AuthorTopic: 🛬 Death of Aviation: Last Flight of the 747  (Read 7973 times)

Offline RE

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I guess a few Airlines can't read the Writing on the Wall.  ::)

RE

https://www.sfgate.com/travel/article/Routes-Delta-at-OAK-Alaska-Southwest-United-13674113.php

Routes: Delta at OAK + A380, Alaska, Southwest, United, Qatar, El Al, Virgin Atlantic, more
This week's most important airline routes news


Chris McGinnis Updated 7:33 am PST, Saturday, March 9, 2019

    This year ANA will use a special sea turtle livery on its A380s flying between Japan and Hawaii Photo: ANA

Photo: ANA
Image 1 of 25

This year ANA will use a special sea turtle livery on its A380s flying between Japan and Hawaii
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In airline route news, Delta will go year-round on a key route out of Oakland; Three A380s head to Hawaii; Alaska adds a spoke to its Seattle hub and finally launches Paine Field service; Southwest's Hawaii flights begin in one week; United kicks off new domestic routes; Qatar is coy about its planned SFO service; Denver welcomes a Caribbean carrier; Virgin Atlantic, Air France-KLM and Delta expand their code-sharing; JetBlue transatlantic speculation picks up; Ethiopian expands Dulles service; and El Al plans O'Hare service.

Delta will revive service June 9 between Oakland and its Atlanta hub, but this time the route will operate year-round instead of seasonally. From June through September, Delta will offer daily service (except Saturdays) with a 737-900, departing Oakland at 10:30 p.m. and arriving at ATL at 6:06 a.m. Effective October 1, the airline will switch to a 737-800 and operate four days a week – Sunday, Monday, Thursday and Friday – and instead of a red-eye, the eastbound segment will depart OAK at noon. Southwest Airlines also flies nonstop between Atlanta and Oakland with one flight daily in each direction.
Recommended Video

The Airbus A380 isn't dead yet. And is Hawaii reaching tourist saturation? This week ANA announced that it will take delivery of three new double-decker behemoths this month to fly between Tokyo and Honolulu starting May 24. The colorful 3-class planes have 520 seats and are painted in special sea turtle livery (one green, one blue, one orange) you can see above or in the slideshow at the top. That's fabulous, fun route news, but how many more airline passengers can Hawaii handle? With the influx coming from the mainland due to the Southwest Effect fare wars combined with this, it's going to get a little crazy in Waikiki and elsewhere where traffic is already a big problem, and hotel demand (and rates) are on the rise. Airbus announced last month that it would stop making the A380 in 2021.

Alaska Airlines this week introduced new service from its Seattle hub to Columbus, Ohio – the only non-stop service in the market. The airline will offer daily roundtrips with an Airbus A320 departing SEA at 9:45 a.m. and departing Columbus at 6:15 p.m. Columbus is Alaska's 91st non-stop destination from Seattle. In other Seattle news, Delta is planning to discontinue its service between SEA and Victoria, B.C. on September 2, although Alaska will continue to fly that route; two months ago, United axed its San Francisco-Victoria flights.

Meanwhile, Alaska this week finally launched commercial service from Washington State's Paine Field, a facility 23 miles north of downtown Seattle that had previously been used only by general aviation flights and the adjacent Boeing plant. The advent of commercial airline service at Paine will make life a lot easier for travelers in Seattle's northern suburbs, saving them a drive of up to 37 miles to Seattle-Tacoma International south of the city. Alaska's new Paine service, operated by its Horizon Air affiliate with three-class Embraer 175s, started with flights to Portland and Las Vegas. By mid-March, Alaska's full schedule of 18 flights a day to eight cities should be in operation, as it phases in service to Los Angeles, San Francisco, San Jose, Orange County, Phoenix and San Diego. United is due to start service from Paine to San Francisco and Denver at the end of March.

Picturesque Victoria, on the southwestern edge of British Columbia is getting a lot harder to fly to. This week, Delta announced that it will cut its Seattle-Victoria flights in September. After 10 years of service, United stopped flying nonstop between San Francisco and Victoria in January. Alaska Air will continue to fly there from Seattle. Or you can take a Kenmore Air float plane from downtown Vancouver.

Unless you've been living under a rock for the past week, you probably have heard that Southwest Airlines finally announced details of its new Hawaii service from the Bay Area. It begins March 17 with daily flights from Oakland to Honolulu, increasing to twice-daily on March 24. Oakland-Maui starts April 8, with daily flights increasing to twice a day April 10. Daily San Jose-Honolulu flights are due to start May 5, followed by daily SJC-Maui service May 26. Southwest will also begin four interisland flights a day between Honolulu and Maui on April 28, and four a day between Honolulu and Kona on the Big Island as of May 12.

United Airlines kicks off several new domestic routes this weekend, mostly from its Denver hub. New United spokes from that hub include Santa Rosa, California; Brownsville, Texas; West Palm Beach, Pensacola, Sarasota, and Destin/Ft. Walton Beach, Florida. Other new United routes that kicked off this weekend include Los Angeles to Redding, California and Cleveland to Tampa, Florida.

Qatar Airways announced some new routes last week, but none of them were to North America. The airline once said it expected to launch Doha-San Francisco flights in 2018, but that didn't happen. What about 2019? "No update as of now when we will start flying to San Francisco," a spokesperson told us via Twitter. "We will announce via our social media channels in case we do. Stay tuned." Meanwhile, after a long-running feud with its Oneworld partner American Airlines, Qatar is expected to decide in the next two months whether it will stay in the alliance or drop out.

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Cayman Airways' 737 MAX 8 arrives at Denver International. Photo: Denver International Airport
Photo: Denver International Airport

Cayman Airways' 737 MAX 8 arrives at Denver International.

Denver has another international destination with the addition of new Cayman Airways non-stop service to Grand Cayman. The carrier is using a brand-new 160-seat 737 MAX 8 on the route, which will operate twice a week (Wednesdays and Saturdays) through mid-August, returning again in December. Previously, Denver was the second-largest U.S. market that had no non-stop flights to the Caribbean.

Delta and Air France-KLM are already joint venture partners, and they are working to bring Virgin Atlantic into that close-knit family this year. To that end, the airlines have announced a big expansion of code-sharing, providing one-stop check-in and seamless connections for Air France and KLM passengers who connect to or from Delta or Virgin transatlantic flights at London or Manchester, and for Virgin travelers from the U.K. who connect to Air France/KLM transatlantic flights at Amsterdam or Paris.

Related: Why your Virgin Atlantic flight attendant might be wearing makeup
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That longstanding speculation about JetBlue beginning transatlantic service bubbled up again this week thanks to an interview that chief executive Robin Hayes gave to the British newspaper The Independent. Hayes told the paper "we're actively looking at it (transatlantic service) now," stirring some Internet rumors that JetBlue will make an announcement as soon as next month. Hayes said JetBlue is looking at flights from Boston and New York JFK to London, probably targeting Gatwick or Stansted airports instead of Heathrow, and using new long-range Airbus A321s equipped with the airline's signature Mint front cabin service to attract the business travel market.

In other international route news, Israel's El Al is reportedly planning to revive non-stop service from Tel Aviv to Chicago O'Hare in 2020 – a route that it abandoned in 2007 – although no details are available. Ethiopian Airlines is targeting June 9 for the launch of 787-8 flights between Addis Ababa and Washington Dulles via a stop in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, boosting the airline's Washington schedule to 10 flights a week.
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Offline azozeo

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Re: 🛬 Death of Aviation: Last Flight of the 747
« Reply #31 on: March 11, 2019, 11:01:15 AM »
The true point I'm trying to make is this.

Back in the day (1980's) the FAA didn't allow commercial aviation aircraft to travel across vast distances of ocean
with only 2 jet engines.

This included L.A. to Honolulu which is 5 hours flight time roughly. Hono to Tokyo etc. Lockheed & Douglas filled the bill with 3 holers.

Has the law changed ? I don't know... I wouldn't personally travel over that much water with just a 2 engine jet, no matter how modern it is.

Well, these days just about all jets on all routes are 2 engines, and the safety record hasn't been too bad.

RE


China has ordered all domestic carriers to ground their Boeing 737 MAX 8s after one of the jets seemingly dropped from the sky southeast of Addis Ababa just six minutes after taking off on Sunday. That accident – which killed all 157 people on board – was the second involving one of the jets in five months, and has led to speculation that Boeing might order all of the jets to be grounded pending further inspection.

Chinese media outlet Caijing was the first to report the decision, citing sources within China’s domestic airline industry. Thee 737 MAX, the fourth generation of Boeing’s narrow-body 737 line, was first flown in 2016, making the string of crashes – two in five months – unprecedented and, according to some analysts, extremely suspect.


https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-03-10/it-begins-china-orders-carriers-ground-boeing-737s-after-ethiopian-airlines-crash
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

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Re: 🛬 Death of Aviation: Last Flight of the 747
« Reply #32 on: March 11, 2019, 11:32:12 AM »
Chinese media outlet Caijing was the first to report the decision, citing sources within China’s domestic airline industry. Thee 737 MAX, the fourth generation of Boeing’s narrow-body 737 line, was first flown in 2016, making the string of crashes – two in five months – unprecedented and, according to some analysts, extremely suspect.

Terrorist sabotage by Mexicans in retaliation for the Wall.

RE
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Offline azozeo

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Re: 🛬 Death of Aviation: Last Flight of the 747
« Reply #33 on: March 11, 2019, 12:48:04 PM »
Chinese media outlet Caijing was the first to report the decision, citing sources within China’s domestic airline industry. Thee 737 MAX, the fourth generation of Boeing’s narrow-body 737 line, was first flown in 2016, making the string of crashes – two in five months – unprecedented and, according to some analysts, extremely suspect.

Terrorist sabotage by Mexicans in retaliation for the Wall.

RE


How will we manage when you go to the great beyond ?
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

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🛬 Boeing’s Problems, Tragically, Are Mounting
« Reply #34 on: March 12, 2019, 02:14:35 AM »
https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2019-03-11/ethiopian-airlines-flight-302-crash-boeing-737-worries-mount

Business
Boeing’s Problems, Tragically, Are Mounting

Two 737 Max 8 crashes in less than five months is unusual – and a cause for worry.
By Mark Gongloff

March 11, 2019, 12:36 PM AKDT


A winglet on the first Boeing 737 MAX airliner is pictured at the company's manufacturing plant, on December 8, 2015, in Renton, Washington.

A winglet on the first Boeing 737 MAX airliner is pictured at the company's manufacturing plant, on December 8, 2015, in Renton, Washington. Photographer: Stephen Brashear/Getty Images North America
Mark Gongloff is an editor with Bloomberg Opinion. He previously was a managing editor of Fortune.com, ran the Huffington Post's business and technology coverage, and was a columnist, reporter and editor for the Wall Street Journal.

Follow @markgongloff on Twitter
LISTEN TO ARTICLE
6:13

    Ethiopia’s air tragedy raises new questions.
    Maybe China will never have the world’s biggest economy.
    We’ve tried something like MMT before.
    Slapping tariffs on European cars would be a huge mistake.

ETHIOPIA-AIR ACCIDENT
Debris from the Ethiopia Airlines crash on March 11.
Photographer: MICHAEL TEWELDE/AFP/Getty Images
Tragedy in Ethiopia


In less than five months, 346 people have died in two plane crashes, first in the Java Sea in October and then in Ethiopia Sunday morning. Both disasters involved Boeing Co.’s 737 Max 8.

Flying may still be the safest way to travel, but when two overwhelming tragedies like these involve the same kind of aircraft in such a short time, it’s natural for people to worry the issue is the equipment, writes Chris Bryant. It’s still too soon to say the 737 Max is the problem, but markets went ahead and punished Boeing stock with the biggest percentage drop in almost two decades. Ironically, Boeing stock had recently ridden to nearly a record high on the 737 Max’s early sales, Chris notes.
Safety First

These crashes will haunt survivors and air travelers for a long time. How long they affect Boeing’s reputation (not the primary consideration, of course) depends on what we learn about their causes in the days ahead. China and other countries grounded the 737 Max after the Ethiopian crash, but the FAA said it still considers the 737 Max airworthy. A key question for Boeing, writes David Fickling, is whether the 737 Max ends up like the DC-10, forever shadowed by safety issues, or the 787, which had some early problems but was a stalwart aircraft in the long run.
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Offline azozeo

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Re: 🛬 Boeing’s Problems, Tragically, Are Mounting
« Reply #35 on: March 12, 2019, 10:58:17 AM »
https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2019-03-11/ethiopian-airlines-flight-302-crash-boeing-737-worries-mount

Business
Boeing’s Problems, Tragically, Are Mounting

Two 737 Max 8 crashes in less than five months is unusual – and a cause for worry.
By Mark Gongloff

March 11, 2019, 12:36 PM AKDT


A winglet on the first Boeing 737 MAX airliner is pictured at the company's manufacturing plant, on December 8, 2015, in Renton, Washington.

A winglet on the first Boeing 737 MAX airliner is pictured at the company's manufacturing plant, on December 8, 2015, in Renton, Washington. Photographer: Stephen Brashear/Getty Images North America
Mark Gongloff is an editor with Bloomberg Opinion. He previously was a managing editor of Fortune.com, ran the Huffington Post's business and technology coverage, and was a columnist, reporter and editor for the Wall Street Journal.

Follow @markgongloff on Twitter
LISTEN TO ARTICLE
6:13

    Ethiopia’s air tragedy raises new questions.
    Maybe China will never have the world’s biggest economy.
    We’ve tried something like MMT before.
    Slapping tariffs on European cars would be a huge mistake.

ETHIOPIA-AIR ACCIDENT
Debris from the Ethiopia Airlines crash on March 11.
Photographer: MICHAEL TEWELDE/AFP/Getty Images
Tragedy in Ethiopia


In less than five months, 346 people have died in two plane crashes, first in the Java Sea in October and then in Ethiopia Sunday morning. Both disasters involved Boeing Co.’s 737 Max 8.

Flying may still be the safest way to travel, but when two overwhelming tragedies like these involve the same kind of aircraft in such a short time, it’s natural for people to worry the issue is the equipment, writes Chris Bryant. It’s still too soon to say the 737 Max is the problem, but markets went ahead and punished Boeing stock with the biggest percentage drop in almost two decades. Ironically, Boeing stock had recently ridden to nearly a record high on the 737 Max’s early sales, Chris notes.
Safety First

These crashes will haunt survivors and air travelers for a long time. How long they affect Boeing’s reputation (not the primary consideration, of course) depends on what we learn about their causes in the days ahead. China and other countries grounded the 737 Max after the Ethiopian crash, but the FAA said it still considers the 737 Max airworthy. A key question for Boeing, writes David Fickling, is whether the 737 Max ends up like the DC-10, forever shadowed by safety issues, or the 787, which had some early problems but was a stalwart aircraft in the long run.



Sputnik News

The UK, Norway, Germany, Singapore, Australia, Malaysia, and Oman are the latest countries to temporarily ban the Boeing 737 Max from entering and leaving their countries after the model was involved in the Ethiopian Airlines and Indonesian Lion Airlines plane crashes – two in less than five months.

United Kingdom

The UK Civil Aviation Authority (UK CAA) said in a press release that it was closely monitoring the situation and will ground all 737 MAXs until further notice.


https://sputniknews.com/asia/201903121073159257-Singapore-Australia-737-Max/
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

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I smell a Corporation Killing Lawsuit on the Horizon.

RE

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/V5K0S0VcJtc" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/V5K0S0VcJtc</a>

https://www.cnn.com/2019/03/12/investing/boeing-stock-update/index.html

Boeing's stock continues steep slide as more nations ban 737 MAX 8 planes
Paul Lamonica-Profile-Image

By Paul R. La Monica, CNN Business

Updated 4:29 PM ET, Tue March 12, 2019

Current Time 0:39
/
Duration Time 6:07
 
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New York (CNN Business)Boeing's stock fell sharply for a second straight day as more nations and airlines grounded the company's 737 MAX 8 planes.
Shares of Boeing (BA) fell more than 11% over the past two days: The stock fell 6% Tuesday following a 5% drop on Monday.
The stock's slide follows the tragic Ethiopian Airlines plane crash on Sunday that killed all 157 passengers and crew on board.
The European Union Aviation Safety Agency announced Tuesday that it was suspending all Boeing 737 Max 8 flights in Europe as a "precautionary measure." The EU joins China, Australia, the UK and several other nations in deciding to halt Boeing 737 MAX 8 flights. The United States has yet to do so.

The FAA said in a statement late Monday that is "collecting data and keeping in contact with international civil aviation authorities" as more information about the crash becomes available.
Boeing said that it has "full confidence in the safety of the 737 MAX."
"We understand that regulatory agencies and customers have made decisions that they believe are most appropriate for their home markets. We'll continue to engage with them to ensure they have the information needed to have confidence in operating their fleets," Boeing added.
The company also noted that the FAA "is not mandating any further action at this time, and based on the information currently available, we do not have any basis to issue new guidance to operators."
But Utah Senator Mitt Romney urged the FAA to follow the lead of other international agencies.
He wrote in a tweet Tuesday that "out of an abundance of caution for the flying public, the [FAA] should ground the 737 MAX 8 until we investigate the causes of recent crashes and ensure the plane's airworthiness."
Senator Ted Cruz added in a tweet later Tuesday that "in light of the decisions of regulatory agencies across the world to ground the Model 737 Max, I believe it would be prudent for the United States likewise to temporarily ground 737 Max aircraft until the FAA confirms the safety of these aircraft & their passengers."
And the influential magazine Consumer Reports also weighed in, saying Tuesday that major airlines that have Boeing 737 MAX 8 planes in their fleets, including American Airlines (AAL) and Southwest Airlines (LUV), should ground the planes even if the FAA does not ask them to do so.
"If the airlines will not ground the planes, CR says the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) should," the magazine said.
American said it would monitor the investigation of Sunday's crash but it has "full confidence in the aircraft and our crew members."

Southwest said, "We remain confident in the safety and airworthiness of the MAX 8. We don't have any changes planned to our MAX 8 operating plans."
Wall Street is still backing Boeing as well. As of Tuesday afternoon, 19 of the 24 analysts that were following the company had it rated a buy. The consensus earnings estimates for Boeing for this quarter and the full year hadn't changed in the past week either.
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Offline RE

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🛬 Boeing and the FAA Already Lost Control of the Narrative
« Reply #37 on: March 14, 2019, 01:29:13 PM »
Not a good week for a Boeing Executive to stop sniffing glue.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/hd1ciPnTGKg" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/hd1ciPnTGKg</a>

RE

https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2019-03-13/boeing-and-the-faa-737-max-grounding-damage-is-already

Boeing and the FAA Already Lost Control of the Narrative

They had a responsibility to err on the side of safety by grounding the 737 Max sooner.
By Brooke Sutherland


Boeing Co.’s “proactive” grounding of its top-selling, and troubled, 737 Max plane is too little, too late. It already lost control of the narrative.

On Wednesday afternoon, the planemaker said it recommended to the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration that all 371 of the aircraft currently in operation globally be temporarily grounded as a “proactive step out of an abundance of caution” following the second fatal crash in just five months. Indeed, President Donald Trump had announced moments before that the FAA would prohibit U.S. airlines from continuing to fly the planes, abandoning a defense of their airworthiness that was becoming an increasingly isolated proposition after Canada joined regulators across the world in deciding precautionary measures were justified. A more conservative approach by Boeing and the FAA was long overdue, but their new-found appreciation for putting safety first doesn’t excuse their previous reluctance.

We still don’t know for sure what caused the most recent crash of an Ethiopian Airlines flight Sunday that killed 157 people, although the CEO of that airline told CNN there were “substantial” similarities to the deadly incident involving a Lion Air flight in Indonesia in October. Canada’s Transport Minister Marc Garneau backed up that stance Wednesday, noting that new satellite data suggested a link and while inconclusive, it was enough to justify safeguards. The FAA, a key regulator of the aviation industry in America, will have to explain why it was so late to do its job. But Boeing also had a responsibility to err on the side of safety and an opportunity to control the story by advocating conservatism earlier. It chose not to, and it will have to wrestle with the reputational damage wrought by that decision.
Clipped Wings

Boeing shares have declined following the second crash involving its 737 Max, but they remain up for the year

Source: Bloomberg

My colleague David Fickling made the comparison to Johnson & Johnson’s handling of the crisis spurred by the death of seven people after a criminal lacing of its Tylenol painkiller. The incident is a PR case study for a reason: J&J got out in front of the issue, recalled all its Tylenol products, and replaced them free of charge; today, households everywhere buy the drug regularly, without concern. Boeing should have mimicked this strategy and recommended that airlines ground its planes until it had more information and could get more answers on the causes of the crash. Or it could have recommended that the FAA put limits on the operation of the plane or require the temporary disabling of the flight-control system that’s being highlighted as a possible cause of the crashes. Instead, CEO Dennis Muilenburg reportedly called Trump personally to express his confidence in the plane, which risks only further deepening the perception that the FAA and Boeing are too closely entwined for either’s own good. Trump said the U.S. worked with Canada on the plane grounding. Maybe; I am personally skeptical that the U.S. would have allowed Canada to go first if that was the case.

Again, we still don’t know what caused the Ethiopian Airlines crash, and Boeing maintains that it has full confidence in the safety of the plane — but we do know that a combined 346 people have died on board brand new 737 Max aircraft at a time when fatal commercial-jet incidents are rare. I think it could have been anticipated that passengers and governments alike would be concerned, and that repeated assurances of confidence might not be enough on their own. 1 The 737 Max program is likely to be perfectly safe over the long term, and Boeing is finalizing a software fix for the flight-control system that’s being tied to the Lion Air crash. It would have been in Boeing’s best interest to vow from the start to remove even the slightest shadow of a doubt before putting these planes back in the sky.
Top Seller

The 737 Max accounts for a substantial portion of Boeing's backlog

Source: Bloomberg Intelligence

There’s undeniably a cost to this: a global grounding will likely lead to a pause in deliveries until a fix is installed and certified, which Vertical Research Partners analyst Rob Stallard estimates would require Boeing to house an additional $1.8 billion a month in inventory. Norwegian Air has already said it expects to be remunerated by Boeing for the cost of sidelining 1 percent of its overall seat capacity. But Boeing now has to take on those expenses and cash flow hits without any PR benefit. Whether it’s true or not, by deflecting, the company now comes across as trying to hold on to every last dollar of profit that it can.

Boeing’s miscalculation may have stemmed from faith in the FAA as the global arbiter of flight safety. That perception has been upended by foreign governments’ decision to decide for themselves whether or not they feel comfortable boarding their citizens on Boeing’s planes. In another snub, Ethiopia plans to send data and voice recorders collected from the crash site to European authorities, rather than to the U.S., which the carrier’s public relations director called “a strategic decision.” 2  Playing follow the leader — in this case, China — on grounding the plane has damaged both Boeing and the FAA’s credibility and put them on the defensive in dealing with this crisis.

    The Financial Times reports that large U.S. companies are asking travel agencies to avoid booking their staff on 737 Max 8 planes.

    Ethiopia reportedly wanted to send the black boxes to Germany, but regulators there declined to receive them because they lack the necessary software.

This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.

To contact the author of this story:
Brooke Sutherland at bsutherland7@bloomberg.net
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Offline Surly1

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Re: 🛬 Boeing and the FAA Already Lost Control of the Narrative
« Reply #38 on: March 14, 2019, 01:51:54 PM »

Boeing and the FAA Already Lost Control of the Narrative


Boeing Co.’s “proactive” grounding of its top-selling, and troubled, 737 Max plane is too little, too late. It already lost control of the narrative.

On Wednesday afternoon, the planemaker said it recommended to the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration that all 371 of the aircraft currently in operation globally be temporarily grounded as a “proactive step out of an abundance of caution” following the second fatal crash in just five months.

You "lose control of the narrative" when you are caught lying through your teeth. If Boeing's was "proactive grounding," then I am King of France. There is also the contemporaneous log of pilot reported episodes of nose-dipping from a number of pilots which Boeing studiously ignored.

Too little, too late. Boeing's PR position is as full of shit as Kellyanne Conway. The citation about J&J's response to the Tylenol episode is right on the money.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

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Re: 🛬 Boeing and the FAA Already Lost Control of the Narrative
« Reply #39 on: March 14, 2019, 02:31:21 PM »

Boeing and the FAA Already Lost Control of the Narrative


Boeing Co.’s “proactive” grounding of its top-selling, and troubled, 737 Max plane is too little, too late. It already lost control of the narrative.

On Wednesday afternoon, the planemaker said it recommended to the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration that all 371 of the aircraft currently in operation globally be temporarily grounded as a “proactive step out of an abundance of caution” following the second fatal crash in just five months.

You "lose control of the narrative" when you are caught lying through your teeth. If Boeing's was "proactive grounding," then I am King of France. There is also the contemporaneous log of pilot reported episodes of nose-dipping from a number of pilots which Boeing studiously ignored.

Too little, too late. Boeing's PR position is as full of shit as Kellyanne Conway. The citation about J&J's response to the Tylenol episode is right on the money.

Looks like they should have hung on to the 747.  That one at least worked.

This looks like a serious design flaw.  Not something that can be fixed with a recall.  With as many planes of this type as they have sold, they're on the hook for $Billions in returned merchandise, besides the lawsuits.  Bye, bye Boeing.

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Design flaw, without doubt.  Boeing is a goner.

Stick a fork in them, they're done.

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https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/14/world/boeing-737-max-ethiopian-airlines.html

Boeing 737 Max Hit Trouble Right Away, Pilot’s Tense Radio Messages Show


A memorial arch on Thursday at the site of the jet crash in Ethiopia.CreditCreditJemal Countess/Getty Images

By Selam Gebrekidan and James Glanz

    March 14, 2019

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia — The captain of a doomed Ethiopian Airlines jetliner faced an emergency almost immediately after takeoff from Addis Ababa, requesting permission in a panicky voice to return after three minutes as the aircraft accelerated to abnormal speed, a person who reviewed air traffic communications said Thursday.

“Break break, request back to home,” the captain told air traffic controllers as they scrambled to divert two other flights approaching the airport. “Request vector for landing.”

Controllers also observed that the aircraft, a new Boeing 737 Max 8, was oscillating up and down by hundreds of feet — a sign that something was extraordinarily wrong.

All contact between air controllers and the aircraft, Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 to Nairobi, was lost five minutes after it took off on Sunday, the person said.

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The person who shared the information, speaking on the condition of anonymity because the communications have not been publicly released, said the controllers had concluded even before the captain’s message that he had an emergency.

8:41 a.m.

Addis Ababa

Data for last half

of the flight was not

publicly released

Path of Flight 302

Based on publicly

available radar data

8:38 a.m.

Takeoff

5 miles

ETHIOPIA

Area of crash

Source: Flightradar24

By Scott Reinhard

The account of the cockpit communications shed chilling new detail about the final minutes before the plane crashed, killing all 157 people aboard. The crash, which has led to a worldwide grounding of Max 8s, was the second for the best-selling Boeing aircraft in less than five months.

Regulatory authorities in the United States and Canada say similar patterns in the trajectories of both planes may point to a common cause for the two crashes. But they cautioned that no explanation had been ruled out yet, and said the planes might have crashed for different reasons.

The new disclosures about the last moments of Flight 302 came as pilots were discussing what they described as the dangerously high speed of the aircraft after it took off from Addis Ababa’s Bole International Airport.
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Pilots were abuzz over publicly available radar data that showed the aircraft had accelerated far beyond what is considered standard practice, for reasons that remain unclear.

“The thing that is most abnormal is the speed,” said John Cox, an aviation safety consultant and former 737 pilot.

“The speed is very high,” said Mr. Cox, a former executive air safety chairman of the Air Line Pilots Association in the United States. “The question is why. The plane accelerates far faster than it should.”
Why Investigators Fear the Two Boeing 737s Crashed for Similar Reasons

The planes flew in similar erratic patterns, suggesting to experts that an automated system might have malfunctioned on both flights.

Ethiopian Airlines officials have said the crew of Flight 302 reported “flight control” problems to air traffic controllers a few minutes before contact was lost. The new account of communications between air traffic controllers and the pilot, Yared Getachew, who had 8,000 hours of flying experience, provides much more information about what was happening in the cockpit.

Within one minute of Flight 302’s departure, the person who reviewed communications said, Captain Getachew reported a “flight control” problem in a calm voice. At that point, radar showed the aircraft’s altitude as being well below what is known as the minimum safe height from the ground during a climb.

Within two minutes, the person said, the plane had climbed to a safer altitude, and the pilot said he wanted to stay on a straight course to 14,000 feet.

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Then the controllers observed the plane going up and down by hundreds of feet, and it appeared to be moving unusually fast, the person said. The controllers, the person said, “started wondering out loud what the flight was doing.”

Two other Ethiopian flights, 613 and 629, were approaching from the east, and the controllers, sensing an emergency on Flight 302, ordered them to remain at higher altitudes. It was during that exchange with the other planes, the person said, that Captain Getachew, with panic in his voice, interrupted with his request to turn back.

Flight 302 was just three minutes into its flight, the person said, and appeared to have accelerated to even higher speeds, well beyond its safety limits.
The wreckage of Flight 302.CreditEPA, via Shutterstock
Image
The wreckage of Flight 302.CreditEPA, via Shutterstock

Cleared by the controllers to turn back, Flight 302 turned right as it climbed further. A minute later, it disappeared from the radar over a restricted military zone.

The disaster drew immediate comparisons to the October crash of another Boeing 737 Max 8, operated by Lion Air, in Indonesia. Both took place soon after takeoff, and the crews of both planes had sought to return to the airport.

The possibility that the two crashes had a similar cause was central to regulators’ decision to ground all 737 Maxes, a family of planes that entered passenger service less than two years ago.

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After the Indonesia crash, a new flight-control system meant to keep the jet from stalling was suspected as a cause. In both cases, pilots struggled to control their aircraft.

[Why investigators fear the two Boeing 737s crashed for the same reason.]

The investigation of the Ethiopian crash is still in its early stages, and safety regulators have noted that it is too soon to draw conclusions about the cause. The so-called black boxes, voice and flight data recorders that contain more detailed information about the Ethiopian flight’s final moments, arrived in France on Thursday for analysis.

Since the Indonesia crash, Boeing has been working on a software update for the 737 Max jets, expected by April. But the company and the Federal Aviation Administration face new questions over whether there should have been more pilot training as airlines added the new models to their fleets.

On Wednesday, the chairman of the transportation committee in the House of Representatives said he would investigate the F.A.A.’s certification of the 737 Max, including why the regulator did not require more extensive training.
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‘Tell Your Husband to Leave Me Alone’

Selam Gebrekidan reported from Addis Ababa, and James Glanz from New York. Thomas Kaplan contributed reporting from Washington.
A version of this article appears in print on March 14, 2019, on Page A1 of the New York edition with the headline: Pilot in Crisis From the Start, Review Shows. Order Reprints
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🛬 Boeing, The FAA, And Why Two 737 MAX Planes Crashed
« Reply #41 on: March 15, 2019, 11:35:41 AM »
Yup, Regulatory Capture + Design Flaw = Dead People.  Which they now will try to "fix" by layering a new level of complexity on a plane that wants to point downward all the time. What could possibly go wrong?  ::)

RE

https://www.greanvillepost.com/2019/03/14/boeing-the-faa-and-why-two-737-max-planes-crashed/

Boeing, The FAA, And Why Two 737 MAX Planes Crashed
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DISPATCHES FROM MOON OF ALABAMA, BY “B”
HELP ENLIGHTEN YOUR FELLOWS. BE SURE TO PASS THIS ON. SURVIVAL DEPENDS ON IT.


Flying the unfriendly skies of capitalism, to sure disaster.

On Sunday an Ethiopian Airlines flight crashed, killing all on board. Five month earlier an Indonesian Lion Air jet crashed near Jakarta. All crew and passengers died. Both airplanes were Boeing 737-8 MAX. Both incidents happened shortly after take off.

Boeing 737 MAX aircraft are now grounded about everywhere except in the United States. [The US finally grounded its 737 MAX fleet only 24 hrs. ago; as Churchill once said, “The US always does teh right thing after tryimng everything else.”] That this move follows only now is sad. After the first crash it was already obvious that the plane is not safe to fly.

The Boeing 737 and the Airbus 320 types are single aisle planes with some 150 seats. Both are bread and butter planes sold by the hundreds with a good profit. In 2010 Airbus decided to offer its A-320 with a New Engine Option (NEO) which uses less fuel. To counter the Airbus move Boeing had to follow up. The 737 would also get new engines for a more efficient flight and longer range. The new engines on the 737 MAX are bigger and needed to be placed a bit different than on the older version. That again changed the flight characteristics of the plane by giving it a nose up attitude.

The new flight characteristic of the 737 MAX would have required a retraining of the pilots. But Boeing’s marketing people had told their customers all along that the 737 MAX would not require extensive new training. Instead of expensive simulator training for the new type, experienced 737 pilots would only have to read some documentation about the changes between the old and the new versions.

To make that viable Boeing’s engineers had to use a little trick. They added a ‘maneuver characteristics augmentation system’ (MCAS) that pitches the nose of the plane down if a sensor detects a too high angle of attack (AoA) that might lead to a stall. That made the flight characteristic of the new 737 version similar to the old one.

But the engineers screwed up.

The 737 MAX has two flight control computers. Each is connected to only one of the two angle of attack sensors. During a flight only one of two computers runs the MCAS control. If it detects a too high angle of attack it trims the horizontal stabilizer down for some 10 seconds. It then waits for 5 seconds and reads the sensor again. If the sensor continues to show a too high angle of attack it again trims the stabilizer to pitch the plane’s nose done.

MCSA is independent of the autopilot. It is even active in manual flight. There is a procedure to deactivate it but it takes some time.

One of the angle of attack sensors on the Indonesian flight was faulty. Unfortunately it was the one connected to the computer that ran the MCAS on that flight. Shortly after take off the sensor signaled a too high angle of attack even as the plane was flying in a normal climb. The MCAS engaged and put the planes nose down. The pilots reacted by disabling the autopilot and pulling the control stick back. The MCAS engaged again pitching the plane further down. The pilots again pulled the stick. This happened some 12 times in a row before the plane crashed into the sea.

To implement a security relevant automatism that depends on only one sensor is extremely bad design. To have a flight control automatism engaged even when the pilot flies manually is also a bad choice. But the real criminality was that Boeing hid the feature.

Neither the airlines that bought the planes nor the pilots who flew it were told about MCAS. They did not know that it exists. They were not aware of an automatic system that controlled the stabilizer even when the autopilot was off. They had no idea how it could be deactivated.

Nine days after the Indonesian Lion Air Flight 610 ended in a deadly crash, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued an Emergency Airworthiness Directive.

The 737 MAX pilots were aghast. The APA pilot union sent a letter to its members:

    “This is the first description you, as 737 pilots, have seen. It is not in the AA 737 Flight Manual Part 2, nor is there a description in the Boeing FCOM (flight crew operations manual),” says the letter from the pilots’ union safety committee. “Awareness is the key with all safety issues.”

The Ethiopian Airlines plane that crashed went down in a similar flight profile as the Indonesian plane. It is highly likely that MCAS is the cause of both incidents. While the pilots of the Ethiopian plane were aware of the MCAS system they might have had too little time to turn it off. The flight recorders have been recovered and will tell the full story.

Boeing has sold nearly 5,000 of the 737 MAX. So far some 380 have been delivered. Most of these are now grounded. Some family members of people who died on the Indonesian flight are suing Boeing. Others will follow. But Boeing is not the only one who is at fault.

The FAA certifies all new planes and their documentation. I was for some time marginally involved in Airbus certification issues. It is an extremely detailed process that has to be followed by the letter. Hundreds of people are full time engaged for years to certify a modern jet. Every tiny screw and even the smallest design details of the hardware and software have to be documented and certified.

How or why did the FAA agree to accept the 737 MAX with the badly designed MCAS? How could the FAA allow that MCAS was left out of the documentation? What steps were taken after the Indonesian flight crashed into the sea?

Up to now the FAA was a highly regarded certification agency. Other countries followed its judgment and accepted the certifications the FAA issued. That most of the world now grounded the 737 MAX while it still flew in the States is a sign that this view is changing. The FAA’s certifications of Boeing airplanes are now in doubt.

Today Boeing’s share price dropped some 7.5%. I doubt that it is enough to reflect the liability issues at hand. Every airline that now had to ground its planes will ask for compensation. More than 330 people died and their families deserve redress. Orders for 737 MAX will be canceled as passengers will avoid that type.

Boeing will fix the MCAS problem by using more sensors or by otherwise changing the procedures. But the bigger issue for the U.S. aircraft industry might be the damage done to the FAA’s reputation. If the FAA is internationally seen as a lobbying agency for the U.S. airline industry it will no longer be trusted and the industry will suffer from it. It will have to run future certification processes through a jungle of foreign agencies.

Congress should take up the FAA issue and ask why it failed.

Posted by b on March 12, 2019 at 04:39 PM | Permalink
A selected comment we endorse—
@ b who wrote

” But the engineers screwed up. “

I call BS on this pointing of fingers at the wrong folk

Engineers get paid to build things that accountants influence. The West is a world in which the accountants have more sway than engineers.

It is all about the money b and to lead folks in some other direction is not like what I think of you.

The elite that own global private finance and everything else killed those people in the planes because they set the standards that the accountants follow and then force the engineers to operate within

The profit narrative is bad for humanity.

Posted by: psychohistorian | Mar 12, 2019 4:55:32 PM | 1

About the Author
“b” is MoA’s founding and chief editor.

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🛬 Death of Aviation: Airbus Supports A Second Hand A380 Market
« Reply #42 on: March 16, 2019, 03:02:41 AM »
Airbus fer Sale!  Get yer Airbus here!

Remember, it is not a "Used Plane".  It is a "Certified Pre-Owned" Plane!

"High Prices? WE BLOW THE LIVING SHIT out of High Prices!

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RE

https://simpleflying.com/airbus-a380-second-hand-market/

Airbus Supports A Second Hand A380 Market
By Jo
March 15, 2019

With the production of the A380 coming to an end in 2021, many are concerned that we’ll no longer get to fly the giant of the skies. But with Airbus confirming to Simple Flying that they ‘support and promote’ the second hand market for the A380, the short term future for the plane, at least, is looking pretty bright.


Airbus are keen to see the second hand A380 market take off. Photo: Airbus

When we reported on the forthcoming fleet shake up at Lufthansa, we were surprised to hear that the airline was planning to sell six of its A380s back to Airbus. With the A380 project for the chop, it was surprising to hear the manufacturer was willing to take back these planes.

Airbus told us at the time:

    “Airbus supports and promotes the A380 second-hand market.”

But how do they support it, and who are they promoting it to?
Who wants a second hand A380?

The Airbus A380 is still fairly young, with the first aircraft only entering into service 12 years ago. They are well away from the end of their useful life, but even so we’ve already seen A380s sent for scrap, as it’s not a well-loved model by the majority of the world’s carriers.

However, not all A380s are unwanted, as even British Airways have said they could be interested in second hand models. With their iconic 747s coming to the end of their lifespan, the A380 could fill the gap very nicely indeed.
British Airways A380

British Airways have indicated they might be interested in second hand A380s. Photo: Airbus

The first operator of a second hand A380 was Hi Fly. The wet leasing company took delivery of MSN006 in July last year, after it came to the end of its 10 year lease with Singapore Airlines. They have since indicated they would be keen to buy more too.

Their decision to make use of the Airbus A380 was well timed, as it was able to step in and fill gaps in the schedules when the 787 was grounded due to turbine blade problems.
Hi Fly A380

Hi Fly are the first airline to operate a second hand A380. Photo: Airbus

When Hi Fly bought their A380 last year, they received full support from Airbus. This included a package of measures to help them bring it into service effectively. Among other things, Airbus included onsite field service and a flight hour services for components offer.

That’s a pretty valuable offer for any airline, and a clear demonstration of Airbus’s commitment to getting second hand A380s back in the air.
Why do Airbus support the second hand market?

Airbus have been clear for some time that they’re keen to support the second hand market for the A380. Commenting on the Hi Fly purchase, Catherine Bras, Airbus’ A380 business development platform leader, said:

“From the beginning we knew it would be good for us to help build a market for second-hand aircraft. We think this is a great opportunity to show what the aircraft can do. There may be some airlines that were hesitant to commit long-term who can now try out an A380 and see what it can do for them. This could help create new routes and expand the market base.”

The manufacturer has also said they see wet leasing as a lucrative area in which the A380 can be used. Wet leasing often provides a solution where seasonality is the problem, and if a route requires substantial capacity for a short while, the A380 is the aircraft that can deliver the maximum seats.
Airbus A380 cabin

The Airbus is an ideal solution when more seats are needed due to seasonality. Photo: Airbus

Whether other wet lessors or even direct carriers will step up and take second hand A380s remains to be seen. However, we suspect that Airbus probably already have a buyer in mind. We’re looking forward to finding out who it is.
« Last Edit: March 17, 2019, 01:18:00 AM by RE »
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🛬 As Boeing faces scrutiny over the 737 Max 8, it can draw on influence
« Reply #43 on: March 17, 2019, 01:24:32 AM »
https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2019/03/16/boeing-737-max-8-catastrophic-crashes-test-companys-clout-d-c/3146037002/

As Boeing faces scrutiny over the 737 Max 8, it can draw on high-flying influence campaign

Bart Jansen and John Fritze, USA TODAY Published 6:56 a.m. ET March 16, 2019 | Updated 8:55 a.m. ET March 16, 2019


President Donald Trump visits a Boeing facility in South Carolina, praises company for its aircraft innovations and being an example for keeping jobs in the U.S. (Feb. 17) AP


WASHINGTON –As lawmakers begin to scrutinize Boeing's grounded 737 Max 8, they will be probing one of the nation's most powerful corporate political players, backed with a multi-million-dollar lobbying budget and a direct line to the White House.

Chicago-based Boeing, the second-largest U.S. government contractor, suffered a setback this week when the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) followed its counterparts around the world in grounding the 737 Max 8 after two catastrophic crashes raised new questions about the plane's software.

Now Boeing faces a test of its influence as congressional investigators look into how the plane was approved, what caused the crashes and why the FAA delayed its grounding order. The Senate Commerce Committee is scheduling a hearing and key House Democrats have vowed "rigorous oversight."
Boeing influence

Like other large U.S. employers, Boeing spends millions of dollars each year on lobbying the administration and making campaign contributions. The company spent $15 million lobbying in 2018, according to disclosure reports, more than household brands like Amazon and Facebook.

Boeing ranked 11th in a Center for Responsive Politics list of the nation's top spenders on lobbying in 2018. 

The company contributed $1 million to Trump's inaugural committee, Federal Election Commission records show. Boeing's employees, meanwhile, pumped about $5 million into campaigns and political committees in last year's midterm election, according to a USA TODAY analysis of FEC data.

"This does not bode well for Americans who fly," Walter Shaub, senior adviser to the Washington-based Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics wrote in a post on Twitter. "Boeing donates $1 million to Trump's sketchy inaugural fund and the U.S. breaks with other nations that have grounded the Boeing 737."
Trump and Muilenburg

Large companies regularly contribute money to political candidates and spend heavily on lobbying. But what sets Boeing apart from most others is the care CEO Dennis Muilenburg has taken to cultivate a relationship with Trump, who owns one of the company's planes, a 757.

That relationship wasn't always so strong. During the 2016 campaign, Trump repeatedly slammed Boeing for the cost of its Air Force One design, suggesting it was "out of control." Candidate Trump criticized the company for setting up a plant in China to finish its 737s, saying it would take "a tremendous number of jobs" out of the country.

Shortly after the election, Muilenburg sought to smooth things over with the president during a visit to Trump's Florida estate, Mar-a-Lago. A month later, and days before Trump became president, Muilenburg appeared at Trump Tower, praising Trump's "engagement."

When it came time for Trump to make his first trip out of Washington in early 2017 he went to a Boeing plant in South Carolina to tout U.S. economic growth. The company was later awarded a contract to build two Air Force One planes for $3.9 billion.

"We've got a whole wave of policy issues, topics we're working on," Muilenburg told analysts on a call last year, "but we have a voice at the table, which is encouraging."

A member of Trump's Cabinet, acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan, spent more three decades with Boeing as an executive before joining the administration in 2017.

Trump has continued to praise the company even as he announced the grounding.

"It's a great, great company with a track record that is so phenomenal," Trump told reporters at the White House on Wednesday. "And they want this solved; they want it solved quickly."
Mixed record

Still, the company has had a mixed track record meeting its policy ambitions in Washington. Muilenburg personally spoke with Trump to lobby for the safety of the 737 Max 8. And the FAA initially stood by the plane as Britain, France and Germany joined a growing list of countries suspended its use in their airspace.

U.S. regulators relented Wednesday, citing new information from the crash site and satellite data that the agency said suggested similarities between the Ethiopian Airlines crash on Sunday that killed 157 people and the crash in October of a Lion Air Flight off the coast of Indonesia that killed 189 passengers and crew.

"Pilots are no longer needed, but rather computer scientists from MIT," Trump posted on Twitter days after the crash, a missive that preceded Muilenburg's call to the White House. "I see it all the time in many products. Always seeking to go one unnecessary step further, when often old and simpler is far better."

FAA: 'No basis' to order grounding of Boeing 737 MAX 8 despite calls worldwide

Experts said Boeing has long been a major player in Washington's influence game, but noted there was no evidence that effort had anything to do with the FAA's delay in grounding the latest 737 model. The federal government spent $23 billion with Boeing in 2017, a U.S. General Services Administration report on federal contracting shows.

"They're really good at capturing defense contracts," said Richard Aboulafia, vice president for analysis at Teal Group and an aviation consultant. "But there's absolutely no evidence that there's anything untoward with the the FAA's decision here."

A Boeing spokesman did not respond to a request for comment.
Aviation oversight

Like many other agencies in the Trump administration, the Federal Aviation Administration isn't working at full capacity. Daniel Elwell, a former Air Force lieutenant general and American Airlines pilot, has been serving as the agency's acting administrator for more than year.

Trump floated the idea of nominating his personal pilot for the top FAA job last year, but backed down following resistance from lawmakers.

The National Transportation Safety Board, by contrast, is a five-member board that investigates crashes and makes non-binding recommendations on how to avoid future mishaps. Trump appointed two of its five members and elevated a third – originally a Bush appointee – to chairman. The board has one vacancy. 

The NTSB is not investigating either the Ethiopian crash or the Lion Air crash. Foreign countries must request NTSB or similar European agencies to investigate.

Mike Slack, a pilot and lawyer who has represented passengers and family members in crash cases, said Trump had little choice but to ground the Max 8 and Max 9 planes. Allowing the aircraft to fly would have gambled jobs – and American lives – and raised even more questions for the administration and Boeing. 

“Is this about protecting Boeing competitively against Airbus, its primary competitor? And why would Boeing’s CEO be calling the president of the United States?” said Slack, a former NASA engineer. “That’s not good form when the background story is already that the FAA is not acting.”
Boeing's success

Boeing has had a mixed record scoring policy wins in Washington.

The company fought hard to reauthorize the Export-Import Bank, an independent agency that provides loans to foreign companies so they can buy high-priced U.S. goods such as aircraft. Congress reauthorized the bank in 2015, despite concern from many Republicans that it used taxpayer money to benefit huge companies like Boeing that didn't need the help.

But while Congress reauthorized the bank, Senate Republicans have declined to confirm all of the board's members. That has left the bank unable to sign deals valued at more than $10 million, far less than the price of the 737 MAX 8 and other Boeing planes. 

Boeing also benefited from a fight to give foreign carriers, including airlines based in Persian Gulf countries, better access to the U.S. market – an outcome that would help them sell more airplanes to their overseas customers. Domestic airlines mostly opposed the idea, arguing that state-owned air carriers brought unfair competition to U.S. skies.

Ultimately, the U.S. Department of Transportation allowed the Gulf carriers to serve the U.S., but required more public reporting of their finances.

Boeing lost another major fight last year. When Delta Airlines sought to import jets from Montreal-based manufacturer Bombardier, Boeing objected to the International Trade Commission. The company argued that the Bombardier planes were subsidized by the Canadian government and, because of that,  represented unfair competition to their own planes.

The Commerce Department threatened to impose tariffs that would have quadrupled the cost of the Bombardier jets. 

The Trade Commission found Bombardier planes should have cost about three times more than the ticket price because of those subsidies but also declined to rule that the planes would harm the U.S. industry, blocking the tariffs in a loss for Boeing.
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Re: 🛬 Death of Aviation: Last Flight of the 747
« Reply #44 on: March 17, 2019, 02:17:28 AM »
Quote
Now Boeing faces a test of its influence as congressional investigators look into how the plane was approved, what caused the crashes and why the FAA delayed its grounding order.

This should be as far-reaching and effective a probe as those police investigations that look into the execution of young black men, which almost never turn up anything actionable or suspicious.

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

 

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