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Offline peter

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Peter's indoor vegetable garden
« on: February 21, 2012, 11:32:47 AM »
This thread will detail how my system is designed and constructed.


A few early pics....



The room was completely unfinished when I started and full to the ceiling with junk. After I cleaned it out and paneled it I first tried covering it with reflective mylar film. I didn't like the results at all and did more research on the most light efficient reflective surface. There are lots of pot grower forums with members which have long experience with indoor growing. The consensus was that a semi-gloss white painted surface worked best. Unless the mylar is perfectly smooth it tends to create uneven light.

You can buy plywood paneling with mylar on it but it is expensive and I wanted to use mostly what I had readily at hand so I painted everything white instead.



There is a great site on the web http://www.flexpvc.com which sells virtually every pvc plumbing fitting made. This box got lost in the mail for about 3 months.



These are all very early photos and many of the details have changed significantly but the basic layout remains the same.

The area in the foreground with 3 rows of 3 totes is for growing large vine type plants that have large root system. Things like tomatoes, cucumbers, beans squash, and potatoes.

The A-frame in the middle is for growing plants that stay relatively small and upright. Things like lettuces, herbs, chard, strawberries, green onions, radishes etc.

Hidden behind the A-frame at the other end of the room is a table with 6 grow pipes on it with wider spacing for growing shorter plants that need more elbow room such as broccoli, cabbages and so on.



This shows the drainage plumbing for the totes. It is made modular so any tote can be easily removed for maintenance. I'll explain the details later. After constructing this I figured out a simpler and less part intensive way to achieve the same thing which I will show later. There was much learning from experience involved.



The other side of the room has 6 growing pipes on a table which are more widely spaced horizontally for growing plants that need more space such as broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, colrabi, eggplant and so on. The photo above is from before the pipes were plumbed.













« Last Edit: February 21, 2012, 11:48:04 AM by peter »

Offline peter

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The Pros and Cons of Hydroponic Food Production. (Part 1)
« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2012, 11:46:29 AM »
Please post links to all Hydroponics related Suppliers in this  thread.
« Last Edit: February 21, 2012, 11:53:39 AM by peter »

Offline peter

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Amazing selection of PVC Fittings
« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2012, 11:51:35 AM »
These guys have pretty much any PVC fitting you can imagine as well as tubing and hoses.

http://www.flexpvc.com/
« Last Edit: February 21, 2012, 11:34:17 PM by peter »

Offline peter

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Good source of LED lights
« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2012, 11:52:41 AM »
This is where I bought my most recent batch of LED lights. Good service, fast shipping, good quality, and prices about 20% below market.

http://www.growtents.com/


Offline peter

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The Pros and Cons of Hydroponic Food Production. (Part 1)
« Reply #4 on: February 27, 2012, 04:07:58 PM »
The Pros and Cons of Hydroponic Food Production. 
(Part 1)
By: Peter Offermann Feb 27, 2012

Although Hydroponics has already been adopted in growing food crops in a massive way it is still under the radar in the public consciousness because of the main 'Con' associated with it. The potential of hydroponics presents a massive threat to the 'status quo' in today's world. Our leaders who have created this status quo, and who benefit disproportionately from it, have used their control of the mass media to keep this method of food production hidden in the shadows. This is a massive subject and I will break the discussion into a number of parts. In part 1 I will restrain myself to mostly discussing the political aspects.

In the first world hydroponics already produces a significant amount of the food we eat. I'll just insert a few photos demonstrating this here.




Click the thumbnail for more photos. Food is one of the key essentials necessary for life. It is obvious that controlling the food supply gives one an enormous amount of power over those [all of us] that need access to it. Within our society such control not only gives one enormous power over others, it also allows one to accumulate great wealth.

Most commodities put up for sale for profit have limited re-purchase potential. I.e. we only need to buy a new washing machine every few years. Food is one of the key markets that guarantees an ongoing clientele.



A book by Lappe & Collins called, "Food First - Beyond the myth of scarcity." Amazon  Link gives an excellent overview of what has been done and continues to be done today.There is an excellent book that explains how 'The Powers That Be' (TPTB) have used food as a weapon throughout history. Colonization was mostly about taking over other people's resources, most importantly productive farm land, in order to force the local residents to work for TPTB so that they could afford to buy food they needed from the 'Company' store because they no longer owned any land to grow their own food.
 






One of the most damaging things TPTB have intentionally done is to organize the modern world so that no location is food self-sufficient.

Why do this you ask?

Because it is next to impossible to bite the hand that feeds you. Your rebellion will soon sputter out if you don't have the resources at hand to feed yourself. Our modern lengthy, and wasteful of resources, supply lines guarantee that if an area such as Iran won't play ball they can be starved into submission or at least into acting in a predetermined way that benefits TPTB.


'Embargoes' such as the one currently being put in place around Iran have been used over and over to conveniently create wars when TPTB need one. The Jewish embargo put in place on Germany before WWII is another prime example.


Germany was not food self-sufficient at the time. Did they have any choice, or at least justification, for starting WWII if they were being destroyed from without?

 
It is obvious today that TPTB that control Governments worldwide see enemies not only "outside' national boundaries but also 'within' them. This is clearly demonstrated by the plethora of new laws being put in place by government bodies such as the FDA in America which are making it ever more illegal for individuals to grow their own food.   

Story link   Story link

TPTB, or those beholden to them, control the vast majority of productive crop land in the world. They mostly monocrop it not only for growing efficiency but also to assure that no area has a wide enough crop diversity to easily sustain life, even in areas that are highly productive farmland. I.e. if the only crop available in your area is corn or potatoes you still need to go to the Company Store to buy groceries.

TPTB have adopted hydroponics in a large way even though it poses the potential of a great risk to them. They have done this because they are greedy. They can't resist increasing their profit margins substantially. Hydroponic growing uses resources massively more efficiently than soil based growing. The amount of water and fertilizers consumed are but a tiny fraction of what is used in traditional farming. Crop productivity is also greatly increased. Hydroponic growing is not limited by lack of good soil or access to vast irrigation systems.

You can even grow indoors if you prefer or need to.

Can you see both the pros and cons for TPTB in this?

Larger profits verses the technology falling into their 'enemies' hands allowing the enemy to become food self-sufficient wherever they happen to be even without access to traditional gardening.

Many of TPTB's politcal agendas depend on the perception of scarcity which allows them to force draconian measures on the masses because they 'need' to be taken.

Hydroponics is easily capable of feeding the world while at the same time reducing the world's reliance on, and use of, vital non-renewable resources such as oil. Oil is used to make fertilizer, plow the land, maintain the crop, harvest it, bring it to market, preserve it in grocery stores, get us to the store and back.

How much would oil's consumption be reduced if we didn't need to do any of this and instead simply grow what we need at home in an easy and efficient way?

This would present a double whammy to TPTB. Not only would they lose regular customers, their profits on oil would also need to be reduced because of much lower utilization.

What would happen to oil prices if it was no longer a 'scarce' commodity?

End of (Part 1.)



« Last Edit: March 01, 2012, 03:44:52 PM by peter »

Offline ross

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Re: Peter's indoor vegetable garden
« Reply #5 on: March 02, 2012, 04:53:09 AM »
COOL!. Glad you re-posted these. Can you talk more about the storage bins in the middle. Those look like less-intimidating projects that some us could do at home.

Offline peter

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Re: Peter's indoor vegetable garden
« Reply #6 on: March 03, 2012, 03:12:11 PM »
Hi  Ross..... sorry for taking so long to reply. Still busy laying out the sites. Almost satisfied enough to get to doing some posting.

This thread will go into great detail about why and how I constructed this system. I'm probably going to do a Part 2 & 3 of the Hydroponics Pros and Cons article first as they will explain the why and the intent of building this system. This thread will then concentrate on the details of the actual construction and operation of the system.

To briefly answer your question. The photos above are from different stages of construction. The totes without plumbing were later plumbed.

The whole system is fed the nutrient solution from a 40 gallon fiberglass rectangular tank seen on the right in the first picture. The nutrient is pumped through all areas of the system and then returned to the tank. The nutrient is recirculated on average for about a month before being replaced. When there are many mature plants transpiration is significant and the nutrient tank is topped on average about 2 gallons per day, sometimes more.

Just straight water is added because surprisingly the plants barely take any of the nutrients out of the solution. There are two sensors in the tank that give me real-time readouts of the two critical qualities of the solution. The first shows the PH, the second shows the Electrical conductivity (EC). The EC shows the concentration of the fertilizer (mineral salts) in the solution.  The higher the concentration of nutrients, the higher the EC.

EC isn't a fool proof indication of nutrient quality as the critical salts, some of which are only in solution in tiny amounts, could be out of balance with each other. Many commercial growers don't recirculate their nutrient to assure premium quality solution. The amount of nutrients needed, even if not recirculated, are tiny compared to growing in soil. When fertilizing soil based crops the balance of the nutrients spread miss the roots.

Anyway I'll go into all this in an orderly fashion once I start working on this thread.

I'm currently building a system of rails for the eight new lights that will easily allow me to reposition them to get optimum coverage even when there are many large plants in the room.


« Last Edit: March 03, 2012, 03:37:46 PM by peter »

Offline RE

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Hydroponics NOW!
« Reply #7 on: November 26, 2012, 11:07:07 PM »
As we have had our various debates about the Orkin Man/Pol Pot, et al, I am quite mindful that had I lived in Kampuchea back in the day, I would have been adjudged one of those "glasses-wearing intellectual" slated for pushing wheelbarrows through muck and ground to fine dust on 600 calories of rice per day. Gardening is a noble and enlightened thing: it teaches humility and patience. Subsistence farming, on the other hand, is a desperate tug of war with nature for survival in slow motion. A very different thing; one the province of scholars, and gentle-men and -women, the other a war of attrition for survival.

Here of course is where Peter's Hydroponics come into the picture.


If we try and do this distributed food production biz in the typical back to the land fashion, without sufficient draft animals and with all the climate and aquifer depletion issues, slaves out there working the land are pretty much guaranteed to fail, not producing as much food as they need themselves for daily energy to do the work.

With the Hydroponics, you have water conservation, a way smaller footprint for producig the food, and the ability to do it inside Shities and Suburbs.

Peter is correct that this really represents the ONLY possible solution to the problem which might ameliorate an extreme die off event if we can educate the population and get started on it soon enough.


Upper Stories of Glass and Steel Towers in the Big Shities could be turned into enormous Vertical Greenhouses. The Water Pumping necessary to get water to the upper stories could probably be done mostly with Wind Power with the Wind Mills placed on top of the buildings and doing direct mechanical pumping, no conversion to electricity.  These buildings are so tall that you could in fact have Perenial Trees growing hydroponically inside them, producing High Energy calorie rich foods like Nuts, Avocados and Bananas.  Even in the middle latitudes with no electricity, passive solar heating inside these structures would keep them near Tropical in condition through most of the year.

With the Crop Failures this year, this is probably THE number one PRIORITY for getting going.  Started soon enough, it could prevent the Big Shities from turning in Zombie Cannibal Wastelands.

It is worth a try here anyhow, and I consider this a NUMERO UNO idea on the Diner Platform of Solutions Diners should promote on any website and in any meeting or group you participate in IRL.

Giving Up is not an option.  Hydroponics provides a CHANCE for Homo Sapiens to avoid the worst of the Four Horsmen.  It is our responsibility as Diners to promote this and work for its implementation ASAP.

RE
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline Surly1

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Re: Hydroponics NOW!
« Reply #8 on: November 27, 2012, 04:40:50 AM »
Capital idea.

Plan for the worst, hope for the best. Seems to be what we do here.

Not exactly hydroponics, but---
http://twistedsifter.com/2012/09/worlds-largest-vertical-garden-rozzano-italy/


Located in Rozzano, Italy, the vertical garden at the Fiordaliso Shopping Center was recognized this week by the Guiness World Records as the largest vertical garden in the world.
Covering a surface of 1,263 square meters (13,594 square feet) with a total of 44,000 plants, the massive vertical garden surpassed the former record-holder, a vertical garden in Madrid that covered 844 square meters (9,085 sq ft).
The garden was innaugurated in 2010 and was designed by architect Francesco Bollani, who remarked, “it took us a year to grow the plants in a greenhouse and 90 days to build the facade. It was like building a giant Lego!”
The garden, which uses small metallic containers and no soil, cost approximately $1.3 million to build.







and then there's this--

http://twistedsifter.files.wordpress.com/2012/09/eden_project_winter_worlds-largest-greenhouse-biomes_bruce_munro_field_of_light.jpg

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline peter

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Re: Hydroponics NOW!
« Reply #9 on: November 27, 2012, 01:26:21 PM »
Quote
Downtown Vancouver rooftop garden first of its kind in North America
http://www.vancitybuzz.com/2012/08/downtown-vancouver-rooftop-garden-first-of-its-kind-in-north-america/

 August 22, 2012
Posted by Vancity Buzz | 3 Comments


Construction has begun on North America’s first VertiCrop urban farming system. Developed by Vancouver based  Alterrus‘ the vertical farm will be on the top level of the downtown parking lot located at 535 Richards Street. It is expected that the farm will operate year round. The farm will be 5,700 square feet, majority of which will be used to grow produce in trays stacked 12 high. The remaining square footage will be used for picking and packing.

From BIV:

    Alterrus’ VertiCrop vertical-farming technology uses hydroponic technology to grow leafy green vegetables and herbs in a greenhouse, without pesticides or herbicides. Its produce will be transported directly to local Vancouver markets, significantly reducing its carbon footprint.

    The produce, to be sold under the Local Garden brand, will be available in Vancouver in October.

    Christopher Ng, CEO of Alterrus, said, “The VertiCrop technology represents a radical shift in sustainable food production.

    “Current food-production methods are ineffective in dealing with the challenges of growing populations and decreasing amounts of farmland. VertiCrop’s high-density urban farming is an effective way to grow nutritious food using fewer land and water resources than traditional field-farming methods.”

    The produce will be packaged on site and can be delivered to markets in the city the same day as they are harvested.

It’s expected that the rooftop farm will produce more than 150,000 pounds annually. It will use less than 10% of the water required for traditional field agriculture, while producing significantly higher yields compared with field-farmed produce. All of the excess water used will be recycled.

The VertiCrop™ Advantage
Designed to grow in any climate and with an exceptionally small footprint in urban environments, VertiCrop™ uses a fraction of the resources needed for field agriculture, while generating substantially higher yields.

    Yields are approximately 20 times higher than the normal production volume of field crops
    VertiCrop™ requires only 8% of the normal water consumption used to irrigate field crops
    Works on non-arable lands and close to major markets or urban centres
    Does not require the use of harmful herbicides or pesticides
    Able to grow over 80 varieties of leafy green vegetables
    Significant operating and capital cost savings over field agriculture
    Significantly reduces transportation distance, thereby reducing cost, energy and carbon foot print
    Provides higher quality produce with greater nutritional value and a longer shelf life
    High levels of food safety due to the enclosed growing process
    Scalable from small to very large food production operations


Update....

Quote
Innovative rooftop vertical farm launches in Vancouver Nov 20, 2012

http://www.mayorofvancouver.ca/verticrop


Today Mayor Gregor Robertson celebrated the opening of the first rooftop vertical farm in Vancouver, and the harvesting of its first commercial crop of leafy local greens.

The vertical farm is in a greenhouse on top of a parkade in downtown Vancouver, with under-utilized space at a Richards Street EasyPark lot being transformed into a home for innovative urban agriculture.

Vancouver-based Local Garden (a subsidiary of Alterrus) will produce approximately 150,000 pounds of leafy green vegetables and herbs a year, free of chemicals, pesticides and herbicides and without the need for genetically modified seeds. The produce will be distributed to local Vancouver grocers and restaurants. Customers include SPUD.ca, Urban Fare, Fable Restaurant, Cioppino’s, Hawksworth and other local restaurants.

“We’re very excited to work with Alterrus to create local green jobs and grow fresh produce right in the heart of downtown Vancouver,” said Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson, who attended the launch. “This project demonstrates the innovative spirit in our City’s booming clean tech sector. Transforming an underused downtown parking lot to create much-needed jobs and fresh, local food is a win-win-win.”

Vancouver has set the goal of becoming the greenest city in the world by 2020, with bold targets such as doubling the number of green jobs, reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 33%, and increasing city-wide food assets by 50%.

“This new greenhouse helps us on all of these fronts,” added the Mayor.

The City of Vancouver is partnering on the project by leasing the rooftop of an underused city-owned parkade to Alterrus.

“We believe this technology has the potential to transform Vancouver’s food system,” said Christopher Ng, CEO of Alterrus. “Vancouver produces a small percentage of its own food. We view Local Garden as a part of a transition to a more sustainable model of food production and delivery.”

Ng noted that produce trucked from California can spend up to four days in transit. By contrast, this project produces a fraction of the carbon footprint of those imports and is picked, packed and ready for the dinner table the same day.

Rick Sielski, Chief Operating Officer of Vancity Credit Union, which provided Alterrus with growth-capital financing for Local Garden, was also on hand to offer his congratulations to Alterrus and Local Garden.

“It’s an innovative project that’s creating jobs, producing local food and reducing its footprint on the environment,” he said. “Projects like this are totally aligned with our vision at Vancity of building vibrant and sustainable communities.”

The Grand Opening, at the EasyPark rooftop in downtown Vancouver, featured Celebrity Chef Trevor Bird, who has been a participant on Top Chef Canada and is owner of Fable Restaurant in Vancouver, one of Local Garden’s customer’s. He presented the speakers with a salad of Local Garden greens and a special dressing he created.

Also on hand were students from Lord Strathcona Elementary School who used iPads donated by the Vancouver Sun and the Hearts of Gold Foundation through the Adopt-a-School campaign. Students supported their community and educated guests on what they have learned in their curriculum about urban agriculture, sustainable farming and healthy diets.

Workers for the greenhouse have been hired through Mission Possible, an organization that helps those facing poverty, homelessness and other challenges, to find meaningful work. Up to four Mission Possible employees will work at the greenhouse to harvest and package freshly grown produce on site.

Alterrus’ vertical-farming technology produces the Local Garden crops hydroponically. The greenhouse is scheduled to produce up to 500 pounds of leafy green vegetables a day including leafy greens, lettuce, spinach and herbs. All produce is picked and packed onsite.

In the 6,000 square-foot Local Garden greenhouse, 4,000 square feet is dedicated as growing space while the remaining space is used for packaging. Produce is grown in trays stacked 12 high and circulating on conveyers to give plants even exposure to heat, light and humidity. The greenhouse produces significantly higher yields with less than 10 per cent of the water required for traditional field agriculture. Virtually all excess water is recycled.

The Local Garden vertical farm will operate year round. Its controlled growing environment shelters its produce from contamination and irregular weather patterns that are challenges for growers of traditional field produce.


I will do an article to bring you up to date on my experiments.

Offline Surly1

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Re: Hydroponics NOW!
« Reply #10 on: November 27, 2012, 02:38:49 PM »
Canada looking better and better all the time.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: Hydroponics NOW!
« Reply #11 on: November 27, 2012, 03:29:45 PM »
Was wondering how food grown in this manner is nutritionally better than food grown the regular way.

The part of less insecticide and chemicals makes sense because it is grown indoors, but was taught as a youngster that greens and vegetables received much of their nutrition from the rich farm soil which there seems to be very little of in the pictures. Does the sun alone provide this increase in nutritional value and is anything left out in the balance by growing with this method?

Offline peter

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Re: Hydroponics NOW!
« Reply #12 on: November 27, 2012, 04:14:56 PM »
Was wondering how food grown in this manner is nutritionally better than food grown the regular way.

The part of less insecticide and chemicals makes sense because it is grown indoors, but was taught as a youngster that greens and vegetables received much of their nutrition from the rich farm soil which there seems to be very little of in the pictures. Does the sun alone provide this increase in nutritional value and is anything left out in the balance by growing with this method?

The answer to that is complex and a very extended topic. Briefly....

The actual fiber of plants is almost exclusively composed of carbon attained from the air and water. Very precise tests have been done to discover how much of the body of soil actually goes into the body of the plant. The percentage amount is so small it is almost unmeasurable.

The nutrients in the soil are unusable by plants in their natural state. While growing in soil plants depend on microorganisms that  thrive around their roots to break these nutrients into their basic water soluble chemical components, commonly referred to as 'salts' that the plant can then absorbs along with the water from the soil.

Once the nutrients are broken down to this level they are identical to 'salts'  produced mechanically  rather than by microorganisms. There are many different salts involved at critical relationships to each other but as long as you get this balance correct soil is not needed in the growing process.

The other obvious need from soil of providing a platform to stabilize the plant can easily be  met by other methods.

Hydroponics uses fertilizers that are already in a soluble state so no soil or associated microorganisms are required. Hydroponic fertilizers do come in endless variants ranging from totally organic, which are made from teas of plants, to those made straight from rock salts. You have as broad a range of choices of nutrients available as when growing in soil.

Providing nutrients when growing in soil is a very inefficient, costly and destructive process because when you water soil only a tiny portion of the nutrient reaches the roots where it is needed, the vast majority leeches into the environment. The amount of nutrients required to grow hydroponically is minute compared to in soil, in the single digit percentages. IE... My system is capable of providing the majority of produce for myself, with substantial overage. I have enough nutrient salts to keep me going for between 10 and 20 years. The amount of nutrient involved is about 60lbs.

Hydroponic growing utilizes water in two ways, both of which are still far more efficient than growing in soil. For maximum performance some operations do not recycle their nutrient solutions. They are utilized only once by the plants. This still only takes a tiny portion of nutrients of soil growing. I use the other method where the solution is recycled for on average about 30 days. I have real-time sensors in my 40 gallon reservoir that show me the PH and the EC (electrical conductivity) of the solution. This gives me a good indicator, but not totally accurate idea of the state of the solution. EC level depends on the quantity of total salts in the solution but does not tell you which salts are there which is also critical. I watch plants very carefully for symptoms of imbalances. Commercial growers use many labratory test.

I have found that during the 30 day cycle of nutrient solution use I often need to add water, up to 3 or 4 gallons a day, at full production but the EC normally doesn't need to be topped up because the plants take up more water than nutrient. I use roughly 60 gallons a month of water to grow with. That amount of water can easily be attained even if it needs to be carried by hand in buckets. Try that with an outdoor soil based garden.

A number of people grow hydroponically outdoors in desert climates because it is so water efficient. Their main problem is providing some shade from the sun.

Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2) is very valuable in hydroponics (a 35% solution rather than 2% for home use). It is basically water with an extra oxygen molecule. It cannot be used in soil growing because it's ability to oxidize  organic material is destructive to the microorganism around the roots in soil which are not needed in hydroponics. H2O2 helps keep algae and molds under control and the plants also like the extra O molecules.

Propaganda about CO2 being destructive to the planet and causing global warming aside, plants love higher levels of CO2 and take it out of the air to enhance their own growth. Many hydroponic growers keep elevated levels of CO2 in their grow areas. With the insane level of destruction of plant life on earth today, reducing the level of CO2 worldwide will only make matters worse not better.

I have started work on a post with lots of photos and details about the hydroponic system I put together for myself so will stop here.     
« Last Edit: November 27, 2012, 04:27:51 PM by peter »

Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: Hydroponics NOW!
« Reply #13 on: November 27, 2012, 05:42:50 PM »
Hope this does not seem offensive to the Heavy Doomers, but a Lite Doomer like myself could not resist investigating Alterrus Systems for an investment opportunity.  Sure enough they have a bulletin board listing symbol ASIUF, stock is trading for 9 cts a share and I have an order in to buy already.

What the Diner has done for me in six short months, directing capital from gold mining ventures to Hydroponics!
RE always said I was a tough case but could be saved.  :laugh:

For anyone else interested.
finance.yahoo.com/news/alterrus-systems-inc-responds-public-143000672.html  :icon_study:

VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA--(Marketwire - Nov. 23, 2012) - It has come to the attention of Alterrus Systems Inc. (CNSX:ASI)(ASIUF) that inaccurate comments about the company's financial position have been made public.

The company wishes to set the record straight.

Alterrus has just completed the first vertical, urban greenhouse in North America that uses its proprietary VertiCrop technology. Local Garden Vancouver Inc. - a wholly owned subsidiary of Alterrus - has developed and is operating this facility located on top of an underused, city-owned parking garage in downtown Vancouver.

This is the first of what Alterrus believes will be many commercial Local Garden installations.

Alterrus has invested extensively in research and development in the creation of its unique, proprietary system. The 6,000-square-foot greenhouse produces leafy greens and herbs under the Local Garden brand for distribution to some of Vancouver's leading food retailers and restaurants.

Contrary to public comments suggesting otherwise, Local Garden Vancouver Inc. is fully financed with private-sector funding and has successfully secured sales commitments for all of its produce.

In building on an underused parkade roof, Local Garden has already created over $500,000 in local construction activity and five to seven permanent jobs on what was previously an empty slab of concrete. Local Garden Vancouver Inc.'s lease generates secure, multi-year revenue for the City of Vancouver to the benefit of all of its taxpayers.

Local Garden Vancouver Inc. is a business with a mandate to supply Vancouver with healthy, locally-grown produce while creating jobs, generating further economic activity and providing shareholder value. 

finance.yahoo.com/news/alterrus-systems-inc-responds-public-143000672.html

Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: Hydroponics NOW!: Video: Vancouver firm opens Rooftop Greenhouse
« Reply #14 on: November 27, 2012, 06:37:50 PM »
Great views, brings up the fact that lettuce transported from California loses HALF it's nutrition in 96 hours !

Could not figure out how to embed so link provided.
www.vancouversun.com/life/Video+Vancouver+firm+opens+rooftop+greenhouse/7585223/story.html     :icon_study:

 

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