AuthorTopic: Meanwhile back at the 'stead  (Read 187028 times)

Online Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #1065 on: June 23, 2018, 10:37:33 AM »
Well, the old truck has now made it under its own power to two different shops, and is now home to rest in the back yard as its mortal remains move toward a state of greater entropy, although, from a human perspective, once the wheels stop turning, the show is pretty much over.

The diagnosis is not unexpected. The truck could easily be fixed for several thousand bucks, but would still no longer be dependable, because there are so many digital components in today's modern cars that can crap out, and all of them expensive and not amenable to repair, just replacement.

Another one "threw a code" when I cranked it to drive it to the (second and final) shop. Because it was easy for the shop to see this problem, with their handy diagnostic computer idiot box, that's the one they thought must be the problem. No boys, that's a brand new one. Add it to the list.

Get this:

The truck went into a sort of what I'd call "safe mode" because the throttle is electronically controlled (no direct mechanical connection between the accelerator pedal and the FI throttle body) and it has two redundant sensors, both of which must agree in order for the throttle to work. The reason for this redundancy goes back a few years to when some electronically controlled cars were accused of "running away" when they were supposedly at idle. (Remember the Audi lawsuits over that?).

If the two sensors disagree, the ECM puts the truck into a mode with almost no power. The engine runs but won't rev up. (To protect soccer moms from driving through the back wall of the garage in case of a malfunction.) Great.

So they said I need a new throttle body sensor or two...and I said that wasn't even the damn problem I called them about, and gave them my laundry list of recent epic fails, all of which are electronic or electrical in nature.

The prognosis...not good.

The treatment decision.....hospice car care until maybe some dealer hopefully takes it off my hands. (I'm running out of room on my place for ultra-realistic car sculptures that don't move.)

What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Online Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #1066 on: June 23, 2018, 11:38:41 AM »
I am attempting to sprout two mango seeds. It's working!!!

I cut the hard seed coats off with scissors, and soaked the seeds overnight in warm tap water. Then I wrapped them in moist paper towels and left them on the kitchen counter in an open zip-lock.

And today I checked 'em...they are both germinating. Life happens, at least for the moment. Now I get to see if I can plant them in small pots.

Fun. Think I'll go buy some more mangos, while BAU permits. Maybe I'll get my food forest going after all.

Eddie like mango.

I eat the fruit. The (future potential) trees are a bonus.

Like olives, keeping them alive here in winter is a bit of challenge, but doable (I hope). I have an olive tree I've had for a decade or so now. It's the fittest of  maybe 20 or so I started with. Only the strong survive, in my care..



What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #1067 on: June 23, 2018, 11:53:34 AM »
Like olives, keeping them alive here in winter is a bit of challenge, but doable (I hope). I have an olive tree I've had for a decade or so now. It's the fittest of  maybe 20 or so I started with. Only the strong survive, in my care..

What kind of olives?  I like Kalamatta olives.

RE
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Online Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #1068 on: June 23, 2018, 12:35:17 PM »
Damned if I can remember.

I think the one that still lives is one I bought from a guy who actually has a grove between here and SA. some CA rich guy who started a vineyard and olive grove with his  tech windfall and retired down here.

It's still in a big pot, and never has made fruit. But it has made a pretty nice bush and I was thinking about putting it in the dirt, now that I've been successful with a few of my figs ( I actually have figs now for the first time.)

Olives are a major pain in the ass to turn into food. They have to be soaked in strong base.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Online David B.

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #1069 on: June 23, 2018, 01:06:47 PM »
Why not build them into a seasonal hoop house. Pull the plastic in spring. Just enough to regulate the lowest of the lows. I know some people who have mounted fig trees and lemon trees in containers built into skids and move them outdoors with a loader and forks each spring. I know nothing about olive trees but if it is like every other fruiting shrub if it is barely making it it won't put any energy into fruit.
If its important then try something, fail, disect, learn from it, try again, and again and again until it kills you or you succeed.

Online Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #1070 on: June 23, 2018, 06:02:06 PM »
That would work and I have the hoop house already, although it needs to be recovered. I even have good new plastic.

I've mostly fiddled with the trees at the place in town, though, after my debacle with a prior tree growing project I had going outdoors at the stead. I lost my drip irrigation during a long trip to Mexico and lost a a whole bunch of  trees I had in buckets at the stead.

I'd brought them back from Florida when Florida agriculture was in the toilet and trees were very cheap there after the 2008 crash. It gets so hot here. You have to really stay on top of watering trees, especially when they're small and in containers. At the house, if i forget, someone else might just water for me.

Of course, I don't travel as much now, and I'm out there every three days at least. The hoop house is a neglected project. I have other things I'd like to do in it too. Like get my aquaponics set-up up and running.

What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Online David B.

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #1071 on: June 23, 2018, 06:16:48 PM »
That would work and I have the hoop house already, although it needs to be recovered. I even have good new plastic.

I've mostly fiddled with the trees at the place in town, though, after my debacle with a prior tree growing project I had going outdoors at the stead. I lost my drip irrigation during a long trip to Mexico and lost a a whole bunch of  trees I had in buckets at the stead.

I'd brought them back from Florida when Florida agriculture was in the toilet and trees were very cheap there after the 2008 crash. It gets so hot here. You have to really stay on top of watering trees, especially when they're small and in containers. At the house, if i forget, someone else might just water for me.

Of course, I don't travel as much now, and I'm out there every three days at least. The hoop house is a neglected project. I have other things I'd like to do in it too. Like get my aquaponics set-up up and running.
you are getting past the point of needing a hired hand! too many projects as the sand of time flows. I'm having one of those days. Nothing is getting done and the property is a mess. Next week is the last school week then kids home everyday. There goes the spring productivity. Maybe this is the year they help more then they slow me down. I love the little beggars of course but I miss the intensity a kidless person can bring to things.
If its important then try something, fail, disect, learn from it, try again, and again and again until it kills you or you succeed.

Offline Palloy2

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #1072 on: June 23, 2018, 06:26:05 PM »
If I remember rightly, mangoes have 4 plants (germ plasma) inside each seed.  When the seed germinates, the plants don't all germinate necessarily.  You should not rush to plant, so you can count the plantlets, then pinch off all but the strongest and then plant-out.  Keep the soil damp-looking all the time, with thick mulch to stop the drying out.  Don't start hydroponics till you can take care of it every day.
"The State is a body of armed men."

 

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