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Collapse Photo Journalism
« on: November 29, 2017, 01:06:47 AM »
The year of 2017 in Disaster Photography from Reuters to Kick Off this thread. 50 Pics at the Reuters URL.

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https://www.reuters.com/news/picture/pictures-of-the-year-natural-disasters-idUSRTX3K7I5


Residents wade through flood waters from Tropical Storm Harvey in Beaumont Place, Houston, Texas, August 28. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman


An aerial view of properties destroyed by the Tubbs Fire is seen in Santa Rosa, California, October 11. REUTERS/Stephen Lam


A woman is assisted while crossing a flooded street after the Huaycoloro river flooded its banks in Huachipa, Peru, March 17. REUTERS/Guadalupe Pardo


The Eagle Creek wildfire burns as golfers play at the Beacon Rock Golf Course in North Bonneville, Washington, September 4. REUTERS/Kristi McCluer

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50 doomiest images of 2017
« Reply #1 on: January 03, 2018, 08:35:56 AM »
http://www.desdemonadespair.net/2017/12/50-doomiest-images-of-2017.html

50 doomiest images of 2017

[html]

 

People play golf as the Eagle Creek Fire burns on both sides of the Columbia River Gorge in Washington and Oregon, 4 September 2017. Photo: Hal Bernton / The Seattle Times

31 December 2017 (Desdemona Despair) – This photo, by Hal Bernton of The Seattle Times, captures the zeitgeist of 2017: humans blithely golfing while their immediate environment burns. Behind the golfers, the Eagle Creek Fire rages on both sides of the Columbia River Gorge, in Washington and Oregon, on 4 September 2017.

You might think this is an aberration, but here’s a similar scene in Los Angeles from two days earlier:

Golfers at Angeles National Golf Course play while the La Tuna fire burns nearby in the Verdugo Hills above Sunland-Tujunga, 2 September 2017. Photo: Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times

In this photo, by Irfan Khan of The Los Angeles Times, golfers at Angeles National Golf Course play while the La Tuna fire burns nearby in the Verdugo Hills. The La Tuna fire portended the enormous Thomas fire, which in December still burns as the largest wildfire on record in California.

But nevermind, we need to play the back nine.

It’s this kind of indifference to the world that dooms humanity. Even when thousands of scientists band together to warn people that industrial civilization is rapidly destroying the biosphere, literally nothing happens.

We see this indifference on a large scale, with the U.S. government’s under-reaction to the destruction of Puerto Rico by Hurricane Maria. Desdemona sees this as the first discrete climate-change catastrophe to hit North America, causing hundreds of thousands of climate refugees to abandon the island for the mainland. It would take a sustained, large-scale effort costing many billions of dollars to rebuild the island to the point that it can sustain its population of 3.5 million people. So far, there’s not much evidence that the U.S. will commit to it. The indifference is deafening.

Here are fifty or so images picked from Desdemona’s 2017 posts. They show the consequences of human indifference to the natural world and to future generations. Indifference is learned, not innate; humans could do something about the destruction, but the trends show that we won’t.

 

ELVAS, Portugal, 20 June 2017 (Los Angeles Times) – Once shaded in canopies of leaves, the N-236-1 is a rural road that cuts through central Portugal, hugging hillsides pungent with eucalyptus and pine.

Now it is littered with husks of burned cars. Along the shoulder, ashen wisps of tree trunks stand sentinel like totem poles. A headline in Portugal’s Expresso newspaper calls it “The Saddest Street in Portugal.”

It’s where many of the 64 victims of Portugal’s deadliest wildfire were burned alive last weekend, trapped in their cars. [Reminiscent of Australia’s “Black Saturday” forest fires in 2009. –Des]

Reeling from its deadliest forest fire, Portugal finds a villain: eucalyptus trees – Questions swirl over “road of death”

16 October 2017 (Protect Mother Earth) – Hurricane Ophelia's strong winds are blamed for fanning flames of deadly forest fires in Portugal and Spain

At least six people have been killed and around 25 others injured – mainly firefighters – during Portugal’s worst day of the year for forest fires.

Around 500 blazes were reported in the country’s central and northern regions where a state of emergency has been declared.

Soaring temperatures of up to 36 degrees celsius have been recorded – extraordinary for mid-October.

Video: Deadly forest fires sweep across Portugal and northern Spain

The Eagle Creek fire burns above Bonneville Dam on Sunday, 4 September 2017. Photo: Arianna Frye

The Eagle Creek fire burns above Bonneville Dam on Sunday, 4 September 2017. Photo: Arianna Frye

5 September 2017 (Reuters) – An Oregon wildfire that has damaged landmarks in the scenic Columbia River Gorge slowed its push toward evacuated houses near the city of Portland on Wednesday, officials said.

As dozens of blazes raged across the U.S. West, the so-called Eagle Creek Fire near Portland merged late Tuesday with another blaze, the Indian Creek Fire. The two combined have charred 30,930 acres (12,520 hectares), officials said.

Heavy fire activity was expected to continue through September in much of the West, and through October in parts of the northern Rocky Mountains and California, the National Interagency Fire Center said, citing hot and dry weather conditions as the primary cause.

The Eagle Creek Fire, burning in the Columbia River Gorge, forced hundreds of people to evacuate homes earlier this week in communities east of Portland, including Warrendale, Dodson and Latourell, and sent ash falling on the city itself.

Eighty-one large wildfires covering more than 1.4 million acres (570,000 hectares) were burning in the western part of the United States Wednesday, a day after federal officials said 200 active duty military personnel would help fight the fires.

“It’s very unusual to have this many fires burning this many acres across such a broad area at this time in September,” National Interagency Fire Center spokeswoman Jennifer Jones said.

Wildfires sweep across U.S. West, slow push toward Portland – “It’s very unusual to have this many fires burning this many acres across such a broad area at this time in September”

Two helicopters land beneath a column of smoke from a forest fire in British Columbia, 8 August 2017. Photo: BC Wildfire Service

A firefighter looks out of a helicopter flying near a forest fire in British Columbia, 12 August 2017. Photo: BC Wildfire Service‏

C-130 pilots with the California National Guard fight the Pier Fire in Sequoia National Forest. It had grown to over 20,000 acres by 5 September 2017. Photo: Tech. Sgt. Jeff Allen / 146th Airlift Wing

C-130 pilots with the California National Guard fight the Pier Fire in Sequoia National Forest. It had grown to over 20,000 acres by 5 September 2017. Photo: Tech. Sgt. Jeff Allen / 146th Airlift Wing

Williams Lake, B.C., 19 August 2017 (250 News) – This summer has been the worst wildfire season on record in British Columbia and as a result those fighting the blazes and others working in emergency management have been working harder than ever.

Potent mix of record heat and dryness fuels wildfires across the U.S. West and British Columbia – “These unprecedented extreme events are exactly the types of events that are more likely due to the global warming that’s already occurred”

Long wildfire season in British Columbia exhausting for firefighters, emergency personnel

Satellite view of a heavy pall of smoke drifting over northern Canada, 15 August 2017. The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on Suomi NPP acquired the data for this image. The image is a mosaic composed from several satellite overpasses because the affected area is so large. Photo: Joshua Stevens / NASA Earth Observatory

Satellite view of a heavy pall of smoke drifting over northern Canada, 15 August 2017. The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on Suomi NPP acquired the data for this image. The image is a mosaic composed from several satellite overpasses because the affected area is so large. Photo: Joshua Stevens / NASA Earth Observatory

15 August 2017 (NASA) – For more than a month, dozens of large fires have raged in British Columbia. Since early July 2017, wildfire has burned through coniferous forests stressed by heat, drought, and infestations of mountain pine beetles. In early August, another cluster of intense fires flared up in Northwest Territories when a cold front pushed through the region with powerful winds.

The resulting smoke plumes were thick enough and high enough in the atmosphere to break a record. According to Colin Seftor, an atmospheric researcher for NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) on Suomi NPP recorded aerosol index (AI) values as high as 49.7 on 15 August 2017—more than 15 points higher than the previous record set in 2006 by fires in Australia.

Record-breaking smoke over Canada from British Columbia forest fires – “If and when the plume drifts over populated areas, it may turn day into night”

Design for the 2017 Burning Man Temple, made from 3,000 boards milled from trees killed by the recent California drought. Graphic: Steven Brummond, Marisha Farnsworth, and Mark Sinclair / Temple2017.org

Design for the 2017 Burning Man Temple, made from 3,000 boards milled from trees killed by the recent California drought. Graphic: Steven Brummond, Marisha Farnsworth, and Mark Sinclair / Temple2017.org

24 August 2017 (SFist) – You’ll notice this year’s Burning Man Temple looks a lot different than previous years’ laser cut jigsaw designs of David Best. Best has handed off the task to his previous lead engineers and architects, who’ve come up with a simple but striking concept composed of flat panels. But that’s not the most significant difference in this year’s Temple, as this year’s builders have a new ecological focus in which they’re using wood from trees killed by drought conditions and global warming [cf. Carbon footprint of Burning Man: 27,000 tons of CO2 per year].

Roughly 100 million trees have died in California forests over the course of the drought, according to Cal Fire estimates, all of which need to be cleared and burned to control fire risks. PG&E was tasked with clearing 300 large Ponderosa pine trees killed by bark beetles that were threatening power lines near Yosemite, and now those dead trees are getting a last bit of life at Burning Man.

That wood has been milled into the 3,000 boards being used to create this year’s Temple. "It’s about a hundred thousand pounds of wood," Temple engineer Mark Sinclair told NBC Bay Area. "It’s not structural grade wood but it’s good enough for our purposes."

Burning Man Temple being built from trees killed in California drought

Forest fires consume parts of the community of Vichuquen in Chile's Maule Region, 27 January 2017. Photo: Martin Bernetti / AFP / Getty Images

Forest fires consume parts of the community of Vichuquen in Chile's Maule Region, 27 January 2017. Photo: Martin Bernetti / AFP / Getty Images

27 January 2017 (Los Angeles Times) – Chile’s worst ever wildfires threatened the city of Concepcion and the nation’s wine industry Friday, a day after flames destroyed a town about 200 miles south of the nation’s capital.

President Michelle Bachelet’s office said the fires had killed 11 people, forced the evacuation of more than 5,000 and burned nearly 900,000 acres, mainly forests.

Most of the evacuees come from the town of Santa Olga, southwest of Santiago, which was destroyed Thursday.

“We are facing a serious situation and can only succeed if we work together,” Bachelet told reporters Friday morning after coordinating relief efforts at a meeting at the La Moneda presidential palace. Earlier in the week, Bachelet said the fires were the worst in the country’s history.

Worst wildfires on record in Chile have killed 11 people – “The greatest forest disaster in our history”

In southern Greenland, a fire that could be fueled by degraded permafrost burns 150 kilometers northeast of Sisimiut, the second-largest city in the territory. Officials aren’t sure how the fire started or when it might end. This 8 August 2017 image was captured by a European Space Agency satellite in natural colors with highlights from near infrared and shortwave infrared imaging. Photo: Pierre Markuse / ESA

In southern Greenland, a fire that could be fueled by degraded permafrost burns 150 kilometers northeast of Sisimiut, the second-largest city in the territory. Officials aren’t sure how the fire started or when it might end. This 8 August 2017 image was captured by a European Space Agency satellite in natural colors with highlights from near infrared and shortwave infrared imaging. Photo: Pierre Markuse / ESA

11 August 2017 (Eos) – In a real clash of fire and ice, a massive wildfire in southern Greenland has captured the world’s attention.

At the end of July, a couple of NASA satellites detected hot spots in Greenland that indicated fire, said Mark Ruminski, a team leader for a hazard mapping system of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. But fires are unexpected in Greenland, so he and his team thought it might be an error in the data.

Then a civilian pilot snapped pictures of a wildfire near Sisimiut, the second-largest city in Greenland. When clouds cleared a few days later, NASA’s Landsat 8 satellite and the European Space Agency’s Sentinel-2 satellites captured photos of the largest of the fires from high above.

Although the current fire’s cause remains a mystery, peat from thawed permafrost could be its fuel, said Jessica McCarty, a geographer at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, who specializes in geospatial analysis of wildfires.

Permafrost, or permanently frozen soil, lies under multiple meters of an “active” soil layer that thaws seasonally. But in certain areas, when ice within the thawing permafrost layer melts, it can expose peat, a material that forms after decomposing plants get smashed down for centuries.

If the fire is being fueled by thawed permafrost, there may be underlying climate change implications, McCarty continued. “The climate change [connection] is that there would be no fires here in Greenland if there were no fuel, and the only way that there’s fuel is if the permafrost is [thawed].”

“Personally, this is very disturbing to me,” McCarty said, because the fire indicates significant permafrost degradation “sooner than [scientists] thought it would happen.” Researchers project significant permafrost loss in Greenland by the end of the century. Not 2017, she said.

Greenland fires ignite global warming fears – “Fire itself will add to the problem and accelerate thawing of permafrost”

 

2 July 2017 (The Siberian Times) – Scientists have located two fresh craters formed on Yamal peninsula this year, with the latest exploding on 28 June with the eruption picked up by new seismic sensors specifically designed to monitor such events, The Siberian Times can disclose.

First pictures of the large craters - or funnels as experts call them - are shown here, and add to four other big holes found in recent years and examined by experts, plus dozens of tiny ones spotted by satellite.

The formation of both craters involved an explosion followed by fire, evidently signs of the eruption of methane gas pockets under the Yamal surface.

People in Seyakha village heard a “loud explosion-like bang” then saw a fire and clouds of black smoke, according to reports.

“Big bang” and “pillar of fire” as latest of two new craters forms this week in the Arctic

21 February 2017 (British Antarctic Survey) – Currently a huge iceberg, roughly the size of Norfolk, looks set to break off Larsen C Ice Shelf, which is more than twice the size of Wales. Satellite observations from February 2017 show the growing crack in the ice shelf which suggests that an iceberg with an area of more than 5,000 km² is likely to calve soon. [Five months later, it happened: Antarctica’s Larsen C Ice Shelf calves trillion ton iceberg. –Des]

Researchers from the UK-based MIDAS project, led by Swansea University, have reported several rapid elongations of the crack in recent years. BAS scientists are involved in a long-running research programme to monitor ice shelves to understand the causes and implications of the rapid changes observed in the region. They shot this footage as they flew over the ice shelf on their way to collect science equipment.

Video: Flyover of Larsen C Ice Shelf crack, February 2017

The giant iceberg A68 detaches from the Larsen-C ice shelf in Antarctica on 1 August 2017, left, and on 25 September 2017. Photo: Airbus / AFP / Getty Images

The giant iceberg A68 detaches from the Larsen-C ice shelf in Antarctica on 1 August 2017, left, and on 25 September 2017. Photo: Airbus / AFP / Getty Images

27 September 2017 (NBC News) – After breaking free from Antarctica this summer, a giant iceberg roughly the size of Delaware is moving on to open waters.

New satellite images from TerraSAR-X show the iceberg known as A68 has begun to drift away from the Larsen C ice shelf and is being driven by currents, potentially toward the South Atlantic.

After breaking free from Antarctica this summer, a giant iceberg roughly the size of Delaware is moving on to open waters.

New satellite images from TerraSAR-X show the iceberg known as A68 has begun to drift away from the Larsen C ice shelf and is being driven by currents, potentially toward the South Atlantic.

The iceberg— weighing an estimated 1.12 trillion tons — officially ripped from the frozen formation in July in a process known as calving, according to scientists at the University of Swansea in Britain. It's such a colossal chunk of ice that maps of the peninsula must be redrawn.

The remaining ice shelf will be closely watched for signs of collapse. There also remains the possibility that the iceberg could pose a risk to cruise ships passing from South America.

Giant iceberg that broke free from Antarctica has begun drifting

19 April 2017 (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory) – In the first such continent-wide survey, scientists have found extensive drainages of meltwater flowing over parts of Antarctica’s ice during the brief summer. Researchers already knew such features existed, but assumed they were confined mainly to Antarctica’s fastest-warming, most northerly reaches. Many of the newly mapped drainages are not new, but the fact they exist at all is significant; they appear to proliferate with small upswings in temperature, so warming projected for this century could quickly magnify their influence on sea level. An accompanying study looks at how such systems might influence the great ice shelves ringing the continent, which some researchers fear could collapse, bringing catastrophic sea-level rises. Both studies appear this week in the leading scientific journal Nature.

Water is streaming across Antarctica – New survey finds liquid flow more widespread than thought

People stroll through the snow-free Chicago Zoo on 19 February 2017. Photo: Jim Schulz / Chicago Zoological Society

People stroll through the snow-free Chicago Zoo on 19 February 2017. Photo: Jim Schulz / Chicago Zoological Society

1 March 2017 (EcoWatch) – Chicago, a city well known for its windy and snowy winters, is experiencing some unusually warm weather. For the first time in 146 years, there was no documented snow on the ground in January and February, according to the local National Weather Service.

January and February are usually the coldest months of the year. As NBC News noted, the city usually averages more than 40 inches of snow per winter and prepares for months to handle with the onslaught of snow with its fleet of snow plows and salt trucks that service more than 280 snow routes.

But the last measurable day of snow was on Christmas Day when two inches covered the ground. In fact, from Feb. 17-22, Chicago set new winter records with six consecutive days of temperatures in the high 60s to 70 degrees Fahrenheit.

Chicago has no snow in January and February for the first time in 146 years of recordkeeping

A girl walks through floodwater outside her home in the El Indio settlement on the outskirts of Piura, in northern Peru, in March 2017. Photo: Ernesto Benavides / AFP

A girl walks through floodwater outside her home in the El Indio settlement on the outskirts of Piura, in northern Peru, in March 2017. Photo: Ernesto Benavides / AFP

24 March 2017 (International Business Times) – At least 84 people have been killed been killed in floods and landslides caused by El Niño storms wreaking havoc across Peru. About half of the country is in a state of emergency to expedite resources to the hardest hit areas, mostly in the north where rainfall has broken records. Flash floods have destroyed more than 145,000 homes and 5% of the Andean nation's roads.

In the normally dry Lima, where a third of Peruvians live, school classes have been suspended and running water restricted after treatment plants were clogged with debris from mudslides. People living in flooded neighbourhoods now face the spectre of diseases thriving amid pools of stagnant water.

IBTimes UK presents powerful photos showing the scale of the most devastating environmental calamity to strike the Andean nation in two decades.

Photo gallery: Floods and landslides across Peru, March 2017

Bangladeshi school children walk through a flooded field as they return home after school at Demra, 16 August 2017. The mix of rainwater and toxic waste from industries has turned the water green. Photo: Suvra Kanti Das / ZUMA / REX Shutterstock

Bangladeshi school children walk through a flooded field as they return home after school at Demra, 16 August 2017. The mix of rainwater and toxic waste from industries has turned the water green. Photo: Suvra Kanti Das / ZUMA / REX Shutterstock

18 August 2017 (Hindustan Times) – A humanitarian crisis is unfolding across large areas of South Asia, with more than 16 million people affected by monsoon floods in Nepal, Bangladesh and India, the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies said in statement in Kathmandu on Friday. 

“This is fast becoming one of the most serious humanitarian crises this region has seen in many years and urgent action is needed to meet the growing needs of millions of people affected by these devastating floods,” said Martin Faller, deputy regional director for Asia Pacific, International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC).

“Millions of people across Nepal, Bangladesh, and India face severe food shortages and disease caused by polluted flood waters,” he said.

“More than one-third of Bangladesh and Nepal have been flooded and we fear the humanitarian crisis will get worse in the days and weeks ahead,”  Faller said.

Record flooding affects 16 million in Nepal, Bangladesh, and India – “This is fast becoming one of the most serious humanitarian crises this region has seen in many years”

Cars drive through the debris of a hailstorm in Argentina that dumped almost five feet of hailstones in minutes, 28 October 2017. Photo: SMN Argentina

Cars drive through the debris of a hailstorm in Argentina that dumped almost five feet of hailstones in minutes, 28 October 2017. Photo: SMN Argentina

28 October 2017 (The Independent) – The aftermath of a storm which dumped up to five feet of water and hail in Argentina has been revealed in images released by the World Meteorological Organisation.

Officials said a fierce hailstorm hit towns in the central Argentinian province of Cordoba on Thursday afternoon, leaving roads closed and vehicles unable to move.

The incredible photos show fire fighters rescuing cars stuck up to their windows in hailstones and a road swamped in debris.

Dramatic photos show sea of hail swamping cars in Argentina – Hailstorm dumps almost five feet of hailstones in minutes

A woman wades through a submerged street at the UNESCO heritage ancient town of Hoi An after typhoon Damrey hits Vietnam, 6 November 2017. Photo: Reuters

A woman wades through a submerged street at the UNESCO heritage ancient town of Hoi An after typhoon Damrey hits Vietnam, 6 November 2017. Photo: Reuters

7 November 2017 (VOA News) – Vietnamese officials say the death toll from a powerful typhoon that struck the country's south-central coast last week has risen to 69.

The Disaster Management Authority says another 30 people are still missing in the aftermath of Typhoon Damrey, which caused extensive damage throughout Khanh Hoa province.

More than 116,000 homes have been destroyed or damaged due to widespread flooding, which have also filled reservoirs to near-capacity.

Death toll in Vietnam from Typhoon Damrey rises to 69

Before and after of the flooding on Buffalo Bayou in Houston from Hurricane Harvey, 27 August 2017. Photo: streetreporter / YouTube

Before and after of the flooding on Buffalo Bayou in Houston from Hurricane Harvey, 27 August 2017. Photo: streetreporter / YouTube

28 August 2017 (The Washington Post) – The record-shattering rains behind the flood catastrophe in Southeast Texas will continue for several more days and are predicted to expand into southwest Louisiana, where double-digit rainfall totals are likely.

As of early Monday, locations near Houston in Harris County had seen up 35 inches, and isolated areas to the northeast up to 40 inches. According to the National Weather Service, the forecast of more than a foot of additional rainfall “would have devastating consequences on the continuing rescue and recovery efforts.”

Some areas could see storm rainfall totals exceeding 50 inches, which would break Texas state records.

The Weather Service office serving Houston described the rain amounts so far “unfathomable.” The 16.07 inches that fell on Houston’s George Bush Airport on Sunday marks the single wettest day in Houston history, making up nearly a third of the 49.77 inches the city sees in an average year. More than two feet fell over the weekend, a record two-day amount.

The August rainfall in Houston, largely from Harvey, shattered its record for any month by a whopping 13.47 inches.

This flood disaster has easily surpassed the havoc wrought by the landmark Tropical Storm Allison in 2001, the Weather Service said.

Rains from Harvey obliterate records, flood disaster to expand

On 31 August 2017, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite acquired natural-color images of extensive flooding along the Texas coast and around the Houston metropolitan area in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey. Note the tan and brown rivers and bays full of flood water from Harvey. Scientists and civil authorities have some concerns about urban and industrial pollutants being mixed into the floodwater runoff. Along the coast, muddy, sediment-laden waters from inland pour into the Gulf of Mexico, which also was churned up by the relentless storm. Photo: Jesse Allen / NASA Earth Observatory

31 August 2017 (NASA) – On 31 August 2017, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite acquired natural-color images of extensive flooding along the Texas coast and around the Houston metropolitan area in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey. Note the tan and brown rivers and bays full of flood water from Harvey. Scientists and civil authorities have some concerns about urban and industrial pollutants being mixed into the floodwater runoff. Along the coast, muddy, sediment-laden waters from inland pour into the Gulf of Mexico, which also was churned up by the relentless storm.

According to the National Weather Service, 51.88 inches of rain were recorded at Cedar Bayou, Texas—the highest rainfall total for any storm in recorded U.S. history. Meteorologists at The Washington Post noted that that is as much rain as usually falls in Houston in an entire year and in Los Angeles in four years. By most accounts, Harvey produced more cumulative rainfall than any storm in the U.S. meteorological record—as much as 24 trillion gallons of water (unofficial estimates).

In addition to providing satellite imagery and data of the storm, NASA has started flying its Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) aboard a Gulfstream III aircraft to collect high-resolution radar observations over rivers, flood plains, and critical infrastructure. That data can be compared and combined with SAR data from satellites such as the European Space Agency’s Sentinel 1A and 1B mission. To read more about NASA’s response to Hurricane Harvey, click here.

Image of the Day: Satellite view of flood waters across Texas, 31 August 2017

People walk out onto what is normally four feet of water in Old Tampa Bay, Sunday, 10 September 2017, in Tampa, Florida. Hurricane Irma and an unusual low tide pushed water out more than 100 yards. Photo: Chris O'Meara / AP Photo

People walk out onto what is normally four feet of water in Old Tampa Bay, Sunday, 10 September 2017, in Tampa, Florida. Hurricane Irma and an unusual low tide pushed water out more than 100 yards. Photo: Chris O'Meara / AP Photo

11 September 2017 (NBC News) – Add this to the list of what makes Hurricane Irma an unprecedented storm: Its strength literally changed the shape of the ocean.

Before making landfall in Florida on Sunday, the most powerful Atlantic hurricane on record sucked water inward away from shorelines, leaving bays along the Gulf Coast practically dry.

That depleted canals, grounded boats, and, in Florida's Sarasota Bay, stranded manatees in knee-high mud. Videos and photos went viral of water receding as far as the eye could see, from shorelines in the Bahamas up through Florida's west coast.

Meteorologists warned the water would return after Irma's eye passed through.

"The wind direction will shift to onshore, causing water levels along the southwest coast of Florida to rapidly rise in a matter of minutes. MOVE AWAY FROM THE WATER! Life-threatening storm surge inundation of 10 to 15 feet above ground level is expected in this area," the National Weather Service in Miami warned Sunday afternoon.

“Once in a lifetime tidal event”: Why Hurricane Irma drained shorelines

GOES-16 satellite image of Hurricane Maria just before sunset, at 5:17 pm EDT Monday, 18 September 2017. Photo: NOAA / RAMMB

GOES-16 satellite image of Hurricane Maria just before sunset, at 5:17 pm EDT Monday, 18 September 2017. Photo: NOAA / RAMMB

18 September 2017 (Weather Underground) – Category 5 Hurricane Maria made a direct hit on the small Lesser Antilles island of Dominica (population 72,000) near 9 pm EDT Monday, becoming Dominica’s first Category 5 landfall on record. At the time of landfall, an Air Force hurricane hunter aircraft measured surface winds of 160 mph and a central pressure of 924 mb. Maria likely did catastrophic damage to Dominica.

Maria put on an incredible display of rapid intensification on Monday, going from a low-end Category 1 storm with 75 mph winds and a pressure of 982 mb at 0Z Monday, to a Category 5 storm with 160 mph winds and a 925 mb pressure 24 hours later. There have now been two Atlantic Category 5 storms in 2017: Maria and Irma. The Atlantic has had only five other years on record with multiple Cat 5s: Dean and Felix in 2007; Emily, Katrina, Rita and Wilma in 2005; Carla and Hattie in 1961; and two Cat 5s each in 1932 and 1933.

Category 5 Hurricane Maria hits Dominica – Prime Minister calls damage “devastating” and “mind boggling”

Infrared GOES-16 satellite image of Hurricane Maria as of 10:51 am EDT Tuesday, 19 September 2017. Photo: RAMMB / CIRA@CSU

Infrared GOES-16 satellite image of Hurricane Maria on 10:51 am EDT Tuesday, 19 September 2017. Photo: RAMMB / CIRA@CSU

19 September 2017 (Weather Underground) – After a direct hit on the small Lesser Antilles island of Dominica on Monday night, followed by a brief weakening, Hurricane Maria reintensified to Category 5 strength with winds of 160 mph on Tuesday morning. Maria will likely be a catastrophic Category 5 or high-end Category 4 storm when it hits the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico on Wednesday morning. Preliminary reports out of Dominica indicate that Maria likely did catastrophic damage there. The northern eyewall of Maria also grazed the southwest corner of Guadaloupe Island on Monday night, and heavy damage was reported there. The core of the hurricane missed Montserrat, Saba, and St. Kitts and Nevis, but these islands have been experiencing sustained tropical storm-force winds and heavy rain squalls.

There is increasing confidence that Maria will reach St. Croix and Puerto Rico on Wednesday with catastrophic results.

Hurricane Maria heads for catastrophic hit on Puerto Rico, St. Croix

Satellite view of Hurricane Irma's eye from NOAA's GOES-16 weather satellite, 4 September 2017. Photo: NOAA / CIRA

Infrared GOES-16 satellite image of Hurricane Maria on 10:51 am EDT Tuesday, 19 September 2017. Photo: RAMMB / CIRA@CSU

Image of the Day: Eye of Hurricane Irma, 4 September 2017

Hurricane Irma, a record Category 5 storm, is seen in this NOAA National Weather Service National Hurricane Center image from GOES-16 satellite taken on 5 September 2017. Photo: Noaa National Weather Service / National Hurricane Center

Hurricane Irma, a record Category 5 storm, is seen in this NOAA National Weather Service National Hurricane Center image from GOES-16 satellite taken on 5 September 2017. Photo: Noaa National Weather Service / National Hurricane Center

6 September 2017 (Newsweek) – Hurricane Irma made landfall on the small island of Barbuda as a lCategory 5 hurricane Wednesday as it heads toward the U.S. Virgin Islands and Florida.

The size of the storm left hurricane and weather scientists speechless. “I am at a complete and utter loss for words looking at Irma's appearance on satellite imagery,” wrote Taylor Trogdon, a scientist at the U.S. National Hurricane Center‏ on Twitter.

Irma strengthened to a Category 5 hurricane Tuesday with winds up to 185 mph. The storm is most powerful ever recorded in the Atlantic Ocean. It’s so strong it is even showing up on scales for measuring earthquakes.

“No way to sugarcoat it. Irma is the type of tropical cyclone that wipes everything, including all vegetation, clean from small islands,” wrote Anthony Sagliani, the Meteorological Operations Manager at weather data firm Earth Networks.

Hurricane Irma leaves scientists at an “utter loss for words” as it hits Barbuda

Surgeons work on a patient, in near-total darkness, at Dr. Isaac Gonzalez Martínez Oncological Hospital in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Photo: Carlos Giusti / AP

Surgeons work on a patient, in near-total darkness, at Dr. Isaac Gonzalez Martínez Oncological Hospital in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Photo: Carlos Giusti / AP

29 October 2017 (The Atlantic) – It’s been over a month since the last of Maria’s Category 4 hurricane-strength winds swept over Puerto Rico, but there is still damage yet to come.

The darkness is persistent. Power and clean water are still tenuous and reliant on generators and outside aid. Contamination threatens basic necessities for dozens of municipalities, and the death toll—already likely a serious undercount—is only rising as diseases and the attrition from devastated infrastructure take their toll. Even with the aid of the federal government and the military, a health-care system facing multiple threats might not be able to protect some of the island’s most vulnerable citizens.

Puerto Rico’s dire health-care crisis – More than a month after Hurricane Maria, citizens are face limited access to medical help and increasing threat of illness

After Hurricane Irma, satellite images indicated a widespread browning of many Caribbean islands in the storm’s destructive path. These natural-color images, captured by the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on the Landsat 8 satellite, show Barbuda before and after the storm. The views were acquired on 27 August 2017 and 12 September 2017. Photo: Joshua Stevens / NASA Earth Observatory

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