AuthorTopic: 🗡️ Suicide Epidemic  (Read 4220 times)

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Re: 🗡️ Questions mounting over Jeffrey Epstein's suicide
« Reply #30 on: August 14, 2019, 01:41:35 AM »
He's in GITMO !

This is getting as good as JFK Theories.  ;D

RE

Because It's Just Not Weird Enough: Someone who may have had inside information on the death of Jeffrey Epstein reported his apparent suicide on 4chan before the news went public.

https://www.businessinsider.com/jeffery-epstein-death-by-apparent-suicide-4chan-post-investigated-2019-8
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

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Re: 🗡️ Questions mounting over Jeffrey Epstein's suicide
« Reply #31 on: August 14, 2019, 01:48:47 AM »
He's in GITMO !

This is getting as good as JFK Theories.  ;D

RE

Because It's Just Not Weird Enough: Someone who may have had inside information on the death of Jeffrey Epstein reported his apparent suicide on 4chan before the news went public.

https://www.businessinsider.com/jeffery-epstein-death-by-apparent-suicide-4chan-post-investigated-2019-8

It's like JFK and 911 rolled into one!  :icon_mrgreen:

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🗡️ Jeffrey Epstein’s Eyes
« Reply #32 on: August 14, 2019, 03:14:33 AM »
https://www.counterpunch.org/2019/08/14/jeffrey-epsteins-eyes/

August 14, 2019
Jeffrey Epstein’s Eyes
by Richard Eskow

Drawing by Nathaniel St. Clair

Jeffrey Epstein had a collection of eyeballs on his wall. They were originally “made for injured soldiers,” we’re told, which presumably means they were artificial. Each was individually framed and mounted in his entranceway. We’re not told whether any soldiers had the chance to use them first.

The eyeballs make sense, because Epstein was a watcher. He watched the young girls whose lives he shattered. His depravity was of a deeply visual nature. His young victims tended to be thin, athletic, and blonde, white in skin and easily imagined in white tennis outfits. That fits with to our dominant culture’s visual vocabulary of innocence and purity, a vision Epstein methodically defiled, over and over. For no reason, except that’s how he got off.

Epstein’s sexual practices have been described in detail elsewhere, and so won’t be here. But it’s safe to say that he put himself in a passive role. He was more observer than participant, at least at first, forcing the girls to perform for him – in more ways than one – the ritual enactment of their own degradation.

Epstein was a watcher, but he wasn’t the only one.

The Collector

Epstein was a collector, too. He collected images, with a carefully curated library of CD-ROMs showing the girls in various states of submission to male desire. There were “hundreds, if not thousands” of such images, we are told.

Did other men appear in those pictures? Nobody seems to know. We do know he collected names, but we’re not sure whose. There are reports of notebooks with lists of powerful men and their sexual preferences. Sometimes people spoke of Epstein’s “little black book,” an archaic phrase with overtones of conquest, dominance, and capture. Such books were said to contain the names of a man’s past assignations. Women were pinioned in their like butterflies, preserved in ink and memory with an entomologist’s precision.

(A meaningless coincidence, I know, that paper notebooks are said to be “bound.”)

Nor is this an unusual practice, apparently. Rhonda Garelick writes of an early career experience working for another wealthy man whose “file of women” included not only pertinent information about them (“Lives with mother, have a woman phone her home to avoid suspicion”), but also catalogued the men they knew, as well as the informal agreements between them. (“Mr. X. agrees to do Ms. Y’s boobs.”)

Epstein collected other curios, too, living ones, drawn to his wealth and fame. Some of the scientists and intellectuals around him flattered his ego, engaging in faux-profound conversations that reek of intellectual masturbation. Maybe Epstein got the same thrill from a massage to his ego as he did from the other kind.

The Hero

The business press gave Epstein its clichéd origin story. He was a plucky guy, we were told, who got ahead by being smarter than the people around him. He was protected by editors who wanted to portray him solely as a “business story,” and by associates eager to praise his “great mind.” Vicky Ward’s piece on that subject is gripping, and important. (It was Ward who first wrote about the eyeballs in his hallway.)

The Washington Post’s Helaine Olen writes that Epstein’s story could become a defining one for our time, like Marie Antoinette play-acting poverty or the antic whisperings of Rasputin in court. It’s an optimistic vision. It presupposes that our civilization will last, and that it will become wise enough to understand the meaning behind Epstein’s story. Neither of those things can be assumed.

We turn our business leaders into heroes. For a while, Jeffrey Epstein was one such hero. The word “hero,” we’re told, comes from the Greek word for “protector” and the Latin word for “safeguarder.” We know Epstein was a safeguarder of secrets. He was a patron and protector to scientists, the secular priests of our times. He was such an extreme protector, in fact, that he procured his own island, with a mysterious cubic temple as an ark to hold his dark mysteries.

Epstein, we’re told, sought the “transhumanist” power to impregnate twenty women in a laboratory. That seems like a bum rap for transhumanism. What he was, mostly, was a creepy businessman on the make. His story was a weird mashup of Horace Greeley-like American boosterism and child pornography, with a touch of sci-fi thrown in for good measure.

Go Westworld, young man.

Yet he died childless, at least as far as we know, having neither conceived nor raised another human being within the bonds of intimacy and affection.

Currency

Is it a coincidence that we all live in a watch-and-collect digital economy? Maybe. But we feast upon each other in the 21st century. They want us – the men, especially – to desire the young, the thin, the white. Pornography is the currency of success, and it buys men like Jeffrey Epstein the innocence of wispy, willowy long-haired children. Then they want us to watch.

But then, Facebook and Instagram make us all voyeurs. They train us to peep into other people’s lives, to stalk friends and strangers, the desirable ones who don’t know we’re watching. There’s a reason Facebook never created a “See who’s looked at your profile” feature, despite the many fraudulent apps claiming to do that. They want us to stalk each other, furtively and longingly, knowing we won’t be seen.

Then they want us to feed on each other’s fear, and anger.

They, in turn, feed on the offal that remains. They turn our fear into servitude and debt, into taking jobs we don’t want, into the surrender of political control and the unwillingness to see the world as it is. They are the watchers and collectors who gather the data churned out by our desire and anger and turn them into assets. They turn our attention into currency, a currency they call “eyeballs.”

The Bullshitter

Epstein was a liar, a phony, a fraud. So is pretty much every other rich business person you’ll see profiled in the business magazine. We don’t shame them; we exalt them, as Epstein was once exalted.

The press made a lot out of the story of “Neom,” the high-tech pseudo-city Saudi Arabia’s new ruler reportedly wants to build out in the desert. The plan is to lure the world’s greatest scientists, as Epstein once lured them, but with fine restaurants, robot maids, flying cars, and an artificial moon. The Neom story was a great opportunity to mock Muhammad bin Salman, that nation’s unelected leader, for his impractical fantasies.

But Neom isn’t the fever dream of a desert chieftain. The dreams of MBS and his henchmen are of the more traditional gore-soaked, bullets-and-handsaw variety, with journalists and feminists as their prey. The Ozymandian freakshow that is Neom was a Western work product, produced by a very Western breed of bullshitter: the professional consultant. Their kind has given us corporation upon corporation, corruption upon corruption, war upon bloodsoaked and sand-strewn war.

This kingdom of sultans and consultants will not last forever. One way or another, it will fall. It will collapse back into the silicate sands from which it came, although by then those sands may be glassy and green. It will fall because it lacks ecological, economic, and moral balance. And it will fall because empires built on bullshit fall even harder than those built on sand.

Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair.

The bullshitter who pitched MBS on the Neom project was undoubtedly cut from the Epstein mold. Such people are charming and persuasive, always good for some entertaining dinner conversation. They’ll make you think, but not so much it gives you a headache. They’ll pitch you an artificial moon, and maybe even throw some young girls in for good measure. That’s Epstein’s kind of transhumanism.

A Spy in the House of Depravity

There are still the questions: Did Epstein work with or for the Mossad? Did he build his wealth through blackmailing? Did “intelligence” tell Alex Acosta to go easy on him when he was the local DA?

Most rumors are false. Some are true. Spies are figures of myth and legend. They also exist.

I thought of Bob Dylan’s “The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll,” a song the 66-year-old Epstein almost certainly heard in his youth, when I heard about Epstein’s death. Ms. Carroll’s death, caused by a blow from a cane while serving food at a society event, was presumably “lonesome” because she was surrounded by unsympathetic eyes. The white society patrons didn’t see her. She was alone in that crowded room, because she was black and poor and the others were neither of those things.

Jeffrey Epstein, on the other hand, was never alone. He had the politicians, the scientists, the assistants, the procurers. They looked at him when he wanted attention, and looked away when he wanted to hide. They were paying attention to him still, even in that cell. Many of them will now breathe a little easier.

Last Call

Calling him a monster is too easy. Epstein was human, a node in the social system we all share, a thin vibrating antenna picking up stray signals on the American frequency. They were the signals of lust, of greed, of the desire to own and manipulate and break other humans.

There are other signals around us, of course, but the ones Epstein caught overwhelm all the others. They’re like border radio stations in the 20th-century, those megawatt bandit broadcasts that poured out the gospel-inflected sound of salvation turned to sin. Once they had your attention they sold you phony medicines that were supposed to cure you, but left you as sick as before. Maybe sicker.

There were always been Jeffrey Epsteins, of course, each a bespoke creature tailored for his place and time. In ancient Egypt, medieval Venice, the California mining camps of 1849, the back alleys of Mumbai … these creatures have always been among us, in every moment. But this creature was made for ours.

What was Epstein thinking and feeling in his last moments? Did he weep? If so, for whom? What went through his mind before it was finally extinguished, like a cigarette crushed in a china cup? Did he picture himself having a drink on his veranda? Did he have a “Rosebud” moment, like Orson Welles in Citizen Kane? For some reason, I picture a silly song from his childhood – something like “You Can’t Roller Skate in a Buffalo Herd,” by Roger Miller – popping into his head in those final moments.

(“But you can be happy,” the song continues, “if you’ve a mind to.”)

Was Epstein murdered, or did he die by neglect? We know that his prison was a hellhole, but it would be foolish not to wonder. We may never know. There are many ways to kill someone, from the black-gloved stranger with a garrote to the corrupt guard who takes a few hundred bucks and is told to take a long break. A lot of sane people might want to die after a few nights in the Metropolitan Correctional Center.

Or maybe they just screwed up. That happens, too. Whatever took place that night, Epstein’s gone and we’re still here, feasting on each other. And they’re still reaping what remains. From the silica sands to the Silicon Valley, eyeballs are captured. Day and night, the reaping goes on.

One thing we know for sure: Epstein died because procedures weren’t followed. He should have been checked every 30 minutes by guards, we’re told, and wasn’t. He was, in the words of the New York Times, “not closely monitored.” Jeffrey Epstein was a spy, in a society of spies. He was a collector, in a collector’s economy. He was a watcher, and he died while nobody was watching.
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⛪ The Catholic Church Shakes as Sex Victims Act Opens Window of Justice
« Reply #33 on: August 14, 2019, 06:27:43 AM »
Sex is top Collapse Newz these days.

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https://www.thedailybeast.com/the-catholic-church-shakes-as-sex-victims-act-opens-window-of-justice

The Catholic Church Shakes as Sex Victims Act Opens Window of Justice


Epstein accuser sues using the same law victims of clerical abuse are. The law had to change because victims can’t.
Margaret Carlson
Updated 08.14.19 8:26AM ET / Published 08.14.19 4:40AM ET
opinion
Photo Illustration by Kelly Caminero/The Daily Beast/Getty

Jeffrey Epstein is dead, but many of his enablers are still with us, part of generations of adults who preyed on children—monsters who have long been protected from their crimes with the passage of time and, too often, the protection of the institutions they served. In New York, the effort to change the law and extend the statute of limitations for these heinous crimes had been frustrated for more than a decade.

Who in the world wanted to slam the door in the face of those harmed by those they trusted when they were too young to do anything about it? As it turns out, upstanding pillars of the Catholic Church and others in cahoots with Republicans who, until last year, controlled the New York State Senate, that’s who.
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If this troubles you, wake up this morning and say Hallelujah. As of Wednesday,  the law in New York that cut off a child victim’s chance for justice for most crimes when they hit the tender age of 23 is dead. In its place is the long-delayed Child Victims Act, which removes the state’s strict statute of limitations on sexual crimes against children and begins a one-year window to revive past claims, no matter how old. It extends the statute of limitations to allow for criminal charges against sexual abusers of children until their victims turn 28 for felony cases, up from the current 23. It allows civil actions against abusers and the institutions that enabled them until victims turn 55.
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Boy Oh Boy
Examining the Past, Present, and Future of Chicago's First Gay Neighborhood

The country’s first official gay village is constantly evolving.
Ad by NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®
Published 07.25.19 3:39PM ET

By Sarah Friedmann

Pride month is one full of both celebration and commemoration for the LGBT+ community. Every June, cities around the world hold pride festivals and parades to honor the anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising – the 1969 protests that are often considered the launching point of the modern gay rights movement. Many pride activities are held in LGBT+ neighborhoods, including in Chicago’s Boystown – first-ever gay neighborhood that was officially recognized by a large city. Following the conclusion of this year’s pride, reflecting on how Boystown was created offers insight into the neighborhood’s unique history – and the challenges and opportunities it faces as it looks to the future.

Chicago’s Boystown was officially recognized as the city’s gay district in 1997, though the neighborhood was rich with LGBT+ history for many years prior. Notably, the modern-day Boystown neighborhood resulted after the LGBT+ community was pushed out of other neighborhoods in Chicago in the 1960s, WBEZ reported. As Tracy Baim, a gay historian and founder of the Windy City Times, described to the outlet, “in the ‘60s gay communities were scattered around the city, with many of the communities … centered around downtown, River North, and Tower Town in the mid part of the last century.” Chicago’s Lake View neighborhood, including the Lake View communities of Triangle Neighbors and Belmont Harbor, was also home to many members of the city’s LGBT+ community in the ‘60s and early ‘70s, the Encyclopedia of Chicago noted. However, “slowly, as rents went up and other things happened, the community was forced out," Baim reported.
Activism at Its Roots

As LGBT+ communities and individuals were being pushed out of various Chicago neighborhoods in the ‘60s, LGBT+ activism – which derived at least partially out of response to discriminatory treatment from police, politicians, and other city officials, was simultaneously on the rise. The aforementioned Stonewall Uprising of 1969 helped spark some of this activism and, a year afterward — in 1970 — Chicago hosted its first-ever pride parade, Chicago magazine noted. The LGBT+ community in Chicago also began opening its first health centers, community centers, and bars at the beginning of the ‘70s, increasingly coalescing around the area that would eventually be known as Boystown.

As WBEZ described, the modern-day boundaries of Boystown really began to take root in the 1980s, as a variety of gay bars began to pop up along the neighborhood’s now-famous Halsted Street. Notably, gay bars not only developed as entertainment venues for the LGBT+ community, but also as essential community spaces and activism grounds as the LGBT+ movement grew. “Across the country, LGBTQ Americans turned to bars and nightlife to provide an escape from pervasive prejudice, and to carve out spaces of their own,” Patrick Sisson wrote in a 2016 Curbed article examining the history of gay bars. “While numerous organizations, publications, and early protests had helped provide direction and momentum [for the LGBT+ rights movement], bars and clubs often served as a gathering place, as well as the stage, for action.”

Moreover, the increasing concentration of gay bars on Halsted Street became a physical representation of solidarity and empowerment in the LGBT+ community.  “… Having a cluster of gay-owned establishments in the Lakeview neighborhood was important. It helped gay people feel like they had a place where they belonged,” Steven Jackson and Jason Nargis of WBEZ wrote. “The North Halsted Street area continued to attract gay businesses and residents, and within a few years, the street was developing an LGBTQ identity.”
Community-Building Gay Bars Spur Neighborhood Investment

The preponderance of gay bars on Halsted and the sense of community they inspired subsequently encouraged many members of the LGBT+ community to move to and invest in the neighborhood around these bars. “One important aspect of the Halsted Street community was that new LGBTQ residents and business owners bought property and permanently settled in the surrounding residential area,” Chicago’s Department of Planning and Development reported in March 2019. Chicago’s pride parade also officially moved its starting location to Boystown in the 1980s.

WBEZ also emphasized that, eventually, this developing neighborhood became a strong force for political activism focused on ensuring that LGBT+ rights were respected and protected. “Property ownership, an expanding merchant association, growing population density, and registered voters meant increased economic and political clout,” Jackson and Nargis of WBEZ wrote. “The community could use its growing influence to lobby local government.”
Official Recognition

Indeed, the Chicago neighborhood became such a political and economic force in the city that it was given a moniker – Boystown – that remains in place today. In seeking to recognize the neighborhood as an epicenter of LGBT+ culture, Chicago’s former mayor, Richard M. Daley, designated the neighborhood as America’s first officially recognized gay village in 1997. “When Chicago designated Halsted Street as a gay neighborhood … that was the first time a U.S. city had officially designated a neighborhood as being ‘gay,’” William Greaves, the director for Chicago’s advisory council on lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender issues said to Time Out Chicago. “It was groundbreaking.” As part of this recognition, decorative pylons adorned with the colors of the rainbow were erected throughout the neighborhood.

Today, Chicago’s Boystown holds an iconic status in the city. Earlier this year, the city painted rainbow stripes on crosswalks throughout the neighborhood ahead of the 50th annual pride parade on June 30. Moreover, the iconic rainbow pylons – as well as the bronze plaques that collectively create a Legacy Tour of LGBT+ history throughout the city, are currently under consideration for landmark status, Curbed noted.
Shifting Demographics

Though Boystown has become a significant visual symbol of LGBT+ identity in Chicago, it’s actually increasingly less inhabited solely by LGBT+ residents. The reasons behind this decline in residency are mixed. On a positive note, vastly improved legal protections for and cultural acceptance of the LGBT+ community means that many LGBT+ individuals are comfortable residing in areas that aren’t specifically known as LGBT+ communities. “…The Census now finds same-sex romantic couples living together in 93 percent of America's counties,” Matthew Yglesias of Vox wrote when outlining this trend. “The gay population is becoming less concentrated as its legal, political, and social reality is increasingly accepted.”

In the real estate realm, inclusive state and city housing policies, coupled with the equality-focused practices of real estate agents, have helped contribute to this trend, despite the fact that there is actually no federal law in place protecting LGBT+ individuals from housing discrimination (the Fair Housing Act doesn’t identify LGBT+ individuals as a protected class). Notably, the National Association of Realtors® (NAR) notes that its organization has taken a strong stance against anti-LGBT+ discrimination. NAR indicates on its website that Article 10 of its Code of Ethics “prohibits REALTORS® from discriminating based on sexual orientation and gender identity.” NAR has also repeatedly engaged in political advocacy to “extend Fair Housing Act protections to the LGBT community.” While these protections have not yet been inserted into federal law, LGBT+ homeownership is on the rise, though it still lags significantly behind the national homeownership average, according to a National Association of Gay and Lesbian Real Estate Professionals (NAGLREP)  2019-20 LGBT Real Estate Report.
Economic and Inclusivity Challenges

While anti-discriminatory real estate practices and a broader general cultural inclusivity are positive factors that contribute to a decline in LGBT+ residency in gay villages like Boystown, there are also negative factors at play as well. As the Journal of Alta California described, homeownership and rental payments are financially untenable for many Americans in gay neighborhoods across the U.S., including Boystown, West Village in New York City, and Castro in San Francisco, which have some of the highest costs of living in the United States. While many LGBT+ individuals certainly still reside in these communities, many others cannot afford to do so. Indeed, “70 percent of LGBTQ renters” say that not having enough money for a down payment constitutes the biggest reason that they haven’t yet purchased a home, NAGLREP reported. These affordability issues speak to a larger housing affordability crisis in the United States – something which NAR and other real estate industry organizations have recognized and are actively trying to address.

Beyond affordability issues, gay neighborhoods have also faced inclusivity issues of their own. As WBEZ described, many of the country’s most well-known and largest gay villages are often perceived as appealing primarily to gay, white men – something that can cause LGBT+ individuals outside of this category, especially individuals of other races and women, to feel like their interests are not represented or prioritized in these neighborhoods. Because gay villages are often perceived as only catering to certain segments of the LGBT+ community, there’s a reluctance by some LGBT+ individuals to take up residence in them.

“ … If the neighborhood is going to continue as a viable and inclusive queer communal space, it will have to adapt,” Andie Meadows, a writer, photographer, and queer femme researcher who leads tours of Boystown, said to WBEZ.  Meadows added that she is “often stuck between understanding where the previous generations who built Boystown are coming from, and also being terribly upset that they are not continuing to move forward towards inclusivity — to where it would actually become an LGBTQIA space.”

Overall, the history of Chicago’s Boystown is both rich and nuanced and it, like many gay neighborhoods across the country, will always be a substantial part of the legacy of its city. What the future holds for Boystown will depend on many political, socioeconomic, and cultural factors that will shape the evolution and identity of the neighborhood, in ways both expected and unforeseen.
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'Shrieking' Heard From Epstein's Jail Cell The Morning He Died
« Reply #34 on: August 14, 2019, 05:53:21 PM »


Epstein, who was reportedly in 'good spirits' recently - meeting with his lawyers for up to 12 hours a day to discuss his case - was found hanging in his Lower Manhattan jail cell with a bedsheet around his neck, which was reportedly secured to the top of a bunk bed, according to the New York Post.

On Monday, Attorney General William Barr said that the Epstein case "was personally important to him," and that the prison had "serious irregularities."
Victoria's Secret Has More Than Epstein Issues

Notably, the staff at MCC reportedly violated prison protocol by failing to check on the high-profile inmate every 30 minutes, according to the Washington Post. Epstein, whose defense attorneys successfully lobbied for him to be taken off suicide watch about a week before he was found dead, was also supposed to have had a cellmate.

    ...he also should have had a cellmate, according to the person familiar with the matter and union officials representing facility employees.

    But a person who had been assigned to share a cell with Epstein was transferred on Friday, and — for reasons that investigators are still exploring — he did not receive a new cellmate. -Washington Post



https://www.blacklistednews.com/article/74279/shrieking-heard-from-epsteins-jail-cell-the-morning-he.html
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

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Who wanted Jeffrey Epstein dead?
« Reply #35 on: August 15, 2019, 02:27:00 AM »
Who wanted Jeffrey Epstein dead?

Who wanted Jeffrey Epstein dead?

By Patrick Martin
12 August 2019

Let’s begin by stating the obvious: Jeffrey Epstein’s violent death in a Manhattan jail cell prevents a trial or a plea deal that threatened to expose business associates and political enablers who made use of the services provided by his alleged sex-trafficking activities, or who profited from this and other sordid operations of the multimillionaire money manager.

Given the extraordinary circumstances surrounding his death, the efforts of the media—and the New York Times in particular—to dismiss out of hand any suggestion that Epstein’s death was the result of anything but a suicide reek of a high-level cover-up. Whether he was strangled in a jail cell by a hired killer or allowed to hang himself is almost beside the point.

Jeffrey Epstein

Epstein’s life came to a violent end while in the custody of the US government. This is an undeniable fact. Even if he committed suicide, the act could not have succeeded without the direct complicity of those who were responsible for his safety.

And while Epstein was accused of deplorable crimes, it should hardly be necessary to point out that he—yes, even Epstein—had the right to a vigorous defense in a trial. That his untimely death preempts and prevents the trial from taking place is a matter of staggering seriousness.

The suspicion of homicide is clearly justified. That Epstein was murdered—whether by an assailant or by the calculated enabling of his jail cell suicide—is far more plausible than the official account of what took place at the Metropolitan Correctional Center over the past three weeks. According to prison officials, Epstein was found hanged in his cell Saturday morning. His guards had neglected to perform their every-half-hour inspection during the night and only belatedly took a look at their prisoner at 6:30 a.m.

This occurred even though Epstein was arguably the most notorious prisoner currently in federal custody, with his arrest on sex-trafficking charges given saturation coverage in the New York and national media. Moreover, he had been placed on suicide watch from July 23, when he was reportedly found unconscious in his cell with marks on his neck, until July 31, when the special provisions, including 24/7 surveillance, were lifted without explanation.

Epstein’s attorneys and other visitors said they saw no signs that the multimillionaire was in low spirits or likely to take his own life, and he had been participating in preparations for his legal defense in an upcoming trial for as much as 12 hours a day.

Investigations have now begun by the Federal Bureau of Prisons, Attorney General William Barr and the Justice Department inspector general, all of whom have ample reason to rig the result and cover up what really happened. So far, the most elementary facts have been withheld from the public. It has not been reported how and with what material Epstein was hanged, or whether there is a video recording of his cell that would show the alleged “suicide” or otherwise shed light on the physical circumstances of his death.

The legal and political circumstances of Epstein’s death are a different matter; they strongly suggest that Epstein had become a danger to an entire section of the Wall Street and political elite, who had a powerful motive to silence him.

The media has quickly moved to denounce anyone who points to the obviously concocted character of the official story as the promoter of a “conspiracy theory.”

The New York Times is aggressively promoting the official claims of suicide. The newspaper’s editorial Sunday begins, “By apparently committing suicide in his Manhattan jail cell on Saturday morning, Jeffrey Epstein spared himself a lengthy trial that could have sent him to prison for the rest of his life on federal sex-trafficking charges.”

The use of the word “apparently” is entirely out of place. In the absence of any details relating to this death, nothing is “apparent.” The Times is simply conditioning the public to accept the suicide narrative without an urgently required criminal investigation into Epstein’s death, which must be considered suspicious.

Furthermore, why does the Times state that Epstein was “spared” a trial? Do the editors have information that supports their assumption that Epstein did not want to have a trial? What about the possibility that his death “spares” other powerful and influential people from having their connections to Epstein’s proven and alleged criminal activities, either sexual or financial, brought into the public eye by a lengthy legal proceeding.

The editorial continues:

“Attorney General William Barr said the Justice Department’s inspector general would open an investigation into the circumstances of Mr. Epstein’s death in federal custody. While Mr. Epstein will never face a legal reckoning, the investigations into his crimes, and those of others connected to him, must continue. His premature death shouldn’t stop law enforcement authorities from finishing the job that they finally took up seriously years after they should have.”

This is cynical claptrap: The Times knows full well that Epstein's death, without a trial or conviction (technically, Epstein dies an innocent man, at least on the most recent charges), will effectively end the investigation. There is no longer the danger of a plea deal, which Epstein's lawyers would certainly have attempted to negotiate in return for his testimony in trials of others whom he might have implicated in the alleged sex-trafficking ring.

The Times does not raise these obvious issues, let alone demand a criminal investigation and public hearings into the circumstances of Epstein's highly suspicious death.

Any elementary review of the facts makes clear that Epstein’s death must be treated as a criminal investigation. Only 24 hours before his death, more than 2,000 pages of documents were released by a Florida court in a civil suit brought by one of the women who has charged Epstein with enslaving her as a teenager as part of his systematic abuse of young girls. The woman filed a defamation suit against Epstein’s partner, Ghislaine Maxwell, who allegedly had acted as a procuress, recruiting teenage girls to service him.

Maxwell is herself a product of the super-rich milieu that vomited up Epstein. She is the daughter of the late British billionaire publisher Robert Maxwell, also the target of numerous allegations of fraud and other financial crimes.

In a grisly similarity, Robert Maxwell died under mysterious circumstances in 1991, when he allegedly fell off his yacht, the Lady Ghislaine (named after the daughter), and his naked body was found floating in the Atlantic Ocean several days later. The death was ruled accidental, although both suicide and homicide were widely suggested at the time.

The documents released Thursday named a number of prominent political and society figures as patrons of Epstein’s sex ring, including two top Democrats, former Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell and former governor and Clinton cabinet member Bill Richardson, a one-time presidential candidate, as well as Prince Andrew, second son of the Queen of England.

Whatever the truth of the allegations against these individuals, there is no question that Epstein was for many years an integral part of the financial and political elite in the United States, hobnobbing with former presidents like Bill Clinton and future presidents—and equally corrupt billionaires—like Donald Trump.

Epstein was a Palm Beach neighbor of Trump, and some of the girls he abused were recruited at Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort. That circumstance may account for Trump’s extraordinary response to the news of Epstein’s death, as he retweeted a right-wing supporter’s suggestion that Epstein was murdered at the orders of Bill Clinton.

The death of Epstein so obviously invites the assumption that this is a case of removing an inconvenient personality, one who could have implicated dozens if not hundreds of powerful people if he were finally brought to trial, that the official claim of suicide made possible by neglect on the part of low-ranking prison guards has been greeted with disbelief. Epstein’s death evokes recollections of Francis Ford Coppola’s The Godfather.

The Epstein case, in all its criminal depravity, sheds light on the state of American capitalist society. The super-rich prey upon the poor and the vulnerable, using them as they wish. They make use of their connections to cover up their crimes, or, depending on the circumstances, arrange for the elimination of those former friends and associates whose activities have become an inconvenience or a danger.

The author also recommends:

The case of Jeffrey Epstein and the depravity of America’s financial elite
[13 July 2019]

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

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Re: 🗡️ Suicide Epidemic
« Reply #36 on: August 15, 2019, 02:30:15 AM »
What We Know About Jeffrey Epstein’s Autopsy
By Adam K. Raymond

 
http://nymag.com/intelligencer/2019/08/jeffrey-epstein-autopsy-results-how-did-epstein-die.html


Barbara Sampson, the chief medical examiner of New York City, announced Sunday evening that she had completed an autopsy of Jeffrey Epstein. She declined, however, to announce any conclusions, saying in a statement that her “determination is pending further information at this time.”

The results of Epstein’s autopsy are highly anticipated in the aftermath of his apparent suicide early Saturday, which has launched many conspiracy theories and resulted in calls for investigation into the Manhattan prison where he was held.

According to the New York Times, though, Sampson “is confident the cause of death is suicide by hanging.” She’s being cautious before releasing her determination and “wants more information from law enforcement.” NBC News also reports that “suicide remains the presumed cause of death and that no sign of foul play has emerged.”

According to two people familiar with the autopsy findings that spoke to the Washington Post, Epstein sustained multiple breaks in his neck bones. Per the Post: “Among the bones broken in Epstein’s neck was the hyoid bone, which in men is near the Adam’s apple. Such breaks can occur in those who hang themselves, particularly if they are older, according to forensics experts and studies on the subject. But they are more common in victims of homicide by strangulation, the experts said.” Jonathan L. Arden, president of the National Association of Medical Examiners, told the paper that a broken hyoid requires pathologists to conduct further investigation of the shape and location of the noose that was used. “If, hypothetically, the hyoid bone is broken, that would generally raise questions about strangulation, but it is not definitive and does not exclude suicidal hanging,” Arden said.

a finding of a broken hyoid requires pathologists to conduct more extensive investigation. That investigation can include analysis of the location of the noose, how narrow the noose is, and if the body experienced any substantial drop in the course of the hanging.

Epstein was not on suicide watch at the time of his apparent hanging, though he had previously spent nearly a week under strict supervision. That came after he was found unconscious with marks on his neck on July 23. On July 29, he was taken off suicide watch at the request of his lawyers, The Wall Street Journal reports.

In the weeks between his being removed from suicide watch and his death, Epstein was not properly monitored. The Times reported Sunday that Epstein was housed alone, against standard practice, and was not checked on every 30 minutes, also against protocol.

Attorney General William Barr appeared to be referring to these issues on Monday when he told reporters, “We are now learning of serious irregularities at this facility that are deeply concerning and demand a thorough investigation.”

Among the little information Sampson shared about Epstein’s autopsy Sunday is that Michael Baden, a former New York City medical examiner, was allowed to observe her autopsy at the request of Epstein’s representatives. Baden, who once hosted the HBO show Autopsy, has conducted private autopsies after high-profile deaths like those of Michael Brown and former NFL tight end Aaron Hernandez.

The results of the autopsy could trigger new legal action in the Epstein case, according to The Daily Beast, which reports that if his death is formally ruled a suicide, his estate “could press a claim for wrongful death while he was in the custody of the state.”
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

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Re: 🗡️ Suicide Epidemic
« Reply #37 on: August 15, 2019, 03:44:07 AM »
What We Know About Jeffrey Epstein’s Autopsy

What did he supposedly hang himself FROM?

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Re: 🗡️ Suicide Epidemic
« Reply #38 on: August 16, 2019, 06:12:38 AM »
What We Know About Jeffrey Epstein’s Autopsy

What did he supposedly hang himself FROM?

RE

Here's one view.

Jeffrey Epstein's Jailhouse Suicide Is More Feasible Than You Think

I should know. I've been there.

image
GETTY IMAGES

In the wake of Jeffrey Epstein’s death this past weekend, I’ve watched, on the television in my cell at Sing Sing, a parade of talking heads express everything from confusion to anger that such a high-profile person could kill himself while in custody. Such disbelief surprises me. Setting aside the question of whether Epstein did, in fact, commit suicide—I leave that to the authorities and the conspiracy theorists—let’s be clear: High profile or not, if you want to kill yourself while in custody, you can find a way.

Presumably, Epstein was not diagnosed with a serious mental illness; such inmates are the hardest to monitor for self-harm. Like all jails and prisons, at the county, state, and federal levels, Manhattan Correctional Center, where he was held, was not equipped to watch his every move. On July 23, guards reportedly found him unresponsive, with bruises on his neck. They put him on what’s known as suicide watch. There, he would’ve been housed in a special cell, perhaps surrounded by plexiglass windows, devoid of anything he could use to harm himself. He would also be under round-the-clock observation. His activity would’ve been logged. He would’ve undergone daily psychiatric evaluations; those would’ve been logged, too.

Jeffrey Epstein Sexual Offender Flyer
Jeffrey Epstein poses for a sex offender mugshot after being charged with procuring a minor for prostitution on July 25, 2013 in Florida
HandoutGetty Images

Six days after he was placed in the tank, as we in prison call it, he was taken back out. For that to happen, at least by the books, a psychologist would’ve determined that he was no longer a risk to himself. Epstein was moved back to the special unit where he’d been held prior to the tank, where it would’ve been almost impossible for MCC staff to watch his every move. (That doesn’t excuse the guards on that unit the night he died, who’d allegedly fallen asleep and later fudged the books.)

In the eighteen years I’ve been incarcerated, I’ve heard countless stories of suicide attempts. All of them happened swiftly, under the radar. When I was on Riker’s Island, certain inmates worked as suicide prevention aides. The SPAs made rounds on the 11pm to 7am shift, while the guards sat on their asses. The gig came with perks, such as using the phone and watching late-night TV in the day room. I recently spoke with Blanco, a former SPA who’s now with me at Sing Sing. He told me, “One time, a bugout”—prison slang for people with mental illness—“threatened to hang himself if he didn’t get a cigarette.” Blanco said he blew him off at first, then doubled back a few minutes later to check in. He found the guy hanging from a sheet tied to the light fixture. Blanco yelled for the guard, who popped the cell and cut the sheet with a hook knife, a tool expressly issued for that purpose.

Jeffrey Epstein found dead in his prison cell
A general view of the Manhattan Correctional Center in New York where the US financier Jeffrey Epstein was found dead on August 10, 2019
Anadolu AgencyGetty Images

I’ve also seen it firsthand. One snowy day in January 2010, at Attica, where I was held at the time, a guy who hailed from Brooklyn, like me, and whose parole year, 2029, was the same as mine, returned to his cell on E Block after tossing around a football in the yard and hanged himself. It was the middle of the day, and inmates and guards were up and down the tier, yet no one saw him do it. In 2013, on the same cell block, on the same tier, another acquaintance hanged himself. He’d been the most talented artist I’ve met in prison. Using wettened bread, dry spaghetti, and other food, he’d sculpt dead-ringer caricatures of the guards. The night he died, he’d spent hours talking to the guy in the neighboring cell, who later said he never saw it coming.

Even inmates that we know are at a very high risk of suicide are difficult to monitor. Over the years, I’ve worked a few stints as an aide on units for inmates with serious mental illness. I’ve heard about men attempting self-harm in all sorts of creative ways. Some swallowed razors or detergent balls. Others snapped the blade out of their prison-issued BIC razors and used it to cut their neck, their wrists, their penis. If they survived, these guys were placed on suicide watch, sometimes for days, sometimes for weeks, until their crisis subsided. Once out, they couldn’t be watched 24/7, and many of them cycled in and out of the tank.

I’ve experienced suicide watch as a patient, too. In 2000, I was arrested for packing a pistol and wound up at Brooklyn Detention Complex, then known as Brooklyn House of Detention, one of New York City’s jails. At intake, a nurse asked if I used drugs, or if I had any psychiatric issues. I said no and no. She then asked if I had a family history of mental illness. I told her about my father, who’d left us when I was one, then committed suicide when I was ten. When Mom had told me, I’d felt betrayed. I’d felt angry. Until then, I’d always thought that one day he’d find me and explain himself. Instead, he took the coward’s way out.

"It was the middle of the day, and inmates and guards were up and down the tier, yet no one saw him do it."

I recounted all of this to the intake nurse, and I was put on suicide watch. Here’s how I remember it: While the others in custody headed to the main unit, I was escorted to another cell, with plexiglass on the bars, and given a smock to wear. After a couple of hours, I started spiraling. I flipped out and flailed my arms, and I demanded to see a psychiatrist. I was cold, the lights never went out, and nobody told me anything. A guard stared at me as if watching laundry on spin cycle: tumble, stop, start again. I was released twenty-four later. It remains one of my worst days in lock up.

Related Story
image
'This Place Is Crazy'

There’s a social hierarchy in prison, a pecking order. At the very, very bottom are the pedophiles and sexual predators, which is where Epstein would’ve wound up. But he managed to skip out on that. He managed to skip out on facing judgement in a court of law, and he skipped out on being forced to face his alleged victims. Just as my father’s suicide denied me the chance to demand an explanation, Epstein’s suicide allowed him to write his own last chapter. And though I understand how he was able pull it off, it’s a shame that he figured it out, too.

John J. Lennon is a contributing editor for Esquire.

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline azozeo

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Re: 🗡️ Suicide Epidemic
« Reply #39 on: August 16, 2019, 06:19:04 AM »
These prisons are full of lower based energies. A good smudging would clear the air  :icon_sunny:
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

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Re: 🗡️ Suicide Epidemic
« Reply #40 on: August 16, 2019, 08:51:14 AM »
How come there's no photo of him hanging from a "light fixture"?  And WHY do they still have light fixtures you could tie a bed sheet to?  They have nice flush mounted fixtures available at Home Depot.

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Offline azozeo

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Re: 🗡️ Suicide Epidemic
« Reply #41 on: August 16, 2019, 09:09:20 AM »
How come there's no photo of him hanging from a "light fixture"?  And WHY do they still have light fixtures you could tie a bed sheet to?  They have nice flush mounted fixtures available at Home Depot.

RE


You ask to many questions.....  It's pistolero Friday  :icon_mrgreen:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/SVW3Bq5Akzc&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/SVW3Bq5Akzc&fs=1</a>
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline azozeo

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Re: 🗡️ Suicide Epidemic
« Reply #42 on: August 16, 2019, 09:15:19 AM »
How come there's no photo of him hanging from a "light fixture"?  And WHY do they still have light fixtures you could tie a bed sheet to?  They have nice flush mounted fixtures available at Home Depot.

RE


You ask to many questions.....  It's pistolero Friday  :icon_mrgreen:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/SVW3Bq5Akzc&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/SVW3Bq5Akzc&fs=1</a>



https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-08-15/epstein-autopsy-finds-evidence-he-may-have-been-murdered

https://www.theepochtimes.com/epsteins-body-claimed-by-associate-report_3043323.html

https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-08-15/tech-ceo-denies-epsteins-alleged-madam-living-his-oceanfront-mansion

https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-08-15/mainstream-media-escalates-attacks-epstein-conspiracy-theories

https://www.investmentwatchblog.com/i-am-going-through-all-of-the-epstein-files-and-highlighting-the-important-information-here-are-my-findings-on-the-first-300-pages-i-went-through-today/

https://thepoliticalinsider.com/epstein-accuser-sues-maxwell-staffers-for-allegedly-enabling-sexual-abuse/

https://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2019/08/epstein-had-portrait-of-bill-clinton-wearing-monica-lewinskys-blue-dress-in-oval-office-inside-his-manhattan-mansion/

https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-08-15/i-cant-explain-any-over-phone-epsteins-bodyguard-freaks-out-demands-reporter-drop

https://forbiddenknowledgetv.net/epsteins-connection-to-uranium-one/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Epstein%27s+Connection+to+Uranium+One

"All The Dirt That's Fit To Print"  enjoy diners....
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

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Re: 🗡️ Suicide Epidemic
« Reply #43 on: August 16, 2019, 03:58:04 PM »
How come there's no photo of him hanging from a "light fixture"?  And WHY do they still have light fixtures you could tie a bed sheet to?  They have nice flush mounted fixtures available at Home Depot.

RE

Supposedly he "hanged himself" from the top bunk on a room with seven foot ceilings, and somehow sustained injuries consistent with strangulation. His cellmate, a former state trooper, was supposedly excused from his cell. Epstein's brother has supposedly ID'd the body, an identification on a par with the location of JFK's brain.

And today Jeffrey Epstein’s autopsy concluded with there medical examiner declaring his death was a suicide by hanging. So see, written evidence. Conclusions. Case closed. No need for a messy and troublesome murder investigation.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/national-security/jeffrey-epsteins-autopsy-concludes-his-death-was-a-suicide-by-hanging/2019/08/16/bb670d58-c053-11e9-a5c6-1e74f7ec4a93_story.html


Nothing to see here citizen: move along.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline RE

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Re: 🗡️ Suicide Epidemic
« Reply #44 on: August 16, 2019, 04:16:23 PM »
How come there's no photo of him hanging from a "light fixture"?  And WHY do they still have light fixtures you could tie a bed sheet to?  They have nice flush mounted fixtures available at Home Depot.

RE

Supposedly he "hanged himself" from the top bunk on a room with seven foot ceilings, and somehow sustained injuries consistent with strangulation. His cellmate, a former state trooper, was supposedly excused from his cell. Epstein's brother has supposedly ID'd the body, an identification on a par with the location of JFK's brain.

And today Jeffrey Epstein’s autopsy concluded with there medical examiner declaring his death was a suicide by hanging. So see, written evidence. Conclusions. Case closed. No need for a messy and troublesome murder investigation.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/national-security/jeffrey-epsteins-autopsy-concludes-his-death-was-a-suicide-by-hanging/2019/08/16/bb670d58-c053-11e9-a5c6-1e74f7ec4a93_story.html


Nothing to see here citizen: move along.

I'm betting Prince Andy had him whacked.

RE
Save As Many As You Can

 

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