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Offline knarf

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Re: 🐕 The Iditarod: The Ultimate test of the Homo Sap-Canine Partnership
« Reply #30 on: March 05, 2018, 07:51:17 AM »
This debate is interesting to me, because we have a lot of animals here. They are our friends, and are treated as such. So I typed in some iditarad
dog handling in google and was surprised to find a web page called "Sled Dog Action Coalition". I haven't read it all, but found this article, I'd like to know if this web site is truthful or not.

Iditarod dog handler tells all


Iditarod dog shelter covered with dog’s frozen pee.

Ashley Keith, a former Iditarod dog handler and now a Sled Dog Action Coalition Volunteer, answered Alaska Magazine’s questions regarding the Iditarod. Here’s what Ashley said:

Question from magazine: As a past sled dog handler, do you believe that all long-distance mushers practice inhumane dog handling treatments or just those that have been in the news due to dog deaths, inhumane kennel practices, etc.?

Ashley’s response: There are many standard practices in the sled dog industry which are in fact harmful to the dogs. For example, most Iditarod mushers tether their dogs. Dogs who don’t make the main teams are never even taken off their chains. Tethering is cruel to dogs, which is why many places across the United States and Canada have banned or severely restricted the practice. We do not support racing dogs in extreme endurance events, nor do we condone the husbandry methods which long-distance mushers, as a whole, practice.

Question from magazine: As someone who used to participate in the mushing world, what made you change your mind against supporting the Iditarod and other mushing races? Do you support shorter distance sled dog sprint races?

Ashley’s response: I handled at multiple Iditarod, Yukon Quest, and Beargrease Champion kennels. I’ve been involved in the sport for nineteen years this coming January. I even used to race. My dream was to run the Iditarod. But after traveling throughout the Midwest and New England to so many kennels, trade fairs and races – I was very upset by the accepted cruelties in the sport. What finally made me walk away from the competitive side of things was handling at a multi-Champion Iditarod kennel in Alaska. This musher was supposed to be an industry leader. And what I witnessed in my few short weeks there were the worst kennel conditions and husbandry techniques I had yet to come across. I finally cut my losses and booked a flight back home after I pointed out that an older dog was not eating, was dehydrated, had no bedding (none of them did – in Alaska, in November), and appeared to have intense abdominal pain. After reporting this to the musher for two days and insisting something be done, the dog was taken out back and shot.

Question from magazine: Why does the Sled Dog Action Coalition oppose the Iditarod?

Ashley’s response: As of January, 2017, at least 147 dogs have been run to death or have died from other causes in the Iditarod. From 2002-2015, an average of only 51% of the dogs that started the race finished.

Question from magazine: Are you against the race, the training methods, how young dogs are raised, how dogs are housed or all of the mentioned?

Ashley’s response: We object to all of the aforementioned. In many states the training methods are considered to be overdriving or overworking an animal. Typical sled dog houses do not meet minimum requirements for dogs kept outdoors per animal cruelty laws. There’s a myth that sled dogs are immune to the cold. Regardless of how sled dogs are housed outside, they get terribly painful frostbite and some have frozen to death. Plastic, metal, and wood shelters provide little to no relief from the hot summer sun. And, they certainly don’t protect dogs from swarms of biting insects.


An arthritic Iditarod dog lying on the cold ground in November, with no bedding in his house and no water in his rusty excuse for a bucket. This photo was taken at a Champion Iditarod kennel with over 200 dogs.

http://helpsleddogs.org/the-harsh-reality/iditarod-dog-handler-tells-all/
« Last Edit: March 05, 2018, 07:53:16 AM by knarf »
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Offline RE

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Re: 🐕 The Iditarod: The Ultimate test of the Homo Sap-Canine Partnership
« Reply #31 on: March 05, 2018, 08:09:26 AM »
This debate is interesting to me, because we have a lot of animals here. They are our friends, and are treated as such. So I typed in some iditarad
dog handling in google and was surprised to find a web page called "Sled Dog Action Coalition". I haven't read it all, but found this article, I'd like to know if this web site is truthful or not.

As in about everything with respect to animals, there are your good people and your bad people.  Bad practices DO exist, and you probably can Google up examples of it complete with videos.  From my experience with mushers though, they take good care of their dogs.  They have to really, because poorly treated dogs just don't run very well.

They do keep the dogs chained when in the kennel, if you keep a lot of dogs (which they need to do) they will fight with each other, particularly the males of course.  But once hooked up, the MUSHER is the "Alpha Male" and runs the show.  They don't fight when hooked to the sled, they RUN.  That is their JOB.  It's a PACK and PARTNERSHIP, where the Homo Sap is the BRAINS behind the operation and the Canines provide the MUSCLE.  Because the dogs are raised from infancy by the musher, they imprint that in their brains and they follow the direction of the musher, like ducklings follow a mother duck.  A well raised and trained Sled Dog will do exactly what the musher commands, and will run until he drops dead if the musher is no good and doesn't know what his dogs can stand.  There are always some stupid ones like this, but they don't last long on the Iditarod.  The folks you see in the Top 10 are very cognizant of the condition of their team, otherwise they won't make it to the finish line.

I won't ever contend that there aren't abuses in the sport, there most certainly are.  But of the mushers I have met over the years, their dogs are very well cared for animals.

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Offline knarf

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Re: 🐕 The Iditarod: The Ultimate test of the Homo Sap-Canine Partnership
« Reply #32 on: March 05, 2018, 08:39:46 AM »
  What you say rings true to me. There are some mushers who are cruel to their dogs, but I would think that most do the best they can to provide the best possible conditions for their beloved dogs. It seems to me that the dogs LOVE to run to pull the sled and the musher and the dogs have strong intimate connection. I think that web site is there to weed out the cruel owners, and therefore it seems one sided. It is very difficult for me to imagine DeeDee Jonrowe being anything other than devoted and kind to her dogs.
  An aside note... Misa went and bought a fairly good pony cart and had the idea of hooking it up to our very big and strong dog, Snowball. Boy was that a comedy of errors!!! :) Snowball had no idea what was going on. I had warned her that the dog would have to be trained from a very young age to pull a cart, but her vivid imagination was too much. :)

  This debate is seems to me to be about human nature in all fields of human activity. Within us all resides the possibility of compassion and care and also cruelty and prejudice ( immature reactions such as revenge, domination, greed, selfishness....). I have no idea on how these combinations develop, or how they mature to produce the outcome. But, it seems very clear that the human race is so complex, it is no wonder that it is unmanageable.
 
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Offline RE

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Re: 🐕 The Iditarod: The Ultimate test of the Homo Sap-Canine Partnership
« Reply #33 on: March 05, 2018, 08:49:20 AM »
  What you say rings true to me. There are some mushers who are cruel to their dogs, but I would think that most do the best they can to provide the best possible conditions for their beloved dogs. It seems to me that the dogs LOVE to run to pull the sled and the musher and the dogs have strong intimate connection. I think that web site is there to weed out the cruel owners, and therefore it seems one sided. It is very difficult for me to imagine DeeDee Jonrowe being anything other than devoted and kind to her dogs.
  An aside note... Misa went and bought a fairly good pony cart and had the idea of hooking it up to our very big and strong dog, Snowball. Boy was that a comedy of errors!!! :) Snowball had no idea what was going on. I had warned her that the dog would have to be trained from a very young age to pull a cart, but her vivid imagination was too much. :)

  This debate is seems to me to be about human nature in all fields of human activity. Within us all resides the possibility of compassion and care and also cruelty and prejudice ( immature reactions such as revenge, domination, greed, selfishness....). I have no idea on how these combinations develop, or how they mature to produce the outcome. But, it seems very clear that the human race is so complex, it is no wonder that it is unmanageable.
 

It takes a LONG time to train a dog to pull a sled.  About the youngest dogs who do it are around 2 years old, and that is rare, usually 3.  Trained basically from birth.  So you have to be doing this nearly every day for 2-3 years.  You can't just hook a dog to a cart and say "Mush Fido" and expect said dog will do much.  LOL.

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Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: 🐕 The Iditarod: The Ultimate test of the Homo Sap-Canine Partnership
« Reply #34 on: March 05, 2018, 09:00:43 AM »
This debate is interesting to me, because we have a lot of animals here. They are our friends, and are treated as such. So I typed in some iditarad
dog handling in google and was surprised to find a web page called "Sled Dog Action Coalition". I haven't read it all, but found this article, I'd like to know if this web site is truthful or not.

As in about everything with respect to animals, there are your good people and your bad people.  Bad practices DO exist, and you probably can Google up examples of it complete with videos.  From my experience with mushers though, they take good care of their dogs.  They have to really, because poorly treated dogs just don't run very well.

They do keep the dogs chained when in the kennel, if you keep a lot of dogs (which they need to do) they will fight with each other, particularly the males of course.  But once hooked up, the MUSHER is the "Alpha Male" and runs the show.  They don't fight when hooked to the sled, they RUN.  That is their JOB.  It's a PACK and PARTNERSHIP, where the Homo Sap is the BRAINS behind the operation and the Canines provide the MUSCLE.  Because the dogs are raised from infancy by the musher, they imprint that in their brains and they follow the direction of the musher, like ducklings follow a mother duck.  A well raised and trained Sled Dog will do exactly what the musher commands, and will run until he drops dead if the musher is no good and doesn't know what his dogs can stand.  There are always some stupid ones like this, but they don't last long on the Iditarod.  The folks you see in the Top 10 are very cognizant of the condition of their team, otherwise they won't make it to the finish line.

I won't ever contend that there aren't abuses in the sport, there most certainly are.  But of the mushers I have met over the years, their dogs are very well cared for animals.

RE

Same with horses and horse racing would like to add.

Many of these owners and trainers spend hundreds of thousands of dollars for a beautiful thoroughbred horse and nurture them with the greatest of love and care to prepare them for the race course.

Some ass holes at a fair track by a cheap claiming horse and drug the shit out of him and bute him up to win a race at a second rate track and the animal rights crowd goes berserk and tries to blame all of racing, all owners and trainers, even try and shut the wonderful horse racing game down entirely.

It's the same with everything with the fucking idiotic control freaks, a few bad apples and the entire bunch have to be outlawed and people who love and adore their horses treated like barbarians.

There is nothing more wonderful than than watching a proud high strung horse prancing on to the track with all his pageantry and colors.

Oh to be at Saratoga right now on a sunny day in August to watch the splendor of the horses and jockeys being paraded around the paddock and marching onto the race track.

The grace, colors, beauty of it all is just breathtaking.

Yet there are those who deem it is their right to ban the Sport of Kings. :icon_scratch: :-\ :emthdown: :emthdown:


                                 


                               


                               


                               



                                             


                                         
« Last Edit: March 05, 2018, 09:02:28 AM by Golden Oxen »

Offline RE

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Re: 🐕 The Iditarod: The Ultimate test of the Homo Sap-Canine Partnership
« Reply #35 on: March 05, 2018, 09:25:48 AM »
Same with horses and horse racing would like to add.

Many of these owners and trainers spend hundreds of thousands of dollars for a beautiful thoroughbred horse and nurture them with the greatest of love and care to prepare them for the race course.

Some ass holes at a fair track by a cheap claiming horse and drug the shit out of him and bute him up to win a race at a second rate track and the animal rights crowd goes berserk and tries to blame all of racing, all owners and trainers, even try and shut the wonderful horse racing game down entirely.

It's the same with everything with the fucking idiotic control freaks, a few bad apples and the entire bunch have to be outlawed and people who love and adore their horses treated like barbarians.

There is nothing more wonderful than than watching a proud high strung horse prancing on to the track with all his pageantry and colors.

Oh to be at Saratoga right now on a sunny day in August to watch the splendor of the horses and jockeys being paraded around the paddock and marching onto the race track.

The grace, colors, beauty of it all is just breathtaking.

Yet there are those who deem it is their right to ban the Sport of Kings.

Absolutely true, it's exactly the same thing.

I love horse racing also as you know, but for this week we are not at Saratoga.  We are in ALASKA, and following the LAST GREAT RACE ON EARTH, the Iditarod.  :icon_sunny:

Advantage of the Iditarod is the race is not over in 3 minutes, which doesn't work too good on the internet.  The Iditarod takes days to complete, great for a message board like this.  It's a marathon for the dogs and the musher.  It's run over the toughest terrain and toughest weather nature can throw out.  It is the signature of Alaska in its partnership between Homo Sap & Canine.

I'll do another update in a while.  Anna Berington dropped back, but now is back up at #2.  The Reddington boys are moving up, I know them.  Martin Buser (an older multiple winner) is hanging in there.

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Offline monsta666

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Re: 🐕 The Iditarod: The Ultimate test of the Homo Sap-Canine Partnership
« Reply #36 on: March 05, 2018, 11:48:39 AM »
When there's money there's corruption also when it comes to competition some people always want to be the best at any cost. You got to oversee against the unscrupulous operators otherwise their unsavory practices will permeate the whole industry. As much as you hate'em those animal rights activists do keep people honest, on their toes and question the general practices that could easily be taken for granted.

Offline Palloy2

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Re: 🐕 The Iditarod: The Ultimate test of the Homo Sap-Canine Partnership
« Reply #37 on: March 05, 2018, 01:33:25 PM »
Quote
... a few bad apples ...

So you believe THAT old excuse, do you?

Quote
Oh to be at Saratoga right now on a sunny day in August to watch the splendor of the horses and jockeys being paraded around the paddock and marching onto the race track.

The grace, colors, beauty of it all is just breathtaking.

That's the sport of kings in public at its best, and the animal rights activists who dig a bit deeper find all the bad apples, and you refuse to believe them and won't work on a compromise with them.  Complete brainwashing.
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Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: 🐕 The Iditarod: The Ultimate test of the Homo Sap-Canine Partnership
« Reply #38 on: March 05, 2018, 02:36:02 PM »
Quote
... a few bad apples ...

So you believe THAT old excuse, do you?

Quote
Oh to be at Saratoga right now on a sunny day in August to watch the splendor of the horses and jockeys being paraded around the paddock and marching onto the race track.

The grace, colors, beauty of it all is just breathtaking.

That's the sport of kings in public at its best, and the animal rights activists who dig a bit deeper find all the bad apples, and you refuse to believe them and won't work on a compromise with them.  Complete brainwashing.

I know your sincere, and very well intentioned with noble goals.

Arguing with you would be fruitless.

Speaking to you as a former owner of a small stable of race horses and a person intimately acquainted with people in the industry, your wrong on this one Palloy. You are also insulting and demeaning good folks who love animals as much as you do.

Your desire to help the horses or dogs, whatever, that are hurt by that minority of unscrupulous scum that permeate our society in all endeavours and who destroy everything that is good or innocent in our world is commendable.

My only wish is that you refrain from condemning and demeaning all for the sake of a few.

Would like to suggest we get the conversation back to the human beings that are being slaughtered throughout the world by our gentle loving governments. 

Syria's war: Ghouta hit with incendiary rockets

Al Jazeera English
Published on Feb 24, 2018
More than 440 civilians have died in just six days in Eastern Ghouta alone.

 
The area is now being hit by incendiary bombs that are appearing in the night skies, weapons that are intended to start large fires when they hit the ground.
 
The opposition holds Russia and Iran responsible for the continuing bombardment, calling it a 'genocide'.
 
Al Jazeera's Osama Bin Javaid reports from Gaziantep on the Turkish-Syria border.

                                   <a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/ZQpRimhqTjM" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/ZQpRimhqTjM</a>

                                   
                                   


Offline RE

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Re: 🐕 The Iditarod: The Ultimate test of the Homo Sap-Canine Partnership
« Reply #39 on: March 05, 2018, 03:11:50 PM »
When there's money there's corruption also when it comes to competition some people always want to be the best at any cost. You got to oversee against the unscrupulous operators otherwise their unsavory practices will permeate the whole industry. As much as you hate'em those animal rights activists do keep people honest, on their toes and question the general practices that could easily be taken for granted.

That's why there isn't much corruption in mushing, there isn't much money in it.  The people who do it already HAVE plenty of money, you have to in order to get into the sport to begin with.  It costs a LOT to pursue that sport, you have to feed and house 20 or so dogs, the sleds are ridiculously expensive and to transport it all to race sites you need a big ass 4X4 pickup to pull an even bigger freaking trailer.  Then some races are held oversees or down in the Lower 48 so you have to fly all your dogs plus your support team of Homo Saps to wherever it is.

However, regardless of the money, you are correct there are always a few cheaters who will do anything to win, like Lance Armstrong in cycling.    In mushing though, few dogs test positive for doping, and the tests are done under international standards, because you have Swedes, Finns, Canadians & Ruskies participating too.  None of what PY thinks sitting in the Tropical Rainforest is the least bit correct.  He just has built the model of what he believes is true and won't let go of it.

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Offline Palloy2

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Re: 🐕 The Iditarod: The Ultimate test of the Homo Sap-Canine Partnership
« Reply #40 on: March 05, 2018, 03:19:53 PM »
Most people only keep one dog at a time, so they only see the actions of one dog with their human family.  As soon as you keep two dogs you start to see dog-dog interactions, including alpha-male dominance and jealous behaviour.  It is quite wrong to think the human is always the one and only alpha-male.

At one time my dalmatian family was five strong, and the alpha-male had a hard time keeping control of his two sons.  They all want affection and so I had to be careful when arriving home as the pack charges you, looking for a pat.  Not a good way to live.  With a family of sixteen or more, you couldn't do it that way or else there would be fights all over the place.  So they all need to be individually penned, as in the dog pound, or individually chained as in this:



The owner would say they love them all, but there is NO ALTERNATIVE to this happening. This applies to EVERYONE.  At best they will only get a sixteenth of love and won't grow up to be well-balanced well-loved dogs.

Turning to the humans, it takes two to fight.  The legitimate Syrian Government is trying to beat its rebels, who are holding the innocent population hostage and preventing UN aid from reaching them.  That video clearly shows the use white phosphorus, which has two effects.  One to burn and maim, the other to provide smoke to cover infantry movements.  The US used it in Fallujah and Mosul (likely Raqqa too), the Poroshenko nazis used it in Donetsk.  When it gets down to desperate street to street fighting it gets used.  This is not genocide by Russians as claimed, how could you exterminate a whole population by dropping white phosphorus on them? or Chlorine gas? - but don't expect balanced reporting.
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Offline RE

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Re: 🐕 The Iditarod: The Ultimate test of the Homo Sap-Canine Partnership
« Reply #41 on: March 05, 2018, 03:31:20 PM »
As I said, when you have that many dogs when you bed them down for the night you HAVE to chain them.  Otherwise they'll tear each other to bits.

However, as soon as the musher comes, they all look to her for guidance.  She is the Leader of the Pack to them.  Mushers come out to be with their pack every day, 24/7/365 is necessary.  Here is Susan Butcher's Kennel:


Each dog has his own house and his own personal space.  The musher feeds them all, and then unchains them to hook to the sled for a morning workout and an afternoon workout.  The musher's Homo Sap children play with the dogs too, most mushers are married with kids, only a few single ones.  That's why you see whole families like the Redingtons all running sleds.

This is a very good life for a dog.  It's not different then keeping horses in a stable or chooks in a coop.  These are work animals primarily, not pets.

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« Last Edit: March 05, 2018, 04:35:02 PM by RE »
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Re: 🐕 The Iditarod: The Ultimate test of the Homo Sap-Canine Partnership
« Reply #42 on: March 05, 2018, 04:23:27 PM »
Along with the current standings (which keep shifting enormously), here is a little about the age and length of time a dog will be part of a musher's pack to pull the sled.

http://iditarod.com/zuma/how-old-are-the-dogs/
Quote
How old are the Dogs?
Posted by Libby Littles in Libby Littles
Date: September 2, 2012 7:15 am

Libby Here!

What is the average age of the dogs? Are they retired after a certain age? These are questions that a lot of you have asked.

Well, students, do you think I’m going to tell you my age? Some of us don’t like to tell those details, (hee hee!)

A musher doesn’t always tell us how old a dog on their team is but here is information to keep in mind.

Dogs can run in the race as soon as they are trained to do so, which means that there are young dogs on the trail. Dogs keep running in a musher’s team as long as they are healthy and as long as they still love to race. That means there are ‘old’ experienced dogs on the trail. It also means that mushers can have a mixture of young dogs (2 or 3 years old) and older dogs (about age 4 -8) on the team.

Often some of the dogs on a team have been in Iditarod before, so some of the dogs have the Iditarod Trail experience. Like our mushers, we have veteran and rookie dogs on musher’s teams. (Veterans= those that have done this before, rookies= those doing it for the first time) Sometimes a musher runs all young dogs, who have not run in Iditarod before as part of training a future team. When a musher chooses the dogs for the team, the dogs that are the healthiest and the most well trained make the team. The team is put together to match or to go along with the musher’s goals.

Like with humans, canines retire, too. Retirement comes at the age that best meets that individual dog. Often retired dogs live out the rest of their lives as family pets or get to roam in the musher’s kennel as a retired lead dog of the kennel. I know of some mushers who have special areas in their kennels for the retired dogs. Retired dogs often live for many, many years, most likely always remembering how awesome it was to run with their musher.

To sum up the question, when a musher picks the dogs for the team, the age of the dog is not the main factor. It isn’t about age, it is more about healthy well trained dogs. It is about looking at the experiences the dogs have had during training. It is about past race experience. It is about looking at the traits of the dogs. It is about a musher picking the dogs that best meet the goals the musher has for the race.

Just spinning some de’tails’!

Libby

Here are current standings:

RACE STANDINGS
POS    MUSHER    BIB    CHKPNT    TIME    DOGS    AVG SPEED
1    Jessie Holmes    41    Out of Rainy Pass    3/5 12:28:00    16 (0)    8.22
2    Richie Diehl    29    Out of Rainy Pass    3/5 13:28:00    16 (0)    8.57
3    Ray Redington Jr    17    In to Rainy Pass    3/5 10:16:00    16    8.22
4    Mitch Seavey    13    In to Rainy Pass    3/5 10:19:00    15    8.96
5    Nicolas Petit    46    In to Rainy Pass    3/5 10:55:00    16    9.14
6    Linwood Fiedler    8    In to Rainy Pass    3/5 11:32:00    16    8.61
7    Ryan Redington    7    In to Rainy Pass    3/5 11:51:00    16    8.70
8    Wade Marrs    11    In to Rainy Pass    3/5 12:04:00    15    8.57
9    Hugh Neff    68    In to Rainy Pass    3/5 12:08:00    15    7.76
10    Peter Kaiser    30    In to Rainy Pass    3/5 12:15:00    16    8.37
11    Kelly Maixner    52    In to Rainy Pass    3/5 12:18:00    16    8.07
12    Joar Leifseth Ulsom    33    In to Rainy Pass    3/5 12:34:00    16    8.53
13    Cody Strathe    2    In to Rainy Pass    3/5 12:38:00    16    8.29
14    Mats Pettersson    3    In to Rainy Pass    3/5 12:55:00    16    8.33
15    Robert Redington    34    In to Rainy Pass    3/5 12:58:00    16    8.26
16    Scott Janssen    23    In to Rainy Pass    3/5 13:40:00    15    6.90
17    Aaron Burmeister    64    In to Rainy Pass    3/5 13:43:00    16    8.22
18    Rick Casillo    9    In to Rainy Pass    3/5 13:45:00    16    8.22
19    Michelle Phillips    18    In to Rainy Pass    3/5 13:51:00    15    8.07
20    Jeff King    40    In to Rainy Pass    3/5 14:10:00    15    7.79
21    Michi Konno    63    In to Rainy Pass    3/5 14:13:00    15    8.11
22    Aliy Zirkle    31    Out of Finger Lake    3/5 06:58:00    16 (0)    8.19
23    Jessie Royer    36    Out of Finger Lake    3/5 07:13:00    16 (0)    8.14
24    Lars Monsen    61    Out of Finger Lake    3/5 08:20:00    15 (0)    7.50
25    Ramey Smyth    21    Out of Finger Lake    3/5 08:53:00    16 (0)    7.38

The race is still fairly bunched up, about 20% in to the finish line in Nome.

Iditarod 2018 3
Iditarod 2018 3

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Offline monsta666

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Re: 🐕 The Iditarod: The Ultimate test of the Homo Sap-Canine Partnership
« Reply #43 on: March 05, 2018, 04:28:08 PM »
However, regardless of the money, you are correct there are always a few cheaters who will do anything to win, like Lance Armstrong in cycling.    In mushing though, few dogs test positive for doping, and the tests are done under international standards, because you have Swedes, Finns, Canadians & Ruskies participating too.  None of what PY thinks sitting in the Tropical Rainforest is the least bit correct.  He just has built the model of what he believes is true and won't let go of it.

Thing is it isn't just doping one should be concerned about. What you also need to consider is the training that takes place behind the scenes and whether those practices are ethical. On race day are the dogs subjected to commands or/and situations that are detrimental to their welfare? It can sound patronizing and extra but with a few considerations the sport can go on if there a strict rules plus accountability. I don't have a clue about dog racing but with horses it took animal activists to highlight the practice of horse whipping before rules came into place to curb that practice. Another was reducing the difficulty of jumps or turns on certain race tracks as the fatality rates at those points were unacceptably high. That last point does reduce the entertainment factor but then it does safe life of horses. It all goes back to the point I raised in my earlier post that some common features of a sport that participants take for granted aren't all that great for the animals in question.

Offline RE

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Re: 🐕 The Iditarod: The Ultimate test of the Homo Sap-Canine Partnership
« Reply #44 on: March 05, 2018, 04:48:03 PM »
However, regardless of the money, you are correct there are always a few cheaters who will do anything to win, like Lance Armstrong in cycling.    In mushing though, few dogs test positive for doping, and the tests are done under international standards, because you have Swedes, Finns, Canadians & Ruskies participating too.  None of what PY thinks sitting in the Tropical Rainforest is the least bit correct.  He just has built the model of what he believes is true and won't let go of it.

Thing is it isn't just doping one should be concerned about. What you also need to consider is the training that takes place behind the scenes and whether those practices are ethical. On race day are the dogs subjected to commands or/and situations that are detrimental to their welfare? It can sound patronizing and extra but with a few considerations the sport can go on if there a strict rules plus accountability. I don't have a clue about dog racing but with horses it took animal activists to highlight the practice of horse whipping before rules came into place to curb that practice. Another was reducing the difficulty of jumps or turns on certain race tracks as the fatality rates at those points were unacceptably high. That last point does reduce the entertainment factor but then it does safe life of horses. It all goes back to the point I raised in my earlier post that some common features of a sport that participants take for granted aren't all that great for the animals in question.

If you want to know about what goes on in Mushing (it's not "dog racing" as in the FL race tracks), I suggest you go read on Iditarod.com about how the sport is overseen.  Go to Utoob and search down vids of the mushers like Dee Dee Jonrowe, Martin Buser and Susan Butcher.  These people are totally devoted to their dogs and their welfare.

Mushing isn't perfect, nothing is.  There are always assholes involved in any sport, or any endeavor at all for that matter.  But I LIVE in Alaska and I know mushers and have seen how they treat and LOVE their dogs.  Most mushers would give their lives to save their dogs, as Dee Dee Jonrowe had to do when a Forest Fire consumed her house and kennel.  She and her husband and dogs all got out alive, they lost everything else.

RE
« Last Edit: March 05, 2018, 05:02:18 PM by RE »
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