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Offline Eddie

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Seastead of the Day
« on: January 14, 2018, 05:13:14 PM »
I can't find the old thread.

I don''t know why I love these huge old William Garden designed boats so much...maybe because my partner likes the huge salons and the views from the huge pilothouses. But I like big boats too. Harder to sail and especially hard to maneuver in tight quarters....but comfie. Very comfie.



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Offline RE

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2018, 07:07:00 PM »
I can't find the old thread.

I don''t know why I love these huge old William Garden designed boats so much...maybe because my partner likes the huge salons and the views from the huge pilothouses. But I like big boats too. Harder to sail and especially hard to maneuver in tight quarters....but comfie. Very comfie.


That's one of the nicest so far.   :icon_sunny:  I like the big Pilot Houses also.  Who wants to stand out in cold rain manning the tiller if you don't have to? ???  :icon_scratch:

Even in good shape I wouldn't want to sail a boat that size solo though.  Minimum one crew, better 2. Preferably female crew with nice TITS!  :icon_sunny: Maintenance costs also expensive.  However, if you run into one ON SALE for say $50K, I'm IN for half!  :icon_sunny:

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Offline Eddie

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2018, 09:32:36 PM »
Forgot the link. The broker has two that look pretty good. These were poorly built boats...looks like these two have had someone's life savings poured into them, to still look this good at this age.

http://www.yachtworld.com/seakistyachtsales/
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Offline RE

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #3 on: January 14, 2018, 10:06:34 PM »
Forgot the link. The broker has two that look pretty good. These were poorly built boats...looks like these two have had someone's life savings poured into them, to still look this good at this age.

http://www.yachtworld.com/seakistyachtsales/

$99.5K is a bit pricy right now.  I'll need to wait for Amazon to buy Kohls for that one.

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Offline RE

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #4 on: January 15, 2018, 03:26:59 AM »
Given my physical limitations, I don't want to ignore the power boats here.  I know they won't run once you can't get diesel and they are polluters, but I would probably sail/drive it even less than my carz.

There are a lot of variants on these, but this restored Tugboat from 1897   :o is a real winner!








http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1897/Tacoma-Tugboat-Classic-Tug-2737240/Newport/RI/United-States#.WlyNYjeUuUk

Asking $163K though, so currently out of budget.  :(

RE
« Last Edit: January 15, 2018, 05:56:05 AM by RE »
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Offline Eddie

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #5 on: January 15, 2018, 08:48:16 AM »
My old sailing buddy sold his big sailboat and bought a trawler. It was a good decision for him. It makes things easier, but you still have docking to think about...and fuel costs are high, but for a single engine small diesel not too bad as of yet. Tied up in the marina, not that much difference in the lifestyle...and that's where most boats reside most of the time, or on a mooring somewhere.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #6 on: January 15, 2018, 11:47:48 AM »
My old sailing buddy sold his big sailboat and bought a trawler. It was a good decision for him. It makes things easier, but you still have docking to think about...and fuel costs are high, but for a single engine small diesel not too bad as of yet. Tied up in the marina, not that much difference in the lifestyle...and that's where most boats reside most of the time, or on a mooring somewhere.

Not worried about the cost of Diesel.  It would be like SaVANnah.  I filled her up at the beginning of winter and the needle is still on full.  I drove her once in Dec just to give her some exercise when the roads were clear of snow and ice.   I use my Explorer all winter because it has 4WD.  SaVANnah stays parked under the carport plugged in to keep the batt topped off and keep the snow off. The Tug would stay parked in the Marina except when Diners came for convocations, then I would have everyone chip in for fuel to go cruising and fishing.  Besides cooking, I could Pilot the boat so I would feel useful.  At the top of that tower, I would feel like King of the Seven Seas!  :icon_sunny:  I would have bow thrusters installed to improve maneuverability in docking.  The best in electronics and navigation, sonar, radar, gps, HAM radio, the WORKS!  My office and the Diner Command & Control center would also be up in the Pilot House.

Marina cost, no different than a sailboat of the same length.  At 62' relatively expensive, but still probably not much more than I pay in rent.  Plus, look at the size of that transom!  What a Back Porch!  :o  Plus no standing rigging or boom in the way to set up a Gazebo or large 10 person tent for lots of Diners if all the berths inside are full up.  What a Party Boat!  ;D

However, at $160K not happening unless Kohl's does a Bitcoin, which is unlikely.  :(  I can still dream though, and use my imagination.  :icon_sunny:


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Offline Palloy2

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #7 on: January 15, 2018, 02:21:47 PM »
A 62' gin palace, tied up in the marina all the time.  And when the time comes for making  a run for the South Pacific, it is limited to its current tank of fuel, probably less than 100  nautical miles. No hand holds anywhere, on deck or below, but a really neat hexagonal shade house on half of the deck.

But think of the opportunities for spending more money on useless crap!



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Offline Eddie

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #8 on: January 15, 2018, 04:12:36 PM »
Palloy is more of a Blondie Hassler type. I'm sure he will recognize this vessel. This is as minimalist as it gets.



What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #9 on: January 15, 2018, 04:39:05 PM »
A 62' gin palace, tied up in the marina all the time.  And when the time comes for making  a run for the South Pacific, it is limited to its current tank of fuel, probably less than 100  nautical miles. No hand holds anywhere, on deck or below, but a really neat hexagonal shade house on half of the deck.

Obviously, with this type of boat I'm not making a FINAL RUN for the South Pacific.

However, if I had it parked in my Fantasy Marina location in Bar Harbor, Maine, I could make a run for a secluded cove on one of the many islands dotting the coastline there.  I could get my chosen Bugout Location all prepped up with buried caches of food, seeds, etc.

Besides, I am buying the thing (if I actually had enough money for that, which I don't and still have a good reserve) as a nice place to LIVE before SHTF Day arrives!  Even YOU don't live on a shrimpy 20' cat, you have a McHovel in the tropical rainforest, complete with electricity, running water and the occassional sneaky Python who wants to share the place with you.

Besides all that, WTF is wrong with a Gin Palace? ???  :icon_scratch:

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« Last Edit: January 15, 2018, 06:03:51 PM by RE »
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Offline RE

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Seastead of the Day: NEW Seasteading SHTF Day Bugout Plan!
« Reply #10 on: January 16, 2018, 07:49:18 AM »
I have developed a NEW SHTF Day Bugout Plan around the Tug and the chosen location of Bar Harbor Maine as residence until SHTF Day arrives.

The plan incorporates 2 boats, the 62' Tug and a 24' Folding Trimaran.

 

The Tug is the main domicile in the Bar Harbor Marina.  The trimaran is kept safely and cheaply in a storage facility stocked with preps.  It can be ramp launched though for fun day sailing until SHTF Day arrives.  It's a trailerable boat.

Here is the chart for the overall neighborhood around Bar Harbor, including Swans Island which is the Bugout Location for SHTF Day.

Swans Island 4
Swans Island 4

The red circles on Swans Island are where Preps are buried for SHTF Day.  Here is a closeup view of Swans Island

Swans Island 2
Swans Island 2

As of the 2010 Census, Swans Island had a population of 332 people.  Only accessible to the general public by ferry, which won't be running after SHTF Day arrives.  You'll need a boat of some type to get there.

When SHTF Day comes, you pull the Trimaran out of the storage facility and launch at the Marina.  The Tug pulls the trimaran to your Swans Island Doomstead location  It's only around 10 NM, it won't use much Diesel.  You set up your Doomstead location with the tools and materials you have in the buried caches.

The Trimaran is used to commute to the mainland and conserve diesel for the Tug.  If you run into diesel you can barter for, you have a couple of 10 Gal Jerry Cans to bring it back to Swans Island, and a couple of 55 Gal drums besides the tanks on the Tug to store diesel in.  Your barter goods are fish and lobsters mainly, until you get your Greenhouses and Hydroponics set up to barter veggies with.  This will take a while as you will need to scavenge glass from abandoned McMansions and ship it back to Swans Island.

Electric power is supplied by Solar PV and Wind Turbines (plenty of wind there!).  Batts are scavenged automotive batteries.  Plenty of wood available for heat and charcoal gasification.  Water mainly supplied by rainwater catchment, although there is fresh groundwater available also.  You also have your on board desalinator on the Tug, run by solar PV panels.

I think this is my best plan yet that allows you to remain part of BAU until SHTF Day arrives, but also allows you to quickly exit to a *relatively* safe location to ride out the Zombie years.

RE
« Last Edit: January 16, 2018, 08:08:18 AM by RE »
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Online Nearingsfault

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #11 on: January 16, 2018, 08:51:42 AM »
Charcoal gasification... Nice touch.
If its important then try something, fail, disect, learn from it, try again, and again and again until it kills you or you succeed.

Offline Eddie

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #12 on: January 16, 2018, 09:33:30 AM »
I think the best vessel for a SHTF plan would an upgraded cruising liveaboard sailboat with a later model replacement diesel and huge tanks for motoring if that's needed. It isn't uncommon to see boats that are good for 2 thousand nautical miles ( 5 knots/hr @ 1 gallon/hr burn rate X 400 gallon tanks).  You wouldn't have to use diesel much, hopefully, so it could be conserved.

I'd want most of my preps onboard and not at the mercy of 332 island zombies.

Size of boat is debatable. Bigger boat holds more stuff, but are hard to single hand. Two good sailors can handle a properly rigged sailboat of 50 ft in good weather, but in a gale I'd prefer a 36 footer, or even an old Westsail 32. Those are one of the most seaworthy production boats ever built. There are documented cases of sailors who abandoned ship in bad storms, and the boats turning up thousands of miles away months later. Tough little bastards.

I remember reading about the the guy who did that. He said the thing he wished for in that Force 10 gale most of all was a helmet to protect his head as he got thrown around inside the cabin as the ocean tried to smash his little craft to bits.

Might have been this book. It's been a long time.

What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Eddie

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #13 on: January 16, 2018, 11:24:44 AM »
I still say this is the best deal on a cruising boat in the entire country. Too bad it's on the other side of the Panama Canal from me, and lying in an expensive Cali marina. It appears to have everything I want except some better electronics. One of the nicest owner built boats I've ever seen, and for sale at 25% (or less) of its cost to build.

I'm sure there would be some issues related to minor things. The boat appears to have never been sailed much at all. Nearly new, and rigged with all the best stuff. Not a fan of in-mast furling, but it makes it easier if the equipment functions properly.



The designer of the hull was John Samson, not "Sampson" as the ad states. He was the best of the ferrocement designer/builders and many of his boats are still afloat.

https://sites.google.com/site/johnsamsonmemorium/Home/samson-marine-and-cruising

Probably good for at least 800 miles under power with 200 gallon tanks and the Lehman tractor engine, even though the boat is huge.



What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Eddie

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #14 on: January 16, 2018, 11:32:49 AM »
That one or this junk, which also appears to still be for sale in Guatemala.


http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1977/Colvin-steel-adapted-chinese-junk-2379967/Rio-Dulce/Guatemala#.Wl5S3ZM-cWo


I emailed the broker about the two big Formosas, and he emailed me back. Not that hard to buy a US registered boat in Guatemala. No local taxes, and there are outfits (sort of like a title company for real estate) that handle the funds escrow and title transfer. I am going to continue to investigate Rio Dulce, which wouldn't be the worst place to keep a boat, in terms of cost. It would be a convenient jumping off place for a SHTF scenario, and worst case I could drive there from here as long as fuel is available.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

 

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