory
By Nicholas
March 8, 2019

For those that are eagerly awaiting updates on the new Boeing 777X, you will be pleased to know that final structure is in place and only the engines need to be joined.

This first 777X-9 is on track to be delivered to Lufthansa in 2020 and will be the first to fly of Boeing’s new flagship aircraft.
Lufthansa 777x


The Boeing 777Xs wingtip. Photo: Lufthansa
What is the story so far?

The Boeing 777x has been designed to replace the current generation of 777 aircraft as well as the retiring 747 aircraft.

But to be such a versatile aircraft, it would require new technologies (such as the folding wingtips to fit in the same airports as current aircraft) and utilizing engineering principles developed for the very success Boeing 787.

The program launched back in 2012, with Lufthansa originally booking in 34 of the 777X aircraft to replace its older 747 fleet. They would later roll back their order to only 20, with a decision to buy several more A350s instead.

Production of the first 777x test model started in 2017, to understand the best ways to build the design, and see if the aircraft can operate correctly on the ground. Then, in 2018, Boeing began construction of their flight test models (specifically number 7 and 8). The first of these has been earmarked to go to Lufthansa once testing is complete.

In late November 2018, the electrical systems were installed and tested, turning the assembling into an actual active machine.

On February 15th this year, the final structural joining was complete, with the wing, midsection and main structure all joined together (so it finally looked like an actual plane).

From here, we can confirm that in the last two weeks the first 777x-9 has begun its paint job, ahead of flight tests in the near future.
777X


Boeing 777X in flight (Computer Generated). Source: Boeing
What has Lufthansa’s reaction been?

Lufthansa, of course, has been monitoring the progress of their new aircraft closely. This will be the first of 20 777X series aircraft in their future fleet.

The 777x series is based on the proven 777, which is already being flown by Lufthansa Cargo as a cargo version and by Austrian Airlines and Swiss as a passenger version. With a length of 76.6 meters and a width of 71.8 meters, the 777-9 far surpasses its predecessor and is currently the longest passenger aircraft in the world. – Markus Löhn, Lufthansa Group Representative at Boeing

Lufthansa will have an all-new interior for the 777X, including a new business class cabin.
Lufthansa


The new Lufthansa B777X business cabin. Photo: Lufthansa

Boeing has addressed concerns about any delays in the 777x construction and eventual delivery, saying that they are very confident that they will deliver the aircraft and guarantee its entry into service in 2020.

What do you think? Will the 777x come together successfully for Lufthansa? Let us know in the comments.
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🛬 Aviation Article Avalanche 2
« Reply #21 on: March 09, 2019, 02:24:02 PM »
https://www.businessinsider.com/best-part-of-emirates-business-class-airbus-a380-cocktail-lounge-2019-3

The best part of my 14-hour, $5,400 Emirates business-class flight was a perk I originally thought was a gimmick
Harrison Jacobs
18h


a380 airbus emirates The bar aboard an Airbus A380 during a delivery ceremony of Emirates' 100th Airbus A380. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

    I recently flew in business class for the first time in my life.
    It was on a 14-hour flight from Dubai to New York operated by Emirates on the Airbus A380 superjumbo, the largest and most expensive commercial airliner in history.
    While there were a lot of perks that blew me away — including the chauffeur service and the extravagant preflight lounge— the A380's in-flight cocktail bar gave the flight a feel entirely unlike what I've experienced.
    Rather than be stuck alone in my seat, I opted to hang out at the bar for a few hours, getting to know other passengers and flight attendants — and getting a drink or snack at my leisure.

For many travel junkies, flying in business class on an Airbus A380 operated by Emirates is considered the crème de la crème of flight experiences.

Until last month, I'd never flown in business class before; it never made sense for my budget.

But then, thanks to Airbus' announcement that in 2021 it will stop producing the A380, the world's largest and most expensive passenger plane, my editors thought I had to try flying back to New York in business class on an Emirates A380, for $5,400.

Read more: I flew 14 hours in business class on the soon-to-be-extinct Emirates A380, the world's largest airliner — and it was more luxurious than I could have imagined

I didn't know what to expect. I'd had an excellent experience flying Emirates in economy class to Dubai in November, but I'd heard mixed reviews about business class. I was worried that all it would mean was a slightly bigger seat and better airplane food.

I was very wrong. While Emirates' business class blew my mind for many reasons — the food, the lounge, and the pod-like seats among them — my favorite part was the plane's famous walk-up cocktail lounge.


Best_Business_Class_Flight_Emirates_Airbus_A380 (154 of 198)The onboard cocktail lounge. Harrison Jacobs/Business Insider

I had heard about the lounge, as many travel experts and frequent fliers consider it the centerpiece of the Emirates business-class experience. But I was skeptical.

I kept wondering: Does anyone actually use it, or is it a gimmick that looks better in a travel magazine?

I got my first taste of the cocktail lounge a few hours after takeoff. Dinner was over, and I was looking for a sweet snack to eat while I watched a TV show.

One of the best parts about the lounge is that it's stocked with fresh fruits, sandwiches, pastries, chips, and other goodies you can grab at your leisure. I took a bag of cherries and a bottle of water and went back to my seat.


Best_Business_Class_Flight_Emirates_Airbus_A380 (156 of 198)The snacks area of the cocktail lounge. Harrison Jacobs/Business Insider

The convenience was great, but it was how much fun the lounge was that showed me what a game-changer it is for travel.

Throughout the flight — and I was on a red-eye — there were always a few passengers there chatting or, more often, talking with the staff.

After sleeping for a few hours, I went into the lounge to stretch my legs and found a group of passengers drinking at the bar and having a conversation with the flight attendant/bartender. I had intended to grab a water bottle and head back to my seat. Instead, I spent three hours hanging out there with passengers and flight attendants.

The flight attendants told us about the worst passengers they've had to deal with, wild things that have happened on board, and what they like to do in their free time. The other passengers and I shared stories from our travels and recommendations for New York and Dubai, and got to know one another.

Halfway through, the bartender mixed an experimental drink at my request, turning the cucumber-fizz mocktail into an alcoholic drink. It was delicious.


Best_Business_Class_Flight_Emirates_Airbus_A380 (196 of 198)My experimental gin cucumber fizz. Harrison Jacobs/Business Insider

A passenger I met told me about how on his flight to Dubai a few weeks before, he and a half-dozen others hung out in the lounge during the Super Bowl, cheering on their team as they used the airplane WiFi to get updates on the score. It sounded like a blast.

As I left the plane the following morning, I was still amazed at how much fun my flight had been. An open social space creates a totally different atmosphere for the passengers and, I imagine, the staff.

The next time you think about splurging on a business-class flight, look for an airline with an onboard lounge — Emirates is far from the only one.
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« Reply #22 on: March 09, 2019, 02:29:47 PM »
https://simpleflying.com/why-the-boeing-777x-is-the-perfect-747-replacement/

Why The Boeing 777X Is The Perfect 747 Replacement
By Nicholas
March 7, 2019

EDIT: A slight mistake was made in the below claim of fuel efficiency, it has been corrected from per mile to per hour of flight time.

As the world holds it’s breath in collective anticipation of the upcoming 777X factory rollout, we are reminded that the world is also saying goodbye to the queen of the skies, the Boeing 747.

The 777 series will soon become Boeing’s largest aircraft and carry the mantle of Boeing’s flagship plane… but does it really hold a candle to the older 747?
British Airways B777


British Airways has 34 B747 aircraft in its fleet at present. Photo: Tom Boon – Simple Flying
Is the 777x a replacement for the 747?

British Airways recently placed a huge order of 18 777X-9 aircraft to replace their fleet of retiring 747 aircraft.  During the press release, Willie Walsh (The CEO of IAG who owns British Airways) had this to say:

“The new B777X-9 is the world’s most fuel-efficient long-haul aircraft and will bring many benefits to British Airways’ fleet. It’s the ideal replacement for the Boeing 747 and its size and range will be an excellent fit for the airline’s existing network. This aircraft will provide further cost efficiencies and environmental benefits with  fuel cost per seat improvements of 30 per cent compared to the Boeing 747.”

Even Boeing has been quick to point out that even they consider the 777x a replacement for the 747:

“The big airplane of the future for the aviation industry is going to be the Boeing 777-9X, It carries 400 passengers. It flies further than the 747 and the A380 does today.” – Boeing vice president of marketing Randy Tinseth

But how does it actually rank up to the 747? You can read in this detailed 777 vs 747 article here.

The critical point, however, is the question “is the 777x really a good replacement for the 747?”

The demand for the 777X should add stability to Boeing’s future performance.
Photo courtesy – The Boeing Company/Facebook


The 777X can transport a large number of passengers (349) but not as many as the 747 (410). The 777x can also fly far (7,525 nmi / 13,940 km) but not as far as the 747 (8,000 nmi (15,000 km). In fact, the Boeing 747 seems to trump the 777x in everything apart from fuel efficiency… so why replace it?

The 747 is simply not designed for this modern climate. Apart from just being cheaper to run (by about 1-2 dollars per seat per hour of flight time) the 777X also features modern technologies (such as the largest engines ever placed on a passenger aircraft) and engineering principles for today’s world. Whilst it would be wonderful to keep using the same design (if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it), the 747 was initially designed many decades ago and is simply outdated.

The 777X is a modern reimagining of a 747, with the requirements of point to point travel, passengers tasted and corporate belt-tightening.

The Boeing 747 factory. Source: Boeing


What do you think? Is the 777x a good replacement for the 747? Let us know in the comments!
« Last Edit: March 09, 2019, 02:49:10 PM by RE »
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« Reply #23 on: March 09, 2019, 02:37:31 PM »
http://www.thedrive.com/news/26805/virgin-atlantic-boeing-747-full-of-cruise-ship-passengers-quarantined-due-to-widespread-sickness

Virgin Atlantic Boeing 747 Full of Cruise Ship Passengers Quarantined Due to Widespread Sickness
The jumbo jet was isolated at London's Gatwick Airport after landing.
By Will Sabel CourtneyMarch 6, 2019

    News


virgin atlantic boeing 747 emergency sickness
Gareth Fuller/PA Wire


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A Virgin Atlantic Boeing 747 was forced into quarantine at Great Britain's Gatwick Airport after landing on Wednesday morning, thanks to the outbreak of a nasty illness that waylaid a number of passengers and crew during the flight. And the fault behind the sickness, it seems, may have been tied to another form of transportation: the dreaded cruise ship.

Everything no doubt seemed fine from the ground, at least at first: Virgin Atlantic Fight 610 completed the eight-hour journey from Bridgetown, Barbados to London, England on time, with the Boeing 747-400 touching down at 5:20am. Upon hitting the tarmac. however, the four-engined jetliner was met by emergency services personnel, the Sussex Police told CNN. A spokesperson for the South East Coast ambulance service elaborated, telling The Guardian that help had been called for about half an hour before the plane landed, after reports had come down that the Boeing contained numerous passengers and crew who weren't feeling particularly well. 

Roughly 30 people were checked out at a special screening center, The Guardian reported. Two were taken to the hospital, according to the BBC. All the other passengers deplaned as normal after the period of quarantine, and "all passengers have since continued their onward journeys," the police said in a statement.

"A number of customers onboard [Virgin Atlantic Flight 610], which landed at London Gatwick this morning from Barbados, reported feeling unwell. As a precaution the plane was met by the relevant authorities who made the decision to screen everyone onboard, in line with standard health and safety procedures," a Virgin Atlantic spokesperson said. “The wellbeing of our customers and crew is always our priority, and we are supporting those affected.”

According to passenger Trevor Wilson, who corresponded with representatives of the media from aboard the plane and the subsequent holding center via Twitter, the Virgin plane was a charter flight, with customer load was made up exclusively of people who had previously been aboard the cruise ship MSC Preziosa—a 139,000-ton Fantasia-class vessel capable of carrying more than 4,000 passengers. And, apparently, a whole lot of viruses, as Wilson claimed the bug—which he described as "mainly a bad chesty cough possibly chest infection"—appears to have originated on the floating vessel, not the flying one. 

"The illness seems to have originated on board ship not the plane," Wilson told Sky News's Joe O'Brien via Twitter. "5 members of cabin crew became sick on flight."

MSC Cruises confirmed to the BBC that the Virgin flight's 448 passengers had indeed been on the cruise ship before the flight.

"We are still investigating what may have caused the illness and we are currently waiting for further updates from Gatwick Airport medical services," the spokesperson said. "What we do know is that on MSC Preziosa, no cases of acute gastroenteritis have been reported in the past 14 days."
Wikipedia / CeeGee

The MSC Preziosa.

Seriously. Why do people still go on cruise ships?

« Last Edit: March 09, 2019, 02:49:55 PM by RE »
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« Reply #24 on: March 09, 2019, 02:47:31 PM »
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-03-06/japan-s-largest-airline-bets-big-on-the-newly-axed-airbus-a380

Japan's Largest Airline Bets Big on Newly Axed Airbus A380
By Dave McCombs
and Kiyotaka Matsuda
March 6, 2019, 11:00 AM AKST Updated on March 6, 2019, 8:04 PM AKST


    Carrier says demand strong enough to fill 520-seat planes
    ANA to challenge rival JAL on flights to islands, CEO says

0:10
Airbus Grounds the A380 Program After 11 Years

Just as a tide of canceled orders has prompted Airbus SE to halt production of the A380 superjumbo, Japan’s biggest airline is betting it can succeed where others have failed -- by filling the luxurious double-deckers with tourists flying to Hawaii.

Starting May 24, ANA Holdings Inc. has scheduled three flights a week from Tokyo to Honolulu on the 520-seat behemoths, painted in a special sea-turtle theme. The carrier will bring on one more A380 for the Hawaii service in July and a third next year, ANA President Yuji Hirako said, adding that reservations for the route are already more than 40 percent higher than a year ago.

The plan leaves ANA as the only passenger line with A380s on order, other than Dubai-based Emirates, which has been the plane’s mainstay airline. The aircraft -- which wowed travelers with in-flight showers, bedrooms and bars but was too big to win over most carriers -- may help ANA close the Hawaii market-share gap with arch-rival Japan Airlines Co. Still, some question whether the carrier can keep filling the plane once the novelty wears off.

“ANA is spending a lot on advertising, so they will initially be able to fill the planes, but in coming years, it may get harder to consistently sell all the seats,” said Yasuo Hashimoto, chief researcher at Japan Aviation Management Research.

Read: What Went Wrong for the A380 Superjumbo

Japan Airlines has counted on Hawaii and the route has become one of the few where it surpasses ANA. JAL, as the airline is known, replaced ANA in a code-share partnership with Hawaiian Airlines in March last year and controls about 33 percent of the Japan-Hawaii air travel market, compared with about 14 percent for ANA, according to JAL.

“This is one of the few major routes where JAL dominates ANA,” said Hashimoto. “If ANA can reverse that, that would be big. Their aim is to take at least part of JAL’s market share.”
Destination Hawaii

More Japanese flying to holidays on the islands

Source: Hawaii Department of Business, Economic Development & Tourism

Even with the added capacity, ANA won’t directly challenge JAL on some Hawaii routes. JAL offers Japan’s only direct flights to Kona, a hotspot on Hawaii’s largest island, and schedules service to Honolulu from the Japanese capital and cities including Osaka and Nagoya.

“We welcome the competition because it will expand the overall market for travel to Hawaii,” JAL President Yuji Akasaka said of ANA’s decision to use the A380. “Our strength is that we fly to more than one city in Hawaii, including Kona.”

ANA said adding the plane will help it compete.

JAL shares gained 0.7 percent as of 2:01 p.m. in Tokyo trading Thursday, while ANA was little changed.

“We are introducing all three of our A380s on the Hawaii route because we want to dominate that in terms of market share,” ANA Chief Executive Officer Shinya Katanozaka told reporters last week.

Read: Airbus Axes A380 Flagship, Drawing Curtain on Jumbo-Jet Era
All Nippon Airways?initial A380

The first A380 for All Nippon Airways.
Source: Airbus

After a dozen years in service, Airbus last month decided it will stop making the A380 in 2021, burying a prestige project that faded as airlines grew to prefer smaller, more fuel-efficient aircraft. Fuel-efficient, twin-engine planes that use lighter material such as carbon fiber have undermined demand for the world’s largest passenger airliner, a guzzler powered by four turbines.

By 2021, there will be about 250 A380s flying with 15 airlines, Airbus said in an email. “The A380 will continue to fly, with A380 operators to be supported by Airbus.”

ANA allocated the super-jumbos to the Honolulu route in 2016 with a plan to start flying two of them this year. The A380s will gradually replace the 787s it currently flies to the mid-Pacific islands in a bet that first- and business-class seating on the massive planes can help draw more and higher-paying fliers.

“That kind of customer drops a lot of money at the destination,” ANA’s Hirako said. Local officials in Hawaii welcome that trend, he added, because they want to boost the islands’ image as a high-end vacation option.

— With assistance by Kyunghee Park
(Updates with share prices in 10th paragraph. A previous version of this story corrected the second paragraph to show a third A380 will be introduced next year.)
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Re: 🛬 Aviation Article Avalanche 3
« Reply #25 on: March 09, 2019, 04:12:18 PM »
https://simpleflying.com/why-the-boeing-777x-is-the-perfect-747-replacement/

Why The Boeing 777X Is The Perfect 747 Replacement
By Nicholas
March 7, 2019

EDIT: A slight mistake was made in the below claim of fuel efficiency, it has been corrected from per mile to per hour of flight time.

As the world holds it’s breath in collective anticipation of the upcoming 777X factory rollout, we are reminded that the world is also saying goodbye to the queen of the skies, the Boeing 747.

The 777 series will soon become Boeing’s largest aircraft and carry the mantle of Boeing’s flagship plane… but does it really hold a candle to the older 747?
British Airways B777


British Airways has 34 B747 aircraft in its fleet at present. Photo: Tom Boon – Simple Flying
Is the 777x a replacement for the 747?

British Airways recently placed a huge order of 18 777X-9 aircraft to replace their fleet of retiring 747 aircraft.  During the press release, Willie Walsh (The CEO of IAG who owns British Airways) had this to say:

“The new B777X-9 is the world’s most fuel-efficient long-haul aircraft and will bring many benefits to British Airways’ fleet. It’s the ideal replacement for the Boeing 747 and its size and range will be an excellent fit for the airline’s existing network. This aircraft will provide further cost efficiencies and environmental benefits with  fuel cost per seat improvements of 30 per cent compared to the Boeing 747.”

Even Boeing has been quick to point out that even they consider the 777x a replacement for the 747:

“The big airplane of the future for the aviation industry is going to be the Boeing 777-9X, It carries 400 passengers. It flies further than the 747 and the A380 does today.” – Boeing vice president of marketing Randy Tinseth

But how does it actually rank up to the 747? You can read in this detailed 777 vs 747 article here.

The critical point, however, is the question “is the 777x really a good replacement for the 747?”

The demand for the 777X should add stability to Boeing’s future performance.
Photo courtesy – The Boeing Company/Facebook


The 777X can transport a large number of passengers (349) but not as many as the 747 (410). The 777x can also fly far (7,525 nmi / 13,940 km) but not as far as the 747 (8,000 nmi (15,000 km). In fact, the Boeing 747 seems to trump the 777x in everything apart from fuel efficiency… so why replace it?

The 747 is simply not designed for this modern climate. Apart from just being cheaper to run (by about 1-2 dollars per seat per hour of flight time) the 777X also features modern technologies (such as the largest engines ever placed on a passenger aircraft) and engineering principles for today’s world. Whilst it would be wonderful to keep using the same design (if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it), the 747 was initially designed many decades ago and is simply outdated.

The 777X is a modern reimagining of a 747, with the requirements of point to point travel, passengers tasted and corporate belt-tightening.

The Boeing 747 factory. Source: Boeing


What do you think? Is the 777x a good replacement for the 747? Let us know in the comments!

No good....

BAD BAD BAD !  :emthdown:

The 2 longest flights on the planet are L.A. to Tel Aviv & L.A. to Sydney (that I know of)

With only 2 engines & ones goes south on L.A. to Sydney, that's askin' for it ......

L.A. to Tel Aviv not so bad except for the 1/2 way point in the Atlantic.
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline azozeo

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Re: 🛬 Aviation Article Avalanche 3
« Reply #26 on: March 09, 2019, 04:15:45 PM »
https://simpleflying.com/why-the-boeing-777x-is-the-perfect-747-replacement/

Why The Boeing 777X Is The Perfect 747 Replacement
By Nicholas
March 7, 2019

EDIT: A slight mistake was made in the below claim of fuel efficiency, it has been corrected from per mile to per hour of flight time.

As the world holds it’s breath in collective anticipation of the upcoming 777X factory rollout, we are reminded that the world is also saying goodbye to the queen of the skies, the Boeing 747.

The 777 series will soon become Boeing’s largest aircraft and carry the mantle of Boeing’s flagship plane… but does it really hold a candle to the older 747?
British Airways B777


British Airways has 34 B747 aircraft in its fleet at present. Photo: Tom Boon – Simple Flying
Is the 777x a replacement for the 747?

British Airways recently placed a huge order of 18 777X-9 aircraft to replace their fleet of retiring 747 aircraft.  During the press release, Willie Walsh (The CEO of IAG who owns British Airways) had this to say:

“The new B777X-9 is the world’s most fuel-efficient long-haul aircraft and will bring many benefits to British Airways’ fleet. It’s the ideal replacement for the Boeing 747 and its size and range will be an excellent fit for the airline’s existing network. This aircraft will provide further cost efficiencies and environmental benefits with  fuel cost per seat improvements of 30 per cent compared to the Boeing 747.”

Even Boeing has been quick to point out that even they consider the 777x a replacement for the 747:

“The big airplane of the future for the aviation industry is going to be the Boeing 777-9X, It carries 400 passengers. It flies further than the 747 and the A380 does today.” – Boeing vice president of marketing Randy Tinseth

But how does it actually rank up to the 747? You can read in this detailed 777 vs 747 article here.

The critical point, however, is the question “is the 777x really a good replacement for the 747?”

The demand for the 777X should add stability to Boeing’s future performance.
Photo courtesy – The Boeing Company/Facebook


The 777X can transport a large number of passengers (349) but not as many as the 747 (410). The 777x can also fly far (7,525 nmi / 13,940 km) but not as far as the 747 (8,000 nmi (15,000 km). In fact, the Boeing 747 seems to trump the 777x in everything apart from fuel efficiency… so why replace it?

The 747 is simply not designed for this modern climate. Apart from just being cheaper to run (by about 1-2 dollars per seat per hour of flight time) the 777X also features modern technologies (such as the largest engines ever placed on a passenger aircraft) and engineering principles for today’s world. Whilst it would be wonderful to keep using the same design (if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it), the 747 was initially designed many decades ago and is simply outdated.

The 777X is a modern reimagining of a 747, with the requirements of point to point travel, passengers tasted and corporate belt-tightening.

The Boeing 747 factory. Source: Boeing


What do you think? Is the 777x a good replacement for the 747? Let us know in the comments!

No good....

BAD BAD BAD !  :emthdown:

The 2 longest flights on the planet are L.A. to Tel Aviv & L.A. to Sydney (that I know of)

With only 2 engines & ones goes south on L.A. to Sydney, that's askin' for it ......

L.A. to Tel Aviv not so bad except for the 1/2 way point in the Atlantic.

Another ship that hasn't been recognized is the SP model of the '47....
That lil' gal was the long range workhorse of the fleet.

She was the vessel used in the 2 longest flights aforementioned.
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline RE

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Re: 🛬 Aviation Article Avalanche 3
« Reply #27 on: March 09, 2019, 05:08:13 PM »
https://simpleflying.com/why-the-boeing-777x-is-the-perfect-747-replacement/

Why The Boeing 777X Is The Perfect 747 Replacement
By Nicholas
March 7, 2019

EDIT: A slight mistake was made in the below claim of fuel efficiency, it has been corrected from per mile to per hour of flight time.

As the world holds it’s breath in collective anticipation of the upcoming 777X factory rollout, we are reminded that the world is also saying goodbye to the queen of the skies, the Boeing 747.

The 777 series will soon become Boeing’s largest aircraft and carry the mantle of Boeing’s flagship plane… but does it really hold a candle to the older 747?
British Airways B777


British Airways has 34 B747 aircraft in its fleet at present. Photo: Tom Boon – Simple Flying
Is the 777x a replacement for the 747?

British Airways recently placed a huge order of 18 777X-9 aircraft to replace their fleet of retiring 747 aircraft.  During the press release, Willie Walsh (The CEO of IAG who owns British Airways) had this to say:

“The new B777X-9 is the world’s most fuel-efficient long-haul aircraft and will bring many benefits to British Airways’ fleet. It’s the ideal replacement for the Boeing 747 and its size and range will be an excellent fit for the airline’s existing network. This aircraft will provide further cost efficiencies and environmental benefits with  fuel cost per seat improvements of 30 per cent compared to the Boeing 747.”

Even Boeing has been quick to point out that even they consider the 777x a replacement for the 747:

“The big airplane of the future for the aviation industry is going to be the Boeing 777-9X, It carries 400 passengers. It flies further than the 747 and the A380 does today.” – Boeing vice president of marketing Randy Tinseth

But how does it actually rank up to the 747? You can read in this detailed 777 vs 747 article here.

The critical point, however, is the question “is the 777x really a good replacement for the 747?”

The demand for the 777X should add stability to Boeing’s future performance.
Photo courtesy – The Boeing Company/Facebook


The 777X can transport a large number of passengers (349) but not as many as the 747 (410). The 777x can also fly far (7,525 nmi / 13,940 km) but not as far as the 747 (8,000 nmi (15,000 km). In fact, the Boeing 747 seems to trump the 777x in everything apart from fuel efficiency… so why replace it?

The 747 is simply not designed for this modern climate. Apart from just being cheaper to run (by about 1-2 dollars per seat per hour of flight time) the 777X also features modern technologies (such as the largest engines ever placed on a passenger aircraft) and engineering principles for today’s world. Whilst it would be wonderful to keep using the same design (if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it), the 747 was initially designed many decades ago and is simply outdated.

The 777X is a modern reimagining of a 747, with the requirements of point to point travel, passengers tasted and corporate belt-tightening.

The Boeing 747 factory. Source: Boeing


What do you think? Is the 777x a good replacement for the 747? Let us know in the comments!

No good....

BAD BAD BAD !  :emthdown:

The 2 longest flights on the planet are L.A. to Tel Aviv & L.A. to Sydney (that I know of)

With only 2 engines & ones goes south on L.A. to Sydney, that's askin' for it ......

L.A. to Tel Aviv not so bad except for the 1/2 way point in the Atlantic.

Another ship that hasn't been recognized is the SP model of the '47....
That lil' gal was the long range workhorse of the fleet.

She was the vessel used in the 2 longest flights aforementioned.

I flew many times LA to Sydney.  Once on a nearly empty Qantas 747 where I half a dozen stewardesses fawning all over me.  ;D  That was in the days they still had the upstairs lounge for 1st Class and the stews were HOT!

Most of the time though they don't fly this route non-stop.  You stop in Honolulu and Fiji.  You don't really need to fly non-stop, and the stops don't add that much time, percentage wise on such a long flight.

RE
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Offline azozeo

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Re: 🛬 Death of Aviation: Last Flight of the 747
« Reply #28 on: March 10, 2019, 05:20:31 PM »
The true point I'm trying to make is this.

Back in the day (1980's) the FAA didn't allow commercial aviation aircraft to travel across vast distances of ocean
with only 2 jet engines.

This included L.A. to Honolulu which is 5 hours flight time roughly. Hono to Tokyo etc. Lockheed & Douglas filled the bill with 3 holers.

Has the law changed ? I don't know... I wouldn't personally travel over that much water with just a 2 engine jet, no matter how modern it is.
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline RE

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Re: 🛬 Death of Aviation: Last Flight of the 747
« Reply #29 on: March 10, 2019, 05:33:36 PM »
The true point I'm trying to make is this.

Back in the day (1980's) the FAA didn't allow commercial aviation aircraft to travel across vast distances of ocean
with only 2 jet engines.

This included L.A. to Honolulu which is 5 hours flight time roughly. Hono to Tokyo etc. Lockheed & Douglas filled the bill with 3 holers.

Has the law changed ? I don't know... I wouldn't personally travel over that much water with just a 2 engine jet, no matter how modern it is.

Well, these days just about all jets on all routes are 2 engines, and the safety record hasn't been too bad.

RE
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