AuthorTopic: C5 Walks into a Diner...  (Read 8255 times)

Offline Eddie

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Re: C5 Walks into a Diner...
« Reply #90 on: April 25, 2018, 07:08:44 AM »
For general info, I recommend Murray Dickson's book:

https://www.amazon.com/Where-There-Dentist-Murray-Dickson/dp/0942364058
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

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Re: C5 Walks into a Diner...
« Reply #91 on: April 25, 2018, 07:09:55 AM »
I have to be careful about what I say and how I say it. While I am happy to impart information about how extractions are done, and how such a thing might be handled in a situation where normal services were/are not available, I can't ethically support folks taking each others bad teeth out to save money when dentists are widely available.

An extraction isn't heart surgery, and the worst case financially is usually a couple of hundred bucks. When people claim to have paid more, the fees usually involve costs of IV sedation or general anesthesia and services performed by an oral surgeon (they do charge more than GP's in most locales.) I'm not an advocate of DIY dentistry.

You should repost this in the thread I split off, "Collapse Dentistry".

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Offline Eddie

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Re: C5 Walks into a Diner...
« Reply #92 on: April 25, 2018, 07:12:34 AM »
Done.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline cernunnos5

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Re: C5 Walks into a Diner...
« Reply #93 on: April 27, 2018, 07:11:58 PM »
I did a rough count and it seems I have put in 12 hundred willow spikes so far. That sort of caught me off guard. Boy did I under estimate the amount of willow. I sure hope these take or I am going to look like The biggest idiot on the face of the planet. A couple more thousand to go.

Offline Eddie

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Re: C5 Walks into a Diner...
« Reply #94 on: April 27, 2018, 07:53:44 PM »
Good luck. If it doesn't work out this year you can always replant next year. :)

(Its hard to come around to that kind of thinking, but it's how farmers have to think, because its reality)

I figured you were hard at work this week since you hadn't checked in. I'm hoping for the best. Send pics when they green up and start growing.
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Offline cernunnos5

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Re: C5 Walks into a Diner...
« Reply #95 on: April 28, 2018, 05:38:07 AM »
Good luck. If it doesn't work out this year you can always replant next year. :)

(Its hard to come around to that kind of thinking, but it's how farmers have to think, because its reality)

I figured you were hard at work this week since you hadn't checked in. I'm hoping for the best. Send pics when they green up and start growing.
Yes. For the first time, Im not thinking about my next post. Too little brain power left over. I'll recycle one of my older posts next round. Probably on greenhouses since my greenhouse just got a full page spread in our local farmers magazine. MrsC5 snuck this up on me. I thought it would be a single photo and some feel good comment of the week.

Nope. Still not enough mental capacity for a snappy comeback, even after a coffee. Ibuprofen awaits

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Don’t Build My Greenhouse
« Reply #96 on: May 09, 2018, 03:37:27 AM »


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C5 Says, Don’t Build My Greenhouse- Redux






C5 silicone



With your Zombified Host, Catatonic5. (I’ll return to Category5 soon enough)



(A special hello and welcome to the new, regular visitors from Italy and Finland. Big numbers  from Finland caught me off guard because MrsC5, who has visited there, informs me they have a huge and vibrant Metal music scene. Soooo…in the name of good Canadian and Finnish relations “Hail Satan, and have a lovely afternoon, Madam”)



 



My brain is mush. My body hurts… and it is going to keep hurting. I have grossly underestimated what it takes to build my living willow fence. I have been using a 30 pound breaker bar to pound the starter holes 2 ft in the ground . Ive put in about fifteen hundred willow so far. That about does the garden.



willow fence 1 I have added a few hundred to close up a few places on the property that looky lues or trespassers might use for easy trespassing. I have a hard earned, new Survival Rule to announce.



C5 Rule of Survival- Store more Ibuprofen



At the moment, I start my day with it. I end my day with it.



All my joints hurt.



Another Doomstead Diner and dentist, on hearing my new rule, wrote, “Ibuprofen is a miracle drug and that’s no shit.”



Whatever you are up to during the collapse of western syphalization will probably include joint and muscle inflammation like you have never known.



I have woken, the last couple nights to fever dreams. Dreams where I am working on some project and wake up sweating, only to drift off and have it happen again and again. OMG, I thought to myself, this is like tree planting dreams. Many years ago I tried tree planting to earn some cash. The physical stress and repetitive action created dreams that everyone there got. You would plant all day, then plant all night in your sleep and wake up exhausted only to do it again. Some planters had dreams where all there trees died from J roots with the foreman yelling at them . Others, that the trees would come alive and come after them. No, really. Something like this…






(That is the story of my doomstead life right there. So many good ideas meant to make my life easier… that took on a life of their own)



That reminds me. Someday I will do a post, “Survival Advice Learned from Naked, Tree Hugging Hippies”



So…… this is a good time to take a short mental break to rework one of my older posts. That is all my mind can handle.





 



Don’t Build My Greenhouse- Redux.



GB9



OK. Let me rephrase that. Build my greenhouse. Its a VERY good idea which I will explain…



BUT… just do it a lot simpler.



That is what I learned while building it. More so, That is what I learned after living with it for a few years. That is even more important. I have a LOVE/HATE relationship with my greenhouse.



A few weeks back, still well below freezing and snow covered, the sun finally came out after a long absence. I stepped out of the shower, working my way towards clothing, took one look at the greenhouse catching sun… and said “C5, Take a Fukital pill”.






I grabbed a six pack (who am I kidding. A 12 pack) and got in some quality, nude sunbathing in my greenhouse time, “exposing” myself to nature, soaking in how awesome I am. Or at least how awesome my greenhouse is. During the transition phases of spring or fall, we use the greenhouse to heat our house. We just open the sliding window and let the heat flow in. I want to upgrade this by adding a fan to blow the heat in. This saves us plenty of firewood. Other times, when it is just miserable outside, I hang out in the greenhouse, getting all the outsidy goodness without any of that sociopathic Mother Nature trying to kill me in cold and painful ways, part.



multi 1Multi 2



I glory in my genius and this multi use room. Its not just for growing stuff. The pumpkins are sun hardening for storage, safe from frost damage. Firewood is being speed seasoned and stored so I dont have to go outside for it. Its also one big solar dehydrator. apple doc



Ive done upgrades since those photos. A second set of reinforcing beams for strength. I just added several cloth lines because it is also our new cloth dryer. The lines also hold trays to be used for food dehydration. I am going to upgrade this again so trays are up high to get the most heat and be out of the way. We totally stopped using our solar dehydrator because it it was a very attractive FAIL.



food dehydrator 2 sm



Its now being re-purposed into a smoke house. The big greenhouse works way better. Quantity has a quality of its own.



But that gets us around to that the greenhouse is an ongoing build. I also hate my greenhouse and worry about it excessively. It aint all magic unicorns shooting skittles out of its ass. Ill add everything I have learned to hate and fear near the end.



 



The reason we are writing this now, is because I recently got some local green Cred. The local, provincial, farming magazine, recently gave a full page article of my greenhouse build and the locals have been congratulating me. MrsC5 snuck this up on me. The magazine had put out a call for, cheap greenhouse ideas. I thought I would get a feel good photo somewhere in the local announcements page, near the bottom. I wasn’t expecting a full page. But, full disclosure, I didn’t get the opportunity to tell everybody everything that is wrong with it.



A reader once commented on my original article, “… like you, I have done the scavenged windows thing but wound up using more lumber, had more joints (leaks), not really a problem if used as walls but yours will be a roof, spent more time and had greater frustrations….if you will consider polycarbonate it comes in 8 and 12 foot lengths, from memory 26 or 30 inches wide, I cant remember for sure, available at Homedespot.”



Correctamundo,  Kung Fu Fonzy grasshoppers.






This took far more time to build than I had hoped and I fear its too fragile…so I will be going back to work on it to reinforce everything. Potentially, some big storm or snow dump may smash it all and have me stripping off all the broken glass to be replaced with polycarb. We’ll wait and see. I had really hoped to do the entire front of the house that year. This is as much time as I can invest this year as everything else I need to do is falling behind. I’ll finish the last half next year. In retrospect, I would have passed on the tire wall as well. Too much time and energy was spent…shoveling dirt. I was looking pretty buff, though. LOL. Bringing it straight to the ground, or on a single layer of tires would have been, no nonsense, and given me more time to do the entire house.



OK. Enough whining and warnings. Im still pretty impressed with it and I will explain why it is still a really good idea. We have a nothing special house built from a mobile home. I joke with Mrs C5 that it reminds me of a Jehovah Witness hall. I hadn’t expected to live in an actual house. That is rather hard for a nomad. Especially a house with so little character.



GB1



But its not bad considering we are mortgage and debt free, plan to stay that way…and have a million dollar view. Lousy insulation and brutal winters, though. That’s a good place to start. Climate Chaos. 2014’s RRR winter, that’s, Ridiculously Resilient Ridge, meant we got hit with the Snowpocalypse out here in Nova Scotia. It killed off over 60% of the deer. Its been Polar Vortex’s since. Could be worse. Western Canada was burning at the time and California…enough said. This region, possibly might end up being the last habitable place on earth. We have no shortage of water here. Soooo….Yes, Its also a monsoon proof greenhouse for early plant starts, frost protection and deluge protected food. Its also a heat generator once the temperature drops for the house. Its also “Space Insulation”. One wall (and the windows) is now protected against the blowing cold sucking heat away. Ideally, I’d build similar structures around the entire house if left to my own devices . Slipstream the house against ever increasing winds as the new weather goes wacky.



A house within a house. Space insulation.



There is a new concept fore you that I stole as a kid reading the book, The Last Canadian. To survive the winter, they knocked a wall out of their cabin and rolled a smaller cabin inside it. This has many applications. Do you plan to winter in an RV. Build a shed over it. Its like wearing a gortex shell over polypropylene. One sheds the weather. The other insulates.



The other advantage of this greenhouse concept…It should be easy to build…in-spite of my previous complaint of over building. I’m no carpenter. I’m a Master MacGyver and Recycler. My most influential movie of all time was The Road Warrior.



“You are a maggot, Max. Living off the corps of the old world”. That’s me.



Other than the 13 rough cut 2x6s, fasteners and silicon, everything else was recycled. I do the impossible with nothing. It’s my gift…..but I don’t have a clue how to do anything “Right”. So this is a simple enough concept. Make a lean to off your house. Cover it with something see through. No complex carpentry required. All the necessary structure was already built into the house by people that knew more of what they were doing than I. I’m leaning on their expertise, quite literally.



GB2My willow planting is quite painful to do but there is little more painful than shoveling dirt… except maybe shoveling rocks. Remember my advice about the Ibuprofen.



GB3GB4GB5



FYI. Much of the glass was from double paned sliding glass doors. Its tough glass and there are two panes in each unit but it is tricky work separating them. I broke a few. I used a box cutter and lots of patience.



GB6GB7



We then added fridges as raised beds, barrels and filled tires to act as heat sinks that would hold heat into the evening. OOPS. And I almost forgot. Rain catchment.GB8



Isn’t that inspirational? Doesn’t it make you feel good?



Now, let me tell you everything wrong with it.






People ask me, if I could do it again, what would I do differently.



The answer is…. everything. I’m stuck with it now. Its the Bi-Polar greenhouse. I love my greenhouse. I also Hate my greenhouse. Where to begin.



Basically, I got too ambitious.



The most obvious thing is to change the angle. I should not of reached out so far. It should have been more vertical. More vertical means more obvious strength to the support beams. Six inches of strength is much different than six feet of strength.Vertical is better. Te he. Especially when a couple thousand pounds of snow comes down on you. No really, at its present angel, it must be shoveled off, each big snow…or the snow will keep accumulating until the whole thing smashes. Even small snows, we have to use a large broom to sweep the snow off to let light in.  I compensated by adding a support beam at the middle and one near the top (not in the photos). No need for either if it was more vertical. We are also free of hail here but that can change.



That is why I also built this. Time hasn’t been as kind to her though.



finished greenhouse



So much promise but she is, pretty much, dry storage at this point.



C5 Rule of Survival- Never enough… dry storage.



Another subtle vertical, tall guy joke.






Look up. Look way up… to the photo at the top of the page.



You see me siliconing  leaks, quite dangerously. There is no safe place to put a ladder without breaking glass. It was tough and risky. This local fame I recently got was based on the 100$ greenhouse idea. I don’t deserve this fame. I spent far more than 100$ alone on silicon. I still have leaks. Leaks rot wood. Siliconing and painting is an on going task. So is reinforcing against superstorms. I will be adding more cross beams as time allows then siliconing all the glass wood corners together so any wind flux may crack the glass but still hold it together. All of this could have been solved using polycarb.



Lets whip back over to Mythos and Logos doomstead. Remember this? This will do the same and be more storm proof



roof 1 docroof 2 doc



It aint all about me. The next build to finish greenhousing the front of the house  will look more like this… but more upright so snow slides off it. This is more sturdy and much easier to build.



Now, lets say you are trying to do the same concept during the collapse, on the cheap, to generate some heat. Lets revisit Mythos and Logos greenhouse again… and lets apply it to the side of an abandoned and squatted in, ex suburban home.



greenhouse 2 docGreenhouse plastic over chicken wire for strength. This is a solar heater for your post apocalyptic house.



 



Now, if you have read this far…you get into the real MEAT of this post.



 



If you look up? Look way up to the first photo… You will notice shade screen… and this opens you to THE BIGGEST problem with this build.



Its too fucking hot!!!!!



It aint just a greenhouse. Its a solar cooker.



It requires management. That means you can not LEAVE IT to go do other things.



If you go away and have not left the doors open… and the sun comes out… not only will you cook your plants….It will melt the siding off your house.



Thus, greenhouse operators learned to use SHADE CLOTH. In our case, we use breeder trash. Recycled from the side of the road, trampoline safety nets. Its a recent joke me and MrsC5 had on a road trip to pick up perennial arctic kiwi plants, the next provence over . If you are in the country, if there is a 4×4 pickup truck out front, there is a trampoline in the back. On country roads, every fifth house has a trampoline. No shit.



Store every safety net you find that gets tossed. That is breeder trash gold.



It’s a one time in the lifetime of a planet opportunity, while everyone is in “Think of the children” mode, worrying about lawsuits.






Well, they help keep the excess population down.



I may do some future experimentation’s  on using trampoline frames. I turned a single one into a small animal shed. Three or four of them could make a good greenhouse.



One more job of the years is to add ventilation windows, near the roof, on the ends, to let excess heat out, without leaving the doors open, where a micro burst of of heavy winds might catch it like a kite and rip it off the building.



In the mean time, Ill keep reinforcing my greenhouse. A storm is a coming.



Speaking of super-storms and and greenhouses… This is next years build.



bus greenhouse



Think of it as a ready made greenhouse, already designed for high winds, impervious to snow load or hail, with easy ventilation. Until then… it’s DRY STORAGE… and filled with bikes.



So, to sum up. Build my greenhouse. Its awesome. Just reduce half the angle so snow slides off it and add more strength to compensate for a climate in chaos.



————————————–



Now it is bonus time. In case you missed them. Best articles of the month



https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/apr/26/were-doomed-mayer-hillman-on-the-climate-reality-no-one-else-will-dare-mention



and more-



” The Surprisingly Solid Mathematical Case of the Tin Foil Hat Gun Prepper ” (It wont allow me to do a direct link to it but you can cut and paste the title and put it in your search engine and it will take you there. Well worth the trouble)



Special mention also goes to this one as well   https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2018/05/07/the-spy-who-came-home



That’s all I got. Back to putting willow in the ground. Its looking like a three years of spring job. This round is coming to an end. See you next month.



 



 



 



 





 



 



 



 






Offline Eddie

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Re: C5 Walks into a Diner...
« Reply #97 on: May 09, 2018, 06:23:25 AM »
I have a 24'x72' high wall hoophouse on the stead built (but never quite properly completed) by the PO (previous owner). I have stared at it for several years now without getting serious.

I did buy some high quality UV resistant plastic to put a new cover on it which is, of course, in dry storage. Not in dry storage is a good aquaculture starter kit, not completed either. I have a completion problem. I'm a good idea man, but end up with too many distractions to stay on track.

And...the pay-off for most of my food growing experiments, including gardening, which I still dabble with, is low. What I've learned is that it makes sense to keep putting food in storage containers. Because I'll probably starve fairly quickly here trying to grow enough food to do anything more than take a couple of cute pics for the blog. It's disheartening.

When I was a kid my parents moved "back to the land" in 1962. I remember big gardens that did feed us. Potatoes stored under our pier and beam house that lasted most of the year.  A corn crib in the barn built out of long gone old growth timber by my great grandfather or maybe his father, whom I never knew. My grandfather was a subsistence farmer who never held a "job". My father knew a lot, and I tried hard to learn none of it. I got a little anyway.

But that was 250 miles north and east of here. Climate matters. Soil matters. Lesson learned, but now I'm dug in here and going nowhere anytime soon, most likely. People do make gardens here. But you have to be pretty savvy. I continue to learn through various failures. Thank goodness for plastic buckets and those de-ox packets. I'm a bad-ass rice and beans storage expert.

Gotta be careful not to use too many. They work so well the buckets can collapse and implode. One is enough.

« Last Edit: May 09, 2018, 06:35:51 AM by Eddie »
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Offline Eddie

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Re: C5 Walks into a Diner...
« Reply #98 on: May 09, 2018, 06:29:48 AM »
Down here the heat is a big problem for a greenhouse. So much so that the real trick is learn how to cool a greenhouse, not heat it.

Big fans and water walls with caught rainwater (no mineral build-up) are effective if you have power to pump the water. I'd like to try using cooling tubes like an earth ship, but I gotta get my backhoe fixed to dig the trenches. Gotta find cheap big pipes..and engineer it to resist standing water, which here means mold and nasty shit like Legionella.

After I get rid of the rest of the pigs (I'm down to thirty now, from 43) I think I'll turn my attentions in that direction.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

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Re: C5 Walks into a Diner...
« Reply #99 on: May 09, 2018, 06:56:57 AM »

But that was 250 miles north and east of here. Climate matters. Soil matters.

Climate and soil matter for sure.  But the real difference here is that C5 works at this 365/24/7, it is his full time job.  Your full time job is drilling teeth.  Pays much better of course.  If you were on the Toothstead as much as C5 is on his Maritimestead, I am sure you could/would do a reasonable facsimile with your work ethic.  In fact that would be a pretty good contest, although I think you are about a decade older than C5.

Unless you can put in the time to a doomstead, you just can't hope to grow enough food for even subsistence living.  It is way easier (and CHEAPER!) just to buy long lasting industrially produced foods and drop them in storage.  I do no growing of any kind, I do not even attempt it.  I don't have the space for it and I am in no shape to be building greenhouses these days.  I can however Vacuum Seal a 50 lb bag of rice into convenient 2 lb bags and drop them in a storage container.  WRT food, aside from Zombies stealing it from me or giving it away to friends (most likely since I am headed for the Great Beyond in short order anyhow), I could last probably 3 years, maybe more with some supplemental fishing, hunting and Goobermint Cheese rations.

I admire C5 for his work ethic and for the fact he has pulled himself off grid and off the industrial bandwagon as much as he has.  It is remarkable.  It is however not all that efficient.  For less money than even he spends, I could get a place set up you would last for a good decade on without growing a fucking thing.

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Offline cernunnos5

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Re: C5 Walks into a Diner...
« Reply #100 on: May 09, 2018, 08:34:32 AM »
Age is a factor. Its why we have pushed ourselves recently. The clear understanding that we will be too old to build these things very soon. This year is less about food and more about infrastructure that will be there later as to produce less work later.

I laugh when people talk about my work ethic. I sit on my ass for months at a time. I wander around staring at materials but doing nothing. MrsC5 gets pissed and worried I am a lazy slob. Then one day happens when I have it figured out....then go phsyco and a week later, BOOM. Something new is there. Then I am back on the couch, thinking.

I like Paul Wheatons motto. My goal in life is to be "Fat, Lazy and Happy"

This week I am just puttering and tinkering. Recovering. My work day will be an hour or two. Yesterday I fixed a recycled wheel barrow, changing the wheel from the flat inflatable type that is close to unfixable so people throw the whole thing out. I put in a solid wheel from some other thrown out object. Today, I will use it to move some firewood closer to the road for loading into our honda civic. About an hours work.... then maybe I will play some vidio games. LOL

Hey, Eddy. I put that DIY dentestry clip in there for you

Offline RE

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Re: C5 Walks into a Diner...
« Reply #101 on: May 09, 2018, 08:38:23 AM »
Age is a factor. Its why we have pushed ourselves recently. The clear understanding that we will be too old to build these things very soon. This year is less about food and more about infrastructure that will be there later as to produce less work later.

I laugh when people talk about my work ethic. I sit on my ass for months at a time. I wander around staring at materials but doing nothing. MrsC5 gets pissed and worried I am a lazy slob. Then one day happens when I have it figured out....then go phsyco and a week later, BOOM. Something new is there. Then I am back on the couch, thinking.

I like Paul Wheatons motto. My goal in life is to be "Fat, Lazy and Happy"

This week I am just puttering and tinkering. Recovering. My work day will be an hour or two. Yesterday I fixed a recycled wheel barrow, changing the wheel from the flat inflatable type that is close to unfixable so people throw the whole thing out. I put in a solid wheel from some other thrown out object. Today, I will use it to move some firewood closer to the road for loading into our honda civic. About an hours work.... then maybe I will play some vidio games. LOL

Hey, Eddy. I put that DIY dentestry clip in there for you

NOBODY moves all that dirt and puts up a greenhouse frame sitting on their ass.  You are full of shit. lol.

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Offline Eddie

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Re: C5 Walks into a Diner...
« Reply #102 on: May 09, 2018, 09:34:10 AM »
Age is a factor. Its why we have pushed ourselves recently. The clear understanding that we will be too old to build these things very soon. This year is less about food and more about infrastructure that will be there later as to produce less work later.

I laugh when people talk about my work ethic. I sit on my ass for months at a time. I wander around staring at materials but doing nothing. MrsC5 gets pissed and worried I am a lazy slob. Then one day happens when I have it figured out....then go phsyco and a week later, BOOM. Something new is there. Then I am back on the couch, thinking.

I like Paul Wheatons motto. My goal in life is to be "Fat, Lazy and Happy"

This week I am just puttering and tinkering. Recovering. My work day will be an hour or two. Yesterday I fixed a recycled wheel barrow, changing the wheel from the flat inflatable type that is close to unfixable so people throw the whole thing out. I put in a solid wheel from some other thrown out object. Today, I will use it to move some firewood closer to the road for loading into our honda civic. About an hours work.... then maybe I will play some vidio games. LOL

Hey, Eddy. I put that DIY dentestry clip in there for you

I saw that.  ;D ;D ;D
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

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The Post Apocalyptic Permaculture Pig- Redux
« Reply #103 on: May 17, 2018, 06:32:15 AM »
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                  C5 and The Post Apocalyptic Permaculture Pig- Redux

               






                  Thus ends the life of Mr Wu. All that is left to do is tell the story. I have been avoiding thinking about this all year. Putting down my 600 lb pound friend and filling a freezer. On the way to the abattoir, tears started to come but I choked it back. Maudlin by nature, its easy for me to only focus on my failures or the experiments that didn’t live up to my expectations. This miffs MrsC5 sometimes. She says I don’t focus enough on my successes. Its true, of course. One of my skills is that I consistently do the impossible with nothing. Its my only real skill. Nothing motivates me more than to be told it cant be done. My usual response is, “Just watch me. If you don’t have any helpful advice, get the fuck out of my way”. But today, my thoughts were that we will most likely never try pig breeding again. We may have a pig again to do field clearing and tilling and freezer within the year. Having a bakers dozen plus a huge boar overwhelmed our abilities. But without the ability to breed ongoing generations, this was a survival Fail for me. It was not an experiment I could afford to fail in. I’ll explain why latter. More so, we lost friends in this endeavor. We also learned the people that had moved onto our land were not the right fit and had to go.
               



                  I had been psyching myself up to shoot Mr Wu and attempting a piss assed butchery. I had already culled one of his siblings as well as one of his offspring…but this would be different. He was my friend. MrsC5 would have nothing of it. She demanded a proper  abattoir and butcher. It seemed I had dodged responsibility but I was relived. When he stepped off the trailer and into the final pen, the abattoir was preparing for the usual potential chase. When Mr Wu followed MrC5 out the trailer and into the pen, the abattoir commented, “Wow. That is not something you see. You must have been very hands on with him”. Other than seeing he was OK, I didn’t want to spent any farewell time with him. That would have been too much. As I turned away, My final thoughts were the cheezy Babe movie lines, “That’ll do pig. That’ll do”.
               



                  It was the Abattoirs words that made it easier on me because I realized he had had a very good life. Now every body says that but in Mr Wu’s case, it was definitely true. The proof  was in his graceful end. He had spent his last year getting strange pussy and having many piglets on another farm while we were away in Peru. More so, he was totally free range, wandering the hills as he pleased (Not something I would recommend, by the way. Feral pigs are an environmental catastrophe).
               



                  When he was with us, after his harness phase, he was left in an orchard we wanted to reclaim surrounded by our ancient dead hedge experiment. This was mainly a Failed experiment. (Another Post…) Torpedo shaped, Pig Headed, little eating machines can push though or rip out of the ground, just about anything you can build, (including buildings) yet word was getting around about this huge pig behind a stick fence and they came miles out of their way down a dirt rode to park their car and stare at this pig.
               



                  But the BIG number of people that knew about Mr Wu came from an article I wrote first at Permies.com and repeated over at the International Preppers Network. Someone from Permies recently asked for More to his story. I said yes….but it should really start by re-posting the original article…and tweaking it into a Redux, more polished version. Its an important article. So, without further Adue. (He looks so tiny in these photos)
               





                  The Post-Apocalyptic Permaculture Pig
               



                  colour 5 header 2https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/colour-5-header-2.jpg?w=1400 1400w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/colour-5-header-2.jpg?w=150 150w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/colour-5-header-2.jpg?w=300 300w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/colour-5-header-2.jpg?w=768 768w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/colour-5-header-2.jpg?w=1024 1024w" />
               



                  If I croak tomorrow, I owe the Prepper and Permaculture world a brief synopsis of what we have learned about raising a pig on a harness. This is outside of most North Americans idea of how to raise a pig. I won’t try to sell you folks that this is “The Way” to raise a pig. Just “A Way”. This was a problem solving experiment, mainly to deal with the incredible expense of fencing or lack thereof in a wold of diminishing resources, both materials and financial. If we screwed up this experiment, we simply would have filled our freezer early and “eaten” the loss.
               



                  O.K. That’s way too serious of a way to start one of my posts. I’ll start again with the words of one of our farm sitters. “Taking the pig for a walk was the high point of all my farm experiences. I was frightened at first but then it was fun.” Mr Wu (bonus points go to anyone that guesses why we named him that) grossly outweighed her at less than a year of age. At this point, I don’t even leash him when taking him for a walk around farm with the dogs. It’s something to see, a huge pig, galloping across the fields with the dogs. It’s a little more intimidating when he is charging towards you like a small buffalo. I’m sure glad he likes me. This is one happy pig. Clearly we did something right…in spite of that certain people told us that we were doing something bad and this might even be cruel for the animal. I had worries, myself. These worries began to flow away the first few times he rolled over onto my feet to have his belly scratched…or when, one time, he broke out of his pen, he didn’t run off into the forest but sauntered up to the front door with a “What are you guys up to” look on his face.
               



                  Now, I take great pride in that I could beat most large dogs in a fight if they attacked me. I trained myself for that. I’m a little rough around the edges. A couple days ago, I came to the conclusion that I would not be able to win in a fight with this pig. Just like the dogs, he was born to fight. Just like the dogs, he likes to rough house as play. A couple of days ago he hit me with a sneak attack. He likes to drive himself between my legs from behind in an attempted to knock me over. My usual defense is to sit on him and ride him around for a while like a bronco buster. This time, he caught me off guard and after a few seconds on the ride, crashed down into a bush in a winded huff without any of my secret ninja pride intact. I looked over to him and realized if he attacked me now…I was done. Instead, I could tell he was doing the piggy equivalent of at laughing at me and his triumph. My point is that this is a happy pig that likes me and has a way better life than most animals we raise for food. At the moment, he is harnessed to a large tire in the garden, tilling up the garden and weeding or working in mulch. He is a pig with a job. A permaculture job. A post-apocalyptic permaculture pig.
               



                  Week 1 dochttps://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/week-1-doc.jpg?w=1400 1400w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/week-1-doc.jpg?w=150 150w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/week-1-doc.jpg?w=300 300w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/week-1-doc.jpg?w=768 768w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/week-1-doc.jpg?w=1024 1024w" />
               



                  pets looking towards Mr Wu dochttps://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/pets-looking-towards-mr-wu-doc.jpg?w=1400 1400w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/pets-looking-towards-mr-wu-doc.jpg?w=150 150w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/pets-looking-towards-mr-wu-doc.jpg?w=300 300w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/pets-looking-towards-mr-wu-doc.jpg?w=768 768w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/pets-looking-towards-mr-wu-doc.jpg?w=1024 1024w" />(What is this alien creature? Are we supposed to kill it?) touch training dochttps://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/touch-training-doc.jpg?w=1400 1400w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/touch-training-doc.jpg?w=150 150w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/touch-training-doc.jpg?w=300 300w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/touch-training-doc.jpg?w=768 768w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/touch-training-doc.jpg?w=1024 1024w" />(Touch training. He did not like me. I was the big bad wolf. To eat, he had to risk me touching him)
               



                  So, how did we get to this point of me on the ground with a pig laughing at me and why should you consider this option, especially in a survival, prepper, permaculture, collapse of western, business as usual, society context. And why should you listen to me besides that I am so charming? I have no pig raising experience. I have no farm experience other than the last few years. I am something of a Survival Expert though that means little. A C5 Rule Of Survival is- “There is no such thing as a Survival Expert. Anyone claiming to be is just trying to sell you something”.

                  Like I said, I had been trying to figure out a way to deal with small livestock raising without the expense of easily sourced or debt financed fencing of our fields. We just can’t afford to fence our fields. We can afford electric fencing and solar batteries as a mobile option…but these are a short term solution to a much larger problem. If you need to feed yourself but the money is gone or that fencing or batteries are no longer available…well, that whole C5 survival expert status means I have to solve that little problem for the next generation of have nots. People have probably seen tethered goats. One online friend had faced the same problem with her cow. She solved it by tethering it to a tire. The cow could eat its pasture and pull the tire further into the field for fresher grass…but couldn’t run off down the road to run amuck.
               



                  The big Lightbulb moment for me was visiting Cuba. For those not familiar with the subject, Cuba is often referred to as “The mini Peak oil” With the embargo in place and the collapse of the Soviet Union ending their oil supplies, Cuba had to adapt to non-Big Ag, mass production food systems coming to a complete stop. When we arrived, it was the end of the dry season, the rains hadn’t arrived yet and grazing was withered. Lots of animals were looking pretty thin. They were also all tethered, tied to anyplace there was grass. Instead of bringing food to the animals, they brought the animals to the food. Oh good. It wasn’t just me waxing all survivalist with this little problem.
               



                  Then we saw a pig out in a field. A couple of piglets were hanging out with it. Why was this pig so far away from people? Did it escape? Was it wild? Then I pointed it out to MrsC5, “Are my eyes deceiving me? That pig is on a leash. I didn’t know that was possible. The little ones aren’t even running off. They are all staying with the big one…unattended.” Then the little wheels started spinning in my head. Might I have just solved our pig fencing dilemma. A day later I explained to MrsC5 that we were going to have a pig on a leash. Luckily, she was immediately on board. Whew. Thank goodness I didn’t have to explain this nutty idea to her. It would be a hard sell to most people. The next insight while walking around in the rural hinterlands of Cuba is that all the houses had fenced yards…but the fences were often hodge podged together from any scraps they could find. A rusted piece of metal from the beach was wired in with scrap wood, boulders, cactus’s, whatever could be scavenged. Most likely to keep pigs out…or in. I never asked. But my theories about fencing in a world with severely limited resources was there in front of my eyes. It was the small, excessively rusty beach metal, carefully woven into the fence that sticks with me to this day. Week 3 with harness dochttps://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/week-3-with-harness-doc.jpg?w=1400 1400w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/week-3-with-harness-doc.jpg?w=150 150w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/week-3-with-harness-doc.jpg?w=300 300w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/week-3-with-harness-doc.jpg?w=768 768w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/week-3-with-harness-doc.jpg?w=1024 1024w" />puttem to work dochttps://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/puttem-to-work-doc.jpg?w=1400 1400w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/puttem-to-work-doc.jpg?w=150 150w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/puttem-to-work-doc.jpg?w=300 300w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/puttem-to-work-doc.jpg?w=768 768w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/puttem-to-work-doc.jpg?w=1024 1024w" />(Put’in him to work young, tilling in the garden)
               



                  There is another C5 Rule of Survival- “There is a big difference between KNOWING in the Biblical Sense and KNOWING in the Porn sense” Unless you have first hand experience in it…assume it doesn’t work…no matter what you saw on youtube…or what you read in my self proclaimed survival expertlyness bloggeryness
               



                  We wanted pigs because pigs were going to be the only way to get the necessary fat intake to survive a Canadian winter without slowly starving to death. We had already learned that chickens weren’t sustainable here, in spite of just assuming we could raise chickens as a survival assumption. A belief I’d had all my life. Knowing in the biblical sense knocked that right out of me. I can’t grow the food they need to get through a winter in this location with limited machinery. I tried. I failed. But I could grow rabbit or pig food. Perhaps you have read the old stories of people that had all the rabbits they needed but starved to death anyhow. Rabbits don’t have the necessary fat. Neither do deer for that matter. Bear, geese and beaver, yes…but we had already given up on the idea that any wild food source would still be around in a collapse setting. Most of the wild animals we take for granted almost went extinct during the Great Depression. It will be worse now. Think of hunting on the very last day of hunting season. Your chances are slim. So that leaves domesticated pigs. If you want cooking oil, it’s going to be lard.
               



                  But with everything else going on around the prepper farm…it had moved into the category of “Next Year” jobs. Next year became next year the next year and so on.
               



                  Then one of our Prepper friends made the decision for us. We got a call, “Guess what? I Just bought three pigs. Berkshire, Tamworth cross”. I jokingly replied, “One of those is for us. Right?”

                  I didn’t actually think he would say yes. OK. It took a few weeks. He was using the old reasoning. If you raise three pigs and sell two that pays for your own pig in the fall. But I think he got curios about how we were going to raise him with this whole tethering idea. We were caught off guard because we wanted to start with a much cheaper breed. It was after all, a practice pig. If we screwed it up the first time, we would just eat what we did wrong. But our friend had already chosen the friendliest and least skittish of the three for us. The one that was most curious and didn’t mind being scratched. The more Berkshire of the three. This put us into a panicky scramble. I had a day to whip up a small enclosure out of recycled fence material I already had on hand. I had to make sure he couldn’t dig underneath. I don’t know how to raise a pig. I butted it against the chicken coop to break the wind.
               



                  O.K. Less story telling. Just the facts. Lets start with what I did wrong right off the bat. You have to start this process at a much younger age than we did. Your pig needs to be touched, scratched and handled as young as possible. Our relationship started with me having to wrestle him down. It turns out I was good at this because of the dog fighting I mentioned above. Just pin it to the ground, pick it up and put it in the truck. I had to do it again a few days later to get the harness on him. Big mistake. To a pig, the only thing that pins it down is a predator in the process of killing it. It didn’t trust or like me again for quite a while. Pigs never forget. MrsC5 hadn’t been the one to pin him so she had to take over trust building with the pig. I was the big bad wolf.walking young Mr Wu 1 dochttps://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/walking-young-mr-wu-1-doc.jpg?w=1400 1400w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/walking-young-mr-wu-1-doc.jpg?w=150 150w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/walking-young-mr-wu-1-doc.jpg?w=300 300w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/walking-young-mr-wu-1-doc.jpg?w=768 768w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/walking-young-mr-wu-1-doc.jpg?w=1024 1024w" />walking young Mr Wu in summer 2 dochttps://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/walking-young-mr-wu-in-summer-2-doc.jpg?w=1400 1400w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/walking-young-mr-wu-in-summer-2-doc.jpg?w=147 147w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/walking-young-mr-wu-in-summer-2-doc.jpg?w=294 294w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/walking-young-mr-wu-in-summer-2-doc.jpg?w=768 768w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/walking-young-mr-wu-in-summer-2-doc.jpg?w=1002 1002w" />putting Mr Wu in pen dockhttps://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/putting-mr-wu-in-pen-dock.jpg?w=1400 1400w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/putting-mr-wu-in-pen-dock.jpg?w=150 150w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/putting-mr-wu-in-pen-dock.jpg?w=300 300w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/putting-mr-wu-in-pen-dock.jpg?w=768 768w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/putting-mr-wu-in-pen-dock.jpg?w=1024 1024w" />
               



                  Trust got rebuilt as he realized there was benefits to this arrangement. In fact, we are onto a new phase of his training. While I write this, he is off leash outside. This is new and has had its own problems we are working out. He gets a few hours of wandering free now.
               



                  Back to early raising. He started in a small enclosure. Two days later, the entire enclosure had been tilled. We were amazed. This little pig was a tilling machine…and the wheels in my head started to turn once more. Anyone who has ever tried to till a garden by hand knows that is not as simple as first envisioned and your first real fear of possibly having a heart attack. People try to get around this back breaking work with deep mulching or cardboard mulching on any other way to avoid tilling. We suddenly had a non gas powered tilling machine. A single minded eating machine. The implications were huge.
               



                   
               



                  tilled dochttps://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/tilled-doc1.jpg?w=1400 1400w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/tilled-doc1.jpg?w=150 150w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/tilled-doc1.jpg?w=300 300w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/tilled-doc1.jpg?w=768 768w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/tilled-doc1.jpg?w=1024 1024w" />(this new enclosure was tilled in about a week…but he was much larger at the time)
               



                  Then came the next training. Getting a leash on the pig was the next problem. Remember, he didn’t trust me now…and I once again had to wrestle him to get the leash on. But I did and then walked him over to the new enclosure. He went right in and started tilling. Pigs are smart. He knew the enclosure was his safe place. We had to leave the leash on him and he just dragged it around for several months because it was easier to grab the leash than try to pin him to get it on. What a change to today. Now he comes up to the fence to say, “Please leash me because I want to go out. He is easier to leash than my dogs. It only took about three days for the pig to figure the leash thing out. He figured out that I was taking him to a new place for him to till. Let the healing begin.
               



                  Slowly his leash got longer when we tied a rope to it. He got attached to the fence or a tire. Unlike most pigs, he got to go places. It wasn’t long before the next big experiment. After a few beers I decided it was time to walk him to the top of the property. The pig, the dogs…and the cat. The cat had already embraced these walks. She knew if she walked in the fields she was hawk food so to explore further she would have to chase the dogs for safety. This was one of the most surreal experiences of my life. A small multi species commune on a walk, bound together for mutual support. The pig was curious enough to follow on this new adventure. It was going fine…until the kitty decided it would be fun to stalk the pig. Understand, the pig had grown fast…but even with this huge size difference, the pig’s instincts kicked in. Instinctualy, pigs seem to know that big cats are its major predator. This tiny kitty was death incarnate….and he yanked me home at a run to the safety of his safe enclosure.
               



                  As spring turned to summer and heat increased, we knew we had to get him out of the sun as leaving him tied in the field was cruel. Apple tree training had begun. We wanted some of the undergrowth under the trees cleared out. Air flow for tree health, a soft place for apples to land and ease of access, and eventually the goal – bring the pig to the food instead of bringing the food to the pig. As a bonus, interrupting the worm cycle of them surviving in the ground again after the apples fall. We still had to trim out all of the undergrowth to keep him from getting tangled…and boy, can that pig ever get himself tangled.pig in the orchard dochttps://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/pig-in-the-orchard-doc.jpg?w=1400 1400w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/pig-in-the-orchard-doc.jpg?w=150 150w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/pig-in-the-orchard-doc.jpg?w=300 300w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/pig-in-the-orchard-doc.jpg?w=768 768w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/pig-in-the-orchard-doc.jpg?w=1024 1024w" />(its hard to see but he is attached to a branch )
               



                  Which gets us to one of the down sides of this type of pig raising. It’s way more labor intensive. A pig is a social animal. It’s sort of cruel to have a single pig unless YOU are willing to be its social pig herd. You have to be around. You have to check up on it regularly. You have to adjust his harness every few days because they grow so fast. If you don’t…that harness will strangle him or chafe his skin causing cuts and lesions so you really have to invest the time of touching and handling him.
               



                  And you have to be there to hear him squeal when he gets himself tangled, which he will. If we go out someplace, he has to go back in his stall so we don’t come home to a strangled or panicked, traumatized pig.
               



                  Your main garden will need a sturdy fence because the pig is going to escape occasionally. Pigs are uber smart and driven by hunger. Mr. Wu learned how to open the fence gate within a short period. He pushes open doors, lifts raised gates, tests every possible escape route. I’ve even seen him try to lift the rope that ties the gate shut because he knows it slides into place.
               



                  Your pig WILL escape. Getting him back in his pen takes some simple training that is easy. Tie a bear bell to the feed bucket. He knows if he hears that bell, glorious food awaits and food is his single driving force. The bell sends him frothing.Walkies doc 2https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/walkies-doc-2.jpg?w=1400 1400w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/walkies-doc-2.jpg?w=150 150w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/walkies-doc-2.jpg?w=300 300w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/walkies-doc-2.jpg?w=768 768w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/walkies-doc-2.jpg?w=1024 1024w" />Solar Pig 1https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/solar-pig-1.jpg?w=1400 1400w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/solar-pig-1.jpg?w=150 150w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/solar-pig-1.jpg?w=300 300w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/solar-pig-1.jpg?w=768 768w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/solar-pig-1.jpg?w=1024 1024w" />
               



                  Now, the next big problem. All this hands on relationship completely changes the relationship. It had always been, I pop this guy in the fall and he goes in the freezer. Then that day came when he plopped down onto my feet and rolled over to have his belly scratched, exposing himself in the same way my dogs would. The second time he did it…I went, “You Bastard. You are going to fuck me up. How can I shoot you?” Now that was always the intention. He was always food and had a time limit. I am “Survivalist enough” that I could shoot and eat my dogs if I had too…but doing so would hurt my soul and I would have to carry that. I carry too much already. Now the pig trusts and loves me as if he were one of my dogs. I can do it if I have to…but don’t ask me to. I need a friend that is not invested emotionally in him to pop him for me. I can handle the rest. I just can’t handle betraying him. This is a common problem for pig farmers. Because of this, a common practice is to trade pigs with another farmer. Killing and eating a pig is fine. Killing and eating the one you became emotionally involved with can be difficult.
               



                  Then Mr. Wu got a lease on life. An execution reprieve. The same prepper friend that we got him from was so impressed with his size and personality…that he encouraged us to keep him for a few years as a breeder. He had decided to go purchase a sow and together, we would breed our own pigs. To cover our loss of winter food, he would share half of his own boar. Now we are going from zero experience to pig breeder. There will be much more to learn.
               



                  Speaking of learning…or our lack thereof, we found out just yesterday that our pig is not suitable for rotational grazing. We would need a different type of pig for that. Grazing pigs will eat grass. Mr. Wu has never been interested in eating grass. He is a rooter. If you want to have grass fed pigs…you need a pig that eats grass. Ours isn’t it. Grass is just in the way. He wants the worms, grubs and field mice. Rotational Tilling…probably. We are really disappointed by what he won’t eat. Our intension had been to winter him on carrots and Jerusalem artichokes. He is not interested. The experiment continues. So know your pig. Until then he will partial winter on apples and squashes we have stored all over the house. And pig rations but the goal is to get him fully off pig feed. We need food that we don’t have to drive to. Food produced right here on the homestead.
               



                  Ours roots so we are using him as a rooter. He is a cold weather breed so he will be out for the winter with a shelter he can go into as a dry place to sleep and escape the wind. We fenced a temporary winter enclosure that our intention is to be an extension to our garden. We wanted to move the garden closer to the house so we have to walk less which really does take up a lot of our farming time. Walking back and forth really does consume time when added up over the year so we have to streamline our calorie and time expenditures. Of course that means expending more time to build him a new area next year.
               



                  Born free 1https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/born-free-1.jpg?w=1400 1400w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/born-free-1.jpg?w=150 150w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/born-free-1.jpg?w=300 300w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/born-free-1.jpg?w=768 768w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/born-free-1.jpg?w=1024 1024w" />Born free 2https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/born-free-2.jpg?w=1400 1400w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/born-free-2.jpg?w=150 150w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/born-free-2.jpg?w=300 300w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/born-free-2.jpg?w=768 768w, https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/born-free-2.jpg?w=1024 1024w" />(Running free with the dogs. This is where we break out into a rousing chorus of Born Free, As Free as the Wind Blows…..)
               



                  I wanted to give a word of warning. Safety stuff. Remember, I said I am an amateur at this pig stuff. Not an expert… and we are talking about a Boar here…so you do have to keep in mind that it is sort of like making friends with a bull… or me for that matter. We are complex bundles of ancient instincts, hormones and luggage.
               



                  We also learned what the term, Pig Headed means. When he is at something he wants…he is all instinct and cannot be dissuaded. Slaps, punches or kicks will not change his mind. He is just too solid to feel any of that…and he will only get bigger.
               



                  So it is important for us all to not “Babe, The Pig” this story too much. There is a reason why pig farmers bring a pointy stick when interacting with there hogs…and occasionally a pig eats a farmer…or a child.
               



                  Someone sent a note that is worth you all reading as a cautionary tale to put some balance into my story. It read,
               



                  “Hey, really enjoyed your post about MR Woo

                  BUT

                  I have a friend who had a very very nice boar who would do the roll and scratch thing

                  Mine did that too.

                  But one day his pig went into “rut” (that’s what they call it)

                  And his friendly li’l 80-90kg pal sent a tusk UNDER his KNEECAP and chased him up a pecan tree

                  he escaped, eventually and spent 10 days in hospital

                  He advised me to dispatch my uncastrated boar, and I did, once he got scary (which was after his lady friend gave birth)

                  Maybe if you never breed with him, he’d be ok, I don’t know.

                  But I just wanted to give you this heads up.I have a four month old uncastrated boar which I am going to swap with another neighbor who has the same

                  and after I’m sure the work is done, I’ll dispatch him, which will probably be in six months.I’ll be sad, but me and my kids will be safe”
               



                  Well, My public service announcement is done. Like most things, You have to weigh the risk to benefit part. You have to assess your own abilities and manage risk. A chainsaw is extremely dangerous. Its also damned useful. So, it has to be used with caution and respect.
               



                  When I first started writing this, I was in the middle of a health crisis. I figured I had a responsibility to pass this on fast. C5 Rule of Survival- If your only goal is Survival…You have a ZERO percent chance of success. Live a good life. Its far easier to live with.
               



                  Rumors of my demise were greatly exaggerated.
               



                  Soooo. I still have a responsibility to continue this post. Good news. Mr. Wu cruncher on some Jerusalem Artichokes or Sunchokes recently and…finally…decided he liked them. With winter approaching, I guess a complex carbohydrate and starch became appealing. Double good news because sunchokes are highly invasive. They are an ultimate survival food for guerilla gardeners. Old School survivalism. Plant and forget. But highly invasive. You will never fully dig them out.
               



                  Now that he recognizes sunchokes as food…he IS digging them himself. Pig to the food instead of food to the pig. Still, I’m storing them in buckets, for the winter, of half sunchokes and half dirt.
               



                  Now, another commenter had written,”This is where, as a permie, I would take a serious look at the dietary diversity and history of the native cultures of your region. Somehow, all of those indigenous cultures were grooving along just fine without Euro foods.” I will add that many survivalist leaning “A’hunin and A’fishin like granpappy and the brave frontiersmen” types will say, “Why bother with all this work?”
               



                  I thought I would nip this in the swollen, unwashed anus.
               



                  Goddess bless the First Nations. In My Blessing the First nations…we really have to ditch the myth of returning to ” dietary diversity and history of the native cultures of your region. Somehow, all of those indigenous cultures were grooving along just fine without Euro foods”. I have written about this recently enough but should badger it again. Those food sources ARE GONE…and have been for quite a while.
               



                  Example. The First Nations in my recently adopted region…in pre colonial invasion days…a staple food source was the passenger pidgin. I bring it up because most people recognize the name and that it is now extinct….but that doesn’t really paint the real picture. Try to imagine the sky so thick with passenger pigeons and other fat filled foul that it would occasionally block out the sun. Imagine Fish stocks so thick that they would occasionally stop fishing boats against a wall and fishermen reporting they could walk on them. Seals in the billions…etc
               



                  Those day are gone. Trying to return to those days is a false narrative. The forests are now mono cultures…ad a shitload of people. I’m not dissing traditional skills…just pointing out the obvious. Most of the species we take for granted almost went extinct or actually did go extinct in areas during the Great Depression and had to be reintroduced with the hunting rules we have today. There is ALOT more people today. I use American Numbers to get my point across.

                  C5 Rule of Survival- “30 million Deer in America. 350 million people. One deer per person per month strictly rationed. You do the unworkable math and Prep accordingly.”

                  I’m not trying to be an argumentative dick. Im trying to save peoples lives that are looking at …being a fake indian…as a survival fall back option. The First Nations have plenty to teach us. Philosophy. Community. Endurance. Unfortunately they can also teach us about starvation…and the near death of a culture because of it. The invaders destroyed the food source to destroy the culture.
               



                  Now imagine 350 million hungry people deciding that going after 30 million deer is a good idea. In a real modern crisis….Ild give the deer about two weeks before they were extinct….forever. Other species follow.
               



                  Another commentor added, “I see your point, but the way I see it , after I look around at most of those 350 million folks, I am betting that 3/4 of them will be gone within a couple of months as they have no idea how to live without everything being delivered to t


Offline Eddie

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Re: C5 Walks into a Diner...
« Reply #104 on: May 17, 2018, 08:01:29 AM »
I knew it wouldn't be easy to load my pigs in a trailer. I only got three adults in there, for the first trip to the auction sale. I caught a bunch of piglets by hand and tossed them over the top.

I was not prepared for the way the big ones fought to the death to go anywhere except into the trailer. I learned that the loading chute should have no visible exits. The went for the gates, which were of the galvanized 3/4 inch tubing variety they sell at Tractor Supply, and tried to dive between the bars.

They bent the gates up and basically knocked them right off the hinges, which turned out to be the weakest point. And they were stout gates I installed myself, the right way.

I tried to let my two Heelers help, but they lack the training that comes with watching older dogs do what needs to be done. In stead of putting the pigs in the trailer, THEY got in the trailer. Very obedient. LOL.

Monday I have to try again. I am going to starve the pigs for an extra day and bait the trailer with corn and try to trap them.

It sucked watching the animals I raised experience the terror of the load-out experience. And then I got almost nothing for the stock at the sale, which was expected. I wasn't even sure they'd take them. The hired hand in the intake area didn't recognize the breed and thought I was trying to sell feral pigs, which is not allowed. I had to educate him and he had to call his boss. It's a long ass drive with the trailer.

Not the way I was hoping my pig raising experience would go, but I learned a lot. If I can't get them in the trailer, I'll see if I can give some away. If they'e free, I expect I'll have no trouble finding people to load them themselves.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

 

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