AuthorTopic: Seastead of the Day  (Read 40727 times)

Offline RE

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #15 on: January 16, 2018, 11:38:31 AM »
I think the best vessel for a SHTF plan would an upgraded cruising liveaboard sailboat with a later model replacement diesel and huge tanks for motoring if that's needed. It isn't uncommon to see boats that are good for 2 thousand nautical miles ( 5 knots/hr @ 1 gallon/hr burn rate X 400 gallon tanks).  You wouldn't have to use diesel much, hopefully, so it could be conserved.

The type of boat you are decribing is a Motorsailer.  They are slow under sail and don't sail well to windward, but they have HUGE tanks and big ass diesel engines and can motor all the way across the Atlantic if necessary.  Very roomy with lots of space to store preps.  You could easily substitute this type of boat for the Tug in my SHTF Bugout Plan.


However, my plan doesn't include doing any trans-atlantic crossings.  You have to have a place to bugout TO and be able to get it ready for SHTF Day.  That's why I picked this location in Maine.  I could easily make regular trips before SHTF Day getting the area ready, even planting some trees that bear fruit.  The sail capability isn't necessary for this, and you don't have all the standing rigging and boom in the way.  All that is also extra maintenance cost as well.

Quote
I'd want most of my preps onboard and not at the mercy of 332 island zombies.

The reason I chose Swans Island is BECAUSE there are 332 people living there.  There are plenty of uninhabited islands in the neighborhood also you could set up shop.  However, as we have discussed, for long term survival you need a COMMUNITY.   In a small community like this, everyone knows each other, they're going to pull together when SHTF Day arrives.  They likely all have boats and fish at least recreationally, plus they stock up on food as a matter of course.  Everyone who lives in remote places does this.  So they shouldn't be starving right off the bat.

I would be making regular trips to the island, so I would get to know the locals and wouldn't be a stranger.  I would share my preps when SHTF day comes, which also would get me brownie points.  Then we all set about making the island suitable for some food growing as well as fishing.  Eating just fish all the time gets old.

Quote
Size of boat is debatable. Bigger boat holds more stuff, but are hard to single hand. Two good sailors can handle a properly rigged sailboat of 50 ft in good weather, but in a gale I'd prefer a 36 footer, or even an old Westsail 32.

Again, my plan doesn't involve any Blue Water crossings, and I don't envision sailing in any Force 10 Gales.  The boats stay chained to a really big ass mooring with heavy chain when it gets too windy.

The small trimaran provides all the sailing capability needed to shuttle back and forth to the mainland for trade purposes and not use up diesel.  I probably would not risk this trip for the first year or even two, but after that the population should have decreased enough there wouldn't be so much danger of being attacked by roving bands of Zombies when you arrive.

RE
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Offline RE

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #16 on: January 16, 2018, 11:51:22 AM »
I am going to continue to investigate Rio Dulce, which wouldn't be the worst place to keep a boat, in terms of cost. It would be a convenient jumping off place for a SHTF scenario, and worst case I could drive there from here as long as fuel is available.

Somehow when SHTF Day arrives, I doubt you would be able to drive to Guatemala.  Borders would be locked up tighter than a Catholic School Virgin, and gas availability for you car would be nil.

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Offline Eddie

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #17 on: January 16, 2018, 11:54:25 AM »
The only production boats that come with huge tankage are motorsailors (that much is true) , but neither boat I just posted is a motorsailor, and both still have excellent range under power.

The junk even has your bow thruster. It has 600 gallons of fuel tankage too. Obviously built by someone who anticipated long trips under power. Also one of the best cruising boats I've even seen. Junks can even be beached. I would only worry about whether the steel hull is sound, and a survey will tell.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Eddie

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #18 on: January 16, 2018, 11:58:55 AM »
I am going to continue to investigate Rio Dulce, which wouldn't be the worst place to keep a boat, in terms of cost. It would be a convenient jumping off place for a SHTF scenario, and worst case I could drive there from here as long as fuel is available.

Somehow when SHTF Day arrives, I doubt you would be able to drive to Guatemala.  Borders would be locked up tighter than a Catholic School Virgin, and gas availability for you car would be nil.

RE

Maybe, maybe not. If I had the boat there, there's always a chance the S could HTF on a day when I'm there sailing already. I'm thinking I have about five years still to prep. I'm not going to be ready for sailing away next week anyway. If the SHTF next week, I go pig farmer full time.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Eddie

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #19 on: January 16, 2018, 12:10:20 PM »
People do frequently walk from Guatemala to here, so there is some chance of making it going the other way. Or I could steal a boat here and sail there, possibly, leaving it parked on a side street with the keys in the ignition.  :)
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #20 on: January 16, 2018, 12:11:05 PM »
Charcoal gasification... Nice touch.

I dropped that one in just for you DB.  ;D

RE
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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #21 on: January 16, 2018, 12:20:18 PM »
People do frequently walk from Guatemala to here, so there is some chance of making it going the other way. Or I could steal a boat here and sail there, possibly, leaving it parked on a side street with the keys in the ignition.  :)

By the time you walked from Austin to Guatemala, somebody would have stolen your Junk, and/or raided it for all the preps.  Your plan to steal a boat to get there faster is better.

Unless you are living on the boat full time, the chances you will be on board when SHTF Day arrives decrease the more days you are away from it.  So your plan basically requires you to be retired and living in Guatemala.

In my plan, you could still be working as a Dentist in Bar Harbor.  Probably not making as much money as you do with your own practice in Austin, but it wouldn't be minimum wage either and your expenses would be way less.  Can you get a license to practice in Maine?

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Offline Eddie

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #22 on: January 16, 2018, 01:28:54 PM »
Not sure anybody in Maine even has teeth. I doubt it. :)

The original plan I was kicking around was to just buy a boat in Guatemala and sail it here, which is a do-able trip. Here would probably really be the Corpus Christi marina, which is a first rate floating dock behind a great breakwater. Most boats there did well in the recent Harvey test, while docks in Rockport  (a nicer small town just up the coast) got washed clean away. That's still a 3 hr drive.

But the thing about Rio Dulce is that you'd already be in an area where the native populations wouldn't much notice a collapse of the US credit system.  A Ray Jason kind of place. And convenient to head to the Pacific, if that seemed to be the place to go. Or you could go anywhere in the Caribbean very easily too.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Nearingsfault

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #23 on: January 16, 2018, 04:43:05 PM »
I have a life goal of taking a multi week sailing course. I had a laser in my teens and did some day sailing later but never anything journey like. It will have to wait until the girls are older I suppose. If It was my SHTF day plan I would want everything aboard and close. Dole it out to helpful locals as you get established in Maine.  I know this little burb would turn inwards in times of trouble and pre existing arrangements with outsiders would be dicey. Your stash would be appropriated "for the common good" in a heart beat if you were not already there. I can't imagine small maritime communities would be any different.
One of my woodgas websites has some postings about woodgas boats. Usually they are eastern european and river boats but really interesting.  Even I would admit maritime gasifiers are not a likely scenario.
If its important then try something, fail, disect, learn from it, try again, and again and again until it kills you or you succeed.

Offline Eddie

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #24 on: January 16, 2018, 05:57:07 PM »
I took a week-long course once,on the coast here. Long ago now. I got food poisoning from the chicken the "captain" served us the first night and ended up having projectile vomiting and diarrhea at the same time in the wee hours. I had to take a Benadryl and as a result of all that the first day or two I was basically a passenger. I did get my "bareboat certificate".

In the mid nineties I had this very serendipitous  opportunity to sail to the USVI from Florida. It took us nine days. A very fine experience, which I doubt I'll ever get to repeat, although I dream of sailing from Texas back to St John and anchoring out for a while. A year seems about right.

That voyage was on a 63 foot Palmer Johnson schooner that looked kind of like this boat below.





Since then I looked into sailing in the Pacific on a tall ship for a three week stint. It would have been on that vessel that they used for the Endurance in that great PBS show about Ernest Shackleton. Not sure if you've ever seen that. It's quite good, and a remarkable true adventure story. I really intended to do it, but I got sidetracked and didn't follow through. The real ship is called the Soren Larsen. I tried to get RE to buy it, but he said it was too much. I think they only wanted about 2 million. We shoulda bought bitcoin.



<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/xLkA8oLwZ3I&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/xLkA8oLwZ3I&fs=1</a>
The Soren Larsen at sea.
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Offline RE

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #25 on: January 16, 2018, 06:06:53 PM »
I have a life goal of taking a multi week sailing course. I had a laser in my teens and did some day sailing later but never anything journey like. It will have to wait until the girls are older I suppose. If It was my SHTF day plan I would want everything aboard and close. Dole it out to helpful locals as you get established in Maine.  I know this little burb would turn inwards in times of trouble and pre existing arrangements with outsiders would be dicey. Your stash would be appropriated "for the common good" in a heart beat if you were not already there. I can't imagine small maritime communities would be any different.
One of my woodgas websites has some postings about woodgas boats. Usually they are eastern european and river boats but really interesting.  Even I would admit maritime gasifiers are not a likely scenario.

Well, I only showed 2 burial locations fo my prep caches, but actually I would have them buried in numerous locations on many of the uninhabited islands in the neighborhood.  The only way the locals could get the locations from me would be to torture me.  Easier just to keep me alive and I dole out the locations as needed.

RE
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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #26 on: January 16, 2018, 06:45:49 PM »
I learned to sail at the ritzy Summer Camp I went to in the late 60s-early 70s.  They had 10 Sunfish sailboats on the lake, along with 2 water ski boats, canoes and rowboats.  I was big into water stuff because I was a good swimmer from my years in Brazil body surfing at Ipanema beach and swimming & diving at the pool in the Country Club Dad the Pigman was a member of, Club Ipica.  So I spent the whole second half of the scheduled day at camp after lunch at the waterfront.


Most of my bigger boat experience came on my dad's boat when he was down in Oz,  it was a 32' homebuilt wood boat he bought cheap.  We only coastal sailed it locally though.  My biggest adventure  came on a friend of his racing boat, sailing down to Tasmania in the Sydney to Hobart race.  I signed on as crew for that.  Talk about windy!  yeesh!  We didn't do great, back of the pack but we made it.

I got my Bareboat certificate on my trip to the Greek Islands in the 70's, as part of a 2 week vacation on a Flotilla boat. 28' Hunters as I recall. There was one lead boat with the flotilla staff, and about 20 boats in the flotilla.  They tested you the first day to make sure you knew SOMETHING about sailing, and then you sailed the boat yourself for the 2 weeks.  You could always radio the lead boat if you got into trouble and needed help.  My friend Mike who was an intern at the hospital I worked at was with me, he was from New Zealand with lots of sailing experience.  Also 2 nurses.  :icon_sunny:

No idea where that certificate is anymore, but I am not going to be doing any charter sailing myself in the future so it doesn't matter.  I am fit to man the tiller, that's about it.  Only way I put to sea is with some fit crew members, preferably female with nice TITS!  :icon_mrgreen:


RE
« Last Edit: January 16, 2018, 07:40:20 PM by RE »
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Offline Palloy2

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #27 on: January 16, 2018, 11:49:44 PM »
Quote
WTF is wrong with a Gin Palace?

Only that they can't go to sea, which for a boat is a bit of a problem.  I don't go for Maine at latitude  44 and with severely cold winters.  What do you want to go keep going back and forth to the mainland FOR?  - to buy more electronic gadgets and fuel.

Actually my new electronic gadget arrived today - an ATA box and a cordless phone.  I finally had to give up on my VoIP system - Linux drivers for sound devices are limited.
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Offline RE

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #28 on: January 17, 2018, 12:09:55 AM »
Quote
WTF is wrong with a Gin Palace?

Only that they can't go to sea, which for a boat is a bit of a problem.  I don't go for Maine at latitude  44 and with severely cold winters.  What do you want to go keep going back and forth to the mainland FOR?  - to buy more electronic gadgets and fuel.

Actually my new electronic gadget arrived today - an ATA box and a cordless phone.  I finally had to give up on my VoIP system - Linux drivers for sound devices are limited.

As I said, this plan does not involve, "going to sea".  It is designed to make you mobile among many small islands off the coast of Maine.

The reason to eventually contact surviving mainlanders is trade.  There might be oranges being sailed up from florida to trade for cod or stripers.

RE
« Last Edit: January 17, 2018, 12:14:22 AM by RE »
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Offline RE

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Seastead of the Day: Crewing the Good Ship Diner
« Reply #29 on: January 17, 2018, 06:16:12 AM »
I just won the Mega-Millions Jackpot for $1B.    :o :icon_sunny:

I am custom designing a Seastead for Diners and am currently interviewing possible crew members to staff the ship.  It's a BIG BOAT, 120' at the waterline.  We will not need a BIGGER BOAT than this.  I will detail features of the Good Ship Doomstead Diner at a later date.  Diners are invited to suggest features for the new boat, so I can communicate them to the shipyard in China building it.

Since it is such a large boat, it will need a large crew.  I am currently interviewing for the position of Captain and have whittled it down to 2 final candidates.  Diners are invited to help me make a decision on the most qualified candidate.  My rank is Commodore, and I will henceforth be referred to as Cmdr. RE.  :icon_sunny:  I swear I will not abuse my rank and take advantage of the crew.  ::)

I will provide a short Bio & Pic of the final candidates for each position as crew member.  Below are the first two competitors for the position of Captain.  I will base my final decision on recommendations from the Diners.  Please let me know why you chose the candidate you did.

Position: Captain

Janet

Bio:

Janet was Captain of the sailing team at Florida State University.  As a 16 year old, she solo circumnavigated the globe in a 32' wood boat built by her father, a Dentist in Texas in his spare time.  Janet's hobbies include singing and playing the guitar.

Ludmila

Bio:

Ludmila was a Lieutenant in the Ruskie Navy before she emigrated to the FSoA.  She graduated Magna Cum Laude as a Mechanical Engineer from Moscow University, where she also was on the Sailing Team.  She is an expert marksman andcross country skier, and competed in the Olypmics in Biathalon.  Her hobbies include playing Chess and Drawing.



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