AuthorTopic: A Window into the Thinking & Experience of the Millenial Doomer  (Read 2805 times)

Offline K-Dog

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Re: A Window into the Thinking & Experience of the Millenial Doomer
« Reply #105 on: March 11, 2018, 11:19:50 PM »
Trace chemicals in the water could also affect men differently to women.  More analysis is needed, but since it would involve expensive cleaning up of the water and couldn't be charged to chemical pollution, it will not get funding.

Of course it won't get funding.  Even if you assume that cleaning up the water would reduce the number of Shoot-em-Ups, it's an ENORMOUS expense on the national level.  Who is going to pick up the tab for that one?  Besides, I don't think it is primarily a chemical problem, it's much more a sociological phenomenon.  The majority of men cannot AFFORD to take on a wife and kids and support them, so they become frustrated and many strike out.  The alternative is to become a Monk, but most men (especially younger ones) can't control their sexual urge enough to be able to make that choice.  They marry and have kids even though they can't really afford them.  It's a Wicked Problem.


RE

Quote
The majority of men cannot AFFORD to take on a wife and kids

They are not making that calculation.  If they were they would figure out how to make it work because we are not yet at a point where defeat in that endeavor is certain.  Most are simply passivly angry at anything which will justify inactivity and partying on.  They do not strike out or do much of anything.  Those who strike out are impulsive basket cases who can't discipline themselves to achieve at all.  These are examples of people, and there are many, who have to be told what to do because they can't achieve on their own. The number of people who have to be told what to do actually exceeds those who can self-actualize and sail their own ships. 

The problem is not that they can't afford a wife and kids.  They don't even know they can't. The problem is patriarchy is a dirty word equated with oppression to them.  To grow up people have to turn off their T.V., get jobs, and be responsible.  This activity being optional for many of our younger generation, unlike it was for us, the easy path became no path at all.  A cultural value exalting sloth was born.  To justify their lack of  activity the responsible among us have become evil control freaks and are ignored. 

We can thank Seattle mothers for the problem because a number of decades ago many found full time employment at Boeing and decided they could do a better job raising children without men at all.  Single motherhood and pussy likin became things to aspire to here and as there were no men around to instill the kind of ethics and behavior women have a great deal of trouble teaching our society went to shit.  Single mother boys are boys forever and can never be men for the number who can pull themselves up by their own bootstraps and provide themselves what their mothers could not are few and far between.  The single motherhood virus spread across the land.

Not having a job in America used to mean you were a bum.  Now it does not.  There are souls who have not been reincarnated a sufficient number of times to know better than to not live like a bum.  They take full advantage of our current situation and such souls were born to Seattle mothers in larger than average numbers.   They wanted to party on and put themselves on the wait list.  Pushed some gentler souls off the list they did.



No you can't.  You failed miserably and now we all have to all suffer for it.
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Re: A Window into the Thinking & Experience of the Millenial Doomer
« Reply #106 on: March 12, 2018, 12:00:44 AM »
Trace chemicals in the water could also affect men differently to women.  More analysis is needed, but since it would involve expensive cleaning up of the water and couldn't be charged to chemical pollution, it will not get funding.

Of course it won't get funding.  Even if you assume that cleaning up the water would reduce the number of Shoot-em-Ups, it's an ENORMOUS expense on the national level.  Who is going to pick up the tab for that one?  Besides, I don't think it is primarily a chemical problem, it's much more a sociological phenomenon.  The majority of men cannot AFFORD to take on a wife and kids and support them, so they become frustrated and many strike out.  The alternative is to become a Monk, but most men (especially younger ones) can't control their sexual urge enough to be able to make that choice.  They marry and have kids even though they can't really afford them.  It's a Wicked Problem.


RE

Quote
The majority of men cannot AFFORD to take on a wife and kids

They are not making that calculation.  If they were they would figure out how to make it work because we are not yet at a point where defeat in that endeavor is certain.  Most are simply passivly angry at anything which will justify inactivity and partying on.  They do not strike out or do much of anything.  Those who strike out are impulsive basket cases who can't discipline themselves to achieve at all.  These are examples of people, and there are many, who have to be told what to do because they can't achieve on their own. The number of people who have to be told what to do actually exceeds those who can self-actualize and sail their own ships. 

The problem is not that they can't afford a wife and kids.  They don't even know they can't. The problem is patriarchy is a dirty word equated with oppression to them.  To grow up people have to turn off their T.V., get jobs, and be responsible.  This activity being optional for many of our younger generation, unlike it was for us, the easy path became no path at all.  A cultural value exalting sloth was born.  To justify their lack of  activity the responsible among us have become evil control freaks and are ignored. 

We can thank Seattle mothers for the problem because a number of decades ago many found full time employment at Boeing and decided they could do a better job raising children without men at all.  Single motherhood and pussy likin became things to aspire to here and as there were no men around to instill the kind of ethics and behavior women have a great deal of trouble teaching our society went to shit.  Single mother boys are boys forever and can never be men for the number who can pull themselves up by their own bootstraps and provide themselves what their mothers could not are few and far between.  The single motherhood virus spread across the land.

Not having a job in America used to mean you were a bum.  Now it does not.  There are souls who have not been reincarnated a sufficient number of times to know better than to not live like a bum.  They take full advantage of our current situation and such souls were born to Seattle mothers in larger than average numbers.   They wanted to party on and put themselves on the wait list.  Pushed some gentler souls off the list they did.



No you can't.  You failed miserably and now we all have to all suffer for it.

That's a fairly novel opinion on the subject.

RE
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Offline luciddreams

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Re: A Window into the Thinking & Experience of the Millenial Doomer
« Reply #107 on: March 12, 2018, 03:35:57 PM »
Of course this will all come crashing down at some point, but when that happens it's game over for our society.

It doesn't have to come "crashing down" to go broke as an O/O.  All that needs to happen is for freight to slow down enough so you can't make your truck payment.  As I said, this is what happened after 9/11.  Probably half the other O/O s I knew went tits up.  The only guys who made it through were guys like me with really low expenses (no rent, no mortgage, no car payment, no wife, no kids) or guys who had already paid off their truck or guys with fat savings accounts to ride out the storm.

Nobody makes $200K as an O/O, anyone who says they do is lying.  Ask them to show you their tax return.  You can gross near that, but your expenses cut way into it.  The only way to make $200K is to drive with your wife as partners or to run a second truck with an employee driver.

Is it possible that the industry has changed since 2001?  By that I mean, is it possible that there are things that you don't know about it any longer due to the fact you have been out of the game for a while now?  I know that you know what you are talking about here.  I'm not accusing you of not knowing. 

Quote
You're still an idealist, just now you have transferred your idealism into trucking and how you will make lots of money as a driver.  ::)

I'm pretty sure that optimism and idealism are different things.  I'm optimistic about trucking, and my future in it.  How am I being idealist about the topic?  Ideally trucks wouldn't exist and we'd all work the land and live an ecotechnic life, and lots of us would be nomads, and some shamans...

Quote
Another piece of advice I am sure you won't take.  Don't go O/O until you have at least 25% of the purchase price for the truck in savings.  "No money down" offers from the fleets are a suckers game.  I only risked it because I had saved more than 30% of the purchase price and JB Hunt was offering a great deal on their trucks at the time to reduce the fleet size, plus I drove that truck straight off the production line and knew it was a good one.  You get a lemon and you are totally fucked.

RE

The dude I referenced earlier that was clearing $800 a day owns his truck.  He bought a 2007 volvo for 20k three years ago.  No doubt you've got to own your truck, and then promptly put 30k in the bank for operating costs.  You should also be able to broker your own loads so that you can keep 100% of the money.  Most o/o's I run into are working for a company, and the company takes somewhere around 25%.   

Offline luciddreams

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Re: A Window into the Thinking & Experience of the Millenial Doomer
« Reply #108 on: March 12, 2018, 03:51:56 PM »


They are not making that calculation.  If they were they would figure out how to make it work because we are not yet at a point where defeat in that endeavor is certain.  Most are simply passivly angry at anything which will justify inactivity and partying on.  They do not strike out or do much of anything.  Those who strike out are impulsive basket cases who can't discipline themselves to achieve at all.  These are examples of people, and there are many, who have to be told what to do because they can't achieve on their own. The number of people who have to be told what to do actually exceeds those who can self-actualize and sail their own ships. 

This is very true.  Most people, deep down, just want to be told what to do.  It makes things easier for people to just be told and then do.  I think this has something to do with an innate proclivity towards anxiety over thinking about things.  I haven't quite figured this out. 

Quote
The problem is not that they can't afford a wife and kids.  They don't even know they can't. The problem is patriarchy is a dirty word equated with oppression to them.  To grow up people have to turn off their T.V., get jobs, and be responsible.  This activity being optional for many of our younger generation, unlike it was for us, the easy path became no path at all.  A cultural value exalting sloth was born.  To justify their lack of  activity the responsible among us have become evil control freaks and are ignored. 

This would be the Dude, from Los Angeles, he might as well be the myth that embodies what you are talking about, the patron saint of the bums...he was a boomer btw.  Anyways, I think there is a lot of truth to this as well. 

Quote
We can thank Seattle mothers for the problem because a number of decades ago many found full time employment at Boeing and decided they could do a better job raising children without men at all.  Single motherhood and pussy likin became things to aspire to here and as there were no men around to instill the kind of ethics and behavior women have a great deal of trouble teaching our society went to shit.  Single mother boys are boys forever and can never be men for the number who can pull themselves up by their own bootstraps and provide themselves what their mothers could not are few and far between.  The single motherhood virus spread across the land.

My mother was a single mother, which makes me one of those kids you are talking about.  However this wasn't Seattle but southern California.  Again, a lot of truth to the above quotation.  I certainly fall into that category with a few exceptions.  Basically I think being a single mother child just delayed my manhood.  I think I was an idealist for about a decade longer then I would have otherwise been had I had a father around to slap some sense into me.  I know I keep bringing up idealism, but I'm doing it because I think it points to a very important truth. 

Idealism is for youth.  Isn't a large part of maturing as a man realizing how the world actually works?  You can be a dreamer so long as you are dreaming up things that can exist within the world as it is. 
Quote

No you can't.  You failed miserably and now we all have to all suffer for it.

What do you mean by this?  How is everybody else suffering on account of lazy millennial bums? 

Furthermore, just for the record, I wasn't wrong with my ideal thoughts.  I was right, morally, but I was wrong where reality is concerned.  There is how things are, and then there is how things aught to be, but they aren't that way...they are how they are.  Nothing can change that. 

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Re: A Window into the Thinking & Experience of the Millenial Doomer
« Reply #109 on: March 12, 2018, 05:13:10 PM »
Of course this will all come crashing down at some point, but when that happens it's game over for our society.

It doesn't have to come "crashing down" to go broke as an O/O.  All that needs to happen is for freight to slow down enough so you can't make your truck payment.  As I said, this is what happened after 9/11.  Probably half the other O/O s I knew went tits up.  The only guys who made it through were guys like me with really low expenses (no rent, no mortgage, no car payment, no wife, no kids) or guys who had already paid off their truck or guys with fat savings accounts to ride out the storm.

Nobody makes $200K as an O/O, anyone who says they do is lying.  Ask them to show you their tax return.  You can gross near that, but your expenses cut way into it.  The only way to make $200K is to drive with your wife as partners or to run a second truck with an employee driver.

Is it possible that the industry has changed since 2001?  By that I mean, is it possible that there are things that you don't know about it any longer due to the fact you have been out of the game for a while now?  I know that you know what you are talking about here.  I'm not accusing you of not knowing. 

Quote
You're still an idealist, just now you have transferred your idealism into trucking and how you will make lots of money as a driver.  ::)

I'm pretty sure that optimism and idealism are different things.  I'm optimistic about trucking, and my future in it.  How am I being idealist about the topic?  Ideally trucks wouldn't exist and we'd all work the land and live an ecotechnic life, and lots of us would be nomads, and some shamans...

Quote
Another piece of advice I am sure you won't take.  Don't go O/O until you have at least 25% of the purchase price for the truck in savings.  "No money down" offers from the fleets are a suckers game.  I only risked it because I had saved more than 30% of the purchase price and JB Hunt was offering a great deal on their trucks at the time to reduce the fleet size, plus I drove that truck straight off the production line and knew it was a good one.  You get a lemon and you are totally fucked.

RE

The dude I referenced earlier that was clearing $800 a day owns his truck.  He bought a 2007 volvo for 20k three years ago.  No doubt you've got to own your truck, and then promptly put 30k in the bank for operating costs.  You should also be able to broker your own loads so that you can keep 100% of the money.  Most o/o's I run into are working for a company, and the company takes somewhere around 25%.

It's possible there have been some changes, but at least for company drivers the mileage pay hasn't changed much if at all.  While I was a company driver I made 53 cents/mile.  I don't see why O/Os would be making so much more now than they were then.  What kind of gig does this guy have that he is making $800/day?  If you come up to Alaska and drive the Ice Road  you can make this kind of money, but why would anyone in the lower 48 pay that when there are plenty of guys who will work for less?

In terms of idealism, you're idealistic about how much money you will make as an O/O.  If it was so EZ to make $200K/year, a whole lot more people would be doing it.

Anyhow, you still need to save up for a truck downpayment and I wouldn't recommend anything as old as that Volvo.

RE
« Last Edit: March 12, 2018, 10:41:27 PM by RE »
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Offline K-Dog

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Re: A Window into the Thinking & Experience of the Millenial Doomer
« Reply #110 on: March 12, 2018, 09:52:36 PM »


No you can't.  You failed miserably and now we all have to all suffer for it.

What do you mean by this?  How is everybody else suffering on account of lazy millennial bums? 

Furthermore, just for the record, I wasn't wrong with my ideal thoughts.  I was right, morally, but I was wrong where reality is concerned.  There is how things are, and then there is how things aught to be, but they aren't that way...they are how they are.  Nothing can change that.

You failed miserably  ==> Feminism did not make more capable citizens who can contribute as they should.  Dysfunction has bloomed.

Now we all have to all suffer for it  ==>  There are no free rides.  Somebody always pays the dinner check but bums never do.  If you don't have any bums in your own family, as is your case, any financial drain can be minimal.  Otherwise you are a sugar daddy because you work and fighting any dysfunction of others to lighten your load could carry a very high price.  Feminism has not admitted defeat and still infects American women.  The beat-down of the responsible American male continues.  The degree to which one suffers from the dysfunction of others depends on their personal situation.

Perhaps because I read the last of Kunstler's World Made by Hand series a few weeks ago this comes to mind.  In Kunstler's World Made by Hand books there are two kinds of people.  Pickers and bandits rape and plunder in the night to take what disciplined responsible people produce in the day.  In a world of collapse there will be many people who having nothing to contribute will indeed become brutal takers.  But there will also be those who will be trying hard to be decent and fair to others.  They will be trying to build something good and new.  They will be idealists.

Perhaps collapse will sharpen the distinctions between us as in Kunstler's books, but takers are among us now.  Yet as we still live in a world of plenty this is not a problem.  For the time being anyway.  Functionality can often be feigned so useless eaters are often not easily identified and everyone eats.  We are in a what-me-worry situation.  This will change.

I have always been idealistic myself and in many ways I still am.  Yes I have learned how deeply humans are flawed and how hurtful and needy many of us are.  Many of us don't have an idealistic bone in our body, but as you say:

Quote
I wasn't wrong with my ideal thoughts.  I was right, morally,

Yes, I agree and thank you for enjoying my observations.
Under ideal conditions of temperature and pressure the organism will grow without limit.

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💸 Millennials say anxiety about money is literally making them sick
« Reply #111 on: March 17, 2018, 12:26:53 AM »
This one has made it to #1 on the r/collapse Hit Parade also.  Posted by Cliffhanger (aka "Cliffy"), who competes with me for most posting of links. lol.  I got in the first comment, but some jackass downvoted it.  Go in there and Upvote me!  ;D

https://www.reddit.com/r/collapse/comments/851nf6/millennials_say_anxiety_about_money_is_literally/

RE

https://www.marketwatch.com/story/millennials-say-anxiety-about-money-is-literally-making-them-sick-2017-09-01?link=sfmw_tw#false

Millennials say anxiety about money is literally making them sick

Published: Sept 9, 2017 9:57 a.m. ET


Money anxiety affects their work and personal lives
iStockphoto
The struggle is real.

By
Maria
LaMagna
Reporter

When Claudia Pennington, 32, started to get serious about conquering her debt, she owed more than $200,000. She and her husband Garrett, who live in Lancaster, Pa., owed $156,000 on their mortgage, plus $16,500 in credit card bills and $36,000 in student loans.

At the time, she was “always worried about money,” she said, and found herself constantly checking their debt balance and the amount in their checking account.

The anxiety even affected her at work.

“I tried to toe the line,” she said of working in marketing before she became self-employed. “I didn’t want to make waves for fear of losing my job, even though I had some suggestions for how to improve things.”

The Penningtons have now paid off the entirety of their debt — by selling their house, cutting back on spending and boosting their incomes, a journey they’ve chronicled on their blog, Two Cup House — and the anxiety has mostly gone away, too. But the constant fear of not having enough funds plagues their entire generation.

X
See Also
A lawyer on how she got to 'that decision-making table'

More than a quarter of millennials say financial stress affects their job performance, over twice the rate of the general population who feels that way, according to a study of more than 2,000 people released in August by insurance and financial planning company Northwestern Mutual.
Courtesy of Claudia Pennington
The Penningtons sold their house to reduce their debt.

Financial anxiety also has made about a quarter of millennials feel physically ill, according to the study, and has made more than half feel depressed.

Kara Perez, a 29-year-old living in Austin, said she felt sick because of her anxiety about money when she graduated from college in 2011 with more than $25,000 in student loans. She was unable to find full-time work and worked various part-time jobs, including as a caterer and receptionist.

Perez said she remembers crying a lot at the time, and she felt she was “swimming in a sea of anxiety.”

“I often feel anxiety in the pit of my stomach,” she said. “It would manifest as nausea for me.”
Here's how to pick retail companies that will survive the meltdown

For many millennials, who came of age and entered the job market during the economic recession, the bad feelings are pervasive. Some 69% said they experienced anxiety because of their income, 67% said it was because of their level of savings and 53% said it was because of worry about losing their job.

“So much of anxiety is just feeling out of control,” said Chantel Bonneau, a wealth management advisor at Northwestern Mutual. “You can never just check a box and say, ‘I handled my financial planning.’ It’s every day of your life you’re forced to make decisions.”

The high cost of housing also presents challenges, and millennials have more student loan debt than any previous generation.

“Millennials really do want a plan, and they are aware they need to save,” Bonneau said. “It’s not the same ball game to buy a property it was maybe 50 years ago or even 25 years ago.”

But for those who do have jobs and incomes, there are some places they can make cuts that could ease the anxiety and put them on a path to saving for a house or other major goal, Bonneau said.

About a third of the millennials surveyed said they were prone to excessive or frivolous spending, more than the 26% of those in Generation X and 19% of baby boomers who said this. About a third of millennials also said they have ended up spending money they budgeted for other things, like savings, on themselves. Just 15% of those in Generation X and 4% of baby boomers said this.

In fact, millennials spend more than an average of $2,300 per year than older generations on key items including groceries, gas, restaurants, coffee and cellphone bills, a survey from the personal-finance website Bankrate.com found. Millennials spent $233 a month on meals compared with $182 in older generations and $161 per month on cellphone charges, versus $135 for people in older generations. (Still, millennials spend less than older generations do on travel and television-related costs.)

Pennington and her husband cut dining out and travel from their budgets at first, she said.

Bonneau suggested staying off social media so you don’t fall into a “compare and despair” trap.

See also: This is why it seems like everyone has more money than you

She also suggested thinking of financial goals in smaller steps, to avoid feeling “hopeless” about larger goals like owning a home or retirement.

Actually creating a financial plan, whether on your own or with a financial adviser, is another good strategy, she said; just one-third of American adults write out a budget at all, according to a survey from polling company Gallup.

For her own clients, for example, it can be helpful to show them projections that illustrate how just adding one or two percent more of their income into a 401k can make a big difference over time, she said.

“If you were saving 0% yesterday and we can get you to saving 3%, that’s a huge victory,” Bonneau said. “It’s about progress.”

Pennington said she wishes she would have focused more on boosting her family’s income, rather than only on the small budget cuts, which add up, but slowly.

But like Bonneau, she also said goal-setting can work, even with hundreds of thousands of dollars of debt looming.

“Focus more on the daily actions and steps to get there, rather than the anxiety,” she said.

Perez was able to completely pay off her student loans four years after graduating. She took various part-time jobs including as a nanny, a van driver for a high-school golf team, a high school lacrosse coach and a freelancer for social media clients.

Now, she has started a financial literacy company for women called Bravely.

“Even when you’re feeling at your lowest, the most stressed out, and when the numbers feel like they won’t add up, it’s possible,” she said. “Keep the faith.”
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Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: A Window into the Thinking & Experience of the Millenial Doomer
« Reply #112 on: March 17, 2018, 04:19:28 AM »
Poor Dears

Offline Eddie

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Re: A Window into the Thinking & Experience of the Millenial Doomer
« Reply #113 on: March 17, 2018, 09:25:31 AM »
[ Claudia Pennington, 32, started to get serious about conquering her debt, she owed more than $200,000. She and her husband Garrett, who live in Lancaster, Pa., owed $156,000 on their mortgage, plus $16,500 in credit card bills and $36,000 in student loans.i]

Kara Perez, a 29-year-old living in Austin, said she felt sick because of her anxiety about money when she graduated from college in 2011 with more than $25,000 in student loans./i]

First, you can't count the mortgage, unless maybe it's seriously underwater. It's a monthly payment that would be there in the form of rent whether they owned a home or not.

Secondly, if the couple above were insolvent, they could have gone chapter 7 and walked away from the credit card debt. So we are talking about two people in their 30's  (the first couple) with a combined non-dischargeable debt of 18K apiece and and another person with a 25K debt.

I would view both these situations as very manageable, and frankly, their debt levels are lower than most non-college educated people that age trying to raise a family.

Sure, if you have no means of making a living and you owe that money, it's scary. My kid owes about 50K just for two years of top flite grad school education, and he's struggling in his first year of paying it back....but he has no kids, he has at least some work, and I expect him to get 'er done.

Just like the couple above.

Anxiety, unfortunately, is a fact of life.  I wonder how they'd sleep at night with my 985K in debt? In BAU debt is a fact of life for most people, especially young people, but also for older people with leveraged investments. You learn to live with it.

I'm with GO on this one.

« Last Edit: March 17, 2018, 09:31:06 AM by Eddie »
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Offline Eddie

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Re: A Window into the Thinking & Experience of the Millenial Doomer
« Reply #114 on: March 17, 2018, 09:38:57 AM »
[ Claudia Pennington, 32, started to get serious about conquering her debt, she owed more than $200,000. She and her husband Garrett, who live in Lancaster, Pa., owed $156,000 on their mortgage, plus $16,500 in credit card bills and $36,000 in student loans.i]

Kara Perez, a 29-year-old living in Austin, said she felt sick because of her anxiety about money when she graduated from college in 2011 with more than $25,000 in student loans./i]

First, you can't count the mortgage, unless maybe it's seriously underwater. It's a monthly payment that would be there in the form of rent whether they owned a home or not.

Secondly, if the couple above were insolvent, they could have gone chapter 7 and walked away from the credit card debt. So we are talking about two people in their 30's  (the first couple) with a combined non-dischargeable debt of 18K apiece and and another person with a 25K debt.

I would view both these situations as very manageable, and frankly, their debt levels are lower than most non-college educated people that age trying to raise a family.

Sure, if you have no means of making a living and you owe that money, it's scary. My kid owes about 50K just for two years of top flite grad school education, and he's struggling in his first year of paying it back....but he has no kids, he has at least some work, and I expect him to get 'er done.

Just like the couple above.

Anxiety, unfortunately, is a fact of life.  I wonder how they'd sleep at night with my 985K in debt? In BAU debt is a fact of life for most people, especially young people, but also for older people with leveraged investments. You learn to live with it.

I'm with GO on this one.

On the flip side, the banksters engineered this problem to benefit the banks, who have been the recipients of the high interest payments that exist on student loans, which are noticeably higher than anything else except credit cards.

If the government can bail out the banks, they should let students consolidate their loans and pay them off at low or no interest. Educating citizens is worth more than preserving the profits of JPM and GS. The government already makes the banks whole on student loan defaults.
« Last Edit: March 17, 2018, 10:07:10 AM by Eddie »
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

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Re: A Window into the Thinking & Experience of the Millenial Doomer
« Reply #115 on: March 17, 2018, 01:31:52 PM »
You learn to live with it.

Or in my case, live without it.  :icon_sunny:

It's quite nice to live with no debt and cash in the bank.  Lowers your stress level immensely.

RE
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline Eddie

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Re: A Window into the Thinking & Experience of the Millenial Doomer
« Reply #116 on: March 17, 2018, 01:44:21 PM »
I think I have a shot at retiring debt free. My equity/debt is looking pretty good these days. My unsecured debt is miniscule.

My student loans (22K) have been paid, so I got that goin' for me.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/8x-nQ-vPw5k&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/8x-nQ-vPw5k&fs=1</a>

What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

 

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