AuthorTopic: Seastead of the Day  (Read 37221 times)

Offline Eddie

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #135 on: February 06, 2018, 09:44:11 AM »
Good boats everywhere I look these days. This one is in Oregon. I like the look of her a lot.


http://sailingtexas.com/201801/sacapulco40101.html
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #136 on: February 06, 2018, 10:41:17 AM »
In Seattle?

No, this one is in CA.  Long Beach.

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Offline Nearingsfault

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #137 on: February 06, 2018, 11:51:06 AM »
Good boats everywhere I look these days. This one is in Oregon. I like the look of her a lot.


http://sailingtexas.com/201801/sacapulco40101.html
That add was so well written and detailed I forgot for a minute I have two little kids. It had me ready to pick up a phone. I really liked the detail on the on board equipment.  You can picture someone just topping up the stores and heading out. It sounds like the boat is itching to be out there again doing what it was meant to do. It brightened my day.
If its important then try something, fail, disect, learn from it, try again, and again and again until it kills you or you succeed.

Offline Eddie

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #138 on: February 06, 2018, 12:45:27 PM »
Good boats everywhere I look these days. This one is in Oregon. I like the look of her a lot.


http://sailingtexas.com/201801/sacapulco40101.html
That add was so well written and detailed I forgot for a minute I have two little kids. It had me ready to pick up a phone. I really liked the detail on the on board equipment.  You can picture someone just topping up the stores and heading out. It sounds like the boat is itching to be out there again doing what it was meant to do. It brightened my day.

My old friend the late Captain Jack told me once that most people who died in the islands in hurricanes were on their boats. I asked him what the hell they'd be doing on their boat if they knew a  hurricane was coming.

He said this:

Sailors travel all over the world, through storms and weather and rogue waves and everything else. Their attitude generally is that their boat has taken care of them, and so they feel deeply that they have an obligation to take care of their boat.

When I read an ad like that one above, I always think of that story. That boat went around the world and hit all the typical ports of call circumnavigators hit, and had work done in the all the usual yards (where it's much cheaper to get stuff done than here.) I'd love to read the owner's account of their adventures. It sure sounds like they had plenty.

My guess is that old age made them leave their boat and the cruising life.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #139 on: February 06, 2018, 01:18:01 PM »
Good boats everywhere I look these days. This one is in Oregon. I like the look of her a lot.


http://sailingtexas.com/201801/sacapulco40101.html
That add was so well written and detailed I forgot for a minute I have two little kids. It had me ready to pick up a phone. I really liked the detail on the on board equipment.  You can picture someone just topping up the stores and heading out. It sounds like the boat is itching to be out there again doing what it was meant to do. It brightened my day.

Eddie's find is a really good one.  I've got another one for tomorrow in the motor sailer division.  Eddie's wins though for two reasons.  One is that PRICE!  :o  That is just amazing with all that is included!  Second is the location in OR.  That's closer to Peter in Ocean Falls then the one I found in CA.  Only thing I don't like is no fully enclosed Pilot House.

You don't have to give up the dream just because you have kids.  Lots of Yachties raise their kids on sailboats.

http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/ct-sun-0802-balancing-act-20150731-column.html

Sailboat family: Raising three kids under 3 with ocean for a backyard


Brittany Meyers with her three daughters, 16-month-old twins Haven and Mira, and Isla, 3, on their sailboat. Meyers and her husband, Scott, live most of the year on their sailboat in the British Virgin Islands. (Brittany Meyers)

Brittany Meyers and her husband, Scott, live on a 44-foot sailboat in the British Virgin Islands with their three children, all under 3.

"This surprises zero people who know us," Meyers, 36, told me. "When I was younger, my main goal was to live in Africa."

She was volunteering in East Africa during her 20s, in fact, when a safari company executive approached her with a job offer.

"He said, 'Do you have any marketing experience?'" she recalled. "All I had done is wait tables, but I was, like, 'That's marketing.' So I ended up working for the safari company for three years."

Her husband, 39, bought his first boat at age 28 with plans to live on it in chilly, gray Seattle.

"He's been a … nomad all his life," Meyers said.

They met while racing sailboats on Lake Michigan. So when the couple, then childless, quit their jobs in Chicago and set sail in 2010, their family and friends didn't register much surprise.

They returned home in 2012 to have their first daughter, Isla, sold their old boat, bought a larger boat and headed back onto the water.

Then Meyers learned she was expecting twins. Haven and Mira were born 16 months ago, and the family wasted no time setting sail a few months later.

Meyers said they plan to stay on the boat for the next 10 years or so. They're weighing their schooling options (island public schools, island private schools, home schooling) and finding ways to supplement the money they saved before they first set sail. Scott has a 200-ton captain's license, so he works as a mariner when they're at sea and sells real estate when they're back home — typically for a few months during hurricane season.

I caught up with the Meyers at her parents' home in Arlington Heights, where the family will be staying until October. I asked her if it feels more or less constricting to live in a three-bedroom house in the suburb where she grew up.

"In some ways, it's a lot harder here," she said. "On the boat, the girls are never more than 12 feet away from me. I always tell people, 'Boats are actually pretty baby-proof, minus the whole surrounded-by-water thing.'"

The cabinets are all locked. Everything's fastened to the floor. Things don't topple over. When they're awake and sailing, the girls are tethered and harnessed to the boat.
Memories of summers past with no rules

None of which stops critics from accusing the couple of needlessly putting their kids in harm's way. Meyers chronicles their adventures on her blog, www.windtraveler.net, and on Facebook, where she frequently hears from people who think she's loony.

"They fall into two camps: First, the people who believe it's just unsafe to be surrounded by water," she says. "Second, the people who say our girls are being raised in a bubble and aren't getting socialized and are going to grow up and be freaks."

Freaks. Sure. From all that sunshine and quality time with their parents and exposure to other cultures.

"It's not like we're floating at sea for days and days on end," Meyers said. "We're in port a lot of the time. Our girls are around other kids all the time."

Yeah, but is it really fair to deny them the all-American childhood spent strapped into a car seat, riding from one scheduled activity to another?

"We sometimes feel bad they're not in soccer or gymnastics," Meyers said. "My husband especially, he was very much the athlete. But we go paddle boarding. They climb trees. They climb all over our boat. They're always interacting with the natural environment, so it's sort of a yin and yang."

And the together time is enviable.

"We definitely think of it as a gift," Meyers said. "We structured our lives and worked and saved, and for the most part, our girls have been with their mom and dad 24/7. I think that's a good thing."

I think it's a beautiful thing.

hstevens@tribpub.com

Twitter @heidistevens13
« Last Edit: February 06, 2018, 01:21:37 PM by RE »
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Offline Nearingsfault

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #140 on: February 06, 2018, 02:01:25 PM »
Interesting. Lets just say not never just highly unlikely. Plus I'm a single dad now. We might have ended up rving but the clock ran out.
If its important then try something, fail, disect, learn from it, try again, and again and again until it kills you or you succeed.

Offline RE

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⛵ Seastead of the Day: Best Boat for the $MONEY$ Competition
« Reply #141 on: February 07, 2018, 05:05:14 AM »
Note: After I composed this article, Eddie posted up a link to another boat which comes in at half the price of this one.  Both boats though come in at a price I can afford.  Both are of similar size, in the 45' range.  Both are located on the West Coast of the FSoA, one in CA, the other in OR.  Differences are the boat I found is about a decade younger than Eddie's find and one is designed more as a pure sailing vessel, the other a motor sailer.  However, the distinctions are blurred here because Eddie's find has an exceptionally large auxiliary engine and fuel storage tank for a sailboat this size; and the one I found appears to be a typical sailboat hull just with a motor sailer cabin top and deck arrangement.  Both appear to be very well maintained by caring owners.  The extremely low price of the one Eddie found makes it the tentative leader here in the overall competition for Best Boat for the $MONEY$, but you would actually have to get your boots on the ground where they are parked to have a look and decide.

We have a new leader in the Motor Sailer division of boats I can realistically afford!  :circle:  I am pretty much giving up on the Cats, I can't find one in the right size range at a reasonable enough price.

1983 Lancer Pilot House.  45', asking 69K, located Long Beach, CA.
http://www.boattrader.com/listing/1983-lancer-pilot-house-103149634/


Coming in @ 45', this boat is 11' longer than the 34' Wagstaff MS which was the previous leader.  It's coming in at the same price, and it's located in the FSoA, not NZ so no shipping cost.  It's only 3 years older than the Wagstaff, and it has a WHOPPING BIG 170hp Perkins Diesel with only 1550 hours on it.  Enclosed Pilot House that I am looking for.  Galley and Nav Station both look perfectly sized and well appointed.  Decent lines, looks like it would sail OK, although I would mainly be motoring it anyhow most of the time I actually took it out for a cruise, which would not be too often anyhow.  Regular maintenance record and upgrades.

 

 

 

I am seriously considering contacting the seller and heading down to Long Beeach to have a look at this vessel.

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Offline Eddie

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #142 on: February 07, 2018, 05:21:50 AM »
Lancers are not as heavily built as most motorsailers. In general the brand is known for the typical water intrusion problems (rotten decks and leaky ports) that a lot of boats of that era have, but they do vary. I'm sure there are some good ones. I had a friend who had a Lancer 28. No my favorite boats, but that one looks nice from a floating apartment POV.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #143 on: February 07, 2018, 05:46:08 AM »
Lancers are not as heavily built as most motorsailers. In general the brand is known for the typical water intrusion problems (rotten decks and leaky ports) that a lot of boats of that era have, but they do vary. I'm sure there are some good ones. I had a friend who had a Lancer 28. No my favorite boats, but that one looks nice from a floating apartment POV.

Like I said, you gotta get your boots on the ground and actually LOOK at it.  It's like my 1983 Tioga.  Many of the RVs from this period were leaky, the roof gave out, etc.  However, if you find one that hasn't had those problems in over 30 years, it's a WINNER!  :icon_sunny:  It was one of the ones that came off the production line really tight.  You can only know if you inspect it yourself.

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Offline RE

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⛵ Boat Bugouts Commentary on Global Economic Intersection
« Reply #144 on: February 07, 2018, 02:09:57 PM »
We have a good little discussion going on on Global Economic Intersection on the Boat Based Bugout Planning article, which JL published over there as well.  You might want to check out the commentary and chip in your 2 cents.

http://econintersect.com/pages/opinion/opinion.php?post=201802051935

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Offline RE

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Re: ⛵ Boat Bugouts Commentary on Global Economic Intersection
« Reply #145 on: February 07, 2018, 07:56:44 PM »
We have a good little discussion going on on Global Economic Intersection on the Boat Based Bugout Planning article, which JL published over there as well.  You might want to check out the commentary and chip in your 2 cents.

http://econintersect.com/pages/opinion/opinion.php?post=201802051935

RE

Eddie chipped in on the discussion on GEI, and I added a bit more as well.  I'm hoping to snag a couple of new Diners in Steve and Charles.  :icon_sunny:  Join the Party over there!

RE
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Offline RE

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #146 on: February 08, 2018, 06:03:01 AM »
Eddie mentioned that the problem with owning a boat isn't the up front cost, but rather the Marina fees.  He's basing this on the fees he would have to pay to put a houseboat under a covered slip on Lake Travis.  Of COURSE Lake Travis is expensive!  It's in the Austin RE Market!  Duh.

Here are the prices from the South Shore Harbor Marina in TX:

Boat Size     Slip Size    Monthly Rate     Per Slip Foot
 30′ and Less     30′     $232.50     $7.75
 30’–35′     35′     $271.25     $7.75
 36’–40′     40′     $320.00     $8.00
 41’–45′     45′     $360.00     $8.00
 46’–49′     50′     $400.00     $8.00
 50’–and Greater     60′     $480.00     $8.00

As you can see, a 45' boat is $360/mo.  Besides that, I'm paying the docking fee!  ::)

RE
« Last Edit: February 08, 2018, 06:18:46 AM by RE »
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Offline K-Dog

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Re: ⛵ Boat Bugouts Commentary on Global Economic Intersection
« Reply #147 on: February 08, 2018, 06:13:17 AM »
We have a good little discussion going on on Global Economic Intersection on the Boat Based Bugout Planning article, which JL published over there as well.  You might want to check out the commentary and chip in your 2 cents.

http://econintersect.com/pages/opinion/opinion.php?post=201802051935

RE

Eddie chipped in on the discussion on GEI, and I added a bit more as well.  I'm hoping to snag a couple of new Diners in Steve and Charles.  :icon_sunny:  Join the Party over there!

RE

Storyline



Quote
At 35, Tripp has an interesting job, a hip car, a passion for sailing, and a great house - trouble is, he lives with his parents. They want him out, so they hire Paula, an "interventionist," who has a formula in these cases: chance encounter, get him to ask her out, involve him in a trauma, meet his friends and get their nod, delay sex, have him teach her something, then launch him. It's worked up to now, but this gets complicated when Tripp thinks she's getting too serious and one of his pals is attracted to Paula's deadpan, semi-alcoholic roommate, who's plagued by a mockingbird. Too many secrets may scrub the launch, and what if Paula really likes him? Who can intervene then? Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

Romance in DE pants and it does not resemble real life at because he has a job.  Does not matter what it is, a legit job is a legit job.  But some millennials don't need no stinkin job.


Seriously, having a boat is fine but bugout only!  Unless you follow the pied-piper of arrogance.  If you follow him ( Orlov ) you can watch your women be raped before you are killed.



Because there is going to be no place to hide and they will have the 50 caliber machine guns not you.
Under ideal conditions of temperature and pressure the organism will grow without limit.

Offline Eddie

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #148 on: February 08, 2018, 06:20:00 AM »
Corpus Christi city marina downtown is where we want to be. There, or one of the municipal marinas in Rockport. (Not sure what the status is for Rockport at present). In Corpus, a liveaboard slip is $400 or so. The amenities and location are excellent. Urban waterfront wth lots of restaurants within walking distance. Rockport is adequate, and quieter. Cost there is comparable to the CC T-Heads.

Port Aransas marinas are closest to the blue water, but they aren't at all protected from storms, and they look a little lower end. There are some private marinas that are quieter friendly places too, but the amenities are lacking. You're gonna pay over 300 anywhere these days.  Most are $400 with electricity. They always charge an additional "liveaboard fee" for people who live on their boats too. that varies.

The Clear Lake area marinas like the one you referenced are too far from where I live, and traffic sucks getting there. But there are some good deals there. I've heard there's one place that's still below $200. Also, there are occasionally dockominiums there you can own outright that can be bought in the 20K range. Of course you still have electricity and an HOA fee every month. But not much.

In the NW slips are higher, like $800 last time I was checking.
« Last Edit: February 08, 2018, 06:22:27 AM by Eddie »
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Eddie

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #149 on: February 08, 2018, 06:25:16 AM »
The lowest rent slips are in Palacios, which is an old Dow Chemical company town south on Matagorda Bay. Kind of isolated though.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

 

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