AuthorTopic: 🛬 Death of Aviation: Last Flight of the 747  (Read 5587 times)

Offline RE

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Re: 🛬 Death of Aviation: Last Flight of the 747
« Reply #45 on: March 17, 2019, 03:04:00 AM »
Quote
Now Boeing faces a test of its influence as congressional investigators look into how the plane was approved, what caused the crashes and why the FAA delayed its grounding order.

This should be as far-reaching and effective a probe as those police investigations that look into the execution of young black men, which almost never turn up anything actionable or suspicious.



My Morning Collapse Wake-Up Call this morning is a Special Aviation Edition:icon_sunny:  Should have it up in an hour or so.

RE
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Death of Aviation & Alaskan Collapse Wedding Soup
« Reply #46 on: March 17, 2019, 04:00:22 AM »


youtube-Logo-4gc2reddit-logoOff the keyboard, microphone & camera of RE



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Published on The Doomstead Diner March 16, 2019



 






(Note:  In the Video, I got my Model Number wrong for the Airbus, the big one is the A380, not the A320.  I didn't catch this error until re-watching the video this morning.  Apologies to the viewers)



 






 



Discuss this Article & Videos at the Cooking Zone Inside the Diner



 



Collapse Wake-Up Call 3/10/2019



 



This was not a good week for Boeing Executives or Stockholders.  In fact, it wasn't a good week for anyone in the Aviation Industry to stop Sniffing Glue.






I've been following the Collapsing Aviation Industry since it began accelerating with the cancellation of the Boeing 747 last year.  That plane was one of the most recognizable ones ever produced, and Boeing's Signature Flagship Jumbo Jet Aircraft, for decades by far the largest passenger plane in the world.



Fairly recently, the European Consortium Airbus built their own Jumbo, the A380.  Even bigger than the 747, but only in production for the last 11 years before Airbus gave up on this White Elephant also and cancelled further orders.  The 747 was first launched from the Boeing plant in Seattle in 1969, lasting a full half century in production.  Now Airbus is promoting a"Used Planes" resale market for various airlines and Saudi Sheiks to sell these behemoths to each other.  Or they just trade them around over the Poker Table or Backgammon Board between beheadings.



Sadly, the demise of these two airplanes is nothing compared to the disaster that befell Boeing over the last couple of months, the HUGELY Faltal Crashes of two of it's Spanking New 737 Max jet, first in Ethiopia and then another one with the Lion Air plane that crashed into the Java Sea immediately after take-off.  An even bigger tragedy of course for the victims of these crashes.



It is fairly obvious at this point that the problem is the result of a combination of a Design Flaw and Regulatory Capture of the FAA by Boeing.  The negligence and liability here is beyond measure, and this in a just world would put Boeing Outta Biz in a heartbeat.  But this culture and system are neither Just nor Fair, and it remains to be seen how it plays out.  Much more on this topic in today's Morning Collapse Wake-Up Call video, at the top of the page.  Also much more in the Death of Aviation thread Inside the Diner.



To accompany your Collapse Brunch brain food this St. Paddy's Day morning, you can have the Alaska Collapse Wedding Soup, along with your Corned Beef & Cabbage.  The Corned Beef & Cabbage recipe went up yesterday so you have time to get it ready before you start drinking Mass Quantities today.



 










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Offline RE

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🛬 Trump's Right. Keep Flying Simple for Pilots
« Reply #47 on: March 18, 2019, 12:13:12 AM »
A good start would be designing the plane so it doesn't need a bazillion sensors running to stay flying level.  ::)

RE

https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2019-03-17/boeing-737-crash-renews-debate-on-complexity-of-planes

Business
Trump's Right. Keep Flying Simple for Pilots


Cockpit crew need enough information to make split-second decisions without being overwhelmed. It’s not an intractable challenge.

By David Fickling
March 16, 2019, 4:00 PM AKDT


They shouldn’t need to be Einstein.

Photographer: Steven E. Frischling/Bloomberg
David Fickling is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering commodities, as well as industrial and consumer companies. He has been a reporter for Bloomberg News, Dow Jones, the Wall Street Journal, the Financial Times and the Guardian.
Read more opinion
Follow @davidfickling on Twitter


President Donald Trump was widely mocked last week for his response to the crash of Ethiopian Airlines Group Flight 302, warning that “airplanes are becoming far too complex to fly”:

In fact, he made a good point, which 737 Max manufacturer Boeing Co., airlines and pilots would do well to heed.

Modern passenger airplanes are by their nature complex – but in most cases, that’s a good thing. The mental attention of air crews is a precious resource, and automated systems allow this to be conserved for when it’s most needed. On top of that, the fly-by-wire systems pioneered by the Airbus SE A320 mean that most planes these days self-correct when pilots move the controls too aggressively – one reason why fatal loss-of-control accidents have fallen by three-quarters over the past three decades.

The problem comes with split-second decisions. Using autopilot to preserve a crew’s mental energy is all very well. Over time, though, mental muscles that go unused end up atrophying. That’s a problem because most air accidents occur in odd, unexpected situations where pilots are having to diagnose a baffling problem under high pressure. One 2014 study of highly experienced Boeing 747 pilots found that 15 out of 16 failed to react properly to misreadings of airspeed in simulator tests, to the extent that the “aircraft” started to stall.

Boeing should be worried about that, because a recurring comment of pilots who’ve flown the 737 Max and predecessor versions is that changes to the basic design and flight control systems make it feel like a different aircraft. Such differences risk breeding confusion.

One of the bedrocks of aviation safety is type classification. A brand-new aircraft must go through type certification, a laborious procedure where a regulator checks that the plane and every one of its component parts is safe. In the case of the Boeing 787, that took eight years and thousands of hours at the Federal Aviation Administration alone. Costs for the process can run into the hundreds of millions of dollars: Though Boeing produces new commercial aircraft no more than once a decade or so, the regulator spends about $230 million every year on certifying new aircraft and parts.

On top of that there’s type rating, which ensures pilots are familiar with the aircraft in question and fully qualified to fly it. This, again, can be phenomenally expensive. Pilots, who typically spend about $70,000 just getting a commercial license, will have to fork out another $30,000 or so each time they’re trained to fly a new aircraft – one reason why most stick to a single model.

The desire to minimize these costs is understandable, especially when there’s a global pilot shortage and a cutthroat aircraft market that typically leaves both Boeing and Airbus with single-digit profit margins.
Low Flying Aircraft

Profit margins at the big aircraft manufacturers rarely crack double figures

Source: Bloomberg

Hence the attraction of the 737 Max. As an updated version of the existing 737 NG models, it’s managed to avoid both those hurdles. Pilots with a 737 type rating are allowed to transition across after a cursory classroom training course, while the common type certificate with the 737 NG means the FAA didn’t have to crawl over every detail of the new design with quite the rigor it would have to devote to a brand-new plane.

That’s attractive both to Boeing and its airline customers, but following these two crashes it’s worth asking: at what cost?

One automated feature that’s been named in relation to the crash of Lion Air 610 last October and could credibly explain some of the in-flight behavior leading up to the Ethiopian Airlines crash is the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System, which helps correct for some of the changed aerodynamics created by the 737 Max’s larger engines.

There’s a detailed debate about whether Boeing gave pilots enough information about this feature in advance. On one hand, it’s possible that the paucity of references to the system in training materials blindsided the air crew and contributed to the Lion Air crash. On the other, it’s equally possible that deluging pilots with too much data could have led to confusion.

These problems seem intractable, but in truth they’re not. While it’s unlikely any plane will ever have a perfect safety record, a few more days of training and simulator flights ought to be enough to alert pilots to the differences between the 737 Max and its earlier variants. Likewise, a suitably tough regulator ought to be able to ensure that problems with new technologies are fully ironed out before a new plane is allowed in the air, regardless of its type certificate.

That will raise costs for manufacturers, airlines, and pilots, which will ultimately get passed on to the flying public. If we want planes to maintain the near-spotless safety record we’ve come to expect, that should be a small price to pay.
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Offline RE

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🛬 British Airways Reveals Stunning New Business Class Suites
« Reply #48 on: March 19, 2019, 01:30:32 AM »
I wonder how much it costs to fly NY-London in one of these new Biz Class configurations?

RE

https://simpleflying.com/british-airways-new-club-suite/

British Airways Reveals Stunning New Business Class Suites

 

British Airways Reveals Stunning New Business Class Suites

British Airways this morning has revealed their brand new Club business class suite. The new Club Suite is set to debut on British Airways brand new Airbus A350-1000 fleet, with deliveries starting in July 2019. This new suite will also replace the current, and somewhat dated, Club World business class seat on all British Airways long haul aircraft by 2023.

British Airways Club World Suite. Photo: British Airways

This new Club Suite cabin will be in a 1-2-1 layout and will have a total of 56 suites. The new Club Suite comes as part of British Airways’ £6.5 billion($8.6 billion) investment to improve the airline.

British Airways Club Suite. Photo: British Airways

New Club Suite features:

The new Club Suite features everything a business class traveler could want. The Club Suite completely trumps British Airways’ current first class offering, and offers the following features:

  • Completely redesigned Club World cabin.
  • Direct aisle access for every passenger.
  • Gate to gate entertainment.
  • 40% more storage than existing Club World seat.
  • Excellent privacy with a door.
  • New vanity unit and mirror.
  • The Suite comes with an 18.5 inch HD screen, and wifi.

New Club Suite cabin video

British Airways Club Suite Bed. Photo: British Airways

Seat dimensions:

The new Club Suite bed dimensions are 6 ft 6 long and 21 inches wide. By far not the most spacious airline business class offering, but it’s on par with most other airlines.

British Airways Club Suite Bed. Photo: British Airways

How to fly British Airways’ new Club Suite and the A350

During phase one, the first A350 aircraft will start some short-haul flying between London and Madrid for crew training. In phase two, from October 1st, 2019, the aircraft will begin long-haul operations. During this period, another three A350 aircraft will join the British Airways fleet and two Boeing 777 aircraft will also be retrofitted with the new cabin.

British Airways A350 Business Class Cabin. Photo: Simple Flying/British Airways.

The A350’s are expected to be equipped with the latest in-flight wifi, large windows and a lower cabin altitude to reduce the effects of jet lag.

British Airways A350 Club Suite map. Photo: British Airways

British Airways Club World history:

British Airways were the pioneer for lie flat business class seats. In 2006, the airline launched the ‘next generation Club World’, which offered lie flat seats with lots of space. But, since the launch of these seats over 13 years ago, other airlines have quickly caught up to British Airways and surpassed their Club World offering.

The Club World business class seats we see today are in an extremely dense and narrow 2-4-2 configuration, and not every seat has directly aisle access. This means that if you sit by the window or in the middle two seats in the cabin, you literally have to climb over another passenger to leave your seat during the flight.

Current British Airways Club World cabin. Photo: British Airways

We are very excited by the new Club Suite. All the current issues should be mitigated by this huge hard product upgrade.

Why British Airways took so long to upgrade their business class cabin

As a reader you may be thinking why on Earth British Airways allowed its business class offering to become so uncompetitive.  Whilst most legacy carriers have been installing business class seats with tons of storage and direct aisle access, British Airways has left Club World alone. There are number of key reasons for this.

British Airways’ London Heathrow hub is unlike any other airport in the world. Heathrow is the busiest two runway airport in the world, and slots are very valuable and limited. The airline offers more direct flights to and from worldwide business hubs than any other airline. In the world of corporate travel, time is money and many passengers they would prefer to fly direct without a stop to maximise sleep. This is especially true when flying from the US to the UK.

Due to running direct flights, large corporations are able to negotiate good discounts directly with British Airways. This is far more convenient than trying to negotiate with every airline that might be used on a less direct route. In a nutshell, companies and passengers are willing to pay for the convenience of British Airways, despite a relatively poor business class product.

What will happen to British Airways’ first class?

This new Club Suite seat is going to appear first on British Airways’ brand new A350-1000 aircraft.

British Airways A350 Club Suite Cabin. Photo: British Airways

The plane is not going to have a first class cabin at all, although British Airways may offer a new first class seat on later A350 deliveries in the 2020’s.

New economy class and premium economy

British Airways is expected to enhance their current economy class and premium economy offering on their new A350 aircraft too. We’ll be expecting to see a larger premium economy cabin and a smaller economy cabin.

Overall, this is a very exciting time for British Airways and we can’t wait to try out their new Club Suite!

What do you think of their new seat? Let us know in the comments!

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🛬 First ANA “Flying Honu” A380 Delivered!
« Reply #49 on: March 21, 2019, 02:42:16 AM »
Isn't it Ironic?  People from an overpopulated Doomed Island pack into an over-sized Doomed airplane to fly to an undersized Doomed Island in the middle of the Pacific Ocean.  Isn't it Ironic, dontchya think?

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/Jne9t8sHpUc" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/Jne9t8sHpUc</a>

RE

https://samchui.com/2019/03/20/first-ana-flying-honu-a380-delivered/

First ANA “Flying Honu” A380 Delivered!

[html]
 

ANA took delivery of the first A380 today in a stunning livery called "Flying Honu" and will operate the aircraft on the popular leisure Narita-Honolulu route from May 24th.

ANA A380 Delivery Ceremony with Airbus CEO Tom Enders, ANA President & CEO Shinya Katanozaka, Chris Cholerton, Rolls Royce President for civil aerospace

ANA A380 Delivery Ceremony with Airbus CEO Tom Enders, ANA President & CEO Shinya Katanozaka, Chris Cholerton, Rolls Royce President for civil aerospace

"The introduction of the Airbus A380 into our lineup is something the entire team at ANA is very excited about,"

said Yutaka Ito, Executive Vice President of ANA. "The A380 is one of the most advanced commercial airliners in the world, and we will hold events to mark its departure in Toulouse as well as when it lands at Narita airport."

ANA's first Airbus A380 sports bold Hawaiian Sky Blue Flying Honu-inspired livery.

ANA has selected special Hawaiian themed liveries for its three A380s, symbolizing the sky, ocean and sunset.

ANA A380 Delivery Ceremony

ANA A380 Delivery Ceremony

The second A380 plane will boast Hawaiian Ocean Emerald Green livery and is expected to roll out of the Airbus Paintshop in Hamburg on March 25, 2019.

The aircraft, MSN 262, registration JA381A, is the first of three Rolls-Royce Trent 900 powered A380s

The three ANA A380s will be painted in a special livery depicting sea turtles which are native to Hawaii. The first aircraft is blue, the second will be green and the third orange. The ANA A380 livery is one of the most elaborate ever painted by Airbus. It took 21 days for the Airbus team to paint a surface of 3,600m2 using 16 different shades of color.

ANA A380 JA381A "Flying Honu"

ANA A380 JA381A "Flying Honu"

The aircraft is set to fly from Japan to Hawaii 3x a week starting on May 24, 2019 with service on Tuesdays, Fridays and Saturdays. The service will increase 10x weekly as of July 1, 2019 when the second A380 enters service.

The aircraft will feature four cabins with five different seating options spread out in the following configuration:

Cabin Number of Seats
First 8
Business 56
Premium Economy 73
Economy 383
Total 520

The 5th seating style comes in the form of what ANA is calling COUCHii. These seats feature an extendable leg rests that convert the seats into a "bed". COUCHii passengers will also receive a dedicated bed sheet, pillow and blanket set amenities.

All passengers will have access to some form of onboard bar and the plane will also feature a "multi-purpose room where new mothers will be able to tend to their babies and passengers will be able to change before arriving at their destination."

First Class

The first class suites look like a modernized version of the existing ANA suite found aboard all 777 products aircraft which are essentially composed of a lay-z-boy in a cubicle and will feature a massive 32" personal TV. The suites will also include sliding doors. 

ANA A380 First Class Suite

ANA A380 First Class Suite

Business class

All business class seats will offer direct aisle access, are fully flat and feature 18" Entertainment screens.

ANA A380 Business Class seat

ANA A380 Business Class seat

Premium Economy

All premium economy seats will feature a 38" pitch and most seats will have a 15.6" entertainment screen. The tray tables will also swivel 90 degrees so customers can still maneuver even when the tray table is open.

ANA A380 Premium Economy

ANA A380 Premium Economy

Economy and ANA COUCHii

All seats will feature 34" pitch and 13.3" entertainment monitors. Each seat comes with power and USB outlets as well. COUCHii seats will only have 32" of pitch.

ANA A380 Economy Class

ANA A380 COUCHii seats

ANA A380 COUCHii seats

ANA A380 COUCHii seats

ANA A380 COUCHii seats

Hawaii Service Upgrades

On top of the new plane, ANA has plans for a special A380 lounge at Honolulu airport featuring separate entrances for premium passengers that connect directly to the upper deck of the aircraft, which will bypass the terminal completely. Other special features include a unique turtle livery for all 3 aircraft, referred to as Honu, and customized food and beverage in each cabin.

ANA A380 Honolulu Lounge

ANA A380 Honolulu Lounge

ANA has noted that First Class passengers will be dining on food from Michelin Start Restaurant,  Noe at the Four Seasons Resort Oahu.  Economy Class passengers will not be left behind on the gastronomic delights as they have a menu designed by Australian Celebrity Chef Bill Granger, famous for his amazing ricotta pancakes. All passengers will also have an “exclusive blue Hawaii cocktail” too.

ANA A380 In-flight meal services

ANA A380 In-flight meal services

Amenity Kits are on the specialty item list as well with business class kits designed by Fred Segal and First class amenity kits from Globe Trotter, which is an English luggage manufacturer.

ANA A380 special amenity kits designed by Globe Trotter

ANA A380 special amenity kits designed by Globe Trotter

If you wanted to use United miles to redeem for free flights on this route expect to pay between 27,500 miles for a one-way economy award up to 55,000 miles for a Business Class award. Virgin Atlantic frequent flyer program is always a sweet spot for flights on ANA and looks like this route should only cost 90,000 miles for a first class round trip ticket.

I will be covering more news shortly with the delivery under way.

 
 

Offline RE

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https://www.businessinsider.com/boeing-quietly-unveiled-777x-replace-747-jumbo-jet-2019-3

Boeing quietly unveiled the $442 million airliner that will replace the 747 jumbo jet
Benjamin Zhang


Boeing 777x

    The Boeing 777X was unveiled on March 13 in a private, employees-only event.
    The 777X is destined to serve as Boeing's new flagship and replace the iconic 747 jumbo jet.
    The 777X comes in two variants: the $410.2 million 777-8, and the $442.2 million 777-9.
    The jet is expected to enter service in 2020 with its launch customer, Emirates.

March 13 was supposed to be a media bonanza for Boeing. The aviation giant was set to unveil its next great wide-body jetliner — one that's destined to serve as its flagship for decades to come and finally replace the legendary 747 jumbo jet.

That day, the attention of the world's news outlets was indeed trained upon Boeing. But not for that reason.

Three days earlier, Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET302 crashed shortly after taking off from Addis Ababa Bole International Airport, killing all 157 passengers and crew on board the Boeing 737 Max 8. It was the second nearly brand-new 737 Max 8 to crash under strikingly similar circumstances.

By the morning of March 13, more than 50 regulatory agencies and airlines around the world had grounded or even outright banned the plane. That afternoon, the Federal Aviation Administration issued an emergency order that grounded the 737 Max in the US as well.

Read more: 2 Boeing 737 Max airliners have crashed since October — here are the airlines that fly the plane

What was supposed to be a day of celebration for Boeing instead became one of the darkest days in the company's history.

The media junket was scrapped, and the first 777X prototype was introduced in a private ceremony reserved for employees.

That said, the unfortunate circumstances surrounding its unveiling does not diminish the importance of the new 777X to Boeing. Here's a closer look.
On March 13, Boeing unveiled the first prototype of its upcoming 777X airliner before a crowd of employees.
Boeing
The Boeing 777X will be available in two variants: the $410.2 million 777-8, and the $442.2 million 777-9.
Boeing
The first prototype was of a 777-9, which will have some massive shoes to fill.
Boeinghttp://www.doomsteaddiner.net/forum/index.php/topic,10371.0.html
The 777X will replace not only the original 777 ...
Boeing
... but Boeing's iconic 747 jumbo jet.
Boeing unveiled its 747-8 jumbo passenger jet to thousands of employees and guests in Everett, Washington. Boeing
It will be Boeing's new flagship.
Boeing

"The big airplane of the future for the aviation industry is going to be the Boeing 777-9," Randy Tinseth, Boeing's vice president of marketing, told Business Insider in an interview at the Farnborough Air Show last year. "It carries 400 passengers. It flies further than the 747 and the A380 does today."

Tinseth added: "The twin-engine, twin-aisle economics of that airplane just beats the big four-engine aircraft, and it's just the reality of the market."
At 252 feet long, the 777-9 is the longest airliner in the world.
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🛬 The Boeing disasters: 346 more victims of capitalism
« Reply #51 on: March 22, 2019, 03:27:11 AM »
https://www.greanvillepost.com/2019/03/21/the-boeing-disasters-346-more-victims-of-capitalism/

The Boeing disasters: 346 more victims of capitalism
Print Friendly, PDF & EmailPrint this post.

HELP ENLIGHTEN YOUR FELLOWS. BE SURE TO PASS THIS ON. SURVIVAL DEPENDS ON IT.

Plane crashes, climate change storms, crumbling infrastructure, gouging drug companies, a repugnantly mercenary political system…All of these disasters are directly attributtable to capitalism, especially as it exists in the US in its most savage and unregulated form. Corporations write their own rules—from Big Pharma to big aerospace firms like Boeing— and in the meantime, while we dump trillions into criminal wars, our infrastructure goes begging, accidents and unnecessary suffering take place all over the place, as these images also prove. Below a short video we prepared of this ghastly inherent feature of capitalism.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/klYRGFXH9GA" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/klYRGFXH9GA</a>
A limited-circulation video prepared by TGP.

    The Boeing disasters: 346 more victims of capitalism
    The tragic and preventable deaths of nearly 350 people demonstrate certain realities of contemporary social and political life. The capitalist system is based on the maximization of shareholder profit, not the satisfaction of the needs of society. If endangering the lives of hundreds of people will lead to higher profits, such a risk is justified.

By Brian Dyne • 21 March 2019
In the wake of two deadly airplane crashes that have killed 346 people, it has become clear that executives at aerospace giant Boeing repeatedly subordinated basic considerations of safety to profit, aided and abetted by the federal government.

The first disaster occurred on October 29, when a Boeing 737 Max 8 operated by Lion Air crashed thirteen minutes after leaving Jakarta, Indonesia, killing 189 people. That same plane only narrowly averted disaster a day earlier, Bloomberg reported this week, when a third, off-duty pilot who happened to be on the flight, intervened under similar conditions that ultimately caused the crash.

Less than five months later, on March 10, Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 crashed about six minutes after takeoff from Addis Ababa, killing a further 157 men, women and children.

Beginning on March 11, every country in the world grounded the 737 Max 8, citing overwhelming safety concerns. The United States was the final holdout, but it grounded the aircraft on March 13.

“Boeing, in developing the 737 Max 8, obviously felt intense competitive pressure to get the new aircraft to market as quickly as possible,” wrote Captain ‘Sully’ Sullenberger in a column in MarketWatch this week. Sullenberger is the pilot who safely landed an Airbus A320 on the Hudson River in 2009 and a leading air safety expert.


Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg (r) with then
Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter—bosom buddies,
of course. Muilenburg and his ilk belong in jail,
with their wealth confiscated.


“When flight testing revealed an issue with meeting the certification standards, the company developed a fix… but did not tell airline pilots about it. In mitigating one risk, Boeing seems to have created another, greater risk,” he wrote.

Sullenberger added, “After the crash of Lion Air 610 last October, it was apparent that this new risk needed to be effectively addressed.” But instead of grounding the aircraft and immediately fixing the problem, Boeing did everything it could to conceal the deadly defect and keep the aircraft flying.

In other words, Boeing executives evidently acted in a reckless, negligent manner, contributing to the deaths of 346 people.

Sullenberger concluded, “It has been reported that Boeing pushed back in discussions with the FAA [Federal Aviation Administration] about the extent of changes that would be required, and after the second crash, of Ethiopian 302, the Boeing CEO reached out to the US President to try to keep the 737 Max 8 from being grounded in the US.”

Both the FAA and the Trump administration, for their part, were more than willing to run interference for the company.

The close integration between the airline industry and the agency nominally tasked with regulating it is well documented. In 2005, the FAA introduced a new program whereby aircraft manufacturers could choose their own employees to serve as FAA “designees,” charged with certifying the safety of their commercial planes. Since then, there has been virtually no independent oversight of the safety of any new civilian planes, those produced at Boeing or elsewhere.

During the 737 Max 8 rollout, Boeing told its pilots that they could learn all they needed to know about flying a new type of airplane from a 56-minute presentation on an iPad and a 13-page manual. Both were approved by the FAA and the pilots’ union, and neither included any information about the system likely responsible for the crashes, the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmenting System, or MCAS.

    Fact is, Boeing and other aerospace firms have been able to eviscerate and take over the duties of the FAA, leaving the fox in charge of the chicken coop.—Editor

US officials, moreover, have deep connections to the airline industry. FAA Acting Administrator Dan Elwell was an American Airlines executive. US President Donald Trump’s new nominee to head the administration, Stephen Dickson, is a former Delta head.


Boeing is a top defense contractor with extensive ties to the military-intelligence apparatus. Patrick Shanahan, the deputy secretary of defense, has worked for Boeing for three decades. Moreover, the current secretary of transportation, Elaine Chao, is the wife of Mitch McConnell, who has received hundreds of thousands of dollars in campaign financing from Boeing.

Moreover, Boeing is a key part of the US financial elite’s war for control of markets. Since the 737 Max 8 series was released in 2017, the sales of just 350 of the 5,011 orders Boeing has received have accounted for 50 percent of the company’s profits. Boeing itself has maintained its status as the world’s fifth-largest defense contractor and is currently the largest US exporter.

Shares of Boeing have more than tripled since the election of Donald Trump and his promises of further deregulation, making it the highest- priced stock in the Dow Jones Industrial Average. The company has accounted for more than 30 percent of the increase of the Dow since November 2016.

The tragic and preventable deaths of nearly 350 people demonstrate certain realities of contemporary social and political life. The capitalist system is based on the maximization of shareholder profit, not the satisfaction of the needs of society. If endangering the lives of hundreds of people will lead to higher profits, such a risk is justified.

Governments, in their turn, serve to protect the interests of the corporations, a reality demonstrated by the Trump White House’s efforts to protect the largest US exporter, and the repeated actions of the FAA to cover up the series of disastrous shortcuts taken by Boeing.

These disasters highlight the need to take the airline industry out of the hands of Wall Street so that air travel can be brought into harmony with human and social needs.

The technological advances that have been made in air travel over the past decades are indisputable. For the first time in world history, travelers can move from any two points in the world within a single day. This technology must be freed from the restraints of giant corporations and of the capitalist system as a whole. This requires the nationalization of the major airlines and aerospace companies, their transformation into publicly owned and democratically controlled utilities to provide for social need, not private profit.

—Bryan Dyne

Select Original Comments we totally agree with
Avatar
Sebouh80 • 6 hours ago

The striking picture of disaster Capitalism is that Boeing corporation through negligence and deceit has caused the death of more then 346 people. However Dennis Muilenburg the CEO of this infamous company was allowed to take home an exorbitant sum of 23.8 million dollars.
Ol’ Hippy Sebouh80 • 5 hours ago

Even more striking is the fact that these murderers will never see the walls of a prison cell.
Avatar
Carolyn Zaremba Sebouh80 • 5 hours ago

That money should be confiscated and paid to the families of the people killed.
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Offline K-Dog

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Re: 🛬 Death of Aviation: Last Flight of the 747
« Reply #52 on: March 22, 2019, 06:11:08 AM »
Quote
The Boeing disasters: 346 more victims of capitalism

Seems to me there has been three times the news coverage a double plane crash normally gets.  What's up.  Who turned the memo crank and why?  How come all across the land journalists have suddenly become crack software engineers?

Who pissed off who and why?  Does anybody but me notice the 'extra' attention?  There seems to be a fresh 'Max 8 death plane' installment every two days; like clockwork.



Look at this, the chance of being struck by lightning is 25 five times or so less than a plane crash.  Both happen regularly.  They may not be common but Jesus Christ has not descended from a mountaintop and declared the second coming because two planes crashed.  The death toll was big this is true, but these were little people and you could cram a lot of them in those big soda cans.  There is really nothing remarkable about the numbers.  Every single death was the same tragedy replayed.  All deaths were equally horrible but the total numbers were about the same numbers as those who die in.  Drum roll please.  Airline crashes.

Unregulated capitalism or the regulation of the journalistic herd.  I say regulation of the journalistic herd by people who don't give two fucks what they plant in everyone's silly little head.



Seriously.  Do any of the people writing any of these articles know what happened?  Do any of them know what a Reynolds number is?  How many have been to Ethiopia?  What was the technology used in the software systems?  Can they tell you?  Do a search on google and you'll find a list of articles on the Boeing crashes that have more to do with the crash of random chance than the crash of any airplanes.  The echo chamber roars.

Journalists, how many kiss ass and do whatever their boss tells them to do in and industry where empty chairs can be filled at the drop of a deadline.

Software or smoke up your ass-ware?  Why is the FBI getting involved in plane crashes when the chance of two planes crashing five months apart is about the same as most people reading this comment taking a dump in the next 24 hours?

Power is fucking with us.
« Last Edit: March 22, 2019, 06:16:40 AM by K-Dog »
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🛬 Russia’s Answer To The Airbus A380: The Sukhoi KR-860
« Reply #53 on: March 23, 2019, 01:25:11 AM »
800-1000 Pssengers?  THAT'S BIG!  I wonder how long Boarding and Debrking would take?

1 Crash would be real bad newz.

On the upside, it uses 4 engines if GE or Rolls-Royce, and 8 (mounted in pairs) if they use cheaper Ruskie Engines.

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Russia’s Answer To The Airbus A380: The Sukhoi KR-860
By Nicholas
March 22, 2019


Many people have heard the tale of how the Airbus A380 came to be. Airbus believed that the future in air travel was hub to hub, and that the plane of the future would be large capacity, with enough room for hundreds of passengers. Boeing, on the other hand, believed in direct routes between destinations (point to point) and therefore focused on smaller, more fuel-efficient aircraft. We, of course, know how this turned out for both companies.

But did you know that there was a third option?

Introducing the Sukhoi KR-860, the gigantic Russian answer to the A380 and the equivalent of doubling down on red. This aircraft took the hub to hub model to the extreme.
KR-860


The KR-860 in flight (model). Source: Tails Through Time

What is the story?

Revealed at the 2001 Paris Airshow, the Sukhoi KR-860 is a four-engine double-decker aircraft (similar to the A380). A direct translation of its name, Kryl’ya Rossii, means the ‘Wings of Russia’, with the 860 referring to how many passengers it could carry. It was under development from Sukhoi, a Russian aerospace firm that also builds a multitude of fighter jets for the military. The aircraft was never actually built, but a 1/24 scale model was created to showcase their future concept.

Three variants were initially proposed.

    A passenger variant (below)
    A cargo variant that could hold railcars/cargo containers (so normal modular shipping containers would not have to be de-loaded for transport).
    A liquid gas variant used to transport products from oil fields. The liquid gas could have been used to power the plane instead of jet fuel, meaning the flight would have been free for the airline.

KR-860

A cross section of the aircraft. Source: Tails Through Time

Let’s have a look at the statistics:

General characteristics

    Capacity: 860-1000 passengers
    Length: 80 m (262 ft 6 in)
    Wingspan: 88 m (288 ft 9 in) with the wings unfolded or 64 m (210 ft) span with wings folded
    Wing area: 700 m2 (7,500 sq ft)
    Max takeoff weight: 650,000 kg (1,433,005 lb)
    Powerplant: 4 × General Electric CF6-80E1A4B turbofan, 320 kN (72,000 lbf) thrust each or
    Powerplant: 4 × Pratt & Whitney PW4168A turbofan, 305 kN (69,000 lbf) thrust each

Performance

    Cruising speed: 1,000 km/h (621 mph; 540 kn)
    Range: 15,000 km (9,321 mi; 8,099 nmi)

Whilst the above suggests either a GE or Pratt engine, there was also the possibility of using eight Kuznetsov NK-93 engines (in pairs) as the cheapest possible solution.
How many passengers could it carry?

The typical A380 can carry around 550 passengers, with an all-economy variant carrying 800. The KR-860 far outstrips this, accommodating 860 passengers and up to 1,000 in an all-economy configuration. To put this in perspective, the designers intended for the lower deck to be 12-abreast seating with three aisles (a first for commercial travel) and the upper deck to have 9-abreast seating with two aisles.
KR-860

The rear escalator of the KR-860. Source: Tails Through Time

To help passengers get on and off rapidly, the aircraft came with three escalators built into the hull. That’s right! Under the plane were escalators to ferry passengers from the ground quickly up to their respective deck.
Boeing copied the wings

This plane had such a large wingspan that the wings themselves had to fold up to arrive at 747 airport gates. Sound familiar? The new Boeing 777x actually uses the same system (although not as extreme as the KR-860).
russian jet

The folding wing of the KR-860. Source: Tails Through Time
Why did it never fly?

The program originally predicted there would be a market for 300 aircraft. As we now know, Airbus only sold 290 A380s over the course of its entire program, so a Russian made super A380 claiming to sell more is highly unrealistic. Possible markets would have been Russia, China, India, Vietnam, and Africa. Western countries were still wary of Russian made aircraft at the time, and would have gone with Airbus or Boeing in preference.

The program itself was estimated to cost around $10bn in 2000. To help with this cost, Sukhoi turned to China and India to create a joint venture. This made the Russian government uneasy about funding an aircraft that ultimately would see little use in Russia. As a result, they diverted funds to other projects in 2001.

Whilst we can agree that Russia (and the world) would never have seen a use for this aircraft, it would have been quite a sight to see.

What do you think? Would you have flown on this aircraft?
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🛬 The Boeing 737 Max crisis goes way beyond software
« Reply #54 on: March 23, 2019, 10:57:03 AM »
https://qz.com/1577986/the-boeing-737-max-crisis-goes-way-beyond-software/


An aerial photo shows Boeing 737 MAX airplanes parked on the tarmac at the Boeing Factory in Renton, Washington, U.S. March 21, 2019.
REUTERS/Lindsey Wasson

CUTTING CORNERS
The Boeing 737 Max crisis goes way beyond software
By Tim Fernholz7 hours ago

There is no small complexity in the task of carrying hundreds of people through the sky at hundreds of miles an hour. More than 100,000 airliners take off and land each day, but two deadly air crashes in six months have shocked passengers, regulators, and industry alike.

Crashes of Boeing’s 737 Max in Indonesia and Ethiopia offer a window into all that complexity. Boeing and its CEO Dennis Muilenburg want the story to be simple: a software problem that can be fixed with a quick patch. But that doesn’t capture the mistakes made by Boeing and American aviation regulators in certifying the plane to carry passengers.

By now, you may well have heard of MCAS, software that automatically pitches 737 Maxes downward to avoid stalling in mid-air. It exists only because Boeing wanted to upgrade its 737 without changing it fundamentally—so it added new engines that made the aircraft more likely to stall, rather than starting from scratch. In the emerging picture of the two accidents, the software only failed because the mechanical sensor it depended on also malfunctioned.

But all that pales next to what will likely be the highlight of investigations into the incident: the training and user experience of the people in the cockpits. Pilots did not have sufficient training to understand how MCAS worked, and two vital safety features—a display showing what the sensor detected, and a light warning if other sensors disagreed—were optional extras (paywall).

Minimizing training and cockpit changes was an economic decision: The upgraded plane would be more attractive to potential purchasers if they did not have to spend expensive hours retraining their pilots. The Federal Aviation Administration determined Boeing’s training and safety plans were fine. Now, investigators want to know why. The answers could be costly for Boeing, and for America’s reputation as a leader in the safe deployment of aviation technology.

Software is easy to blame, because for many people computer science is a mystery. But these crashes emerged from an experience we’re all familiar with: the pressure to deliver on a tight timetable, the temptation to cut corners, and the hope that in a big, complex world, one little kludge won’t mess up the whole program.
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🛬 Cathay Pacific Prepares For Their Boeing 777X Launch
« Reply #55 on: March 25, 2019, 01:19:42 AM »
https://simpleflying.com/cathay-pacific-boeing-777x/

Cathay Pacific Prepares For Their Boeing 777X Launch

Cathay Pacific Prepares For Their Boeing 777X Launch

Asia’s first 777X customer has begun preparation’s for the introduction of their Boeing 777-9X. Cathay Pacific CEO Rupert Hogg, says the airline is “already in discussion” with Boeing and “others” on every aspect of the 777-9X aircraft, which Cathay is planning to roll out as part of the airlines’ future long-haul fleet.

Cathay Pacific 777-9X will feature a four-class configuration. Photo: Boeing

On December 20, 2013 Cathay Pacific announced an order for 21 Boeing 777-9X aircraft, as part of Cathay’s future long-haul fleet strategy. The order is valued at more than $7 billion at current list prices.

The 777-9X delivers Cathay Pacific with improved payload range capability and reduced operating costs, in addition to a significant reduction in environmental emissions. According to chief customer and commercial officer Paul Loo, Cathay is expected to receive its first 777-9X around June 2021. Deliveries will continue through 2024.

The Boeing 777X

The Boeing 777X will be the largest and most efficient twin-engine jet in the world. The 777X will feature greater cabin width and seating capacity, new GE9X engines and new composite wings with folding wingtips. Boeing designed the aircraft to build on the engineering and interior innovations introduced in their 777 and 787 Dreamliner.

The Boeing 777Xs folding wing-tip. Photo: Wikipedia

Boeing has two variants for the 777X, the 777-8 and the 777-9. The technical specifications of the aircraft, are as follows:

What will the interior look like on Cathay’s 777X?

Cathay Pacific’s 777-9 will feature a four-class configuration. Unlike, the Airbus A350s in Cathay’s long-haul fleet, the 777-9 will feature a first class cabin. The 777-9 will receive a substantial upgrade to the soft product delivered to the existing first class seats, which are already undergoing a hard product refresh.

Cathay is working closely with the airframer, seat supplier, inflight entertainment provider, and its own industrial designer, to avoid the problems the airline encountered with its last premium product, introduced on the Airbus A350.

Cathay Pacific’s current first class. Photo: Cathay Pacific

Vivian Lo, general manager of customer experience and design at Cathay Pacific, talked about the upgraded first class, saying “we have always taken pride whenever we launch a product that it is flagship and industry-leading, and that’s where we aspire to be. We’re committed to be best in class. We’re working towards a new product that will come in 2021. Meanwhile, we’re also looking at how we want to enhance the first class experience before we add the new product.”

Vivian Lo continued, explaining the enhancements in more detail, saying “Part of that is refreshing the hard product, but my team and I are also working towards looking at the soft product, whether that’s food and beverage, the amenities, the duvets, so that you also enhance that overall experience for our most premium and special customers,”.

Do we know what routes the 777-9X will fly on?

With the capabilities that the 777X offers, it’s certain that Cathay would want to maximize the aircraft by putting the aircraft on a route with a high volume of passengers and cargo each day.

John Slosar, chief executive of Cathay Pacific, talked about the potential routes of the 777X, saying “We think it will be an ideal fit for long-haul destinations in North America and Europe, in particular those routes where we carry high volumes of passengers and cargo each day. Cathay Pacific is committed to modernizing its fleet to provide a superior experience to passengers.”

Cathay Pacific Cargo B747-8F landing in Toronto. The 747-8F operates twice weekly into Toronto. Photo: Andrew Eastwood

In my opinion, I think Toronto, New York (JFK) and London would be the most likely routes for Cathay’s 777-9X. Each route receives several 777-300ER passenger flights a day, as well Cathay operates the 747F to these cities throughout the week.

Overall

With the 777-9X offering high seat capacity and range capability, I’m interested to see what routes the aircraft will fly. Also, its exciting to hear that Cathay will be putting an upgraded first class product onboard.

What route do you think the 777-9X will fly for Cathay? Let us know in the comments!

 

 

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🛬 What’s the real difference between flying economy and FIRST CLASS?
« Reply #56 on: March 25, 2019, 01:51:10 AM »
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/travel_news/article-6805131/Inside-British-Airways-2-8k-A380-CLASS-suite-flying-ECONOMY.html



[html]

What’s the real difference between flying economy and FIRST CLASS? Inside British Airways’ £2.8k A380 suite featuring a personal wardrobe, bone china plates and a 7ft 6in bed (but they do serve wine worth just £10 a bottle)

  • Ted Thornhill flies from Heathrow to Johannesburg and back. Outbound in First, and economy on the return
  • The first-class suite on the A380 is the biggest that BA offers, so this is the No1 seat in the carrier's fleet
  • Passengers in First board on their very own jet bridge - and there are only 14 seats in the entire cabin
  • On the way back Ted sits in the upper deck economy cabin - and is shocked at the standard of the wine 

The Queen has her throne. Trump has his Oval Office chair. I have seat 2A in first class on a British Airways A380.

Yes, it feels that epic. And so it should. This is, after all, BA's top offering. The biggest and poshest suite in its fleet.

Before sitting down in it on a flight from London Heathrow Airport's Terminal 5 to Johannesburg, I had thought the golden age of flying was over. But as I sip my welcome glass of Laurent-Perrier Grand Siecle Champagne I wonder if it’s actually still with us.

Ted flies from London Heathrow Airport's Terminal 5 first class with British Airways to Johannesburg. Pictured is an official picture of a suite identical to the one he puts to the test
 

Ted flies from London Heathrow Airport's Terminal 5 first class with British Airways to Johannesburg. Pictured is an official picture of a suite identical to the one he puts to the test

Ted enjoys a glass of Laurent-Perrier Grand Siecle Champagne in first class before take-off
 

Ted enjoys a glass of Laurent-Perrier Grand Siecle Champagne in first class before take-off

It certainly seems so if you’re able to splash out thousands on a first-class ticket with BA on the A380.

ADVERTISING

It’s a flying experience like no other.

And taking to the skies in this magnificent monster jet with the British flag carrier in economy on the return leg isn’t bad, either.

But before getting on to that allow me to divulge the first class experience, which is more or less glorious from start to finish – though there are some minor shocks along the way.

THE CHECK-IN AND LOUNGE

The experience begins at a dedicated check-in area in T5 that BA calls ‘The First Wing’.

Here a series of check-in desks lie hidden from the proletariat behind a gold-coloured scalloped steel and glass enclosure.

There’s a huge amount of floor space, a small lounge area with flowers, armchairs and leather banquettes and lightly flavoured glasses of water and cold towels on offer.

Is this a check-in area or a spa?

I’m travelling with my partner and 19-month-old daughter and we’re guided to one of the desks by a perky BA host where our luggage is checked in by another member of staff whose bonhomie levels are equally high.

Then it’s onwards through an exclusive security lane, where the bonhomie levels drop.

 
First class passengers check in at T5 in The First Wing, which even has its own dedicated security lanes (pictured)
 

First class passengers check in at T5 in The First Wing, which even has its own dedicated security lanes (pictured)

One of the bonuses first class passengers get is access to the extremely swanky T5 Concorde Room (pictured). It's like the inside of a five-star hotel
 

One of the bonuses first class passengers get is access to the extremely swanky T5 Concorde Room (pictured). It's like the inside of a five-star hotel

 
Ted's Concorde Room sea bass
 

Ted's Concorde Room sea bass

No special treatment from the security staff, just staccato instructions.

I don’t mind. I find gruff security staff reassuring.

Next, it’s time to waft on through to BA's swanky Concorde Room, past the riff-raff in the business lounge to a lounge that’s exclusive to first class ticket holders.

To be frank, it’s more like a five-star hotel lobby, bar and restaurant than an airport lounge.

There are chandeliers, waiting staff buzzing around, eager to dispense Champagne (we adults waste no time accepting a flute each) and private dining booths.

We ensconce ourselves in one of these and avail ourselves of the free treats on offer from the a la carte menu.

I opt for seared sea bass on a bed of Provençale vegetables and a glass of white Burgundy (Pernand-Vergelesses Combottes, Domaine Jean Fery, 2015).

So far, so first-class-ish.

THE FIRST CLASS CABIN

Next, the big moment. Setting foot on an A380 for the first time. Right at the very front.

The first thrill is that rows one to four - i.e the mere 14 passengers in the first class cabin on the bottom deck at the front - get their very own jet bridge.

I walk down it all on my own as two BA crew members beam at me from the doorway of the aircraft.

BA's first class seats are the biggest in the fleet, with 30 per cent more personal space and 60 per cent more personal stowage than the first suites on 747s and Dreamliners
 

BA's first class seats are the biggest in the fleet, with 30 per cent more personal space and 60 per cent more personal stowage than the first suites on 747s and Dreamliners

First class passengers sitting in the middle of the cabin can easily chat as the seats are angled towards each other. A privacy screen can be raised at the touch of a button
 

First class passengers sitting in the middle of the cabin can easily chat as the seats are angled towards each other. A privacy screen can be raised at the touch of a button

 

I’m giddy with excitement.

Upon entering I actually turn right, not left, as is the tradition for swanky cabins, because the jet bridge connects at the nose.

The seats are arranged in a reverse Herringbone layout, with five window/aisle seats on each side and four in the middle.

The ambience is one of hushed English elegance. I feel underdressed in my casual-wear.

Plenty of room for manoeuvre: This picture Ted takes on his mobile phone shows just how big the First suites are
 

Plenty of room for manoeuvre: This picture Ted takes on his mobile phone shows just how big the First suites are

In First, the toilets are decorated with a fresh flower
 

In First, the toilets are decorated with a fresh flower

I’m offered the aforementioned Laurent-Perrier fizz within seconds.

It’s a fine tipple. And so it should be – you'll be lucky to find a bottle retailing for less than £100.

BA also offers a Gusbourne Limited Release Twenty Fifteen glass of bubbles – made in Kent, the ‘garden of England’ - which retails for £40 a bottle.

So far, so reassuringly expensive.

But there are some shocks in store on the retail-price front.

At the front of the menu booklet is a message that says ‘our sommeliers have created a signature experience to be savoured’.

But turning over to the white and red section of my First Class menu, I find a Marco Zunino Malbec Reserve 2017 from Mendoza. The 2016 vintage is worth £10. 

That’s a shockingly low value for a cabin experience costing thousands and surely not terribly ‘signature’, despite the fact that this wine has received critical acclaim

Indeed, a wine merchant friend of mine, who’s been in the business for 20-odd years, tells me later: ‘That’s nothing very special for first class.’

(BA works with a master of wine on its list so I’d be keen to know what the thinking is here.)

After the seat belt signs come off I opt for a glass of Ritual Pinot Noir 2015 from the Casablanca Valley in Chile, which is delicious. And, in pleasing fine-dining-style, I'm shown the bottle and poured a sample so I can c

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Can U Spell L-E-M-O-N?



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https://www.businessinsider.com/southwest-airlines-boeing-737-max-makes-emergency-landing-florida-2019-3

A Southwest Boeing 737 Max headed for storage in the desert just made an emergency landing in Florida
Benjamin Zhang


FILE PHOTO: A Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 MAX 8 aircraft is pictured in front of United Airlines planes, including Boeing 737 MAX 9 models, at William P. Hobby Airport in Houston, Texas, U.S., March 18, 2019. REUTERS/Loren Elliott A Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 MAX 8. Reuters

    A Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 Max airliner made an emergency landing in Orlando, Florida, on Tuesday.
    "The aircraft returned and landed safely in Orlando. No passengers were aboard the aircraft," the Federal Aviation Administration said in a statement to Business Insider.
    The pilots reported an engine issue that appears to be unrelated to the control-software problems that grounded the Boeing jet.
    The plane was being ferried to Victorville, California, for desert storage.

A Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 Max airliner made an emergency landing in Orlando, Florida, on Tuesday.

Southwest Airlines Flight 8701, a Boeing 737 Max 8, was en route from Orlando to Victorville, California, when its pilots declared an emergency minutes after takeoff, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) said in a statement to Business Insider.

Southwest Airlines told Business Insider that its pilots "reported a performance issue with one of the engines."

The engine issue reported by the pilots appears to be unrelated to the control-software issues that have plagued the 737 Max and may have contributed to the crashes of both Lion Air Flight JT610 and Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET302.

Neither of the two ongoing crash investigations have indicated any performance issues with the plane's CFM International Leap-1B engines.

The FAA said it is investigating the flight that lasted just 11 minutes.

Southwest Airlines, which is based in Dallas, is the single largest operator of the Boeing 737 Max.

Read more: Here are the airlines that fly the Boeing 737 Max

The plane involved in the incident is one of 34 Boeing 737 Max aircraft in the Southwest fleet that were grounded by an FAA emergency order earlier this month after the crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET302.

Flight 8701 was headed for the Southern California Logistics Airport in Victorville, where the plane will be kept in short-term desert storage. As a result, there were no passengers on board the flight.

"The Boeing 737 MAX 8 will be moved to our Orlando maintenance facility for a review," Southwest said in a statement.

Read more: The Boeing 737 Max is likely to be the last version of the best-selling airliner of all time

At the heart of the controversy surrounding the 737 Max is MCAS, the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System. To fit the Max's larger, more fuel-efficient engines, Boeing had to position the engine farther forward and up. This change disrupted the plane's center of gravity and caused the Max to have a tendency to tip its nose upward during flight, increasing the likelihood of a stall. MCAS is designed to automatically counteract that tendency and point the nose of the plane downward.

Initial reports from the Lion Air investigation, however, indicate that a faulty sensor reading may have triggered MCAS shortly after the flight took off. Observers fear Ethiopian Airlines flight may have experienced a similar issue.

Read more: 53% American adults say they don't want to fly on a Boeing 737 Max

Boeing is working on a software update for MCAS along with hardware improvements to get its plane flying again.

Here is the FAA's statement in its entirety:

"The crew of Southwest Airlines Flight 8701, a Boeing 737 MAX aircraft, declared an emergency after the aircraft experienced a reported engine problem while departing from Orlando International Airport in Florida about 2:50 p.m. today. The aircraft returned and landed safely in Orlando. No passengers were aboard the aircraft, which was being ferried to Victorville, Calif., for storage. The FAA is investigating."
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🛬 How The Boeing 777X Is Replacing The 747 And Airbus A380
« Reply #58 on: March 28, 2019, 01:39:21 AM »
https://simpleflying.com/how-the-boeing-777x-is-replacing-the-747-and-airbus-a380s/

How The Boeing 777X Is Replacing The 747 And Airbus A380

How The Boeing 777X Is Replacing The 747 And Airbus A380

 

The Boeing 777X has found an unpredicted new source of customers: airlines who are looking to replace their 747 and A380 fleets.

The upcoming aircraft from Boeing has won popularity as the next must-have ‘big’ aircraft on the market, as Airbus and Boeing phase out their Jumbo jets.

777X

Boeing 777X-8 in flight (Computer Generated). Source: Boeing

How popular is the 777X?

The Boeing 777X was originally designed and marketed to replace previous models of the 777 series. Recent sales from Boeing show that the 777X is quickly becoming the most popular in the series.

According to the manufacturer, the order book for the new 777X has far exceeded previous versions of the 777 series even before their respective launches. The 777-200 only had 147 orders before launch and the 777-300ER had 160. By comparison, the 777X has 358 orders and the plane is not expected to fly for an airline until late this year. To double down on this fact, the 777X already has half of the 800 total orders that the 777-300ER made over its entire lifetime.

I would make the argument that we’re doing pretty well,” – Boeing VP-marketing, Randy Tinseth.

Some of these orders come from airlines like British Airways, who recently signed an 18-order and 24-option deal for 777X-9 aircraft. Or Emirates, who have a whopping 150 of the aircraft on order (115 777X-9s and 35 777X-8s) to replace their fleet of 777-300ERs.

What about as a replacement for 747s and A350s?

In previous articles, we have discussed how the Boeing 777X is designed to replace the 747 and the Airbus A350 to replace the A380. Boeing has made great strides in marketing their new 777X-9 as the perfect wide-body replacement for both the Boeing 747 and the Airbus A380.

“I believe [the 777-9] will be the next 747 or the next [Airbus] A380 in the market, but it’s going to do those things much more efficiently than those big, four-engine airplanes could”, said Tinseth.

United 747

United 747 Aircraft. Photo courtesy United Airlines

You can see how the 777X compares to the 747 here and the A380 here.

Boeing also believes that many airlines will soon be replacing their widebody fleets, as their stock 747s and A380s ‘age out’ of use. This will push up 777X sales even higher, as carriers seek out a suitable replacement.

“In the 2022-2023 time frame, we’re really going to step into a significant replacement cycle on widebodies, We should start to see [the 777X] take off faster.”

What about Airbus A350 sales?

But let’s not just take Boeing’s word on how well they are doing, but look at the raw numbers ourselves. Previously, we discussed the sales of the Airbus A350 vs the Boeing 777X, but that was before this latest influx of new orders.

The Airbus A350 had 780 orders before its first flight in 2014, whilst the Boeing 777X series only has 344 orders, not even half of what Airbus had before launch.

Airbus A350-941 (reg. F-WWCF, MSN 002) in Airbus promotional CFRP livery at ILA Berlin Air Show 2016. Source: Wikicommons

Boeing seems to be confident that they will get new orders from existing 777X customers over the lifetime of the aircraft, based off historic successes with their 787 Dreamliner program.

“If you look at the 787, of the 73 customers we have, 41 have come back and repurchased the airplane, I think that … has shown a change in the market over the last several years. [It’s] a better-balanced market, more diverse business models, higher replacement demand. … [T]he buying habits of our customers have changed,” concluded Tinseth.

Whether the 777X or the A350 will succeed the 747 and A380 seems to be still up for debate. We will have to wait and see.

What do you think? Is the 777X the future of widebody travel? Or will the A350 continue it’s head start? Let us know in the comments below.

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🛬 The Rise and Fall of the A380
« Reply #59 on: March 29, 2019, 03:46:13 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/HmHjI9Z_vbI" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/HmHjI9Z_vbI</a>
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