AuthorTopic: 🗡️ Suicide Epidemic  (Read 2690 times)

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🗡️ Suicide Epidemic
« on: December 07, 2017, 12:52:14 AM »
They still have a ways to go to catch up to the Indian Farmers.

RE

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/dec/06/why-are-americas-farmers-killing-themselves-in-record-numbers

On the Ground: reporting from all corners of America
Why are America's farmers killing themselves in record numbers?


The suicide rate for farmers is more than double that of veterans. Former farmer Debbie Weingarten gives an insider’s perspective on farm life – and how to help

Wednesday 6 December 2017 06.00 EST
Last modified on Wednesday 6 December 2017 13.17 EST

It is dark in the workshop, but what light there is streams in patches through the windows. Cobwebs coat the wrenches, the cans of spray paint and the rungs of an old wooden chair where Matt Peters used to sit. A stereo plays country music, left on by the renter who now uses the shop.

“It smells so good in here,” I say. “Like …”

“Men, working,” finishes Ginnie Peters.

We inhale. “Yes.”

Ginnie pauses at the desk where she found her husband Matt’s letter on the night he died.

“My dearest love,” it began, and continued for pages. “I have torment in my head.”

On the morning of his last day, 12 May 2011, Matt stood in the kitchen of their farmhouse.

“I can’t think,” he told Ginnie. “I feel paralyzed.”

It was planting season, and stress was high. Matt worried about the weather and worked around the clock to get his crop in the ground on time. He hadn’t slept in three nights and was struggling to make decisions.

“I remember thinking ‘I wish I could pick you up and put you in the car like you do with a child,’” Ginnie says. “And then I remember thinking … and take you where? Who can help me with this? I felt so alone.”

Ginnie felt an “oppressive sense of dread” that intensified as the day wore on. At dinnertime, his truck was gone and Matt wasn’t answering his phone. It was dark when she found the letter. “I just knew,” Ginnie says. She called 911 immediately, but by the time the authorities located his truck, Matt had taken his life.
Ginnie Peters returns to the farm workshop in Perry, Iowa where she found her husband Matt’s letter on the night he died.
Ginnie Peters returns to the farm workshop in Perry, Iowa, where she found her husband Matt’s letter on the night he died. Photograph: Audra Mulkern

Ginnie describes her husband as strong and determined, funny and loving. They raised two children together. He would burst through the door singing the Mighty Mouse song – “Here I come to save the day!” – and make everyone laugh. He embraced new ideas and was progressive in his farming practices, one of the first in his county to practice no-till, a farming method that does not disturb the soil. “In everything he did, he wanted to be a giver and not a taker,” she says.

After his death, Ginnie began combing through Matt’s things. “Every scrap of paper, everything I could find that would make sense of what had happened.” His phone records showed a 20-minute phone call to an unfamiliar number on the afternoon he died.
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When she dialed the number, Dr Mike Rosmann answered.

“My name is Virginia Peters,” she said. “My husband died of suicide on May 12th.”

There was a pause on the line.

“I have been so worried,” said Rosmann. “Mrs Peters, I am so glad you called me.”

Rosmann, an Iowa farmer, is a psychologist and one of the nation’s leading farmer behavioral health experts. He often answers phone calls from those in crisis. And for 40 years, he has worked to understand why farmers take their lives at such alarming rates – currently, higher rates than any other occupation in the United States.

Once upon a time, I was a vegetable farmer in Arizona. And I, too, called Rosmann. I was depressed, unhappily married, a new mom, overwhelmed by the kind of large debt typical for a farm operation.
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We were growing food, but couldn’t afford to buy it. We worked 80 hours a week, but we couldn’t afford to see a dentist, let alone a therapist. I remember panic when a late freeze threatened our crop, the constant fights about money, the way light swept across the walls on the days I could not force myself to get out of bed.

“Farming has always been a stressful occupation because many of the factors that affect agricultural production are largely beyond the control of the producers,” wrote Rosmann in the journal Behavioral Healthcare. “The emotional wellbeing of family farmers and ranchers is intimately intertwined with these changes.”

Last year, a study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that people working in agriculture – including farmers, farm laborers, ranchers, fishers, and lumber harvesters – take their lives at a rate higher than any other occupation. The data suggested that the suicide rate for agricultural workers in 17 states was nearly five times higher compared with that in the general population.

After the study was released, Newsweek reported that the suicide death rate for farmers was more than double that of military veterans. This, however, could be an underestimate, as the data collected skipped several major agricultural states, including Iowa. Rosmann and other experts add that the farmer suicide rate might be higher, because an unknown number of farmers disguise their suicides as farm accidents.

The US farmer suicide crisis echoes a much larger farmer suicide crisis happening globally: an Australian farmer dies by suicide every four days; in the UK, one farmer a week takes his or her own life; in France, one farmer dies by suicide every two days; in India, more than 270,000 farmers have died by suicide since 1995.
In 2016, nearly half of Iowa’s 23 million acres of farmland was planted in field corn.
In 2016, nearly half of Iowa’s 23 million acres of farmland was planted in field corn. Photograph: Audra Mulkern

In 2014, I left my marriage and my farm, and I began to write. I aimed to explore our country’s fervent celebration of the agrarian, and yet how, despite the fact that we so desperately need farmers for our survival, we often forget about their wellbeing.
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Four years after contacting Rosmann as a farmer, I am traveling across Iowa with a photographer in an attempt to understand the suicide crisis on America’s farms. It’s been raining all morning – big gray swaths – and we are standing in the entryway of the Rosmanns’ house.

“Should we take off our shoes?” we ask. Mike’s wife, Marilyn, waves us off. “It’s a farmhouse,” she says. On this overcast day, the farmhouse is warm and immaculately decorated. Marilyn is baking cranberry bars in the brightly lit kitchen.

Mike appears a midwestern Santa Claus – glasses perched on a kind, round face; a head of white hair and a bushy white moustache. In 1979, Mike and Marilyn left their teaching positions at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville and bought 190 acres in Harlan, Iowa – near Mike’s boyhood farm. When he told his colleagues that he was trading academia for farm life, they were incredulous.

“I told them farmers are an endangered species, and we need them for our sustenance. I need to go take care of farmers, because nobody else does,” says Rosmann. Once back in Iowa, the Rosmanns farmed corn, soybeans, oats, hay, purebred cattle, chickens and turkeys. Mike opened a psychology practice, Marilyn worked as a nurse, and they raised two children.

When the rain breaks, Mike pulls on muck boots over his pants, and we go outside. He has the slightest limp; in 1990, during the oat harvest, he lost four of his toes “in a moment of carelessness” with the grain combine, an event he describes as life-changing. We are walking through the wet grass toward the cornfield behind his house, when he cranes his head. “Hear the calves bellering?” he asks. “They’ve just been weaned.” We stop and listen; the calves sound out in distressed notes, their off-key voices like prepubescent boys crying out across the field.

In the 1980s, America’s continuing family farm crisis began. A wrecking ball for rural America, it was the worst agricultural economic crisis since the Great Depression. Market prices crashed. Loans were called in. Interest rates doubled overnight. Farmers were forced to liquidate their operations and evicted from their land. There were fights at grain elevators, shootings in local banks. The suicide rate soared.

“What we went through in the 1980s farm crisis was hell,” says Donn Teske, a farmer and president of the Kansas Farmers Union. “I mean, it was ungodly hell.”
Mike Rosmann, an Iowa farmer and psychologist, is one of the nation’s leading experts on farmer behavioral health and the US farmer suicide crisis.
Mike Rosmann, an Iowa farmer and psychologist, is one of the nation’s leading experts on farmer behavioral health and the US farmer suicide crisis. Photograph: Audra Mulkern

In the spring of 1985, farmers descended on Washington DC by the thousands, including David Senter, president of the American Agriculture Movement (AAM) and a historian for FarmAid. For weeks, the protesting farmers occupied a tent on the Mall, surrounded the White House, marched along Pennsylvania Avenue. Farmers marched hundreds of black crosses – each with the name of a foreclosure or suicide victim – to the USDA building and drove them into the ground. “It looked like a cemetery,” recalls Senter.
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Rosmann worked on providing free counseling, referrals for services, and community events to break down stigmas of mental health issues among farmers. “People just did not deal with revealing their tender feelings. They felt like failures,” says Rosmann.

During the height of the farm crisis, telephone hotlines were started in most agricultural states.

“And what was the impact?”

“We stopped the suicides here,” he says of his community in Iowa. “And every state that had a telephone hotline reduced the number of farming related suicides.”

In 1999, Rosmann joined an effort called Sowing Seeds of Hope (SSOH), which began in Wisconsin, and connected uninsured and underinsured farmers in seven midwestern states to affordable behavioral health services. In 2001, Rosmann became the executive director. For 14 years, the organization fielded approximately a half-million telephone calls from farmers, trained over 10,000 rural behavioral health professionals, and provided subsidized behavioral health resources to over 100,000 farm families.

Rosmann’s program proved so successful that it became the model for a nationwide program called the Farm and Ranch Stress Assistance Network (FRSAN). Rosmann and his colleagues were hopeful that farmers would get the federal support they so desperately needed – but though the program was approved as part of the 2008 US Farm Bill, it was not funded.

While Senator Tom Harkin and other sympathetic legislators tried to earmark money for the FRSAN, they were outvoted. Rosmann says that several members of the House and Senate – most of them Republicans – “were disingenuous”. In an email, Rosmann wrote, “They promised support to my face and to others who approached them to support the FRSAN, but when it came time to vote … they did not support appropriating money … Often they claimed it was an unnecessary expenditure which would increase the national debt, while also saying healthy farmers are the most important asset to agricultural production.”

The program, which would have created regional and national helplines and provided counseling for farmers, was estimated to cost the government $18m annually. Rosmann argues that US farmers lost by suicide totals much more than this – in dollars, farmland, national security in the form of food, and the emotional and financial toll on families and entire communities. In 2014, the federal funding that supported Rosmann’s Sowing Seeds of Hope came to an end, and the program was shuttered.
John Blaske looks out over his farm fields in Onaga, Kansas.
John Blaske looks out over his farm fields in Onaga, Kansas. Photograph: Audra Mulkern

The September sky is chalk gray, and for a moment it rains. John Blaske’s cows are lined up at the fence; cicadas trill from the trees. It’s been a year since he flipped through Missouri Farmer Today and froze, startled by an article written by Rosmann.
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“Suicide death rate of farmers higher than other groups, CDC reports,” the headline read.

“I read it 12 or 15 times,” Blaske says, sitting next to his wife Joyce at the kitchen table. “It hit home something drastically.”

In the house, every square inch of wall or shelf space is filled with memorabilia and photos of their six children and 13 grandchildren. Music croons softly from the kitchen radio.

Blaske is tall and stoic, with hands toughened by work and a somber voice that rarely changes in inflection. We’ve been speaking by phone since the winter, when Rosmann connected us. “How’s the weather out there in Arizona?” he would ask at the outset of each phone call. I’ve followed Blaske through multiple health scares and hospital stays, as he has realized that the depression and suicidal thoughts he’s endured alone for years are common among farmers.

The first time we spoke, Blaske told me, “In the last 25 to 30 years, there’s not a day that goes by that I don’t think about suicide.”

The CDC report suggested possible causes for the high suicide rate among US farmers, including “social isolation, potential for financial losses, barriers to and unwillingness to seek mental health services (which might be limited in rural areas), and access to lethal means”.

For a farmer, loss of land often cuts deeper than a death, something Blaske understands firsthand. On Thanksgiving Day in 1982, a spark shot out from Blaske’s woodstove to a box of newspaper. The fire climbed curtains, melted doors, burned most of the house. The Blaskes became homeless.

Soon after the fire, the farm crisis intensified. The bank raised their interest rate from seven to 18%. Blaske raced between banks and private lenders, attempting to renegotiate loan terms. Agreements would be made and then fall through. “They did not care whether we had to live in a grader ditch,” remembers Blaske.

Desperate, the family filed for bankruptcy and lost 265 acres. For the first time, Blaske began to think of suicide.
Joyce and John Blaske stand at the entrance to their barn at their farm in Onaga, Kansas.
Joyce and John Blaske stand at the entrance to their barn at their farm in Onaga, Kansas. Photograph: Audra Mulkern

Much of the acreage lost to the Blaskes sits across the road from the 35 acres they retain today. “I can’t leave our property without seeing what we lost,” Blaske frets. “You can’t imagine how that cuts into me every day. It just eats me alive.”

Rosmann has developed what he calls the agrarian imperative theory – though he is quick to say it sits on the shoulders of other psychologists. “People engaged in farming,” he explains, “have a strong urge to supply essentials for human life, such as food and materials for clothing, shelter and fuel, and to hang on to their land and other resources needed to produce these goods at all costs.”

When farmers can’t fulfill this instinctual purpose, they feel despair. Thus, within the theory lies an important paradox: the drive that makes a farmer successful is the same that exacerbates failure, sometimes to the point of suicide. In an article, Rosmann wrote that the agrarian imperative theory “is a plausible explanation of the motivations of farmers to be agricultural producers and to sometimes end their lives”.

Since 2013, net farm income for US farmers has declined 50%. Median farm income for 2017 is projected to be negative $1,325. And without parity in place (essentially a minimum price floor for farm products), most commodity prices remain below the cost of production.

In an email, Rosmann wrote, “The rate of self-imposed [farmer] death rises and falls in accordance with their economic well-being … Suicide is currently rising because of our current farm recession.”

Inside the sunny lobby of the newly remodeled Onaga community hospital, where Joyce Blaske happens to work in the business department, Dr Nancy Zidek has just finished her rounds. As a family medicine doctor, she sees behavioral health issues frequently among her farmer patients, which she attributes to the stressors inherent in farming.

“If your farm is struggling, you’re certainly going to be depressed and going to be worried about how to put food on the table, how to get your kids to college,” she says.
Having just finished her rounds, Dr Nancy Zidek stands at the entrance of the newly-opened community hospital in Onaga, Kansas.
Having just finished her rounds, Dr Nancy Zidek stands at the entrance of the newly opened community hospital in Onaga, Kansas. Photograph: Audra Mulkern

In August 2017, Tom Giessel, farmer and president of the Pawnee County Kansas Farmers Union produced a short video called “Ten Things a Bushel of Wheat Won’t Buy”. At $3.27 per bushel (60lb), Giessel says, “The grain I produce and harvest is my ‘currency’ and it is less than one-fifth of what it should be priced.”
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He shows snapshots of consumer goods that cost more than a bushel of wheat: six English muffins, four rolls of toilet paper, a single loaf of bread – even though one bushel of wheat is enough to make 70 one-pound breadloaves.

Dr Zidek says the wellbeing of farmers is inextricably linked to the health of rural communities. “The grain prices are low. The gas prices are high. Farmers feel the strain of ‘I’ve got to get this stuff in the field. But if I can’t sell it, I can’t pay for next year’s crop. I can’t pay my loans at the bank off.’ And that impacts the rest of us in a small community, because if the farmers can’t come into town to purchase from the grocery store, the hardware store, the pharmacy – then those people also struggle.”

Indeed, it is Saturday afternoon, and downtown Onaga is practically deserted. There’s a liquor store, a school, a few churches, a pizza place, a youth center and boarded-up storefronts. “You need to have a family farm structure to have rural communities – for school systems, churches, hospitals,” says Donn Teske of the Kansas Farmers Union. “I’m watching with serious dismay the industrialization of the agriculture sector and the depopulation of rural Kansas … In rural America,” he adds, “maybe the war is lost.”

After finding the article in Missouri Farmer Today, John Blaske decided to contact Rosmann. But the article listed a website, and the Blaskes did not own a computer. So he drove to the library and asked a librarian to send an email to Rosmann on his behalf. A few days later, as Blaske was driving his tractor down the road, Rosmann called him back.

“He wanted to hear what I had to say,” Blaske says. “Someone needs to care about what’s going on out here.”

Since the 1980s farm crisis, Rosmann says experts have learned much more about how to support farmers. Confidential crisis communication systems – by telephone or online – are effective, but staff need to be versed in the reality and language of agriculture.

“If you go to a therapist who may know about therapy but doesn’t understand farming, the therapist might say, ‘Take a vacation – that’s the best thing you can do.’ And the farmer will say, ‘But my cows aren’t on a five-day-a-week schedule.’”
Quiet streets on a Saturday afternoon in Onaga, Kansas, population 700.
Quiet streets on a Saturday afternoon in Onaga, Kansas, population 700. Photograph: Audra Mulkern

Affordable therapy is critical and inexpensive to fund – Rosmann says many issues can be resolved in fewer than five sessions, which he compares to an Employee Assistance Program. Medical providers need to be educated about physical and behavioral health vulnerabilities in agricultural populations, an effort Rosmann is working on with colleagues.

John Blaske says painting helps. When he’s feeling up to it, he paints heavy saw blades with detailed farmscapes. Counseling and medication have also helped, but he craves conversation with farmers who know what he’s experiencing. “I would really give about anything to go and talk to people,” he says. “If any one person thinks they are the only one in this boat, they are badly mistaken. It’s like Noah’s Ark. It’s running over.”
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Inside the farmhouse, Blaske places two journals in my hands. They’re filled with memories of walking through town barefoot as a child, how his mother would pick sandburs out of his feet at night; about the years he worked full-time at the grain elevator, only to come home to farmwork in the dark and counting cows by flashlight.

The image of Blaske on the farm, illuminating the darkness, is a powerful one. “Sometimes the batteries were low and the light was not so bright,” he wrote, “But when you found the cow that was missing, you also found a newborn calf, which made the dark of night much brighter.”

In the US, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 1-800-273-8255. In the UK the Samaritans can be contacted on 116 123. In Australia, the crisis support service Lifeline is on 13 11 14. Other international suicide helplines can be found at www.befrienders.org.
« Last Edit: June 18, 2019, 04:41:36 PM by RE »
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https://www.cnn.com/2019/05/17/health/suicide-rates-young-girls-study/index.html

Suicide rates in girls are rising, study finds, especially in those age 10 to 14

By Dr. Edith Bracho-Sanchez, CNN

Updated 11:55 AM ET, Fri May 17, 2019


(CNN)Suicide rates for young girls are rising at a pace faster than that of boys, changing the established patterns that boys are more likely to die by suicide and that girls are more likely to consider it and attempt it, according to a new study.

Researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital in in Columbus, Ohio analyzed suicide rates of US kids and teens ages 10 to 19 between 1975 and 2016 using the Wide-ranging Online Data for Epidemiologic Research database, run by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In that period, there were more than 85,000 suicides in kids and teens, with 80% in boys and 20% in girls. The rates of suicide peaked in 1993 and had been on the decline until 2007, when they again started to climb, according to the findings, published Friday in JAMA.

Although boys were 3.8 times more likely than girls to kill themselves over the 40-year study period, the gap is rapidly narrowing. Starting in 2007, the rates of suicide for girls 10 to 14 increased 12.7% per year, compared with 7.1% for boys the same age. A similar trend was seen for teens 15 to 19, with rates of suicide going up 7.9% for girls and 3.5% for boys.

Boys 15 to 19 continued to take their own lives using firearms at far greater rates than girls, but the rates of hanging and suffocation in girls approached those of boys.
More young people, especially girls, are attempting suicide by poisoning, study says
More young people, especially girls, are attempting suicide by poisoning, study says
Suicide is the second leading cause of death in kids and teens ages 10 to 19 in the United States after accidents and unintentional injuries, according to the CDC. Rates of suicide have historically been higher in boys than in girls across all age groups.
Girls turning to more lethal means is cause for "great concern," explained lead author Donna Ruch, research scientist at Nationwide Children's Hospital, adding that girls continue to attempt suicide at higher rates and the shift toward more lethal methods could have dire consequences for the rates of completed suicide in this group.
How to look for suicide warning signs

How to look for suicide warning signs 02:35
The study was not designed to determine the reasons behind the troubling trends, explained Dr. Joan Luby, a child and adolescent psychiatrist at the Washington University School of Medicine, and Sarah Kertz, a clinical psychologist at Southern Illinois University, in a commentary published alongside the study in JAMA.
But given the short period of time over which the rates of suicide have spiked for young girls, Luby and Kertz point to social media as a likely contributor.
Girls may be more vulnerable to the negative effects of social media
"Compared with boys, girls use social media more frequently and are more likely to experience cyberbullying," Luby and Kertz wrote.
Girls who are depressed also elicit more negative responses from their friends on social media than boys, they added.
Teen suicide rates spiked after debut of Netflix show '13 Reasons Why,' study says
Teen suicide rates spiked after debut of Netflix show '13 Reasons Why,' study says
Combined, they say, these findings suggest that the negative effects of social media may be stronger on girls and may provide one explanation for why young girls are more vulnerable to suicidal thoughts and behaviors.
Yet social media may be just one piece of the puzzle.
The role of societal rules and expectations
"We know that certain societal rules and expectations for women can be associated with higher rates of mental health issues and suicide rates," said Dr. Barbara Robles-Ramamurthy, child and adolescent psychiatrist at the Long School of Medicine at UT Health San Antonio, who was not involved in the study. "Then you add a possible biological component -- hormones -- and a genetic predisposition."
Number of children going to ER with suicidal thoughts, attempts doubles, study finds
Number of children going to ER with suicidal thoughts, attempts doubles, study finds
Another reason for the rise in depression and suicidal behaviors for both boys and girls may be more stress and pressure being placed on kids, said Dr. Gene Beresin, executive director of the Clay Center for Young Healthy Minds at Massachusetts General Hospital and professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, who also was not involved in the study.
"Kids are feeling more pressure to achieve, more pressure in school, and are more worried about making a living than in previous years," he said.
In isolation, none of these factors has been proven to lead to an increase in suicidal behaviors and ultimately suicide, but taken together, a pattern begins to emerge, Beresin said.
Recognizing warning signs in children and teens
Mental illness -- especially when it comes to depression and anxiety -- can be silent or manifest in ways parents would not expect, Robles-Ramamurthy said. In addition to sadness, depression in kids and teens can manifest as anger and irritability.
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"It's very normal for your child to start getting a little more moody and defiant," she said of the teenage years. "But if you start seeing drastic changes, their academic performance is declining, they're not spending as much time with family or isolating themselves, those are big red flags."
If those behaviors are present, Robles-Ramamurthy recommends asking teens clearly whether they feel depressed or have considered hurting themselves or ending their lives. Asking these questions directly does not increase the risk of suicide, she added.

How to get help: In the United States, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255. The International Association for Suicide Prevention and Befrienders Worldwide also provide contact information for crisis centers around the world.
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Offline RE

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🗡️ Suicide Epidemic
« Reply #2 on: June 18, 2019, 04:40:09 PM »
It's tough to be a kid growing up in a Collapsing Civilization.  :'(

RE

https://www.nbcnews.com/health/kids-health/suicide-rates-among-young-people-reach-their-highest-level-2000-n1018376

Suicide rates among young people reach their highest level since 2000
One teenage girl is working to prevent youth suicides and reduce the stigma of mental illness.


New research finds an increase in rates of teenage boys dying by suicide. Laurense Balan / EyeEm / Getty Images

June 18, 2019, 7:06 AM AKDT
By Erika Edwards

Suicide rates among young people are rising, reaching the highest levels since 2000, a study published Tuesday finds.

But most alarming, the researchers said, was a 21 percent rise in boys aged 15-19 dying by suicide in 2017 from the year before.

"Previous studies talked more of an increase in female suicide, but what we’re showing is that rates among males are also increasing rapidly," Oren Miron, the study's lead author and a research associate in biomedical informatics at Harvard Medical School, told NBC News.
Warning signs of suicide: How to help kids with stress and mental health
May 21, 201903:08

As part of the study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, Miron and his colleagues analyzed data on suicides from 2000 to 2017 from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. They focused on teens and young adults between 15 and 24.

They found that in 2017, the suicide rates for this age group reached their highest levels since 2000. That includes an increase of 8 percent among girls aged 15-19 dying by suicide from 2016 to 2017, according to the new research.

Experts not involved with the study, however, caution the new data may not reflect an overall trend.

"The question that we can't answer about 2017 is, is this the beginning of a greater increase in youth suicide deaths or an anomaly in an otherwise steady trendline?" said Jonathan Singer, president of the American Association of Suicidology, a nonprofit that advocates for suicide prevention. "We will have to wait until 2019 data are available to have any way of answering that question."

Still, there is no doubt that over time, a steadily growing number of young people are dying by suicide.

"I think what you’re seeing is a reflection of an incredibly stressed out group of kids," Singer said.
Warning signs can be vague

The warning signs of depression and possible suicide ideation can be vague, especially during the teenage years, when it's often perfectly normal to go through phases of moodiness and withdrawal. And experts in the field say serious mental health problems can manifest themselves differently from person to person: anger in one person, chronic headaches in another, excessive crying in others.

"One of the best things to do is make sure that kids are surrounded by adults who can monitor them, who know them, both online and offline, and who are thinking, 'How do I know when this kid is doing well, and how do I recognize signs of distress?'" Singer said.

"You don't see if you're not looking for it."

"You don't see it if you're not looking for it," said Fenway Jones, 16, of Fenton, Mich.

One of Jones's closest friends, a boy named Jasper, died by suicide in 2017, the year the new data show an uptick among teen boys. Jasper was 16 years old. The two friends had bonded over their shared love of the game Dungeons and Dragons.

"It was super shocking and devastating," Jones told NBC News. "I had seen him just a little while before he died." She said didn't notice anything that would have given her a clue her friend was suffering.

"We weren’t looking for the minor changes. We saw the happiness that he had, and we didn't see the other side of it."

Within the year, another one of Jones's friends, a 16-year-old girl named Tori, also died by suicide.

Jones, then just 14, used her grief to start a group called Jasper's Game Day. She and others travel to gaming conventions to spread awareness about suicide, and to reduce the stigma surrounding mental illness.

"I tell them it's OK to not feel OK," Jones said.
When two of her friends died by suicide, Fenway Jones, 16, started a group called Jasper's Game Day to raise awareness about mental health.Courtesy of Fenway Jones

Her efforts appear to be working. Since Jasper's Game Day began two years ago, thousands of people have approached Jones to talk about mental health.

"They tell me their personal stories: how they dealt with depression, struggles or even if they attempted suicide or knew someone who did," Jones said.

Money raised by Jasper's Game Day through sales of T-shirts and bracelets is donated to local crisis centers.
Something going on on a societal level

The new study found that in 2017, 6,241 teenagers and adults in their early 20s died by suicide. Young men accounted for the vast majority — 5,016 — of those deaths.

Potential explanations for the apparent increased rates shown among teen boys during that year are unclear. Indeed, other studies find that suicide rates in teen and young adult women are increasing.

Related
Nightly News
National suicide intervention program hopes to change how kids talk about mental illness

One possible explanation is that "boys, as a rule, are a little more impulsive than females," said Dr. Greg Plemmons, a pediatrician and researcher at Vanderbilt University in Nashville who was not involved with the new study. "But girls are catching up."

Plemmons led a study last year that found the rate of hospitalizations for suicidal thoughts or attempts increased for both boys and girls over the past decade. The research team identified 115,856 emergency department visits from 2008 to 2015 for suicide ideation or attempts in young people.

However, they saw "a bigger jump among adolescent females compared to males," Plemmons said.

"Something is going on on a societal level," he said. "We certainly need more intervention."

If you or someone you know is in crisis, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255, text HOME to 741741 or visit SpeakingOfSuicide.com/resources for additional resources.
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🗡️ Isolated And Struggling, Many Seniors Are Turning To Suicide
« Reply #3 on: July 28, 2019, 02:00:20 AM »
This apparently is a bed designed to prevent suicides  ::):


Only a Shrink could come up with this.

RE

https://www.npr.org/2019/07/27/745017374/isolated-and-struggling-many-seniors-are-turning-to-suicide

Isolated And Struggling, Many Seniors Are Turning To Suicide
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July 27, 20198:00 AM ET
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Sheri Adler at an American Behavioral Health Systems office in Wenatchee, Wash. At age 72, Adler attempted to take her own life.
Jovelle Tamayo for NPR

Dr. Julie Rickard thought her visit to Wisconsin over the Christmas holiday would bring a break from her day job working in suicide prevention in Wenatchee, Wash.

The visit didn't go as planned. After a tense fight broke out between her mother and another family member, everyone dispersed. Rickard readied herself for the trip back to the Pacific Northwest.

At the airport, she received a call from her mother, Sheri Adler. This was not out of the ordinary — Adler, like many adoring mothers, always calls her daughter after parting ways.

On the phone, Adler wanted to tell her daughter how much she loved and appreciated her.

"Normally I would think, 'Oh that's a sign of suicide,' but it was during my layover," Rickard says. "I had just left her, and my whole life she had always cried when I left and would always say I love you."

Reach Out: Ways To Help A Loved One At Risk Of Suicide
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Reach Out: Ways To Help A Loved One At Risk Of Suicide

This time was different. "This time," Rickard says, "it was goodbye."

When the plane landed, Rickard received another call. Her mother, at age 72, had tried to take her own life.

"I went home, and I guess I just didn't know how to handle it," Adler says about the suicide attempt. "It was just more than I could put together ... I just made a stupid mistake. I guess I just wanted to give up, because I felt like I wasn't a good mom. And that's all I ever wanted to be."

The American Behavioral Health Systems facility in Wenatchee, Wash., includes suicide-safe features and positive images of the Pacific Northwest, aimed to motivate patients.
Jovelle Tamayo for NPR

Since the attempt in January, Rickard has helped her mother find care. Adler now takes medication and meets with a therapist for depression and help coping with family issues. They both say she's doing better.
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Still, the episode reflects the vulnerability of a group that researchers call a "forgotten" population, particularly when it comes to the issue of mental health: senior citizens.

The Risk Among Seniors

Left: Dr. Julie Rickard and her mother, Sheri Adler. Right: Rickard shows suicide-safe features at an American Behavioral Health Systems facility in Wenatchee, Wash., on July 23.
Jovelle Tamayo for NPR

Across the country, suicide rates have been on the rise, and that rise has struck the nation's seniors particularly hard. Of the more than 47,000 suicides that took place in 2017, those 65 and up accounted for more than 8,500 of them, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Men who are 65 and older face the highest risk of suicide, while adults 85 and older, regardless of gender, are the second most likely age group to die from suicide.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, there were 47.8 million people over the age of 65 in the U.S. as of 2015. By 2060, that number is projected to reach 98.2 million.

Don't see the graphic above? Click here.

That concerns mental health experts like Dr. Jerry Reed, who manages suicide, violence and injury prevention at the nonprofit Education Development Center.

"It's likely that if we have a problem now, we may very well have a problem in the future if we don't pay attention," says Reed.

What's particularly worrying, say experts like Reed, is that when seniors attempt suicide, they are far more likely to die than those who are younger.

A kitchen with positive and calming imagery at American Behavioral Health Systems.
Jovelle Tamayo for NPR

Research has found that one out of four senior citizens that attempt suicide dies, compared to one out of 200 attempts for young adults. While the precise reasons for these figures remain unclear, experts suggest seniors are frailer and thus more vulnerable to self-inflicted injury. They can also be more isolated, which makes rescues more difficult, and perhaps even plan their attempts more carefully.

Why Seniors Are At Risk
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After Husbands' Suicides, 'Best Widow Friends' Want Police Officers To Reach For Help

There are myriad reasons that elderly adults are more susceptible to the nation's 10th leading cause of death.

One of the most prevalent is loneliness. Older adults often live in isolation and may be struggling with the death of a lifelong husband or wife, or with the grief of losing other close family or friends.

Research has shown that bereavement is "disproportionately experienced by older adults" and can often trigger physical or mental health illnesses like "major depression and complicated grief." With children often far from home, parents and grandparents can be left miles away, craving the love and human connection family visitation brings.
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Teen Suicide Spiked After Debut Of Netflix's '13 Reasons Why,' Study Says

Aging can also present transitions that are difficult to cope with. Approximately 80% of older adults live with a chronic disease – such as arthritis, diabetes and high blood pressure — and 77% have at least two, according to The National Council on Aging.

As senior citizens lose the ability to complete once routine daily tasks, depression can set in. Physical ailments might end a senior's ability to drive, read, engage in conversation or other activities that allow a person to stay independent or find meaning.

"Transitions are a very difficult period for someone in life, and if you're not prepared for that transition, you tend to notice every single behavior that marginalizes or sets you aside from other people," Reed says.

For Adler, it was a combination of factors that led her to want to end her life. She lives more than 1,500 miles from her daughter, whom she describes as her best friend, and that distance, she says, and the isolation that came with it, proved difficult.

"It helps to be around other people ... when [my daughter is] so far away, it just seems hopeless," Adler says. "And I did something stupid ... I just couldn't take it anymore."

Rickard, a psychologist, feels that when her mother lost the ability to read books in the aftermath of a stroke, her mental health was negatively affected and she lost a part of her identity.

Following a rash of suicides in nearby senior citizens communities, Dr. Julie Rickard in 2012 founded the Suicide Prevention Coalition of North Central Washington State.
Jovelle Tamayo for NPR

Adler also says that as an older person, she sometimes feels stigmatized — she says people avoid talking to her and don't want to engage. Growing older in America can be "very hard," she says. "People don't talk to you."

Knowing What To Watch For
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VA Struggles To Unlock The Reasons Behind High Suicide Rates Among Older Veterans

Research on suicide among the elderly is scant, which means loved ones and caretakers are often unaware of the warning signs. But experts say there are certain behaviors that should be considered red flags. These include stockpiling medication, rushing to revise a will, using alcohol or drugs increasingly, altering sleep habits, sharing statements of hopelessness and withdrawing socially.

The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention also warns of seniors saying goodbye or expressing the feeling of being a burden.

Julie Rickard shows one of the nature images hung up in the American Behavioral Health Systems facility that aim to encourage patients.
Jovelle Tamayo for NPR

Following a rash of suicides in nearby senior citizens communities, Rickard in 2012 founded the Suicide Prevention Coalition of North Central Washington State. The coalition's work has helped drive down the number of suicides in the area.

Now, Rickard works as the program director at American Behavioral Health Systems, a provider of substance abuse treatment services. She is also spearheading one of the nation's only pilot projects to coach physicians and residents in long-term care on the warning signs of suicide.

Rickard believes that through human contact, medical and psychiatric help, exercise, physical well-being, regular visits to primary care providers and hydration, seniors can improve their mental health.

A bed designed to help prevent suicide at American Behavioral Health Systems.
Jovelle Tamayo for NPR

"Oftentimes there's a belief that it's a normal part of aging for people to feel bad, or to go through loss, or to have lots of death and grief, and to just not recover from their depression, when in truth it's very recoverable and it's something we should be targeting," Rickard says.

Unfortunately, Rickard says, seniors are often left behind in America.

"If we treated them they wouldn't feel like they were swimming in the middle of the ocean with no life preserver," Rickard says.

As for her own mother, she says she hopes she now realizes there is nothing she could ever do to be a "burden" to her. "It's a gift to me when she asks for help or I get to be there for or just spending time with her," Rickard says. "And what I hope millions of people hear in this message is that they're not a burden either."

If you or someone you know may be considering suicide, contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 (En Español: 1-888-628-9454; deaf and hard of hearing: 1-800-799-4889) or the Crisis Text Line by texting HOME to 741741.

This story was produced and edited for broadcast by Samantha Balaban and Evie Stone.
Save As Many As You Can

Offline Surly1

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Re: 🗡️ Isolated And Struggling, Many Seniors Are Turning To Suicide
« Reply #4 on: July 28, 2019, 02:29:51 AM »
This apparently is a bed designed to prevent suicides  ::):


Only a Shrink could come up with this.

RE

For the life of me, I am wondering HOW. Clearly, no one will die from falling out of bed.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

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🗡️ Jeffrey Epstein dead in apparent suicide
« Reply #5 on: August 10, 2019, 06:34:28 AM »
That saves a little taxpayer money.

RE

Jeffrey Epstein dead in apparent suicide

By Larry Celona and Eileen AJ Connelly

August 10, 2019 | 8:56am | Updated


Jeffrey Epstein Patrick McMullan via Getty Image

More On:
jeffrey epstein
Creepy phone messages revealed in Jeffrey Epstein document dump
Twisted photos unsealed in Jeffrey Epstein 'sex slave' case
Jeffrey Epstein demanded '3 orgasms a day... like eating': court docs
Jeffrey Epstein's alleged 'sex slave' reveals the men she claims she was forced to sleep with

Convicted pedophile Jeffrey Epstein died overnight in an apparent suicide, law enforcement sources told the Post Saturday.

A gurney carrying a man who looked like Epstein was wheeled out of the Manhattan Correctional Center around 7:30 a.m. and headed to New York Downtown Hospital. A call for a reported cardiac arrest came in at 6:38 a.m., Fire Department sources said.

Two weeks ago, Epstein, 66, was placed on suicide watch after he was found nearly unconscious in his cell with injuries to his neck.

The multimillionaire financier was being held without bail pending trial on child sex-trafficking charges.

Epstein was busted July 6 over the alleged sexual abuse of dozens of young girls in his Upper East Side townhouse and his waterfront mansion in Palm, Beach, Florida, between 2002 and 2005. He pleaded not guilty and faced up to 45 years in prison.

Thousands of documents unsealed Friday in connection with a defamation case against the perv’s alleged recruiter revealed dozens of high-profile names that a self-identified victim, Virginia Giuffre, said she was forced to perform sex acts with, from former Maine Sen. George Mitchell and ex-New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson, money manager Glenn Dubin and MIT professor Marvin Minksy.
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Offline azozeo

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Re: 🗡️ Jeffrey Epstein dead in apparent suicide
« Reply #6 on: August 10, 2019, 10:50:11 AM »
That saves a little taxpayer money.

RE

Jeffrey Epstein dead in apparent suicide

By Larry Celona and Eileen AJ Connelly

August 10, 2019 | 8:56am | Updated


Jeffrey Epstein Patrick McMullan via Getty Image

More On:
jeffrey epstein
Creepy phone messages revealed in Jeffrey Epstein document dump
Twisted photos unsealed in Jeffrey Epstein 'sex slave' case
Jeffrey Epstein demanded '3 orgasms a day... like eating': court docs
Jeffrey Epstein's alleged 'sex slave' reveals the men she claims she was forced to sleep with

Convicted pedophile Jeffrey Epstein died overnight in an apparent suicide, law enforcement sources told the Post Saturday.

A gurney carrying a man who looked like Epstein was wheeled out of the Manhattan Correctional Center around 7:30 a.m. and headed to New York Downtown Hospital. A call for a reported cardiac arrest came in at 6:38 a.m., Fire Department sources said.

Two weeks ago, Epstein, 66, was placed on suicide watch after he was found nearly unconscious in his cell with injuries to his neck.

The multimillionaire financier was being held without bail pending trial on child sex-trafficking charges.

Epstein was busted July 6 over the alleged sexual abuse of dozens of young girls in his Upper East Side townhouse and his waterfront mansion in Palm, Beach, Florida, between 2002 and 2005. He pleaded not guilty and faced up to 45 years in prison.

Thousands of documents unsealed Friday in connection with a defamation case against the perv’s alleged recruiter revealed dozens of high-profile names that a self-identified victim, Virginia Giuffre, said she was forced to perform sex acts with, from former Maine Sen. George Mitchell and ex-New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson, money manager Glenn Dubin and MIT professor Marvin Minksy.


It only took "we the people" 50 years to figure out 35's killer. With today's transparency, next Monday should have the answer  :icon_mrgreen:
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline RE

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Re: 🗡️ Jeffrey Epstein dead in apparent suicide
« Reply #7 on: August 10, 2019, 11:21:01 AM »

It only took "we the people" 50 years to figure out 35's killer. With today's transparency, next Monday should have the answer  :icon_mrgreen:

After reading a few more articles, I don't think it was suicide.  I think he got offed.  He could have testified against too many Pigmen & Politicians.

RE
Save As Many As You Can

Offline azozeo

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Re: 🗡️ Jeffrey Epstein dead in apparent suicide
« Reply #8 on: August 10, 2019, 05:46:35 PM »

It only took "we the people" 50 years to figure out 35's killer. With today's transparency, next Monday should have the answer  :icon_mrgreen:

After reading a few more articles, I don't think it was suicide.  I think he got offed.  He could have testified against too many Pigmen & Politicians.

RE


He was offered lethal & took it.  :evil4:

Releases the spirit back to the cosmos, to be reckoned with off planet.
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline azozeo

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Re: 🗡️ Jeffrey Epstein dead in apparent suicide
« Reply #9 on: August 11, 2019, 01:33:34 PM »

It only took "we the people" 50 years to figure out 35's killer. With today's transparency, next Monday should have the answer  :icon_mrgreen:

After reading a few more articles, I don't think it was suicide.  I think he got offed.  He could have testified against too many Pigmen & Politicians.

RE


Here ya' go. From the horses mouth ....

https://nypost.com/2019/08/10/former-mcc-inmate-theres-no-way-jeffrey-epstein-killed-himself/
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline RE

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Re: 🗡️ Jeffrey Epstein dead in apparent suicide
« Reply #10 on: August 11, 2019, 02:04:42 PM »

It only took "we the people" 50 years to figure out 35's killer. With today's transparency, next Monday should have the answer  :icon_mrgreen:

After reading a few more articles, I don't think it was suicide.  I think he got offed.  He could have testified against too many Pigmen & Politicians.

RE


Here ya' go. From the horses mouth ....

https://nypost.com/2019/08/10/former-mcc-inmate-theres-no-way-jeffrey-epstein-killed-himself/


Yup.  You try commiting Seppuku with no sword, no plastic bag to put over your head...NADA.

Next up on the Chopping Block of outrageously rich pervs is Prince Andrew.  The Brit tabloids will have a field day with that one.

RE
« Last Edit: August 11, 2019, 02:06:47 PM by RE »
Save As Many As You Can

Offline azozeo

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Re: 🗡️ Jeffrey Epstein dead in apparent suicide
« Reply #11 on: August 11, 2019, 02:15:34 PM »

It only took "we the people" 50 years to figure out 35's killer. With today's transparency, next Monday should have the answer  :icon_mrgreen:

After reading a few more articles, I don't think it was suicide.  I think he got offed.  He could have testified against too many Pigmen & Politicians.

RE


Here ya' go. From the horses mouth ....

https://nypost.com/2019/08/10/former-mcc-inmate-theres-no-way-jeffrey-epstein-killed-himself/


Yup.  You try commiting Seppuku with no sword, no plastic bag to put over your head...NADA.

Next up on the Chopping Block of outrageously rich pervs is Prince Andrew.  The Brit tabloids will have a field day with that one.

RE


I never have tasted "Royal bar-b-que'd Homo Sushi"

Maybe triple 6 has. He needs to drop us a line on this blue blood massacre. Triple 6 part deux is in order.....  :icon_mrgreen:
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline azozeo

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Re: 🗡️ Jeffrey Epstein dead in apparent suicide
« Reply #12 on: August 11, 2019, 02:19:58 PM »

It only took "we the people" 50 years to figure out 35's killer. With today's transparency, next Monday should have the answer  :icon_mrgreen:

After reading a few more articles, I don't think it was suicide.  I think he got offed.  He could have testified against too many Pigmen & Politicians.

RE


Here ya' go. From the horses mouth ....

https://nypost.com/2019/08/10/former-mcc-inmate-theres-no-way-jeffrey-epstein-killed-himself/


Yup.  You try commiting Seppuku with no sword, no plastic bag to put over your head...NADA.

Next up on the Chopping Block of outrageously rich pervs is Prince Andrew.  The Brit tabloids will have a field day with that one.

RE


I wonder if Dandy Andi will squeal like a "pigman" before his whack job. Don't touch that dial.

I'm as giddy as sophomore school girl over Big Ben's Monday Morning Q/B talk on Woo-Woo newz about all of this poor 1% er'  misfortune.....
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline azozeo

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Re: 🗡️ Jeffrey Epstein dead in apparent suicide
« Reply #13 on: August 11, 2019, 02:35:24 PM »

It only took "we the people" 50 years to figure out 35's killer. With today's transparency, next Monday should have the answer  :icon_mrgreen:

After reading a few more articles, I don't think it was suicide.  I think he got offed.  He could have testified against too many Pigmen & Politicians.

RE


Here ya' go. From the horses mouth ....

https://nypost.com/2019/08/10/former-mcc-inmate-theres-no-way-jeffrey-epstein-killed-himself/


Yup.  You try commiting Seppuku with no sword, no plastic bag to put over your head...NADA.

Next up on the Chopping Block of outrageously rich pervs is Prince Andrew.  The Brit tabloids will have a field day with that one.

RE



The biggest shit-storm I've been able to find on Andi is he groped young girls. Hef did that all his adult life & went  to a happy grave.
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline RE

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Re: 🗡️ Jeffrey Epstein dead in apparent suicide
« Reply #14 on: August 11, 2019, 02:55:55 PM »

It only took "we the people" 50 years to figure out 35's killer. With today's transparency, next Monday should have the answer  :icon_mrgreen:

After reading a few more articles, I don't think it was suicide.  I think he got offed.  He could have testified against too many Pigmen & Politicians.

RE


Here ya' go. From the horses mouth ....

https://nypost.com/2019/08/10/former-mcc-inmate-theres-no-way-jeffrey-epstein-killed-himself/


Yup.  You try commiting Seppuku with no sword, no plastic bag to put over your head...NADA.

Next up on the Chopping Block of outrageously rich pervs is Prince Andrew.  The Brit tabloids will have a field day with that one.

RE



The biggest shit-storm I've been able to find on Andi is he groped young girls. Hef did that all his adult life & went  to a happy grave.

Playboy models were 18+.  Far as we know, Hef stayed on the legal side of the line.

RE
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