AuthorTopic: Seastead of the Day  (Read 16699 times)

Online RE

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #375 on: May 06, 2018, 04:26:38 PM »
Soil not good as a result though, all the nutrients get washed out and it's pretty rocky anyhow.  So you're going to have to build your own soil in your greenhouse for your raised beds or ship it in, or raise your produce with hydroponics and aquaculture at least for a while until you have soil to work with.


Yeah, and no where to get any soil, probably. I thought about that.

I read somewhere the Irish built up their soil from kelp raised in the ocean shoals.  It would take a few years though I imagine to get a decent amount.

Barges do service that area though, so you just make one big order and ship in a ton or two.

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Online Eddie

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #376 on: May 22, 2018, 06:28:32 PM »


For $1500 you can buy this hurricane damaged Westsail 32, which is hooked to a mooring in Coral Bay that probably goes for $300.year.

It had a chainplate ripped right out and it has some deck and maybe cabin top damage. Looks like the rudder's gone (Oops I was wrong, just hard to see. Score!) 

The engine took on water. It's toast, I'm sure.

Bit of a fixer-upper.

I mention it because I reckon someone WILL move onto it before too long, and no matter how much hassle it is, and how much work the boat needs (but probably won't get done), they'll be getting a good deal on a floating apartment in paradise.

They'll need a dinghy.
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Online Eddie

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #377 on: May 25, 2018, 10:45:24 AM »
This is a pretty good one. $50K. I'm pretty sure somebody bought it on the West Coast a few years back, went cruising, and eventually sailed through the canal and it ended up in Houston. It has what looks like up-to-date electronics and some other good cruising gear that wouldn't be cheap to buy new.

Old Allieds were well built, and this is a one-off version built just before the company finally went out of business for good. Supposedly it is the only fixed keel 42XL ever built. They were a Sparkman and Stevens design (if I remember right) and most of them are very traditional centerboard yawls (a very old design based on the old CCA racing rules from the 1960s or before.) This one is a deep keel sloop, with roller jib.

I like the layout below. The galley isn't perfect, but it would make a nice liveaboard.






http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1981/Allied-42XL-3211312/#.WwhKRdMvwWo
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Online Eddie

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #378 on: May 27, 2018, 10:32:46 AM »


As much as I like those big old William Garden designs, I know full well that a more modest boat makes far better common sense for anyone who has to learn the word "budget".

This one is big enough for a couple (barely), and yet small enough to easily single hand. I like the lovely upgrades, although the butterfly hatches and louvered companionway doors make the vessel less seaworthy for offshore sailing, imho. But it's a trade-off. They'd be very nice when you were on the hook or on a mooring somewhere. Maybe the guy who was good enough to do all that nice woodwork was smart enough to rig some way to seal up the cabin better for crossings. The pics aren't good enough to tell.

Somebody fixed up this old boat up to go cruising to the Caribbean or maybe just the Bahamas. It's in Islamorada, which would be a good jumping off point to sail back here, or to go the other way, toward Coral Bay and points south.

https://miami.craigslist.org/mdc/boa/d/ft-pearson-35/6578069549.html

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Online Eddie

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #379 on: May 29, 2018, 06:10:16 PM »
The pics suck. Sounds like a nice old boat. It's pretty. $28K. Price cut in half. Lying in Ft. Myers Beach, which is southern gulf coast.
Hull #1 of the Tartan 37 Blackwatch, which was Tartan's 1st 37 footer. Later 37' models are not the same design. They built these in the late 60's. Fiberglass pioneers.





https://fortmyers.craigslist.org/lee/boa/d/37-tartan-1965-blackwatch/6576099128.html

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Online Eddie

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #380 on: May 30, 2018, 06:18:34 AM »
One of the prettiest of the early fiberglass boats was the 44' Pearson Countess, designed by John Alden and built in the mid 1960's. In addition to the factory boats, they built some hulls that were professionally completely by various boatyards of the day. Countesses are very beautiful boats when nicely restored, and sometimes people go crazy and rebuild them from the bottom up. I've seen them go for 150K, in great condition.

The Countess was a motorsailer, but with an emphasis on the sailing part. A sailor's motorsailer.

This one is a 1965 Countess hull that was finished out by the Morse shipbuilding yard, one of the old school Maine yards that built clipper ships back in the day. Not around anymore either, I don't think.

Florida is where old boats go to die. The sailors go to the old sailors home, and the boats end up on the hard somewhere in FL, baked by the sun and subject to ruin from topside leaks and mold in the rainy, humid climate down there.

Once again, the pics are absolutely horrible. Wish they were better. This one looks worth saving. It's on the Atlantic coast, advertised for 50K. The first pic is a factory Pearson, a sister ship. The CL ad pics of the boat exterior are so small you get no idea what you're looking at.




The interior pics are a little better than the others.







https://miami.craigslist.org/mdc/boa/d/foot-john-alden-pearson-and/6596271138.html
« Last Edit: May 30, 2018, 06:23:00 AM by Eddie »
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Online Eddie

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #381 on: May 30, 2018, 07:49:10 AM »
Found some decent pics of the real boat above, on a different site. Maybe it's still afloat, and not on the hard. Good sign. I don't see any sails though.








http://www.sailboatlistings.com/view/72344

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Online Eddie

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #382 on: June 03, 2018, 10:50:58 AM »
I saw this old Bristol 40 on a FSBO site. It's lying in Houston. Another one left behind when the people who cruised her flew home to wherever home is.

That seems to be a fairly common story for people who "sell off and sail away". It's not for good, because they get tired of it, they run out of money, and/or it's a couple who split up because the sailing dream wasn't all it was cracked up to be, and one partner had enough and bailed. Lots of reasons to abandon the live-aboard dream, once you've done it and it isn't your fantasy anymore.

This is another old CCA rule design, and it's a small boat for a 40 footer, by today's standards. But they are well built, and can be had for reasonable money. They're asking $38K and will no doubt end up settling for somewhat less.





http://www.sailboatlistings.com/view/71524

The bonus for those actually reading this post is that the guy who owns the boat obviously had dreams of powering down and living a simple life, and he had a blog going for a while. I have only just tasted it. Here's an excerpt.

Cost
Original concept:  We’ll do our best to keep up with what we spend on the boat.  It’s just too much effort, with no real purpose as I see it, to track every single penny (cost/benefit ratio is too far out of whack).  We’ll give close general costs for those interested.

New concept:  Well, I did NOT keep track of purchases even in a broad general sense.  Why?  I just didn’t feel like it.  One of the reasons I adopted the lifestyle of living on a sailboat was to escape the mundane and depressing reality of tracking, working for, stressing over, fighting for, arguing about, pining for, putting my hope in, worrying about, and ultimately centering my life around MONEY.  To track money would mean that I once again become slave to it.  And . . .  “cost/benefit ratio” ?!?!  What exactly did I mean by that?  I can only surmise that I was using the term in the traditional accounting sense, because I do not believe that life should be looked at from an accounting perspective.  Additionally, if anyone is actually reading this with the idea or thought of even trying to do the same thing, the “cost” would, or might, give them the thought that “There is no way I/we can do this.”  In my short time of living on the sailboat, I have seen all manners of other liveaboards with distinctly different lifestyles and accompanying monetary budgets.  So, to paraphrase a sign I saw, when it’s important, you find a way, when it’s not, you find an excuse.

It wasn’t important to me, so there’s my excuse.  If it’s important to you, you will find a way.

UPDATE:  I tallied up our major expenses and have listed them here so that others could see what we spent.  We’re not finished yet, so I’ll add to this as necessary.

Item Approximate cost
Boat $26,000
Main sail $3,000
Main sail cover $600
New running rigging $900
Head sail repair $1,200
Standing rigging repairs $300
Fuel tank repair $200
Head repair $400
New anchor $400
Spare anchor $300
New anchor rode (100’ 3/8” chain, 300’ 3/4” 3 strand nylon) $800
WirieAP $400
Refrigeration $1,000
Lazy jacks $175
Boom preventer $190
Dinghy davits $900
Dinghy $1,000
Dinghy outboard $600
Solar panels $575
Charge controller $385
Batteries $1050
iPad $400
Navionics $120
Steering system repairs $1,200
New life lines $380
Water pump/system repairs $330
New engine instruments $275
Handheld VHF radio $130
Binoculars $250
New depth sounder $150
Other miscellaneous $5,000
Forestay/backstay chainplates and backer plates for foredeck cleats $570
Jacklines and safety tethers (homemade) $206
Foulweather gear $150

Costs Total
$49,536


For more pics and more blog, follow the link.

https://www.emet.us/cost/

Like a lot of blogs, it isn't very user friendly, but I did a search with "sailing' as the key word and got a look at what looks like the very first shakedown cruise for this couple, when they were still fixing the boat up. Great local knowledge here for anybody sailing Galveston Bay. Lots of spoils to run aground on. I wonder if they ever got a depth sounder?

CLINT
We went for our first sail in the Gulf of Mexico this past weekend.

The marina channel to the ICW is definitely shallow and we ran into mud twice getting into the ICW.  Fortunately, it’s very soft mud and going slow helps prevent us from wedging ourselves into any bank that we encounter.  We just reverse back into the “deeper” water and then take a different route.  It’s becoming standard operating procedure.

It’s 4 hours of motoring at 4.5 knots to get from the marina to the end of the south jetty at Galveston.  Much better than the 10 to 11 hours from Seabrook.

We also learned that not all bridges that require contact with a bridge operator are named properly, or named at all, on the Navionics charts.  Calling the Galveston Channel Bridge operator on 16 yields you nothing even though the chart says it’s the Galveston Channel; no mention of the bridge name.  We kept getting the Galveston Causeway Railroad bridge operator and we finally said that we were trying to reach the small bridge into the Galveston Channel.  At that point the X bridge operator came on and we were politely informed that, for future reference, it’s called the Pelican Island bridge.  Oh…

We made it to the end of the jetty without incident, raised the sails, killed the engine, and steered a course S/SE.  It’s so much nicer being able to set the sails and just sail out in the Gulf.  In the Bay we had to worry about uncharted pipes and pilings, shallow water, other small vessels, obnoxious speed boaters, The Kemah Beast, and the ship channel traffic.  At 4 NM from the shore, there’s really nothing to worry about.  Just set the sails and sail.  We don’t have a self steering system yet, but I was able to get everything “balanced” and Emet would track and hold her course for 4 to 5 minutes before I had to make a small correction.

To avoid potentially running through some shipping traffic we adjusted course SW and ran parallel with the shore for about 2 NM, then resumed our S/SE heading for about 5 NM.  Nothing like being able to set sail and steer a course for mile after mile after mile knowing that it’s clear.  The water was calm, the winds light, the sun bright.  This is what cruising is supposed to be.

We turned around and headed back with the plan of anchoring out overnight.  We wanted to be able to drop anchor before it got too late.

gulf_sail_3
Sailing. Some friends on a power boat tracked us down and took some pics.
On the sail back we had a broad reach on a port tack.  It was very light air.  We don’t have a boom preventer set up or a whisker pole.  To keep our boom from flogging about I tied a line from one of the boom bails to the mid-ship cleat and cinched it tight.  This worked very well.

gulf_sail_2
Keeping the boom secure with a makeshift boom preventer.
In that same pic you can see that our genoa is also luffing and flogging about.   I was really thinking how nice a whisker pole would be.  I then got the idea that I might be able to keep the genoa from luffing as much by tying a line to the clew and running it to the port stern cleat.

gulf_sail_1
Whisker line in place of a whisker pole.
Not as effective as a whisker pole, but it certainly helped stabilize the sail.  It prevented it from luffing forward, which helped it maintain its shape and more easily recover and fill in the light air.

gulf_sail
Sunset courtesy of Alisa.
So, we sailed on to our anchor spot.  We arrived around 9:00 PM, dropped the Mantus anchor, and let out about 30 to 40 feet of our Maggi chain.  I backed down on it hard and Emet began swinging on the anchor.  It seemed that the anchor was dug in good.  I paid out the remaining chain and about 50 feet of our 300 foot 3/4″ nylon line.  We were now resting on 150 feet of anchor rode in about 15 feet of water.

We killed the engine and fixed dinner.  It was going to be a peaceful night.  Or so I thought.

I was sleeping in the cockpit on the starboard seat because there was a nice breeze and it was a little cooler up there.  At about 1 AM I was literally thrown awake.  I woke up flying off the cockpit seat cushion, looking down at the water, and grabbed the steering pedestal to keep from crashing into it.  I called down to Jodi in the middle of all the racket that was crashing and banging inside:

“Are you OK?”
She said, “Yes.”
“Wow, that was a pretty big one.”
“Yeah, you slept through the other ones.  That was the biggest one, though.”
“The other ones . . .?”
“It’s been like that all night.”

And that was our first rolly anchorage.  It was pretty rolly all night and there was quite a current.  I could hear it clearly rushing past the boat and could see bubbles and light foam created as Emet’s bow split the surging water.  I watched for a while and then went back to sleep.  Every now and then I was awakened by rolling that was a little more intense than the rest.  Occasionally, I would check our position to make sure we weren’t drifting.  We weren’t.  The anchor was holding steady.

We woke up around 7 AM.  Position check showed that we hadn’t moved, but we had swung around.  Coffee and ship watching for an hour or so then the anchor came up and we started motoring back.  Completely uneventful.  We did run into another mud bank right off the ICW into the marina channel, but some folks in a power boat saw us and pulled us free.  As they were pulling us off, I watched the depth sounder and I “think” I know where to go to avoid the mud.  As we reentered the marina channel on this “new” path, we didn’t run into anything.

Looking forward to the next Gulf sail.


« Last Edit: June 03, 2018, 11:05:13 AM by Eddie »
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Online Eddie

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #383 on: June 03, 2018, 11:16:14 AM »
I wondered what the "Kemah Beast" was, so I looked it up."  I thought he might have been referencing the current in the Clear Lake channel  when the tide is coming in, which is a beast...but I was wrong.

A new one since my days on Galveston Bay.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/UeQCKdNvpzs&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/UeQCKdNvpzs&fs=1</a>
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Online Eddie

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Re: Seastead of the Day ---- The Second Cheapest Apartment in Paradise
« Reply #384 on: June 03, 2018, 12:49:22 PM »



 37 foot Tayana Sail Boat FOR SALE - $5000 (Coral Bay, St. John)
condition: fair
length overall (LOA): 37
make / manufacturer: Tayana
propulsion type: sail
year manufactured: 1978
We have a 37 foot Tayana Sail boat with some hurricane Irma damage. It is on mooring, never sunk, would make an excellent live-aboard. It is currently located in Johnson's Bay, outside of Coral Bay, St. John. It's a great boat, but needs a little fixing up to go sailing.

It has a queen sized v-berth forward and convertible double berths in the main salon. 1 head and 1 galley. New awnings, permanent legal mooring with kayak/dingy available.

First $5,000 takes it. Call for further information.





Maybe THE cheapest. The ad for the Westsail appears to be gone.

Cheap rent is hard to find these days. This, in my opinion, would be the best rent deal currently in existence. Or the best floating RV slot, at least.

You could make a lot of boat repairs paying $300/yr for a mooring, and no other bills. It's an off-grid proposition, of course.
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Online Eddie

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #385 on: June 07, 2018, 06:48:07 PM »
The prices CAN go lower! Well, maybe not much lower on this one.

If only the slips were free.




 FREE 1964 SAILBOAT -- Not a scam! You pick it up, it's YOURS (Corpus Christi)
 
condition: salvage
length overall (LOA): 30
propulsion type: sail
year manufactured: 1964


FREE TO GOOD HOME!!!! Tow it home today!!! 30 ft vintage sailboat


Bought this sailboat on eRepairables, low-ball bid and never expected to "win" the auction. Well, it'll take a fortune to get it here to Tennessee. Plus, the wife's less-than-thrilled reaction makes it imperative that it goes, and goes NOW! The auction yard where it's located is closing, so must be gone by 6/14/18. You can have this beauty for the low storage cost (if any)! Our loss is your gain!!!

(from CL)
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Online RE

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #386 on: June 07, 2018, 07:51:49 PM »
The prices CAN go lower! Well, maybe not much lower on this one.

It probably leaks, the engine doesn't work and the sails are moth eaten.

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Online Eddie

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Re: Seastead of the Day
« Reply #387 on: June 19, 2018, 09:49:06 AM »
It happens sometimes. You run across several examples of some older boat design  for sale at the same time. I think I posted this one, back when it first made landfall in Texas and the owner flew home. Since then, it's price has dropped way down, and it will sell at some price. This is a small, but extremely well-found boat. If memory serves the original asking price was above 20K. There are two or three others out there for sale in various ports, but this one is far and away the best. One of Phil Rhodes many great boats. At some time int he past, somebody who knew what they were doing upgraded this boat a lot. I suspect that person is dead now.









The wet/dry vac means the bilge is getting wet. Probably just some topside leaks, but you can bet there's an issue. Hmmm.

At 13K it's still a hell of a deal. Too bad slips aren't free.
« Last Edit: June 19, 2018, 09:51:46 AM by Eddie »
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

 

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