AuthorTopic: 🛬 Death of Aviation: Last Flight of the 747  (Read 3534 times)

Offline RE

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🛬 Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET302 - Crash Animation [X-Plane 11]
« Reply #60 on: March 29, 2019, 03:49:26 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/fIunpQQpzs0" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/fIunpQQpzs0</a>
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Offline RE

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🛬 NEW Virgin Atlantic A350 LOFT Upper Class
« Reply #61 on: April 09, 2019, 11:51:00 AM »
Dick Branson sells to the "Upper Class" wannabees. 🤑

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/r_IiYcBadAc" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/r_IiYcBadAc</a>

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This isn't your grandaddy's Pan Am.

Gotta attract the rich clients.  J6P is outta cash for Happy Flying.

RE

https://simpleflying.com/almost-perfect-singapore-airlines-a350-business-class-from-singapore-to-johannesburg/

Almost Perfect: Singapore Airlines A350 Business Class from Singapore to Johannesburg

Almost Perfect: Singapore Airlines A350 Business Class from Singapore to Johannesburg

 

As my round-the-world adventure continued, I flew Singapore Airlines’ A350 from Singapore to Johannesburg. After flying Singapore Airlines on a short-haul flight in business class, I was excited to see what their long-haul experience was like. In the end, the flight was almost perfect.

Singapore Airlines’ A350 Business Class was almost perfect.

Booking

One-way flights from Singapore to Johannesburg are quite expensive. You can usually find a business class flight for around $4,000. However, you can usually reduce that cost by flying out of a Southeast Asian gateway like Ho Chi Minh City or Phnom Penh. Since I was flying to Cape Town, I booked this flight as a one-way from Ho Chi Minh City to Cape Town with a few days stopover in Singapore. With the help of a travel agent, I was able to reduce the cost of this leg in business-class to around $1,985 – over a 50% discount!

You could book this flight through KrisFlyer, which is Singapore Airlines’ frequent flyer program. One way Advantage awards can cost up to 90,000 KrisFlyer miles in business class. Meanwhile, saver awards can get you business class for 49,000 KrisFlyer miles.

Airport experience

Since my flight departed at 1:30 AM and my hotel check-out time was 2:00 PM, I arrived at the airport around 2:30 PM. Singapore Airlines had a dedicated business class check-in point in Terminal 3, where their flights to Africa depart. It took me about 15 minutes to check my bags and clear immigration. At Singapore’s Changi Airport, security screening is at each gate or cluster of gates. All you need is a valid boarding pass and passport to enter the departure areas.

I made my way to the SilverKris lounge. The lounge was gigantic. There were tons of seating spaces, which soon became necessary. However, one major drawback was a lack of outlets. I had to hunt around the room for a solid 30 minutes before I found a seat that had power access. Singapore Airlines could really work on introducing more power outlets in their lounge.

Singapore Airlines’ SilverKris lounge had a lot of seating, but limited power access.

Unfortunately, this was the only business class lounge in T3. Consequently, the lounge itself was quite crowded. Singapore Airlines offered a large buffet area, however, there were only about 10 different hot food options. Furthermore, the dishes were quite small, meaning staff were constantly replacing the dishes. I settled for some beef stew, mashed potatoes, rice, and a Coca Cola.

SilverKris Lounge food.

The food itself was tasty. Over the nine hours that I spent in the lounge, a few different items were served and the self-serve drink selection was always full. The staff worked constantly to maintain the lounge. Every so often, they would come around with a cart to collect used service items or offer additional tea, coffee, or some light snacks.

There were also showers available in the SilverKris Lounge. No appointment was necessary. Instead, a shower attendant would put your name down on a list. If you didn’t want to wait in the bathroom for your turn, they would hand you a little buzzer.

Once Jewel opens, you might find a better pre-flight experience outside the lounge.

I left the lounge for my gate at 12:00AM. Boarding started at 12:55AM for our 1:30 departure. Amazingly, boarding for this fully-loaded A350 was complete in 20 minutes. Wow!

Onboard

Business class passengers boarded through the forward door. There, I was greeted by a smiling team of flight attendants. I turned right into the cabin and made my way to seat 16K!

16K on Singapore Airlines’ A350

Singapore Airlines arranges their business class in a 1-2-1 configuration. The seats aren’t reverse herringbone. Instead, Singapore Airlines offers a forward-facing configuration with lie-flat seats. 16K was a window seat in the penultimate row of business class in the forward cabin. A smaller business class cabin was located behind the second set of doors.

There are no overhead bins over the center rows. As a result, overhead bin space can fill up quickly. Be sure to board early! We did end up running out of space in the overhead compartments in business class by the end of the boarding process.

Reading light, power outlet, and storage nook

To the right of the seat was a reading light, power outlet, and storage nook. During the flight, laptops, iPads, books, or newspapers could be stored there. Below the reading light was the universal power outlet in addition to a USB outlet. The power was only active after takeoff.

Below that was the handset entertainment controller. Singapore Airlines’ business class monitors are not touch screen so it was necessary to use the remote.

Singapore Airlines remote control

Below that was the tray table and a storage area for water bottles. Headphones were also stored there.

Storage by the remote control

On the left side of the seat were the seat controls.

Singapore Airlines business class seat controls

There was also another set of lights in the partition.

Additional lighting

The footwell in this configuration is tucked underneath the armrest of the seat in front. As a result, the footwell is angled away from the seat and is a bit on the small side. Below the footwell was an area to store your shoes or larger bags.

Singapore Airlines business class footwell and shoe storage

 

Above the footwell, was the only real place to hold a glass, a mirror, and additional storage for smaller items like a wallet, passport, phone, or glasses.

Additional storage and a mirror

Waiting at my seat upon boarding was a pair of slippers, eye mask, and socks. Singapore Airlines doesn’t offer amenity kits. Rather, additional items such as a toothbrush, razor, comb, etc. are found in the lavatory.

Additional amenities were in the lavatory

Also in the lavatory, one could find mouthwash, facial mist, and some hand lotion.

Additional amenities

There was even a nice little flower in the lavatory.

Flower in the lavatory

Back to the seat. In order to convert the seat in bed mode, you have to flip down the back of the seat. This is a bit cumbersome. However, flight attendants were proactive and offered to make my bed for me. In addition, when the back is lowered, additional bedding and a heavier pillow were revealed.

The seat in bed mode

I did like how there was a little mattress pad on the seat. It wasn’t much in terms of padding, but it did add a little aspect of hygiene since I wasn’t sleeping directly on the seat surface.

The one slight downside to this seat is that you have to sleep angled. By this point, I was exhausted so was able to get some sleep. However, I did end up with some aches that awoke me as a result of the awkward sleeping position. On this 10-hour flight, I ended up getting about six hours of sleep. It wasn’t bad and I was able to get an additional two hours of sleep on the short leg between Johannesburg and Cape Town.

The angled footwell.

The bedding itself was solid, however. The pillow and blanket were perfect for a long-haul flight.

In addition, the seat itself was very private. The partition extends quite far which encloses your space. Though not a suite, this was nevertheless an excellent seat for privacy.

Onboard experience

Singapore Airlines offered a fantastic entertainment selection on this flight. There were over 100 movies in addition to a large number of TV shows and audio options. If you’re flying the world’s longest route, you’ll definitely have plenty of content to keep you occupied.

Singapore Airlines offers excellent in-flight entertainment

It isn’t a touchscreen. However, the remote control worked just fine and I was able to scroll through and view what I needed to.

Singapore Airlines provided noise-canceling headphones. They were identical to the ones offered on my previous flight and did the job.

If you were in the mood to read, flight attendants passed out various options for newspapers prior to departure.

Business class passengers received 30 mb of free wifi. In addition, paid for wifi was also available. Do note, however, that Singapore Airlines’ charges for wifi based on data usage. It can be quite easy, as I discovered, to blow through your package! Make sure that no background apps are running and you pause your session when you’re not using it. These are some easy ways to save some of that precious data.

Meals

After settling in, I was offered some pre-departure champagne. Singapore Airlines served Charles Heidsieck Brut Reserve.

Pre-departure champagne

The menu was already at my seat. Food and drink options were as follows:

About 20 minutes after takeoff, the initial service started. First, I ordered a Coke and it came with some nuts.

Coke and nuts

About 30 minutes after takeoff, I was offered the refreshment. I selected the toasted walnut bread with roasted beef, coleslaw, and salad. Really, it was a light sandwich.

Singapore Airlines refreshment

The sandwich tasted like a normal sandwich. Granted, it is hard to make a sandwich unique. I did appreciate that Singapore Airlines served it warm and well made. Overall, though, it wasn’t terribly special.

About an hour after takeoff, flight attendants cleared the refreshment and made my bed. I got about six hours of sleep. When I woke up, I ordered a Coke with some trail mix.

Coke and trail mix

Minor detail, but I would have liked to see the trail mix served in a little bowl. It wasn’t a huge deal since flight attendants were proactive with clearing trash, however, it was a slightly awkward presentation.

About two-and-a-half hours out, flight attendants commenced the breakfast service. This was the main meal on this flight. I first received the starter.

Fresh fruit starter

Despite about eight hours in the air, the fruit still tasted very fresh. Much to my liking, the pineapple was also quite sweet. In comparison to other inflight fruit I’ve had, this was pretty good.

After the fruit, flight attendants came around and offered cereal.

Singapore Airlines breakfast cereal

The cereal was standard and it was nice to see they had something more substantive than cornflakes. Flight attendants also offered passengers skim or whole milk to go with the cereal.

After the cereal was cleared, flight attendants served the main meal about one-and-a-half hours prior to arrival. I used the iconic “Book the Cook” option from Singapore Airlines. I pre-ordered the chicken curry.

Singapore Airlines Book the Cook Chicken Curry

The chicken curry was fantastic! Singapore Airlines is known for their excellent catering. This meal was no exception. I was pleasantly surprised as the dish was rich in flavor. The rice also didn’t taste like typical airplane rice. It was fluffy and fresh. I would have liked some garlic bread, since Singapore Airlines serves an excellent garlic bread, but the roll was just right with this meal.

Above all, this was the best breakfast I’ve had on a plane.

Cabin Crew

From the time I boarded until I deplaned, flight attendants constantly addressed me as “Mr. Singh”. I like when flight attendants put the effort in to memorize a passenger’s name since it elevates the entire experience. Every experience I had with flight attendants were exceptional.

Singapore Airlines has a tough cabin crew certification process. It really showed in how immaculately put together the flight attendants were. They constantly maintained their appearance and never once looked even remotely tired. They all seemed glad to be onboard the flight and enjoyed providing excellent service.

Well done to this crew!

Arrival

On top of it all, Singapore Airlines excels in terms of priority baggage. I only had to wait for about five minutes after clearing immigration for my bags to arrive at the carousel in Cape Town. The business class and priority tagged bags all came out first.

Overall

This flight was almost perfect. There was excellent content, attentive service, and fantastic catering. I did find that the angled footwell was a bit uncomfortable. However, I was still able to get six hours of sleep. I’d really want to see how the angled footwell does on one of their ultra long haul flights, since they use the same seat in business class across their long-haul A350s.

Would I fly Singapore Airlines again in long-haul business class? Absolutely. In fact, I hope to one day fly on their longest route to New York!

Would you fly Singapore Airlines? Have you flown Singapore Airlines before? Let us know in the comments below!

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https://www.cnbc.com/2019/04/13/stratolaunch-first-flight-worlds-biggest-airplane-built-for-rockets.html

Stratolaunch, the world's largest airplane and built to launch rockets, takes first flight
Published 37 min ago
Michael Sheetz
@thesheetztweetz
Key Points

    Stratolaunch became the largest airplane in the world to fly on Saturday, people familiar with the test flight told CNBC.
    With a wingspan measuring 385 feet, the airplane is built to launch rockets from the air.
    Late Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen founded Stratolaunch in 2011.

For the first time ever, the Stratolaunch aircraft moved out of the hangar to conduct aircraft fueling tests.

Aviation has a new number one in size, as a one-of-a-kind airplane completed its first test flight on Saturday morning above California's Mojave desert, people familiar with the flight told CNBC.

The test makes the immense Stratolaunch the largest airplane in the world to fly, with a wingspan measuring 385 feet -- wider than a football field is long. With two fuselages and six Boeing 747 engines. Stratolaunch is built to launch rockets from the air.

Stratolaunch is an "air launch" system, meaning that the aircraft will carry rockets up to about 35,000 feet and then drop the rocket. One of the advantages of such a system, touted by Stratolaunch as well as Richard Branson's Virgin Orbit, is that flying in and out of a traditional runway gives greater flexibility and, eventually, will allow for quick turnaround between launches.

The company has had various partnerships, as well as internal plans, for the rockets that Stratolaunch will carry. SpaceX was one of the company's earliest partners but Stratolaunch later switched to a contract with Northrop Grumman-owned Orbital ATK to fly the Pegeasus XL rocket. Stratolaunch's plan to develop its own fleet of rockets was scrapped in January.
VIDEO01:14
Stratolaunch rolls out of the hangar for fueling tests

Stratolaunch Systems is owned by Vulcan, which manages the estate of late Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen. The billionaire entrepreneur founded Stratolaunch in 2011, in partnership with specialty aircraft builder Scaled Composites. Allen died in October, following complications of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

Allen's passing is cited as one of the main reasons for the shift in Stratolaunch's plans at the beginning of this year. When the company announced in January that it was ending development of its own rocket engines and vehicles, Stratolaunch reportedly laid off more than 50 of its 80 employees.
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🛬 JAL cleared to receive Airbus A350XWB later in 2019
« Reply #64 on: April 14, 2019, 12:32:57 AM »
https://www.aerotime.aero/aerotime.team/22554-jal-cleared-to-receive-airbus-a350xwb-later-in-2019

JAL cleared to receive Airbus A350XWB later in 2019
Source : Airbus


Image : FlugKerl2, CC BY-SA 4.0

Japanese authorities have issued type certification for the Airbus A350 XWB, opening doors for Japan Airlines (JAL) to receive first deliveries of the airliner later in 2019.

The type certification was issued by Japan’s Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transportation, and Tourism (MLITT) and covers the aircraft powered by Rolls-Royce Trent XWB engines, Airbus announced on April 11, 2019.

While about a third of all A350XWB orders (a total of 890 as of March 31, 2019) come from Asia Pacific, the only Japanese airline planning to introduce the airliner to its fleet is Japan Airlines (JAL). The airline placed 18 A350-900s and 13 A350-1000s firm order with Airbus in 2013.

JAL is now expecting the first deliveries “in the middle of 2019”, according to Airbus, which also adds that JAL’s A350 XWB fleet will enter service on major domestic routes starting with its Haneda - Fukuoka route from September.

A350XWB are due to replace older widebody aircraft within the Japanese carrier fleet - a position currently strongly occupied by Boeing aircraft. JAL operates an all-Boeing fleet of 167 aircraft, 117 of which are widebodies: Dreamliners, 777s and 767s.
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Offline K-Dog

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https://www.cnbc.com/2019/04/13/stratolaunch-first-flight-worlds-biggest-airplane-built-for-rockets.html

Stratolaunch, the world's largest airplane and built to launch rockets, takes first flight
Published 37 min ago
Michael Sheetz
@thesheetztweetz
Key Points

    Stratolaunch became the largest airplane in the world to fly on Saturday, people familiar with the test flight told CNBC.
    With a wingspan measuring 385 feet, the airplane is built to launch rockets from the air.
    Late Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen founded Stratolaunch in 2011.

For the first time ever, the Stratolaunch aircraft moved out of the hangar to conduct aircraft fueling tests.

Aviation has a new number one in size, as a one-of-a-kind airplane completed its first test flight on Saturday morning above California's Mojave desert, people familiar with the flight told CNBC.

The test makes the immense Stratolaunch the largest airplane in the world to fly, with a wingspan measuring 385 feet -- wider than a football field is long. With two fuselages and six Boeing 747 engines. Stratolaunch is built to launch rockets from the air.

Stratolaunch is an "air launch" system, meaning that the aircraft will carry rockets up to about 35,000 feet and then drop the rocket. One of the advantages of such a system, touted by Stratolaunch as well as Richard Branson's Virgin Orbit, is that flying in and out of a traditional runway gives greater flexibility and, eventually, will allow for quick turnaround between launches.

The company has had various partnerships, as well as internal plans, for the rockets that Stratolaunch will carry. SpaceX was one of the company's earliest partners but Stratolaunch later switched to a contract with Northrop Grumman-owned Orbital ATK to fly the Pegeasus XL rocket. Stratolaunch's plan to develop its own fleet of rockets was scrapped in January.
VIDEO01:14
Stratolaunch rolls out of the hangar for fueling tests

Stratolaunch Systems is owned by Vulcan, which manages the estate of late Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen. The billionaire entrepreneur founded Stratolaunch in 2011, in partnership with specialty aircraft builder Scaled Composites. Allen died in October, following complications of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

Allen's passing is cited as one of the main reasons for the shift in Stratolaunch's plans at the beginning of this year. When the company announced in January that it was ending development of its own rocket engines and vehicles, Stratolaunch reportedly laid off more than 50 of its 80 employees.

Probably a good move to circle the wagons and concentrate on the platform.  Field of dreams comes to mind and this was his dream.  Rockets others can build.

Under ideal conditions of temperature and pressure the organism will grow without limit.

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🛬 American Airlines extends cancellations through Aug. 19
« Reply #66 on: April 14, 2019, 01:28:06 PM »
Count on AA suing the beejeezus out of Boeing.  ;D

RE

https://www.aol.com/article/news/2019/04/14/american-airlines-extends-cancellations-through-aug-19/23711527/

American Airlines extends cancellations through Aug. 19


Thomson Reuters
Apr 14th 2019 12:14PM

CHICAGO, April 14 (Reuters) - American Airlines Group Inc said on Sunday it is extending Boeing Co 737 MAX cancellations through Aug. 19, leading to about 115 daily canceled flights, or 1.5 percent of its daily summer flying schedule.

In a letter to employees and customers, Chief Executive Doug Parker and President Robert Isom said they believe the 737 MAX will be recertified before Aug. 19, but they want to ensure reliability "for the peak travel season and provide confidence to our customers and team members when it comes to their travel plans."

Boeing's 737 MAX aircraft was grounded worldwide in March following a fatal crash on Ethiopian Airlines that killed all 157 aboard, just five months after a similar crash on Lion Air that killed all 189 passengers and crew.
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Next stop: The Airplane Graveyard.


RE

https://www.businessinsider.com/boeing-737-max-fills-storage-lots-2019-4

Boeing can't deliver the 737 Max to customers, and now the planes are clogging up its storage lots
Benjamin Zhang


Boeing 737 Max factory Renton Unpainted Boeing 737 airliners at the company's Renton, Washington, factory. REUTERS/Lindsey Wasson
BA Boeing Co

    The global Boeing 737 Max fleet has been grounded since March 13 in response to the crashes of Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET302 and Lion Air Flight JT610.
    Boeing has suspended customer deliveries of the 737 Max, but production of the plane has continued at a pace of 42 aircraft a month.
    As a result, Boeing's storage lots are packed with undelivered 737 Max aircraft.
    Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

The global Boeing 737 Max fleet has been grounded since March 13 in response to the crashes of Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET302 and Lion Air Flight JT610.

Along with the grounding, Boeing also suspended customer deliveries of the 737 Max. However, the company did not shut down the Renton, Washington, factory where the 737 is assembled.

Read more: Boeing's problems are mounting and things are going to get worse before they get better.

Before the March 10 crash in Ethiopia, Boeing had been producing the 737 at a rate of 52 aircraft a month with plans to ratchet production up to 57 planes by the end of the year.

In fact, production continued unabated for nearly a month after the crash, until Boeing announced plans to slash the rate from 52 planes a month to 42 planes a month.
Boeing airplanes at Boeing Field in Seattle. REUTERS/Lindsey Wasson
As a result, Boeing is storing the undelivered in various locations around the Puget Sound, a company spokesman told Business Insider.

Even with the production slowdown, the number of undelivered aircraft sitting in and around Boeing's production facilities is beginning to swell.

The planes are sitting in storage lots at the Renton factory; at the Paine Field next to Boeing's Everett, Washington, factory; and at the company's Seattle Delivery Center at Boeing Field.

Aerial photos of the facilities appear to show that space is filling up.
Boeing 737 Max aircraft parked at the airport adjacent to the Renton factory. AP Photo/Elaine Thompson
It's unclear when the 737 Max will be able to resume service. American Airlines and Southwest Airlines have both pulled the plane from its schedule until mid-August, and United has pulled the plane from flights through early July.

Boeing is working on a software update to fix the 737 Max's troubled flight-control system. According to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the agency is expecting Boeing's final proposed fix in the coming weeks.
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🛬 The Airbus A330 vs The Boeing 777 – What Plane Is Better?
« Reply #68 on: April 17, 2019, 01:45:01 AM »
https://simpleflying.com/airbus-a330-vs-boeing-777/



The Airbus A330 vs The Boeing 777 – What Plane Is Better?

 

The Airbus A330 program was developed back in the late 80s as a new way to transport passengers long distances on only two engines. Boeing, sensing a change in the wind, wanted to get in on the action and develop their own two-engine long-haul aircraft.

Both were released within two years of each other, and are practically the same size. But which is better? Let’s find out. We will be looking at passengers, range, and how much an airline would expect to pay (and wether it would be worth the money!).

A330

Airbus A330 vs Boeing 777. Source: Simple Flying

As we are looking a historic leapfrog type situation with Boeing trying to out do Airbus and so on and so forth, we should stress that Boeing was behind Airbus when it came to the launch of their aircraft, and thus would have had a few years more to beat the competition.

Again, it pains us to say this, but Simple Flying is not owned by Boeing or Airbus or any other aircraft manafacture. If you spot bias, do let us know and we will correct it.

The Airbus A330 vs The Boeing 777

Below is a outline of all the different types of Boeing 777 aircraft from our ‘777X vs 777-300ER‘ article:

Type Length Span Passengers (3 class) Max passengers Range List price
777-200 63.73 m 60.93 m 305 440 5,240 nmi US$261.5 M
777-200ER 63.73 m 60.93 m 305 440 7,065 nmi US$306.6M
777-200LR 63.73 m 64.80 m 301 440 8,555 nmi US$346.9M
777-300 73.86 60.93 m 368 550 6,030 nmi US$361.5M
777-300ER 73.86 64.80 m 365 550 7,370 nmi US$375.5M
777F 63.73 m 64.80 m n/a n/a 4,970 nmi US$352.3M

And here is a brand new table highlighting the differences in the Airbus A330 family (and just for fun, like above, we have included the freight variant):

Type Length Span Passengers (3 Class) Max Pax Range List Price
A330-200 58.82 m (192.98 ft) 60.3 m (197.83 ft) 246 406 7,250
 nmi
US$238.5M
A330-200F 58.82 m (192.98 ft) 60.3 m (197.83 ft) 70,000 kg (154,324 lb) N/A 4,000
 nmi
US$241.7M
A330-300 63.67 m (208.89 ft) 60.3 m (197.83 ft) 300 440 6,350
 nmi
US$264.2M

As we can clearly see from the above charts, in terms of passengers the A330 family is the equivalent of the Boeing 777-200 series. In fact, this writer is awfully suspect of the fact that the Airbus A330-300 is listed as having an almost similar length as the Boeing 777-200. Thus it is easy to answer that the Boeing 777 series wins in the passenger department.

777-200

A United 777-200 comes in to land. United was the launch customer of this aircraft. Source: Wikimedia

Looking at range, the A330 family actually does very well against the Boeing 777 family. The A330-200 beats any first generation 777 series, and the A330-300 beats the Boeing 777-300. Its only when the extended range 777 versions come out that Airbus is left in the dust.

A330

Air China Airbus A330-200. Source: Wikimedia

The real kicker is the price. Look at the price of the A330-300 ($264 million USD) vs the Boeing 777-300 ($361.5 million USD). Whilst we know that airlines don’t pay list value for aircraft, you have to wonder why airlines would pay $97 million more. After all, how much is an extra 68 passengers worth over a long run?

Fuel

For those who want to know which aircraft was more fuel efficient. Source: Wikimedia

It’s tough to say which aircraft is better. The A330 family is smaller than the Boeing 777 series, but can almost compete on a level playing field. Beyond the first generation, the A330 no longer remains competitive and the tourch is handed over to Boeing.

Bonus: What about the A330neo vs The Boeing 777X?

Whilst these two aircraft are not strictly comparable (that would be best left for the Airbus A350 vs Boeing 777X which you can read about here), many readers have asked us to put them to the Simple Flying test. Let’s start with some statistics to outline the basics.

  Airbus A330neo Boeing 777X
Type A330-800neo A330-900neo 777-8 777-9
Cockpit crew 2 2 2 2
Seating 257 287 365 414
Exit Limit (Total possible passengers) 406 440 Unknown 475*
Length 58.82 m (193.0 ft) 63.66 m (208.9 ft) 229 ft 0 in (69.8 m) 251 ft 9 in (76.7 m)
Height 17.39 m (57.1 ft) 16.79 m (55.1 ft) 64 ft 0 in (19.5 m) 64 ft 7 in (19.7 m)
Width, cabin 5.26m / 17ft 3in 19.6 ft (5.96 m)
Cargo capacity 136.0 m3 (4,800 cu ft) 162.8 m3 (5,750 cu ft) Unknown 8,131 cu ft (230.2 m3)
Fuel Capacity 139,090 l (36,740 US gal), 111,272 kg (245,313 lb) 350,410 lb (158,940 kg), 52,300 US gal (197,977 L)
Range 8,150nmi / 15,094km 7,200nmi / 13,334km 8,690 nmi / 16,090 km 7,525 nmi / 13,940 km

Now its important to understand that the 777X is simply a bigger plane. This means that the Boeing has better passenger capacity (coming close to double for the 777-9 vs -800neo), better cargo space (which can be very lucrative for these airlines) and they are far longer.

Airbus A330neo

TAP Portugal seat layout on the Airbus A330neo. Source: TAP Portugal

When it comes to range, we can see that the A330neo quickly jumps up. The A330neo-800 does a better range the 777-9 but is just beaten by the 777-8. Both versions of the A330neo seem to be just behind the Boeing 777X. This means that they could technically perform the same routes as these aircraft but lack the passenger capacity to make it worthwhile… or do they?

There is a common idea that a smaller aircraft is easier to make profitable; as the fewer seats you have to sell, the easier it is to break even. If the A330neo can provenly operate more effectively than the 777x on the same route, then that would be very interesting for airlines.

We will leave it up to you in the comments to decide which is your favorite.

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🛬 Virgin Atlantic’s A350 cabins pose fascinating PaxEx questions
« Reply #69 on: April 18, 2019, 12:17:39 AM »
https://runwaygirlnetwork.com/2019/04/17/virgin-atlantics-a350-cabins-pose-fascinating-paxex-questions/

Virgin Atlantic’s A350 cabins pose fascinating PaxEx questions

 

Virgin Atlantic’s A350 cabins pose fascinating PaxEx questions

 

While the majority of the attention around Virgin Atlantic’s new Airbus A350 aircraft is perhaps understandably on its doorless but nonetheless improved Upper Class seats, there are also positive passenger experience improvements in the premium economy and economy sections, with customization of Collins Aerospace’s widely used MiQ seat in Virgin’s Premium Economy cabin, and Recaro’s increasingly popular CL3710 seat in economy.

The Premium cabin is Virgin’s largest ever non-leisure cabin with 56 seats: while the Gatwick-based Boeing 747 fleet used for holiday destinations has 66 seats, the Airbus A340-600 which the A350 is set to replace offers 38. “In comparison to the aircraft it’s replacing, certainly on the New York route, the premium cabin is 30 percent bigger now,” Gareth Salt, A350 programme director, explained to Runway Girl Network. “Premium economy is one of our most popular cabins.”

Daniel Kerzner, vice president for customer experience, highlighted that Premium is not just popular: it’s profitable. “It’s our highest-performing cabin when it comes to a customer satisfaction standpoint, and so for us there’s more of a demand for the premium product that we put out there, not less of a demand for that.”

 

Rotation
Yet Virgin Atlantic will be installing eight-abreast, not seven-abreast, Collins MiQ seats on its A350, in the tighter 2-4-2 configuration. Crucially, the question of comparison with arch-rival British Airways is yet to be answered: BA, too, will offer 56 seats, but that means either seven rows of eight seats or eight rows of seven.

RGN asked Kerzner and Salt about whether 2-4-2 premium economy was a large enough “comfort canyon” between the A350’s wide 3-3-3 economy seats, and the 34-inch pitch with which Virgin plans to outfit its extra-legroom economy in particular, and Premium, but the line taken separately by both executives referred back to the existing fleet, which is 2-3-2 on board the A330/A340 and 787 cabins.

“For us, the aircraft is a different fuselage to the rest of the fleet,” Kerzner explained. “The A350 is a wider aircraft, which actually means that you can put more seats in the aircraft without sacrificing comfort for our customers. What we’ve tried to do is put one of the best premium seats on board the aircraft. For a lot of people traveling in premium, that is their business class or their Upper Class experience.”

2-4-2 means these are Virgin’s narrowest premium economy seats. Image: John Walton

Virgin Atlantic has focussed on refining the color, materials and finish of the hard product, said Mark Croucher, head of customer experience and CRM at Virgin Holidays, recently moved over from the A350 program. “We did redesign the rear shield of the MiQ, actually, working with Collins, both to get the level of quality that we want, the coloring, and the monitor arm. It’s a pretty standard seat, and they’re somewhat less inflexible than others in terms of what opportunities we have.”

But will a well-designed seat make up for width, even with the clever drop-arm of the MiQ platform?

Virgin Atlantic redesigned the MiQ seatback shroud. Image: John Walton

Croucher thought it will, “both from a seat and a service perspective. I think — I will be biased! — but I wholly believe it’s true that we lead in the premium economy market. We have the best seat out there, we have the best service, we have the best food, the Wander Wall, the added snacks that you get on those aircraft. It’s a really good product, and I think the A350 is going to be no exception even with a 2-4-2.”

The styling rather unfortunately makes the seats look much narrower than they are. Image: John Walton

A crucial question is the differentiation from economy, where at the rear of the aircraft is the relatively small 235-seat cabin, of which 36 seats are 34” extra-legroom “Economy Delight”, with the rest pitched at 31”: the Virgin standard. The seats are the latest Recaro CL3710 fully-featured space-saving slimline, and the amount of space that the engineering behind these new-generation seats creates was truly remarkable in Virgin’s demo room, and the effort put into the fabric design and conception was equally visible.

The amount of space squeezed out of the seat pitch by CL3710 is truly astounding. Image: John Walton

It’s a fascinating contrast that at the same time Virgin Atlantic will be offering its widest-ever economy class seat and its narrowest-ever premium economy class seat, on the same aircraft. Observing passengers’ purchasing behavior and relative satisfaction when comparing between cabins on the A350 and across cabins between the Virgin fleet of A330s and 787s will be equally compelling.

The Recaro CL3710 in its A350 configuration is Virgin’s widest ever economy seat. The RAVE IFE is provided by Safran (former Zii) and the inflight connectivity is Inmarsat GX. Image: John Walton

Virgin Atlantic provided economy class intra-Europe travel and accommodation in Crawley, UK for this event.

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Offline azozeo

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Death of Aviation: FAA Approves GooG Drones !
« Reply #70 on: April 24, 2019, 01:03:36 PM »

Google parent Alphabet just beat Amazon to the punch in an incredibly important business: Drone deliveries. Wing, an Alphabet subsidiary focused on commercial drones, has received approval from the FAA to operate as an airline, a certification that will allow it to move ahead with plans to experiment with drone deliveries in the US, a service it has already launched in parts of Australia (the suburbs around North Canberra) to mixed reviews.


https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-04-23/faa-approves-googles-wing-commercial-drone-flights
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Death of Aviation: U.S. Navy Patents anti-gravity craft (no shit)
« Reply #71 on: April 24, 2019, 01:16:58 PM »
The US Navy has been granted a patent for an advanced aircraft which resembles a flying saucer UFO. Military inventors filed plans for a highly unusual flying machine which uses an ‘inertial mass reduction device’ to travel at ‘extreme speeds’. What that means is that the aircraft uses complex technology to reduce its mass and thereby lessen inertia (an object’s resistance to motion) so it can zoom along at high velocities. The patent is highly complex and describes methods of reducing the mass of an aircraft using various techniques including the generation of gravity waves, which were first detected in 2016 after being produced when two black holes collided.



https://metro.co.uk/2019/04/18/us-navy-secretly-designed-super-fast-futuristic-aircraft-resembling-ufo-documents-reveal-9246755/?ito=cbshare

I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline azozeo

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Re: Death of Aviation: FAA Approves GooG Drones !
« Reply #72 on: April 24, 2019, 01:24:31 PM »

Google parent Alphabet just beat Amazon to the punch in an incredibly important business: Drone deliveries. Wing, an Alphabet subsidiary focused on commercial drones, has received approval from the FAA to operate as an airline, a certification that will allow it to move ahead with plans to experiment with drone deliveries in the US, a service it has already launched in parts of Australia (the suburbs around North Canberra) to mixed reviews.


https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-04-23/faa-approves-googles-wing-commercial-drone-flights



<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/I6Ffr1U7KMY&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/I6Ffr1U7KMY&fs=1</a>
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline azozeo

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Death of Aviation: Why do airplanes look like nightclubs now?
« Reply #73 on: April 24, 2019, 02:27:33 PM »



The travel journalist Paula Froelich remembers walking onto her first Virgin America flight and thinking, “What is this, a club?” When the airline launched in the US in 2007, industrial designer Adam Wells decided to avoid the sickly “yellow-green fluorescent lighting” standard on planes in favor of warm, pinkish-purple mood lighting, already a feature in Virgin Atlantic’s first class cabin. The goal was to make the often stressful experience of air travel more welcoming and relaxing — and possibly even pleasant.

Calming, perhaps, but still clubby. Froelich was skeptical of Virgin America’s apparent intention to make airplanes cool, but says that with its comfortable seats and individual screens, “It was just a nice experience. For a lot of people, flying is not a nice experience.”













https://www.vox.com/the-goods/2019/4/19/18485015/airplane-blue-lighting-delta-jetblue-united
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline RE

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I'm sure they will make it up with new Military Contracts.  ::)

RE

https://abcnews.go.com/Business/boeing-billion-hit-grounding-737-max-jet/story?id=62597627

Boeing announced Wednesday that it was taking an initial $1 billion hit on the grounding of the 737 Max jet following two fatal plane crashes in five months.



The company also abandoned its previous full-year financial outlook as it grapples with the aftermath of the 737 Max fallout and works to implement software upgrades to its best-selling plane. Boeing is also halting stock buybacks.

The crashes of the 737 Max jets operated by Indonesia's Lion Air on Oct. 29 and by Ethiopian Airlines on March 10 killed a total of 346 people (189 and 157 deaths, respectively).
(MORE: Ethiopian Airlines pilots re-engaged safety system amid chaotic scene in Boeing 737 Max cockpit: Preliminary report)

Chicago-based Boeing disclosed the information early Wednesday ahead of a call with investors.

The company reported Q1 earnings of $2.15 billion on revenue of $22.9 billion. Boeing said that losses from the 737 Max were partially offset by higher defense and services revenue.
(MORE: American Airlines cancellations extend into June amid Boeing 737 Max grounding)

Boeing also said it is making steady progress on the path to final certification for a software update on the 737 Max, with over 135 test and production flights of the software update complete.

ABC News’ Christine A.Theodorou contributed to this report.
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