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Offline K-Dog

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Re: C5 Walks into a Diner...
« Reply #165 on: June 10, 2018, 01:44:03 AM »
When I started Makita was about all there was. Then DeWalt came along and took it to the next level (of voltage, LOL).

Now there are a lot more choices. Sometimes one company doesn't make the one tool you need.

Another reason I chose Ryobi.  They had the most variety of tools available for the same batt system.  You can even get Weed Eaters that run on the One+ Batts.

Indeed, going back a few years every tool had a different batt and different voltages.  A total mess.  A few companies like DeWalt and Ryobi have cleaned this up some.  Pick a system now and stick with it for future purchases and you will save a lot on Batts.

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A weed eater that runs on batteries is a joke.

Real dogs go Stihl.



This baby is a FS 70R from the commercial line.  The homeowner line has a white case around the two stroke engine.  With a premium baby like that shown here you can mow a lawn as fast as you can walk.  Electric farmin equipment have shortcomings.  Quality equipment that can really get the job done as well as the gas version I show here needs to have a collection of charged batteries ready to get any real work time. Quality equipment costs.  I agree with C5 that the Stihl electric line is great but it is not cheap.

I have a unit like that I show which I got last month but mine has its motor detachable so different tools can be connected for different jobs.  I have a blower tool which I can hook up after eatin weeds.  Blows trimming remnants off the sidewalk onto the grass. 

Two weeks ago I climbed on my roof and used it to blow tree debris off the doghouse.  It looks like a length of white plastic pipe but inside four impellers turn and blow air out the end at a couple hundred miles an hour.  There is an electric blower also made by Stihl.  I doubt their electric blower out-performs what I have though it is also a very good blower.  It alone cost more than the dual trimmer arrangement I have with the extra blower attachment and all the electric tool does is does is blow,  no trimming.  It also won't run for even an hour with the premium battery.  Getting more than one battery adds more to the cost.  Recharger and batteries sold separately.

In collapse the chemistry of batteries will fail with time.  Gas powered equipment will be more durable and the fuel requirements of small tools are not so great.  Fuel for gas powered small tools can cost thirty dollars a gallon right now and equipment can still generate a reasonable profit for a professional gardener.  This would also be true for someone with a garden plot with a few veggies to sell.  I have a small roto-tiller I got at a low price but I could get a tilling attachment for my Stihl combo tool if I wanted. 

A recipe for making two stroke fuel biofuel would be a good idea and robust equipment should be identified.  I don't see batteries being available once the economy collapses.  Lithium batteries go bad just sitting on the shelf and in general batteries have shelf life.  The infrastructure to build good batteries is going to go away when SHTF but a greatly scaled down arrangement of what we have now could support a small engine infrastructure far more easily than the complex centralized distribution channels battery manufacture demands.  Small engines being lower tech can have a local support infrastructure that could support standard designs.  It would be more robust.

Not all tools are so efficient as the blower and trimmer.  Pressure washers suck gas as well as they can shoot water but for many things small two stroke engines get the job done well and sources of fuel should not be impossible to come up with because the quantity needed is low.
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Offline RE

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Re: C5 Walks into a Diner...
« Reply #166 on: June 10, 2018, 02:58:28 AM »
I did some price comparisons on the net to see exactly the difference in price you pay for the "professional" line of power tools versus the "consumer" lines.  It turns out that DeWalt DOES in fact make a cordless electric Chainsaw which is part of their line of power tools running off the same Batts, in their case a 40V batt.  You can forget my estimate earlier of a 30% price differential for these tools from the Ryobis.  That was just the teaser price for the first few tools in their line.

Cost of the chainsaw from DeWalt, $280 WITHOUT any batts or charger.  Cost of ONE 40V batt, $250.  So if you don't already own other DeWalt cordless tools, the cost to get into this chainsaw to carve up your piggies is a nice wallet lightening $530.  :o

By contrast, the Ryobi chainsaw comes in at $110, and batts for it go $50/each.  I can buy the saw and two more batts for $210, less than half the cost of the DeWalt.

Now, you are going to say to me, "But RE, this is PROFESSIONAL equipment! It will LAST longer!"

It might, but it really depends on how often you use the equipment and how much stress you put on it.  The reason that contractors blow out equipment is because they over stress it, even the pro quality gear.  It's 2 in the afternoon, the motors are over-heating but they keep going because time is money and the job has to get done, don't ya know?  If you don't over-load your equipment, it doesn't burn out on you.

So again, it really depends on how often you're going to use it and what the load is the equipment has to handle.  Cutting up a pig which is mostly soft meat with bones max 3" or so in diameter is not a huge load, and as a Gentleman Farmer you're probably only going to do one in a day, not 50 of them coming from the feed lot.  So do you really need to spend $530 for this task?  I doubt it.

However, people who routinely push their equipment as hard as they can and try to drill holes through thick posts 100 in a day will routinely burn out equipment and finally cough up exorbitant amounts of money to buy "the best in class" from Stihl, Dewalt etc.  Use some CFS and don't push the equipment that hard!  ::)

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Offline David B.

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Re: C5 Walks into a Diner...
« Reply #167 on: June 10, 2018, 08:02:09 AM »
Sorry guys. I am a bit dead from the work day for a good post but I thought I would throw in on the subject. I promote CORDED electrical tools for resilience. Convenience is cool and helpfull but short lived. When the battery is gone the tool is gone. I pick through alot of peoples garbage. That is a pride thing for me. Not a shame. I recycle. Tons of those battery packs in the trash. I also get 20 year old power tools and they still work. There is a compromise though. A converter on your car can get an electrical supply near where you need it and run cords from there. I know a guy that does all his firewood that way with an electric chainsaw. Getting an electric chainsaw is on my list but I will save up for a quality Stihls. My reasoning is, someday I may selectivly cut with the gas chainsaw (or goddess forbid, an ax) cut into carriable sized logs, then buck them up at home with the solar panels. It is a stop gap measure before it is all coppice wood after that.

Just my two cents worth. Corded power tools. Not battery powered.
I meant inverter.

In a pinch where your batts are all shot, you can always turn a cordless drill into a corded one with some Solder, some wire and a transformer to bring your 12V batt to the right voltage for the tool.

However, if I was still in prepping mode, I would lay in a bigger supply of batts for my tools.

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I want to order one of these:   https://www.amazon.com/SMAKN-Converter-Module-adaptor-Regulator/dp/B00VRAZYN0/ref=sr_1_17?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1528642734&sr=1-17&keywords=dc%2Fdc+12+volt+to+18
Solid state and probably more durable then the cheap inverters. There are an awful lot of cordless tools without batteries out there. These converters are available in almost any step up step down configuration...
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Offline farmgal

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Re: C5 Walks into a Diner...
« Reply #168 on: June 10, 2018, 08:41:08 AM »
Thank you for the replies on my question about the butchering on harvested wild game.  We find most hunters locally do send their game out to be done. Even those that do some home work will send out for sausages, smoking and so forth.

I have enjoyed reading about the power tools, I do have a selection as I tend to buy the older ones from local farm sales and some of them are tough as nails, otherwise I buy dewalt myself with the same battery. Yes it was a sigh worthy when the bill came in!

As for Chainsaws, I have a light little one for small jobs, and a bigger gas one for the bigger jobs. I have my eye on getting a battery powered one that is a single top handle for cutting my tree hay.. but so far like most things I am using hand clippers or hand saw at this time. However the tree's are getting bigger and at some point, the small powered saw will work better. At this point, I have a barter deal for use of a wood splitter when required. Its just not needed enough to own my own at this time.

As for the butchering, I have a hand held bone saw that does most of the work very nicely, If I can't debone the meat out and or need to cut extra bone, I have a powered with a cord jigsaw that gets the job done.  I have a older mid size freezer that is used as the cold storage for the meat as they are aged and while I process them. I also have a cement deep cellar on the farm that is low enough in the ground that I can use it as a cold house but I tend to use it for milk/veggies raither then meat.

 I just use frozen jugs done in the active freezers to keep it cold. I also do regular washes of salt -sugar brine over the meat while aging or hold it for process.  I am big on salt, I clean my wooden cutting boards with salt etc.

Interesting read gentleman..

Offline RE

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Re: C5 Walks into a Diner...
« Reply #169 on: June 10, 2018, 09:37:26 AM »
Sorry guys. I am a bit dead from the work day for a good post but I thought I would throw in on the subject. I promote CORDED electrical tools for resilience. Convenience is cool and helpfull but short lived. When the battery is gone the tool is gone. I pick through alot of peoples garbage. That is a pride thing for me. Not a shame. I recycle. Tons of those battery packs in the trash. I also get 20 year old power tools and they still work. There is a compromise though. A converter on your car can get an electrical supply near where you need it and run cords from there. I know a guy that does all his firewood that way with an electric chainsaw. Getting an electric chainsaw is on my list but I will save up for a quality Stihls. My reasoning is, someday I may selectivly cut with the gas chainsaw (or goddess forbid, an ax) cut into carriable sized logs, then buck them up at home with the solar panels. It is a stop gap measure before it is all coppice wood after that.

Just my two cents worth. Corded power tools. Not battery powered.
I meant inverter.

In a pinch where your batts are all shot, you can always turn a cordless drill into a corded one with some Solder, some wire and a transformer to bring your 12V batt to the right voltage for the tool.

However, if I was still in prepping mode, I would lay in a bigger supply of batts for my tools.

RE
I want to order one of these:   https://www.amazon.com/SMAKN-Converter-Module-adaptor-Regulator/dp/B00VRAZYN0/ref=sr_1_17?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1528642734&sr=1-17&keywords=dc%2Fdc+12+volt+to+18
Solid state and probably more durable then the cheap inverters. There are an awful lot of cordless tools without batteries out there. These converters are available in almost any step up step down configuration...

Your link is broken.

You can get just the transformer module and wire up yourself.  I have 4 of these I bought for $15/each which handle 8V-80V transforms either way.  You adjust the input/output range with little screws, there are no knobs to turn.  It took me a while to figure that out.  lol.  They's handle up to 10A, which is enough to power even a 12" Circular Saw.


https://www.ebay.com/itm/DC-DC-400W-8V-80V-10A-Digital-Controlled-Boost-Step-up-Module-Power-Supply-Pro/202288317677?_trkparms=aid%3D555018%26algo%3DPL.SIM%26ao%3D2%26asc%3D20160908110712%26meid%3D0ebec2a3c7a74d07a8bdc33e1a3c8e46%26pid%3D100677%26rk%3D4%26rkt%3D30%26sd%3D171431441179%26itm%3D202288317677&_trksid=p2385738.c100677.m4598

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Offline RE

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Re: C5 Walks into a Diner...
« Reply #170 on: June 10, 2018, 10:16:37 AM »
Thank you for the replies on my question about the butchering on harvested wild game.  We find most hunters locally do send their game out to be done. Even those that do some home work will send out for sausages, smoking and so forth.

We have only 2 companies here that do the sausage making and smoking for you, Alaska Sausage & Seafood down in Anchorage and Matanuska Meats here in the Valley.  There probably is somebody up in Fairbanks that does this too, but I don't know of them.  If you live anywhere else in Alaska, you have to DIY.

The issue besides a dearth of commmercial operations doing this is the cost for people here who do subsistence fishing and hunting.  A friend of mine gave me about 10 lbs. of cold smoked Nova Salmon out of her take during dipnetting season a few years back she had smoked and vacuum sealed by Alaska Sausage & Seafood.  I asked her how much it cost, $4/lb, which is certainly cheaper than the cost of a pound of Nova in the grocery store which comes in at around $20/lb, but then you have to figure in your cost in gas to get down to Kenai and campsite costs as well to figure what it finally costs, which is probably around $10/lb.

The folks who do subsistence fishing & hunting here work on a very low budget.  It's about 50-50 Native and White people.  $4/lb is just too much to pay when you can DIY.  So the only people who send out are the touristas and the rich guys who work on the Slope and make 6 figures.

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Offline K-Dog

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Re: C5 Walks into a Diner...
« Reply #171 on: June 10, 2018, 01:24:43 PM »
Sorry guys. I am a bit dead from the work day for a good post but I thought I would throw in on the subject. I promote CORDED electrical tools for resilience. Convenience is cool and helpfull but short lived. When the battery is gone the tool is gone. I pick through alot of peoples garbage. That is a pride thing for me. Not a shame. I recycle. Tons of those battery packs in the trash. I also get 20 year old power tools and they still work. There is a compromise though. A converter on your car can get an electrical supply near where you need it and run cords from there. I know a guy that does all his firewood that way with an electric chainsaw. Getting an electric chainsaw is on my list but I will save up for a quality Stihls. My reasoning is, someday I may selectivly cut with the gas chainsaw (or goddess forbid, an ax) cut into carriable sized logs, then buck them up at home with the solar panels. It is a stop gap measure before it is all coppice wood after that.

Just my two cents worth. Corded power tools. Not battery powered.

A great two cents!

Take some of RE's DC modules with an adjustable DC output and bus them together.
bussedConnections
bussedConnections

If the voltage modules are all set to 16.5 volts a 20 AMP load will only suck the output voltage down to 15.5 volts.  The drawing I made can put out 40 AMPs but better to add more modules on the bused connections if you needed that much current.  More modules will reduce the voltage drop in the resistors under load so output voltage will not dip as much.

Details will vary by specific application and I am only presenting the idea here.  I have done this trick with a dozen surplus laptop supplies to make a very high current low voltage DC supply for LED lighting in a horticultural application.  I made my own LED grow lights which worked very well. 

Looking up the ohms per foot of 20 gauge wire show that it has about 9 ohms in 1000 feet.  This means only ten or twenty feet of twenty gauge wire would give a good resistance to balance currents if you want to make your own resistors.

Newer battery powered tools use higher voltages so I did not lock my example to 12 volts.  Different tools have different voltage needs so a high current supply has to be able to switch voltages or more than one supply is needed.  Having more than one supply would be a lot easier build  than to have to switch multiple modules between voltages in one supply. 


The high quality of professional tools such as the Stihl electric line means their working life could be extended by a 'corded battery' made from a dead battery case used as a plug in connector, along with a supply of power modules wired together as described above.  Connect to the dead battery case by a long cord or even a pair of cords to share heavy loads.  Some electric tools take a lot of current because they use low voltage.  Power means high currents when voltages are low.  That is why voltages in battery packs are going up.  To reduce current draw and give more power.

If a single 20 gauge wire from each 10 amp module carried current to the dead battery connector and all the wires were simply connected together in a bundle, then no balancing resistors would be needed at all.  The wires would be the resistors.

10 Amps by itself at 12 volts is only 120 watts.  A serious tool will need more amps and the power cord to the tool/battery connector has to have good current carrying capacity to prevent excess voltage drop.  20 gauge wire will carry a maximum of 8 amps but busing more modules to reduce current draw brings the load on each wire below 8 amps.  Two modules would only have to supply 5 amps each to handle a 10 amp load.

Quote
Lithium-ion batteries age. They only last two to three years, even if they are sitting on a shelf unused. So do not "avoid using" the battery with the thought that the battery pack will last five years. It won't. Also, if you are buying a new battery pack, you want to make sure it really is new. If it has been sitting on a shelf in the store for a year, it won't last very long. Manufacturing dates are important.

https://electronics.howstuffworks.com/everyday-tech/lithium-ion-battery2.htm

The economics of battery replacement totally offset fuel savings sorry to say.  As Diners we also know going electric is not as 'green' as it seems.  Biofuel and two cycle devices would be greener in the greater scheme of things but after SHTF the environment will start a long slow journey back to cool so being green won't matter anyway.

Going 'green' is good if you have any notion of civilization surviving on any level into the future.  But if you know for sure that SHTF day is near and that after SHTF day we are all going Mad Max then worrying about the environment is total a waste of time since the earth will be fixing itself and there won't be enough of us around to stop it from doing so.  If that is the case you might as well take a road trip and burn baby burn.


It's a conundrum!
« Last Edit: June 10, 2018, 02:05:26 PM by K-Dog »
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Offline RE

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Re: C5 Walks into a Diner...
« Reply #172 on: June 10, 2018, 01:53:04 PM »
Sorry guys. I am a bit dead from the work day for a good post but I thought I would throw in on the subject. I promote CORDED electrical tools for resilience. Convenience is cool and helpfull but short lived. When the battery is gone the tool is gone. I pick through alot of peoples garbage. That is a pride thing for me. Not a shame. I recycle. Tons of those battery packs in the trash. I also get 20 year old power tools and they still work. There is a compromise though. A converter on your car can get an electrical supply near where you need it and run cords from there. I know a guy that does all his firewood that way with an electric chainsaw. Getting an electric chainsaw is on my list but I will save up for a quality Stihls. My reasoning is, someday I may selectivly cut with the gas chainsaw (or goddess forbid, an ax) cut into carriable sized logs, then buck them up at home with the solar panels. It is a stop gap measure before it is all coppice wood after that.

Just my two cents worth. Corded power tools. Not battery powered.

A great two cents!

Take some of RE's DC modules with an adjustable DC output and bus them together.
bussedConnections
bussedConnections

If the voltage modules are all set to 16.5 volts a 20 AMP load will only suck the output voltage down to 15.5 volts.  The drawing I made can put out 40 AMPs but better to add more modules on the bused connections if you needed that much current.  More modules will reduce the voltage drop in the resistors under load so output voltage will not dip as much.

Details will vary by specific application and I am only presenting the idea here.  I have done this trick with a dozen surplus laptop supplies to make a very high current low voltage DC supply for LED lighting in a horticultural application.  I made my own LED grow lights which worked very well. 

Looking up the ohms per foot of 20 gauge wire show that it has about 9 ohms in 1000 feet.  This means only ten or twenty feet of twenty gauge wire would give a good resistance to balance currents if you want to make your own resistors.

Newer battery powered tools use higher voltages so I did not lock my example to 12 volts.  Different tools have different voltage needs so a high current supply has to be able to switch voltages or more than one supply is needed.  Having more than one supply would be a lot easier build  than to have to switch multiple modules between voltages in one supply. 


The high quality of professional tools such as the Stihl electric line means their working life could be extended by a 'corded battery' made from a dead battery case used as a plug in connector, along with a supply of power modules wired together as described above.  Connect to the dead battery case by a long cord or even a pair of cords to share heavy loads.  Some electric tools take a lot of current because they use low voltage.  Power means high currents when voltages are low.  That is why voltages in battery packs are going up.  To reduce current draw and give more power.

If a single 20 gauge wire from each 10 amp module carried current to the dead battery connector and all the wires were simply connected together in a bundle, then no balancing resistors would be needed at all.  The wires would be the resistors.

10 Amps by itself at 12 volts is only 120 watts.  A serious tool will need more amps and the power cord to the tool/battery connector has to have good current carrying capacity to prevent excess voltage drop.  20 gauge wire will carry a maximum of 8 amps but busing more modules to reduce current draw brings the load on each wire below 8 amps.  Two modules would only have to supply 5 amps each to handle a 10 amp load.

Quote
Lithium-ion batteries age. They only last two to three years, even if they are sitting on a shelf unused. So do not "avoid using" the battery with the thought that the battery pack will last five years. It won't. Also, if you are buying a new battery pack, you want to make sure it really is new. If it has been sitting on a shelf in the store for a year, it won't last very long. Manufacturing dates are important.

https://electronics.howstuffworks.com/everyday-tech/lithium-ion-battery2.htm

Great ideas on how to up the power supply potential there KD!  :icon_sunny:

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Offline David B.

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Re: C5 Walks into a Diner...
« Reply #173 on: June 10, 2018, 01:58:11 PM »
Take some of RE's DC modules with an adjustable DC output and bus them together.
bussedConnections
bussedConnections

If the voltage modules are all set to 16.5 volts a 20 AMP load will only suck the output voltage down to 15.5 volts.  The drawing I made can put out 40 AMPs but better to add more modules on the bused connections if you needed that much current.  More modules will reduce the voltage drop in the resistors under load so output voltage will not dip as much.

Details will vary by specific application and I am only presenting the idea here.  I have done this trick with a dozen surplus laptop supplies to make a very high current low voltage DC supply for LED lighting in a horticultural application.  I made my own LED grow lights which worked very well. 

Looking up the ohms per foot of 20 gauge wire show that it has about 9 ohms in 1000 feet.  This means only ten or twenty feet of twenty gauge wire would give a good resistance to balance currents if you want to make your own resistors.

Newer battery powered tools use higher voltages so I did not lock my example to 12 volts.  Different tools have different voltage needs so a high current supply has to be able to switch voltages or more than one supply is needed.  Having more than one supply would be a lot easier build  than to have to switch multiple modules between voltages in one supply. 


The high quality of professional tools such as the Stihl electric line means their working life could be extended by a 'corded battery' made from a dead battery case used as a plug in connector, along with a supply of power modules wired together as described above.  Connect to the dead battery case by a long cord or even a pair of cords to share heavy loads.  Some electric tools take a lot of current because they use low voltage.  Power means high currents when voltages are low.  That is why voltages in battery packs are going up.  To reduce current draw and give more power.

If a single 20 gauge wire from each 10 amp module carried current to the dead battery connector and all the wires were simply connected together in a bundle, then no balancing resistors would be needed at all.  The wires would be the resistors.

10 Amps by itself at 12 volts is only 120 watts.  A serious tool will need more amps and the power cord to the tool/battery connector has to have good current carrying capacity to prevent excess voltage drop.  20 gauge wire will carry a maximum of 8 amps but busing more modules to reduce current draw brings the load on each wire below 8 amps.  Two modules would only have to supply 5 amps each to handle a 10 amp load.



That was my plan take a dead battery case and mount it in it. I had not thought of ganging up more than one of them great idea there... The older NIMH batteries would have room for two of the units. For me its a step up converter from 12 volts to 19 volts. I thought I would convert it at the tool since it takes inputs from 11-18 volts so it could compensate for voltage drop at the tool. Probably a 14 gauge dead extension cord no more then 30ft.  I think they make these power supplies for laptop charging in cars which is why they are so cheap. I like this scenario there are oodles of cordless tools sans batteries out there... I'll keep my corded ac tools in reserve. They are unkillable tanks.
« Last Edit: June 10, 2018, 02:01:29 PM by David B. »
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Offline RE

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Re: C5 Walks into a Diner...
« Reply #174 on: June 10, 2018, 02:13:34 PM »
Another thought.

If you do get a tool with an old but dead batt you want to hook to the wired system, save the tool batt case but gut the interior of the batt and run the wires out of that to hook to your power supply with say a 30A connector.  Then you can just snap the batt into the slot the same way you always did, just it would have the wire poking out the bottom to connect to the power supply.

None of my tools need so much power.  I'm not a big power hog like you macho men.  I got maybe 30' of weeds to eat on my backyard porch by the fence.  I'm not buying a Stihl for that. lol.

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Offline K-Dog

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Re: C5 Walks into a Diner...
« Reply #175 on: June 10, 2018, 03:01:11 PM »

That was my plan take a dead battery case and mount it in it. I had not thought of ganging up more than one of them great idea there... The older NIMH batteries would have room for two of the units. For me its a step up converter from 12 volts to 19 volts. I thought I would convert it at the tool since it takes inputs from 11-18 volts so it could compensate for voltage drop at the tool. Probably a 14 gauge dead extension cord no more then 30ft.  I think they make these power supplies for laptop charging in cars which is why they are so cheap. I like this scenario there are oodles of cordless tools sans batteries out there... I'll keep my corded ac tools in reserve. They are unkillable tanks.




Horrible picture, but follow the link for the details. 

https://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Ohmite/TUW10JR10E?qs=sGAEpiMZZMtbXrIkmrvidENDXSGPAR%2fjNq%252bZReBzvag%3d

0.1 ohm at 10 watts for a buck each.  Paralleling lower wattage resistors with resistances bumped up appropriately is cheaper.  A can of worms you can spend hours figuring out. 

For a recent circuit I made I bought 4700pF 6KV capacitors and paralleled 6 of them together and then put two of such paralleled arrangements in series for  0.014 uF at 12,000 volts.  My goal was to replace a filter cap of 0.012uF at 10000 volts.  The original arrangements used two 0.025 uF caps at 6 KV and a found exact replacements but at $70.00 each.  $140.00 to replace a couple of missing caps is too much so I did it for $13.00 using the laws of series parallel capacitors.

Not the same math exactly as for resistors.  The series parallel laws are inverted.  But the principle is the same.

Quote
Save the tool batt case but gut the interior of the batt and run the wires out of that to hook to your power supply with say a 30A connector.  Then you can just snap the batt into the slot the same way you always did, just it would have the wire poking out the bottom to connect to the power supply.

Something like that.



The best connector for that are Anderson Powepoles.

https://powerwerx.com/anderson-power-powerpole-sb-connectors?utm_source=bing&utm_medium=cpc&utm_term={keyword_text}&utm_campaign=Anderson+-+Exact&utm_adgroup=Anderson+Powerpole&mkwid=swRhORc6i_dc&pcrid={creative}&plc={placement}&pkw=anderson%20powerpole&pmt|=e&utm_content=Anderson%20Powerpole
« Last Edit: June 10, 2018, 03:09:13 PM by K-Dog »
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Offline David B.

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Re: C5 Walks into a Diner...
« Reply #176 on: June 10, 2018, 03:53:07 PM »

That was my plan take a dead battery case and mount it in it. I had not thought of ganging up more than one of them great idea there... The older NIMH batteries would have room for two of the units. For me its a step up converter from 12 volts to 19 volts. I thought I would convert it at the tool since it takes inputs from 11-18 volts so it could compensate for voltage drop at the tool. Probably a 14 gauge dead extension cord no more then 30ft.  I think they make these power supplies for laptop charging in cars which is why they are so cheap. I like this scenario there are oodles of cordless tools sans batteries out there... I'll keep my corded ac tools in reserve. They are unkillable tanks.





Horrible picture, but follow the link for the details. 

https://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Ohmite/TUW10JR10E?qs=sGAEpiMZZMtbXrIkmrvidENDXSGPAR%2fjNq%252bZReBzvag%3d

0.1 ohm at 10 watts for a buck each.  Paralleling lower wattage resistors with resistances bumped up appropriately is cheaper.  A can of worms you can spend hours figuring out. 

For a recent circuit I made I bought 4700pF 6KV capacitors and paralleled 6 of them together and then put two of such paralleled arrangements in series for  0.014 uF at 12,000 volts.  My goal was to replace a filter cap of 0.012uF at 10000 volts.  The original arrangements used two 0.025 uF caps at 6 KV and a found exact replacements but at $70.00 each.  $140.00 to replace a couple of missing caps is too much so I did it for $13.00 using the laws of series parallel capacitors.

Not the same math exactly as for resistors.  The series parallel laws are inverted.  But the principle is the same.

Quote
Save the tool batt case but gut the interior of the batt and run the wires out of that to hook to your power supply with say a 30A connector.  Then you can just snap the batt into the slot the same way you always did, just it would have the wire poking out the bottom to connect to the power supply.

Something like that.



The best connector for that are Anderson Powepoles.

https://powerwerx.com/anderson-power-powerpole-sb-connectors?utm_source=bing&utm_medium=cpc&utm_term={keyword_text}&utm_campaign=Anderson+-+Exact&utm_adgroup=Anderson+Powerpole&mkwid=swRhORc6i_dc&pcrid={creative}&plc={placement}&pkw=anderson%20powerpole&pmt|=e&utm_content=Anderson%20Powerpole
I've been using these ones   https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B00SGYUH2I/ref=oh_aui_bia_detailpage_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

for 12 volt stuff up to 15 amps. You need a crimper for them though same as the andersons . UHG I remember my series and parallel rules but its been some time. Its just so damn easy to buy full circuits. Yet another thing that will be gone after BAU.
If its important then try something, fail, disect, learn from it, try again, and again and again until it kills you or you succeed.

Offline RE

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Re: C5 Walks into a Diner...
« Reply #177 on: June 10, 2018, 04:06:33 PM »

That was my plan take a dead battery case and mount it in it. I had not thought of ganging up more than one of them great idea there... The older NIMH batteries would have room for two of the units. For me its a step up converter from 12 volts to 19 volts. I thought I would convert it at the tool since it takes inputs from 11-18 volts so it could compensate for voltage drop at the tool. Probably a 14 gauge dead extension cord no more then 30ft.  I think they make these power supplies for laptop charging in cars which is why they are so cheap. I like this scenario there are oodles of cordless tools sans batteries out there... I'll keep my corded ac tools in reserve. They are unkillable tanks.





Horrible picture, but follow the link for the details. 

https://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Ohmite/TUW10JR10E?qs=sGAEpiMZZMtbXrIkmrvidENDXSGPAR%2fjNq%252bZReBzvag%3d

0.1 ohm at 10 watts for a buck each.  Paralleling lower wattage resistors with resistances bumped up appropriately is cheaper.  A can of worms you can spend hours figuring out. 

For a recent circuit I made I bought 4700pF 6KV capacitors and paralleled 6 of them together and then put two of such paralleled arrangements in series for  0.014 uF at 12,000 volts.  My goal was to replace a filter cap of 0.012uF at 10000 volts.  The original arrangements used two 0.025 uF caps at 6 KV and a found exact replacements but at $70.00 each.  $140.00 to replace a couple of missing caps is too much so I did it for $13.00 using the laws of series parallel capacitors.

Not the same math exactly as for resistors.  The series parallel laws are inverted.  But the principle is the same.

Quote
Save the tool batt case but gut the interior of the batt and run the wires out of that to hook to your power supply with say a 30A connector.  Then you can just snap the batt into the slot the same way you always did, just it would have the wire poking out the bottom to connect to the power supply.

Something like that.



The best connector for that are Anderson Powepoles.

https://powerwerx.com/anderson-power-powerpole-sb-connectors?utm_source=bing&utm_medium=cpc&utm_term={keyword_text}&utm_campaign=Anderson+-+Exact&utm_adgroup=Anderson+Powerpole&mkwid=swRhORc6i_dc&pcrid={creative}&plc={placement}&pkw=anderson%20powerpole&pmt|=e&utm_content=Anderson%20Powerpole
I've been using these ones   https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B00SGYUH2I/ref=oh_aui_bia_detailpage_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

for 12 volt stuff up to 15 amps. You need a crimper for them though same as the andersons . UHG I remember my series and parallel rules but its been some time. Its just so damn easy to buy full circuits. Yet another thing that will be gone after BAU.

My Ewz runs 36V with a 1000W motor.  It's my biggest electric power hog. It uses this type of connector:



There are connectors to pull the batt out of the bike and connectors to disengage the motor from the bike.  They are cheap and none of them has failed so far.  Pick em up at Auto Zone.

RE
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline RE

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Re: C5 Walks into a Diner...
« Reply #178 on: June 10, 2018, 04:42:23 PM »
BTW, when I bought the Ewz I bought with it a spare motor assembly, spare controller and spare throttle, along with spare tires and inner tubes.  The motors are BEASTS.

Ewz Motor
Ewz Motor

You could easily run a Table Saw, Drill Press or Joiner with these motors.

RE
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline cernunnos5

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Re: C5 Walks into a Diner...
« Reply #179 on: June 20, 2018, 10:07:20 AM »
I have been meaning to get back to this.... but I have been behind the ball lately. I stick with my CORDED power tools for resilience, position....

But since we clearly have some Electrical guys here...and me being a luddite, I see an opportunity.

I have a decent solar system... but that only lasts until the batteries die. Some people have solar that feeds into the grid. No grid, no batteries, done.

But here is a question I have to reach out to electrical guys for.

Can someone tell me about a practical DC motor that I can get some work out of by directly  tying it into the solar panels. Only works when sun is available.

Give me your thoughts guys. Can it be turned into, say, a wood saw.... or.... something that turns a reworked  generator for sunny day, power tool use.

That should give you folks something to chat about or share your knowledge of where to look for someone doing similar.

 

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