AuthorTopic: How Safe Are Root Canals?  (Read 675 times)

Offline azozeo

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How Safe Are Root Canals?
« on: March 04, 2018, 12:01:09 PM »
http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/how-safe-are-root-canals




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Tens of millions of root canals are performed each year, yet how safe are they? Consider the morbid fact that it is the only procedure routinely performed where a dead part of your body — the diseased tooth — is kept attached to your body.

Almost 60 million root canals are performed a year (1), on individuals who are mistakenly informed that it is a safe and harmless procedure. While your teeth may look and feel fine after the procedure, the reality is that it is impossible for all of the bacteria to be removed from the tooth. After a root canal, the healthy bacteria changes to highly toxic anaerobic bacteria that will continue to thrive inside and around the tooth, jawbone and periodontal ligament causing numerous potentially long term health problems. (1)
Dr. Weston Price

Dr. Weston Price was a brilliant dentist and researcher who studied the relationship between nutrition, dental and physical health. He was the head of research for the dental association for 14 years.  In their studies, Dr. Price and the Mayo Clinic discovered that bacterial growth in root canals could be transferred to animals to recreate the same diseases of the human donor. Their tests proved successful in 80 to 100% of the animals. In particular, heart disease could be transferred 100% of the time (1, 2). It’s shocking to know that as far back as 1908 Dr. Price and the Mayo Clinic found that bacteria and the toxins from root canals could enter the bloodstream and thus travel to any point in the body and create disease to that particular tissue or organ. (1, 2). Price went on to discover that numerous degenerative diseases have their origin in root canal procedures, the most frequent are circulatory and heart disease.

Others would follow in Dr. Price’s footsteps to bring this knowledge to the public. Dr. George Meinig would discover his work 70 years later and bring it to the forefront through his book, Root Canal Cover Up.  The Toxic Element Research Foundation (TERF) would later use state of the art DNA technology to identify multiple bacteria found within root canal teeth, the jawbone next to root canals as well as in areas of extracted teeth where proper protocols were not performed to remove the periodontal ligament and necrotic bone.
Basic tooth anatomy

A tooth has multiple layers, the first is the  enamel, the second layer is the dentin and the inner core is the pulp. Tiny fibers come out of the tooth and intertwine with fibers coming out of the bone, and they unite to form the periodontal ligament. This ligament is also an incubator for billions of bacteria to multiply. (1) The dentin layer is not solid, but is actually comprised of tiny dentinal tubules, that if stretched would be approximately three miles long, per tooth. This is another excellent place for bacteria to hide and develop. In fact when Weston Price did his research, this is exactly where he found anaerobic bacteria in the thousands of teeth he tested. (2) Since it is impossible to sterilize these accessory canals, it becomes a haven for bacteria to grow and develop. As bacteria multiply and create infection, it will oftentimes extend down into the jawbone where it creates cavitations—areas of necrotic tissue in the jawbone itself.
Common bacteria found in root canals

The American Dental Association (ADA) still insists to this day that Dr. Price and the Mayo Clinic Research was incorrect, yet they have no research to back this claim. Dentists are misled to believe that root canals are a safe and harmless procedure. While they may claim that bacteria found in teeth with root canals can’t cause disease, the simple fact remains, the bacteria found in root canaled teeth are not the same normal bacteria found in your mouth. Without oxygen and nutrients the friendly bacteria become highly toxic, capable of causing long term infection, jawbone loss and numerous diseases.

In Hal Huggins article on Root Canal Dangers, he shares the following information on the five major bacteria species (out of the fifty –three that are commonly found in root canal teeth). (2)

Capnocytophaga ochracea: Found in brain abscesses associated with dental source of infection. Causes human disease in the central nervous system. Also related to septicemia and meningitis.

Fusobacterium nucleatum: Produces toxins that inhibit fibroblast cell division and wound healing processes. Causes infection in the heart, joints, liver and spleen.

Gemella morbillorum: Linked to acute invasive endocarditis, septic arthritis and meningitis.

Leptotrichia buccalis: Reduces the number of neutrophils (a critically important white blood cell), thus lowering immune competence.

Porphyromonas gingivalis: Destroys  red blood cells by drilling holes (porins) in them, causing the cell to bleed to  death. Low red blood cell counts that do not recover after dental revision are frequently responding to the porin activity of this microbe.  P gingivalis also  alters the integrity of the endothelial lining of blood vessels, which leads to inflammation and bleeding in the inner lining of blood vessels. According to Dr. Huggins this is the key step in formation of atherogenesis that leads to heart attacks. P. gingivalis can change friendly bacteria into pathogens. (2)
Chronic disease linked to root canals

According to Dr. George Meinig, (one of the founders of the American Association of Endodontists) and author of Root Canal Cover Up, a high percentage of chronic illness can originate from root canals, the most frequent being circulatory and heart disease. The next common diseases include those affecting the joints, such as arthritis and rheumatism; this is followed by diseases that affect the brain and nervous system such as ALS and MS.
Additional risks

Root canal treatment increases the risk of infective endocarditis. (4)

Root canals are associated with high rates of infection (up to 54%) with anaerobic bacteria. In a 1998 study for oral focal infection, 26 patients had blood drawn and tested during and ten minutes after their procedure.  All root canals contained anaerobic bacteraemia. (5)
Conclusion

It is important to do your own research before any surgical procedure and treatment plan. A root canal is a surgical procedure. The decision on whether to have a root canal or remove the tooth is best made between you, your doctor and your biological dentist. Establishing an appropriate pre and post procedure protocol can expedite your recovery process.
Resources

    Beyond Amalgam:  The Hidden Health Hazard Posed by Jawbone Cavitations by Susan Stockton, MA, foreword by Christopher John Hussar, DDS, DO
    Root Canal Cover up by George Meinig, D.D.S.
    Uninformed Consent: The Hidden Dangers in Dental Care by Hal A. Huggins, D.D.S., M.S. and Thomas E. Levy M.D., J.D.
    1 http://terfinfo.com/Files/Root%20Canal%20News%20Release_2.pdf
    2 http://www.westonaprice.org/dentistry/root-canal-dangers
    3. http://www.westonaprice.org/dentistry/dental-cavitation-surgery
    4. http://www.greenmedinfo.com/article/dental-procedures-such-scaling-and-root-canal-treatment-increase-risk-infective-endocarditis
    5. http://www.greenmedinfo.com/article/endodontic-therapy-root-canal-associated-high-rates-infection-54-anaerobic-bacteria


After sixteen years of struggling with MCS, Elisha McFarland recovered her health through alternative and natural healing methods. It was this experience that encouraged her to pursue an education in natural health.  She has the following designations:  Doctor of Naturopathy, Master Herbalist, D.A. Hom., B.S. in Holistic Nutrition, Certified Wholistic Rejuvenist and EFT-ADV. You can visit her website at: http://www.myhealthmaven.com or follow her on Facebook  at https://www.facebook.com/myhealthmaven
Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of GreenMedInfo or its staff.



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Offline Eddie

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Re: How Safe Are Root Canals?
« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2018, 02:58:41 PM »
http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/how-safe-are-root-canals




Green Med Info

Tens of millions of root canals are performed each year, yet how safe are they? Consider the morbid fact that it is the only procedure routinely performed where a dead part of your body — the diseased tooth — is kept attached to your body.

Almost 60 million root canals are performed a year (1), on individuals who are mistakenly informed that it is a safe and harmless procedure. While your teeth may look and feel fine after the procedure, the reality is that it is impossible for all of the bacteria to be removed from the tooth. After a root canal, the healthy bacteria changes to highly toxic anaerobic bacteria that will continue to thrive inside and around the tooth, jawbone and periodontal ligament causing numerous potentially long term health problems. (1)
Dr. Weston Price

Dr. Weston Price was a brilliant dentist and researcher who studied the relationship between nutrition, dental and physical health. He was the head of research for the dental association for 14 years.  In their studies, Dr. Price and the Mayo Clinic discovered that bacterial growth in root canals could be transferred to animals to recreate the same diseases of the human donor. Their tests proved successful in 80 to 100% of the animals. In particular, heart disease could be transferred 100% of the time (1, 2). It’s shocking to know that as far back as 1908 Dr. Price and the Mayo Clinic found that bacteria and the toxins from root canals could enter the bloodstream and thus travel to any point in the body and create disease to that particular tissue or organ. (1, 2). Price went on to discover that numerous degenerative diseases have their origin in root canal procedures, the most frequent are circulatory and heart disease.

Others would follow in Dr. Price’s footsteps to bring this knowledge to the public. Dr. George Meinig would discover his work 70 years later and bring it to the forefront through his book, Root Canal Cover Up.  The Toxic Element Research Foundation (TERF) would later use state of the art DNA technology to identify multiple bacteria found within root canal teeth, the jawbone next to root canals as well as in areas of extracted teeth where proper protocols were not performed to remove the periodontal ligament and necrotic bone.
Basic tooth anatomy

A tooth has multiple layers, the first is the  enamel, the second layer is the dentin and the inner core is the pulp. Tiny fibers come out of the tooth and intertwine with fibers coming out of the bone, and they unite to form the periodontal ligament. This ligament is also an incubator for billions of bacteria to multiply. (1) The dentin layer is not solid, but is actually comprised of tiny dentinal tubules, that if stretched would be approximately three miles long, per tooth. This is another excellent place for bacteria to hide and develop. In fact when Weston Price did his research, this is exactly where he found anaerobic bacteria in the thousands of teeth he tested. (2) Since it is impossible to sterilize these accessory canals, it becomes a haven for bacteria to grow and develop. As bacteria multiply and create infection, it will oftentimes extend down into the jawbone where it creates cavitations—areas of necrotic tissue in the jawbone itself.
Common bacteria found in root canals

The American Dental Association (ADA) still insists to this day that Dr. Price and the Mayo Clinic Research was incorrect, yet they have no research to back this claim. Dentists are misled to believe that root canals are a safe and harmless procedure. While they may claim that bacteria found in teeth with root canals can’t cause disease, the simple fact remains, the bacteria found in root canaled teeth are not the same normal bacteria found in your mouth. Without oxygen and nutrients the friendly bacteria become highly toxic, capable of causing long term infection, jawbone loss and numerous diseases.

In Hal Huggins article on Root Canal Dangers, he shares the following information on the five major bacteria species (out of the fifty –three that are commonly found in root canal teeth). (2)

Capnocytophaga ochracea: Found in brain abscesses associated with dental source of infection. Causes human disease in the central nervous system. Also related to septicemia and meningitis.

Fusobacterium nucleatum: Produces toxins that inhibit fibroblast cell division and wound healing processes. Causes infection in the heart, joints, liver and spleen.

Gemella morbillorum: Linked to acute invasive endocarditis, septic arthritis and meningitis.

Leptotrichia buccalis: Reduces the number of neutrophils (a critically important white blood cell), thus lowering immune competence.

Porphyromonas gingivalis: Destroys  red blood cells by drilling holes (porins) in them, causing the cell to bleed to  death. Low red blood cell counts that do not recover after dental revision are frequently responding to the porin activity of this microbe.  P gingivalis also  alters the integrity of the endothelial lining of blood vessels, which leads to inflammation and bleeding in the inner lining of blood vessels. According to Dr. Huggins this is the key step in formation of atherogenesis that leads to heart attacks. P. gingivalis can change friendly bacteria into pathogens. (2)
Chronic disease linked to root canals

According to Dr. George Meinig, (one of the founders of the American Association of Endodontists) and author of Root Canal Cover Up, a high percentage of chronic illness can originate from root canals, the most frequent being circulatory and heart disease. The next common diseases include those affecting the joints, such as arthritis and rheumatism; this is followed by diseases that affect the brain and nervous system such as ALS and MS.
Additional risks

Root canal treatment increases the risk of infective endocarditis. (4)

Root canals are associated with high rates of infection (up to 54%) with anaerobic bacteria. In a 1998 study for oral focal infection, 26 patients had blood drawn and tested during and ten minutes after their procedure.  All root canals contained anaerobic bacteraemia. (5)
Conclusion

It is important to do your own research before any surgical procedure and treatment plan. A root canal is a surgical procedure. The decision on whether to have a root canal or remove the tooth is best made between you, your doctor and your biological dentist. Establishing an appropriate pre and post procedure protocol can expedite your recovery process.
Resources

    Beyond Amalgam:  The Hidden Health Hazard Posed by Jawbone Cavitations by Susan Stockton, MA, foreword by Christopher John Hussar, DDS, DO
    Root Canal Cover up by George Meinig, D.D.S.
    Uninformed Consent: The Hidden Dangers in Dental Care by Hal A. Huggins, D.D.S., M.S. and Thomas E. Levy M.D., J.D.
    1 http://terfinfo.com/Files/Root%20Canal%20News%20Release_2.pdf
    2 http://www.westonaprice.org/dentistry/root-canal-dangers
    3. http://www.westonaprice.org/dentistry/dental-cavitation-surgery
    4. http://www.greenmedinfo.com/article/dental-procedures-such-scaling-and-root-canal-treatment-increase-risk-infective-endocarditis
    5. http://www.greenmedinfo.com/article/endodontic-therapy-root-canal-associated-high-rates-infection-54-anaerobic-bacteria


After sixteen years of struggling with MCS, Elisha McFarland recovered her health through alternative and natural healing methods. It was this experience that encouraged her to pursue an education in natural health.  She has the following designations:  Doctor of Naturopathy, Master Herbalist, D.A. Hom., B.S. in Holistic Nutrition, Certified Wholistic Rejuvenist and EFT-ADV. You can visit her website at: http://www.myhealthmaven.com or follow her on Facebook  at https://www.facebook.com/myhealthmaven
Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of GreenMedInfo or its staff.

Hal Huggins is an ex-dentist from Colorado whom I'd say was the very biggest charlatan in dentistry during my practice career. He had his license jerked for using scare tactics and bogus research to convince patients to remove their silver amalgam fillings and have him replace them with composite resin fillings (much to his personal financial gain). Any article you see that mentions him as an expert can be immediately discarded as junk. That's just off the top.

Now, lets talk about root canals. This Weston Price guy was not on my radar. Since he died in 1948, I'm not surprised.

Here's what the website Science Based Medicine says about Price:



One of our readers requested a post about the Weston A. Price Foundation (WAPF). I knew it was not a trustworthy source of medical information, but I had not imagined just how atrocious it really was. After spending some time on the website, I realized that it is not just a cornucopia of false information about dentistry and nutrition, but is full of anti-vaccine propaganda and bizarre and dangerous health advice that could result in serious harm to patients.


Who was Weston A. Price?

He was an American dentist who lived from 1870 to 1948. He did research in support of the focal infection theory. He claimed that root canal therapy created hidden infections that spread toxins or bacteria into the rest of the body to cause systemic diseases like arthritis, and that those teeth should have been extracted, not repaired. Mainstream dentistry was wary of endodontic therapy for a time, but the trend was reversed after better-designed, more rigorous research showed that root canals didn’t have systemic consequences. Nevertheless, “holistic” and “biological” dentists who still believe the focal infection myth are still extracting teeth unnecessarily. Rational Wiki calls Price “the patron saint of crank dentistry.”

Looking for the cause of tooth decay, Price traveled to non-Western countries and observed indigenous peoples. Based on his unsystematic observations, he claimed that the Western diet was responsible for everything from tooth decay to tuberculosis. He claimed that a diet of nutrient-dense whole foods and animal fats would allow humans to achieve perfect physical form and perfect health generation after generation. His nutrition claims went far beyond the evidence. Dr. William Jarvis called his work a classic example of the “myth of the healthy savage.” A review in The Journal of the American Medical Association characterized his approach as evangelical rather than scientific.


https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/sbm-weston-prices-appalling-legacy/

Okay,here's my take on root canals. Just short and sweet. I don't have time to write a scholarly paper, but I have plenty of experience and plenty of training. I perform several root canal procedure most weeks, and I've been able to follow patients in my private practice who have had them, for well over 30 years.

I love this factoid from the "scholarly article" AZ posted (#sarcasm):



Consider the morbid fact that it is the only procedure routinely performed where a dead part of your body — the diseased tooth — is kept attached to your body.

Oh really? How about your finger nails? Or your tooth enamel? Or the outer layer of your skin? Or your hair?

All stone cold dead. Sorry.

Not to mention there are still people walking around with dead pig heart valves. Not only dead, but not even human.

So that scare-tactic sentence is completely and utterly bogus.


Here's my take. Every tooth that needs a root canal is a unique situation. There are two main problems sets that have to be successfully treated for a good outcome.

1. The pulpal space (the canal or canals) must be be cleaned, shaped, disinfected,and then packed with an obturating material that completely obliterates the empty space created when the pulp dies or is preemptively removed from the diseased tooth. This is easier on some teeth than others, and if it can't be accomplished, the prognosis (chances of long term success) goes way down. So some root canals have a higher potential for success than others, based on the tooth morphology. Crooked roots are harder. Cracked roots are usually hopeless. Cracked roots are also hard to diagnose.

2. Then, assuming the root canal procedure is successful, you still have to build back the missing part of the tooth destroyed by disease. Guess what? The less you bring your dentist to work with, that harder that is, and the more guarded the prognosis. Root canal teeth often need posts and crowns afterward, and that's a whole area where success can be turned into failure.

If both those problems can be treated well then clinically significant re-infection rates are low, and people keep their teeth, usually for a long time.

Please understand. No doctor can restore an extremely diseased tooth and make it better, or even as good, as it was before it got diseased. Patients tend to not get that, but it seems pretty easy to understand to me.

Teeth that have been treated endodontically (root canal teeth) often do fail in the long haul, because teeth, in general, take a beating in the course of gnawing on candy, ice, inanimate objects, and other teeth (grinding). Teeth that have had root canals are weaker teeth than virgin (undiseased) teeth.

Any and all dental work has some failure rate. Poor treatment fails at a higher rate than good treatment. People who take good care of their teeth have a better prognosis for success than sugar addicted crackheads. Am I going too fast for you?

Quality varies. I could write all day on why that is, but just trust me. It's true.

There are plenty of poor dentists and some quacks out there. Anyone advertising that he/she is a "Biologic Dentist" is a quack.EOM.


Root canal treatment is getting better. It's had more progress in terms of good new instruments and materials during my practice career than most other procedures. Today, it appears we are on the verge of some fairly big breakthroughs, which will no doubt change how we do root canals and the success rates will no doubt go up.

If you have had a root canal and your tooth hurts months or years later, or you have swelling, or your tooth gets loose, it's likely time to get that tooth out. Sometimes, though root canals can be retreated successfully a second time. The prognosis, as you might expect, is more guarded for re-treats.

The article you posted was pure shit AZ. But I'm glad you posted it, so we could discuss the issue, which is one worth talking about.


















« Last Edit: March 04, 2018, 03:04:54 PM by Eddie »
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Offline agelbert

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Re: How Safe Are Root Canals?
« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2018, 04:00:06 PM »
Eddie,
Agreed. The article is pure .

Since you made some points, I would like your take on molar pockets in general and the space where the root canal is made as well.

You said this:
Quote
1. The pulpal space (the canal or canals) must be be cleaned, shaped, disinfected,and then packed with an obturating material that completely obliterates the empty space created when the pulp dies or is preemptively removed from the diseased tooth. This is easier on some teeth than others, and if it can't be accomplished, the prognosis (chances of long term success) goes way down. So some root canals have a higher potential for success than others, based on the tooth morphology. Crooked roots are harder. Cracked roots are usually hopeless. Cracked roots are also hard to diagnose.

Given that the space needs to be totally filled, how do you deal with the possible soft bone tissue receeding after the root canal and causing an abscess which gets filled with hard to reach bacteria?

Also, is there some technique where a pocket in one molar that is between two molars (on the side, not the top) which are relatively healthy and pain free can be "filled" to avoid food making contact with an exposed nerve in the pocket? I have a pocket I have to knot dental floss (making it big) to get the food crud that gets in there out. It's gotten so I don't use that molar much. I have no pain and no swollen lymph nodes in the mandible beneath said molars.


« Last Edit: March 05, 2018, 10:52:11 AM by agelbert »
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Offline Eddie

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Re: How Safe Are Root Canals?
« Reply #3 on: March 04, 2018, 04:50:59 PM »
There are several semi-alternative methods of home care that I've seen people try that can help this type of problem.

First, this is periodontal disease we're discussing. Pockets exist because patients lose bone around their teeth from gum disease. The  only time pockets make root canal treatment fail is when bone loss is so severe that the area at the tip of the root is involved. This type of pocket often causes tooth loss on vital teeth that are still alive. Any tooth that has lost half the bone it once had around the root has a poor long term prognosis.

But..I do have some ideas for you.

There is a treatment modality called "Perio Protect" that has a lot of potential. This system was developed by a dentist I actually know, one of my mentors for whom I have a great deal of respect. He spent a long time, many years, getting FDA approval for a medical device which is a tray that holds some kind of medicament. So he charges a lot for these special trays, and frankly I'm not sure they're that special. I think the same technique might work using something less fancy, (and I'm thinking of a simple "boil and bite" sports mouthguard which is super cheap and user friendly).

His main medicament is simply regular 3% hydrogen peroxide, which his (real, respectable) research shows is effective in the trays to completely sterilize perio pockets, killing 100% of the bad bugs that cause bone loss. This is fairly huge. Periodontists (my friend is a GP) have never been able to get this with their various treatments. Other medicaments that are alternatives to try would be Listerine or chlorhexidine rinse  (requires an Rx, but any dentist licensed in your state can and will prescribe it for you if you have gum disease). Put a small amount of peroxide in the tray and wear it for 20-30 minutes a day. That's it.

The knotted floss is good. I teach people to do that nearly every day of my life.

Another device that I've seen "cure" perio is an oral irrigator called a "Shower Floss" It's essentially a water pick type of thing, but it attaches above your shower head, and uses the higher pressure from your home plumbing, which is much more powerful than the actual water pick, which is not very effective for gum disease (or anything else). I worry about whether this could possibly do some harm by forcing bacteria into your bloodstream or maybe give you an air embolus, but I have seen many people use it with good results and I have not seen anyone get harmed so far. You can buy this device online, probably from Amazon.

Another home remedy that might have some potential for harm (but probably not much if you're judicious) is to brush your gums an teeth with with Tea Tree oil. Someone might recognize this as something Edgar Cayce once recommended in one of his trances. This stuff is toxic and should not be ingested, but I don't think wetting your toothbrush with it and using it once a day is likely to cause harm. I do not have proof.

None of these except the "real" Perio Protect regimen (as sold and prescribed by a trained dentist and using the expensive trays) is  mainstream treatment. I'm giving you my assessment of alternative treatments, based on my experience. I am not recommending any of them, because I have a license I need to protect. But I think they have some merit.

I hope one of these approaches works for you. Give me your feedback if you try any of them.
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Offline agelbert

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Re: How Safe Are Root Canals?
« Reply #4 on: March 05, 2018, 10:40:17 AM »
There are several semi-alternative methods of home care that I've seen people try that can help this type of problem.

First, this is periodontal disease we're discussing. Pockets exist because patients lose bone around their teeth from gum disease. The  only time pockets make root canal treatment fail is when bone loss is so severe that the area at the tip of the root is involved. This type of pocket often causes tooth loss on vital teeth that are still alive. Any tooth that has lost half the bone it once had around the root has a poor long term prognosis.

But..I do have some ideas for you.

There is a treatment modality called "Perio Protect" that has a lot of potential. This system was developed by a dentist I actually know, one of my mentors for whom I have a great deal of respect. He spent a long time, many years, getting FDA approval for a medical device which is a tray that holds some kind of medicament. So he charges a lot for these special trays, and frankly I'm not sure they're that special. I think the same technique might work using something less fancy, (and I'm thinking of a simple "boil and bite" sports mouthguard which is super cheap and user friendly).

His main medicament is simply regular 3% hydrogen peroxide, which his (real, respectable) research shows is effective in the trays to completely sterilize perio pockets, killing 100% of the bad bugs that cause bone loss. This is fairly huge. Periodontists (my friend is a GP) have never been able to get this with their various treatments. Other medicaments that are alternatives to try would be Listerine or chlorhexidine rinse  (requires an Rx, but any dentist licensed in your state can and will prescribe it for you if you have gum disease). Put a small amount of peroxide in the tray and wear it for 20-30 minutes a day. That's it.

The knotted floss is good. I teach people to do that nearly every day of my life.

Another device that I've seen "cure" perio is an oral irrigator called a "Shower Floss" It's essentially a water pick type of thing, but it attaches above your shower head, and uses the higher pressure from your home plumbing, which is much more powerful than the actual water pick, which is not very effective for gum disease (or anything else). I worry about whether this could possibly do some harm by forcing bacteria into your bloodstream or maybe give you an air embolus, but I have seen many people use it with good results and I have not seen anyone get harmed so far. You can buy this device online, probably from Amazon.

Another home remedy that might have some potential for harm (but probably not much if you're judicious) is to brush your gums an teeth with with Tea Tree oil. Someone might recognize this as something Edgar Cayce once recommended in one of his trances. This stuff is toxic and should not be ingested, but I don't think wetting your toothbrush with it and using it once a day is likely to cause harm. I do not have proof.

None of these except the "real" Perio Protect regimen (as sold and prescribed by a trained dentist and using the expensive trays) is  mainstream treatment. I'm giving you my assessment of alternative treatments, based on my experience. I am not recommending any of them, because I have a license I need to protect. But I think they have some merit.

I hope one of these approaches works for you. Give me your feedback if you try any of them.


   Thank you for your advice. I understand that you are not offically recommending any particular treatment, but informing me of what is available out there.  I notice you mentioned the boil and bite mouth piece type. I've been looking into that recently. I do have an occasional clenching problem (not a grinding problem), so I have considered the boil and bite mouthpiece if my clenching gets out of hand. So far, I only get some jaw pain from clenching about once every other year. However, the jaw pain can last about three weeks with some swollen lymph nodes for a while.  :(
But, as I said, it's not a big deal so far.

Considering the information you gave me, it does appear that I have periodental disease attacking that molar with a side pocket. I will study all the treatments. I do use tea bags and ginger when the clenching causes pain. They work quite well. I have never brushed my teeth with tea tree oil but I will just stick a tea bag next to my jaw for several hours if I experience symptoms of pain or swollen lymph nodes beneath the molars. It really works. If Edgar Cayce used that technique or something like it, I think he did it because it worked.  :icon_sunny:

I agree that high pressure water may create added bacterial infection avenues in the molar pocket.

I'll let you know if I come up with something that works, or if I just go do the Perio Protect tray thing with a dentist.

Thanks again. 💐
« Last Edit: March 05, 2018, 11:00:33 AM by agelbert »
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Offline Eddie

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Re: How Safe Are Root Canals?
« Reply #5 on: March 05, 2018, 12:32:17 PM »
FWIW tea tree oil is an essential oil from an Australian tree. It is not related to actual tea. It is both bactericidal and fungicidal.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tea_tree_oil

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Re: How Safe Are Root Canals?
« Reply #6 on: March 05, 2018, 01:14:40 PM »
I've been busy the last few days & haven't had a chance to thank you Ed for the follow up.

My whole point in the post was to get your professional opinion on this article.
I know nothing of the medical industry, so when I see a fresh article that challenges the status quo, I like to post it.

It's something fresh to discuss that we can all learn from.
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Online RE

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😷 CDC identifies a mystery cluster of deaths among dentists
« Reply #7 on: March 09, 2018, 12:31:24 AM »
https://www.cnn.com/2018/03/08/health/dentists-lung-disease-cluster-mmwr-cdc/index.html

CDC identifies a mystery cluster of deaths among dentists

By Susan Scutti, CNN

Updated 6:11 PM ET, Thu March 8, 2018
Oral Health and Diabetes_00003521


Oral Health and Diabetes 02:22
Story highlights

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic, progressive lung disease with poor prognosis
    Of nine patients, seven died during the reported 16-year period

(CNN)A cluster of cases of a progressive lung disease occurred among dentists and other dental workers treated at one Virginia care center, according to Thursday's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Of nine patients, referred to as a cluster, seven died during the reported 16-year period. The disease, called idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, is a chronic, progressive lung disease with a poor prognosis. The cause is unknown.
A cluster is a term used to define a collection of cases "grouped in place and time that are suspected to be greater than the number expected," Dr. Randall J. Nett, lead author of the study and medical officer with the US Public Health Service, explained in an email.

Dread dentist visits? This might help
Dread dentist visits? This might help
In this case, among 894 patients treated for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis at the Virginia hospital, nine patients -- or 1% -- were identified as dentists or dental technicians. This number "was about 23 times higher than expected," Nett said.
All the cluster patients -- eight dentists and one dental technician -- were men, with an average age of 64. Though the reason for illness has not been identified, occupational exposures are possible, Nett and his colleagues wrote.
"Dentists and other dental personnel have unique exposures at work," Nett said. "These exposures include bacteria, viruses, dusts, gases, radiation, and other respiratory hazards."
One of the surviving cluster patients reported polishing dental appliances and preparing impressions without using a mask or other protection, according to the report. During these tasks, a dental worker would have been exposed to silica and other compounds with known or potential respiratory toxicity.
"At this time, we do not know what caused this cluster of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis cases in dental personnel," said Nett, who recommended that workers "wear certified respiratory protection" if the ability to improve ventilation is not practical or effective.
Stopped flossing? Teeth still vital to overall health
Stopped flossing? Teeth still vital to overall health
"More work has to be done before we can make any conclusions about the risk dentists or other dental personnel have," Nett said. "CDC will follow up on this newly recognized cluster."
About 650,000 dental personnel work throughout the nation, he said.
Dr. Paul Casamassimo, chief policy officer of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry's Pediatric Oral Health & Research Center, said the new report is "not surprising."
For years, dentists have been exposed to plaster and dust from drilling, in addition to the toxic substances listed in the report. The cluster patients were all older, so they may not have been using the most up-to-date practices for personal protection and safety, he noted.
"We do work with materials and with human bioproducts that are potentially damaging to our bodies if we inhale them," Casamassimo said. Younger dentists are taught differently than in the past, so they know to delegate certain work or procedures to laboratories that meet more safe and stringent ventilation requirements, he said.
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Today, dental personnel also have required protections from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, he said.
His own father was an "old-school" dentist.
"My father passed away at 79," Casamassimo said. Though his father did not die of pulmonary fibrosis, he had respiratory problems.
"This probably has been more common than we have known in the past," he said.
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Online RE

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😷 Dentists Mysteriously Dying of Lung Disease: CDC Report
« Reply #8 on: March 10, 2018, 12:59:42 AM »
http://www.newsweek.com/dentists-mysteriously-dying-lung-disease-idiopathic-pulmonary-fibrosis-cdc-838559

Dentists Mysteriously Dying of Lung Disease: CDC Report
By Elana Glowatz On 3/9/18 at 11:56 AM


Health officials have found a mysterious pattern of dentists dying from the lung disease idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. LOIC VENANCE/AFP/Getty Images

Health officials are trying to figure out why dentists are dying after discovering a strange pattern in cases of a lung disease.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that an analysis of patients at a Virginia care center found a high incidence of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) for dentists. Out of nearly 900 patients studied over roughly two decades, the CDC found eight dentists and one dental technician, all men, had the disease. Seven of the patients had already died.

While that does not sound like a lot, it represents 1 percent of the total IPF patients. Meanwhile, the CDC noted, only about 0.038 percent of people living in the country are dentists.

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“A questionnaire was administered to one of the living patients, who reported polishing dental appliances and preparing amalgams and impressions without respiratory protection,” according to the CDC. “Substances used during these tasks contained…known or potential respiratory toxicity. Although no clear etiologies for this cluster exist, occupational exposures possibly contributed.”

The investigation came after one dentist diagnosed with the lung disease alerted the CDC to the pattern at the care center.

“Although IPF has been associated with certain occupations, no published data exist regarding IPF in dentists,” the CDC said. However, “dental personnel are exposed to infectious agents, chemicals, airborne particulates, ionizing radiation and other potentially hazardous materials. Inhalational exposures experienced by dentists likely increase their risk for certain work-related respiratory diseases.”

Pulmonary fibrosis is a condition in which lung tissue becomes scarred, the U.S. National Institutes of Health explain. The thickened lung tissue makes it difficult to get oxygen into the blood, depriving crucial organs like the brain and heart.

When doctors cannot find a cause for the scarring condition, it is known as being idiopathic. Experts still do not have a full understanding of what causes the disease, and it kills many patients between three and five years after they are diagnosed.

Officials also still do not know what caused the cluster of dentists with the illness.

“Although the etiology of IPF is unknown, exposures that have been suggested as contributing factors include viral infections, cigarette smoking and occupations where exposure to dust, wood dust and metal dust are common,” the CDC said.

Signs of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis include shortness of breath, a chronic and dry cough, weight loss, fatigue, joint and muscle pains and clubbed fingers or toes.

“We do work with materials and with human bioproducts that are potentially damaging to our bodies if we inhale them,” Dr. Paul Casamassimo, the chief policy officer of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry Pediatric Oral Health and Research Center, told CNN.
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Offline Eddie

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Re: How Safe Are Root Canals?
« Reply #9 on: March 10, 2018, 09:35:38 AM »
Acrylic, metal dust, silica, bacteria, sloughed human epithelium and blood. How could inhaling that shit for 30 or 40 years hurt you?
« Last Edit: March 10, 2018, 09:37:13 AM by Eddie »
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

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Re: How Safe Are Root Canals?
« Reply #10 on: March 10, 2018, 09:40:50 AM »
Acrylic, metal dust, silica, bacteria, sloughed human epithelium and blood. How could inhaling that shit for 30 or 40 years hurt you?

Do you wear a surgical mask all the time?

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Offline Eddie

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Re: How Safe Are Root Canals?
« Reply #11 on: March 10, 2018, 09:56:32 AM »
I don't always wear a mask in the lab, but I do less in-house lab than most of the older guys did, and have less exposure. I probably do wear a mask a lot of the time, just because it's already on when I go in there to do a little grinding. I'll try to pay more attention to that. LOL.

Dentures would be my guess as to the most likely source of dusty death, but the nickel chrome alloy in partial plates is a possible. We know silicosis is a problem for people who are exposed to porcelain dust. Fancy labs have dust collectors, but I've never had the lab space to to get that tripped out.

What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

 

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