AuthorTopic: Whole Lotta Shakin' Going On-Global Quakes  (Read 66838 times)

Offline azozeo

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Re: Alaska Earthquake: RE goes on the offensive - UPDATE
« Reply #420 on: December 03, 2018, 05:21:07 PM »
OK, I have sent Faxes and Emails to both the Frontiersman & Sen. Murkowski.

Most of the residents here are poor low income people who couldn't prep the way I do even if they could see what is coming down the pipe.  They live paycheck to paycheck and just have trouble paying the rent most of the time, much less go shopping at Wally World for years to prep up for such a disaster.

I need to step up to the Plate for them, I have to Practice what I Preach here now.  I am going full RE on this one, I am going to make these people get to fucking work one way or the other.  The management company is completely negligent, unlawful, and besides that are stonewalling on phone calls or meetings.  We need MUSCLE and PUBLICITY!  I will get it.  One way, or the other.

I will report back later in the day if/when I get some responses from media and politicos.

RE

I met with a reporter from the Frontiersman earlier this afternoon.  He is compiling stories for an article which should come out in the next couple of days.

I did not hear back from Se. Murkowski's office, but I got 2 visits from maintenance today, one where they turned the water back on, the second where they turned it off again.  "Magically" also, they are supposed to be bringing in Porta-Potties tonight, and also supposedly someone from Corporate will be flying up tomorrow to assess the situation.  This should have happened on Friday.

The Squeaky Wheel gets the Grease.  :icon_sunny:

RE


What front man did u use ?

A - Trotsky

B - Churchill

C - Robert Plant 
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline RE

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⛰️ 1800 Aftershocks since the Big One
« Reply #421 on: December 04, 2018, 12:43:04 AM »
It' like living on a Vibrator.  ::)

RE

https://www.adn.com/alaska-news/2018/12/03/nearly-1400-aftershocks-have-been-measured-since-fridays-70-earthquake-in-alaska/

Some 1,800 aftershocks have been measured since Friday’s 7.0 earthquake in Alaska

    pencil Author: Matt Tunseth
    clock Updated: 2 hours ago calendar Published 1 day ago


Earthquakes associated with Friday's 7.0 earthquake north of Anchorage as of 5:45 p.m. Sunday. The red dots represent shakes in the previous 24 hours, and the yellow dots are from the past week (with virtually all of them since Friday. The large dot directly north of the city was Friday's quake) Map from Alaska Earthquake Center.

Earthquakes associated with Friday's 7.0 earthquake north of Anchorage as of 5:45 p.m. Sunday. The red dots represent shakes in the previous 24 hours, and the yellow dots are from the past week (with virtually all of them since Friday. The large dot directly north of the city was Friday's quake) Map from Alaska Earthquake Center.

Update, 6 p.m. Monday:

Small aftershocks continued Monday from Friday’s 7.0 earthquake, with more than 1,800 measured by early evening. A total of 153 measured greater than 3.0, 18 were at 4.0 or greater and five were greater than 5.0, according to the Alaska Earthquake Center.


Update, 6:30 a.m. Monday:

Dozens of small earthquakes rattled Anchorage and Mat-Su on Sunday night and early Monday -- and a few bigger ones probably caused unwanted wake-ups.

Twin magnitude 3.5 shakers struck at 9:51 and 9:52 p.m. Sunday, the first 10 miles north of Anchorage and the second 18 miles northwest of Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, according to the U.S. Geological Survey Earthquake Science Center.

A magnitude 3.4 quake was measured 10 miles northwest of Anchorage at 10:40 p.m. A 3.5 hit at 1:30 a.m., 17 miles northwest of JBER, followed by a magnitude 3.8 just before 3:20 a.m. 13 miles northwest of JBER. Twin 3.2 quakes followed just before 6 a.m., one near Anchorage and the other near Wasilla.

Original Sunday story:

Aftershocks from Friday’s magnitude 7.0 quake will continue to diminish over time, but that doesn’t mean the shaking will stop right away.

“You can expect earthquakes in magnitude 5 or 4 to continue for the next couple of weeks, and as time goes on it tapers off,” said Rafael Abreu, a geophysicist with the U.S. Geological Survey Earthquake Science Center. (Track the latest aftershocks here.)

As of Sunday evening, there had been nearly 1,400 recorded aftershocks of any magnitude; 593 of magnitude 2.0 or greater; 17 that registered at least 4.0; and five that were at least 5.0. All the aftershocks have been clustered around the epicenter across Knik Arm from Anchorage.

[Why the 7.0 earthquake was felt differently across Anchorage — and why it has potential for more big aftershocks]

Abreu said models show the frequency, and strength, of the quakes should go down over time.

Although devastating, large earthquakes give scientists a wealth of data to help study and better model future earthquakes.

“It gives us a better understanding of what is happening from a geologic point of view,” he said.

While Friday’s quake was a big one, Abreu said it wasn’t unusual in that Southcentral Alaska is one of the world’s most seismically active areas.

“We’re definitely not surprised to see an event of this magnitude happen in this area,” he said.

[Support local journalism in Alaska. Subscribe to the Anchorage Daily News / adn.com]
« Last Edit: December 04, 2018, 01:38:46 AM by RE »
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Offline RE

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⛰️ Quake-shaken Jewel Lake homes sink into sand
« Reply #422 on: December 05, 2018, 06:25:27 AM »
https://www.ktva.com/story/39581859/built-on-sand-some-south-anchorage-homes-sink-into-the-ground

Quake-shaken Jewel Lake homes sink into sand
Tuesday, December 4th 2018, 11:53 AM AKST
Updated: Tuesday, December 4th 2018, 4:36 PM AKST
By: John Thain


A cluster of at least 10 homes in the Jewel Lake neighborhood are all dealing with the same serious problem: Friday's 7.0 earthquake appears to have liquefied the sandy ground they were built on.

Foundations are sitting crooked, some with broken concrete and earth around them. One neighbor had to build a ramp to get his car out of the garage because the driveway sank so much. In serious cases, like Yana Rekoum's, the house has pinched off the plumbing, prompting the muni to declare her home unsafe to live in. She's planning on staying with friends.
Dean Cannon Inspects crawlspace
Dean Cannon Inspects crawlspace John Thain

"It's going to cost a lot of money and people don't have that kind of money just lying around," said resident Dean Cannon, as he inspected the crawlspace under his home.

The sandy ground is broken apart and some of the supporting beams are crooked. Pipes that used to be 6 inches off the ground now rest on the sand.

The cost to repair a damaged foundation can easily reach $50,000 and, like many Alaskans, the Cannons don't have earthquake insurance. Neighbors are looking to each for information on any financial aid that might be available, but nothing is certain.
Dean Cannon's house foundation
Dean Cannon's house foundation John Thain

Still, Cannon isn't completely discouraged.

"We are lucky we picked such a great place to live because everybody has each other's back," he said.

Cannon says neighbors helped his wife get out of the cold and in touch with him when the earthquake hit.

"You just can't buy that kind of stuff," Cannon said.
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Offline RE

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⛰️ Quake Update: Aftershocks
« Reply #423 on: December 06, 2018, 01:49:26 PM »
We just had a series of 3 aftershocks within a few minutes of each other.  The middle one was big enough to get me out of my chair but it didn't last long enough for me to head for the back door again.  I'm guessing the middle one was in the mid 5s.

This is getting old fast.

RE
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Offline RE

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⛰️ When do tremors stop being aftershocks and start being new earthquakes?
« Reply #424 on: December 08, 2018, 12:49:22 AM »



Science
When do tremors stop being aftershocks and start being new earthquakes?

    pencil Author: Madeline McGee
    clock Updated: 18 hours ago calendar Published 1 day ago


Aftershocks recorded after the Nov. 30, 2018 earthquake. (Screengrab from Alaska Earthquake Center website)

Most of the thousands of aftershocks that continue to rattle Anchorage and Mat-Su after Friday morning’s magnitude 7.0 earthquake have been too small to feel. Others have sent rocks cascading onto parts of the Seward Highway. Some shook residents awake, like the 4.7 aftershock that struck 9 miles northwest of Anchorage around 3:49 a.m. Wednesday. Other jolted people in the middle of the day, like the 4.8 aftershock at 12:45 p.m. Thursday (followed by another, measuring 4.7, a minute later).

And some came back-to-back, like the two aftershocks around 12:45 p.m. Thursday that jolted Southcentral Alaska with preliminary magnitudes of 4.8 and 4.1.

These lingering tremors have become an annoyance for many residents. As of 2:30 p.m. Thursday, 2,888 aftershocks had been recorded, of which 185 measured at least 3.0, 23 were at 4.0 or greater and five measured at least 5.0, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

That’s left some people wondering: Are the shakes that continue to jolt us several days after the initial earthquake truly aftershocks anymore — or are they brand-new earthquakes?

Natalia Ruppert of the Alaska Earthquake Center, based at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, says they are indeed aftershocks.

[Why the 7.0 earthquake was felt differently across Anchorage]

Earthquakes come in clusters, and seismologists refer to the largest one in a sequence as the “mainshock." The earthquakes that occur in the aftermath of a mainshock continue to be called “aftershocks” until the seismic activity in the region returns back to the level it was at before the mainshock, Ruppert said.

“For an earthquake of this size, we expect the aftershocks to continue for a few months," Ruppert said. "The rate of the aftershocks, however, will be going down with time.”


Compared to the magnitude 9.2 Good Friday earthquake that devastated Anchorage in 1964, this is a fairly tame prediction. Aftershocks continued for more than a year after that quake, according to the Alaska Earthquake Center, and in the first day alone, 11 aftershocks registered a magnitude of 6.0 or greater.

Aftershock updates as of 2:30 p.m. Thursday:

5+: 5

4+: 23

3+: 185

2+: 983

1+: 1,692

Total: 2,888
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Offline RE

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Re: ⛰️ Quake Update: Aftershocks
« Reply #425 on: December 08, 2018, 09:16:21 AM »
Another nice one at 7:36 AM this morning.  4.1.

Looks like the fault rupture is under Big Lake.



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Offline Eddie

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Re: Whole Lotta Shakin' Going On-Global Quakes
« Reply #426 on: December 08, 2018, 09:37:10 AM »
Quick, go move the plane before it gets sucked under the earth's crust forever.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

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Alaska Quake Diary: Page 2
« Reply #427 on: December 09, 2018, 04:57:29 AM »


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Published on the Doomstead Diner on December 9, 2018






Discuss this article at the Geological & Cosmological Events Table inside the Diner



 



Image result for alaska railroad repair earthquakeI am taking this week off from Ranting to do an Update on the Earthquake situation up here in Alaska.  It's been a full week since the Earthquake hit, and mostly it is good news as far as repair work is concerned.



I personally have all my services back, electricity, heat, water and flushing toilets.  My unit sustained no major visible damage, although some of them did with cracked foundations, boilers ripped off the walls and so forth.  Management was rather slow in responding, but they appear to be on the job now.  Perhaps this will get them to fix some other long standing issues which predate the quake as well.



On the road and rail infrastructure front, the Alaska Railroad which carries both passengers as well as freight & coal between Seward, Anchorage and Fairbanks is back up and running after about 4 days, the track was busted up just north of where I live.  Minnesota Drive which connects Anchorage and Ted Stevens has been partially repaired and travel to and from the airport is now possible.  2 way traffic has been restored on the Glenn Highway connecting the Valley to Anchorage, although it is single lane in some sections.



What I am going to cover today is your heating issues when faced with both loss of electricity and loss of your NG supply, but before I get to that I want to answer a couple of questions posed to me both on the Diner Blog and on our Global Collapse Reddit site.  First a personal issue question:



Image result for handicap commode Q:  What do you do about Toilet & Bathing?



A:  This is not a huge problem.  For urination, I just urinate in the toilet as usual, just without flushing.  When the water gets restored, I flush it all at once.  For the poop issue, I have a "cripple commode" which uses a lined bucket system.  After the call of nature is complete, I pull out the liner and go deposit it in the dumpster, just as you would after pooper-scooping up the doggie-doo when Fido does his bizness.  You don't really need the whole commode arrangement though, just a bucket and a camping toilet seat for it will do.  It's easier to get on and off the commode though.  Far as bathing is concerned, it's Sponge Bath time until the water is restored, no showers.  I did this fairly often in my trucking years when marooned in locations without showers to buy.  As long as you have some water on hand (which you should if well prepped), you just fill a small bowl with water and use a sponge to wipe yourself down if you are getting too smelly.  Really though, for a short duration outage, you can just go without unless you have a real halitosis problem.  I also have packages of premoistened and medicated towelettes that are used for giving sponge baths to cripples who can't get out of bed.  These are also a handy prep to have around.



Q:  Can you really call it a "disaster" if nobody died and BAU is up and running again after a few days?



A:  Well, it's certainly not a disaster on the scale of say the Indonesian Tsunami which sent 100s of 1000s to the Great Beyond on a loss of life scale.  Also not nearly the disaster Katrina or Sandy were on the monetary scale, both disasters well into the 10s of Billions of dollars.  It is still a disaster though, particularly for many homeowners who don't carry Earthquake insurance, which is rather expensive for what is generally a very infrequent event in any given location.  If your foundation cracks and your home is deemed unsafe by the building inspectors, this can cost $50,000 and more to fix up.  Sometimes it's just cheaper to bulldoze the McMansion and build a new one.  Which if you are still paying a mortgage on the old one can be tough to afford to finance.  The many smaller problems with plumbing also add up and can be tough for individuals to afford to repair.



Then you have the damage done to the general community infrastructure of roads and gas, electric and water lines.  This costs the government a lot of money to fix up, and where does that money come from?  Generally disaster loans issued by FEMA, which adds to the debt carried by your community which then in theory gets paid by taxes, but many communities are already at or above their carrying capacity for debt service, while still paying for teachers, cops, firemen and sanitation workers.  Thus you end up with municipal bankruptcies piling up.



The issue is these things add up, they are part of the maintenance cost of maintaining the Industrial Civilization.  It ends up being a "Death by a Thousand Cuts", rather than one individual disaster bringing on the end, although one really "BIG ONE" could be the straw that breaks the Camel's Back and sends the whole thing into a tailspin.  A big one hitting Seattle for instance on the scale of the one that hit Anchorage in 1964 at 9.0 could do that, taking out such financial engines as Amazon and Microsoft, and numerous other smaller companies in Silicon Valley.  At some point we won't be able to keep up with this, and thus the Industrial Civilization will collapse in entirety with time, even if it doesn't happen everywhere at the same time or overnight.



Now, onto the main topic for today, which is having an Emergency Heating Plan for your domicile, particularly important if you live in high latitude and/or altitude locations in the winter.  It can be important in spring, summer & fall also, especially at night when the sun goes down.



Image result for wood burning stove Probably the best emergency heat plan is to have a Wood Burning Stove and a good supply of wood at the ready in case your regular heat source is out, but these are rather expensive to put in just for emergencies.  Off-grid Doomsteaders do use them as a primary souce of heat of course, but they have saved the money normally put toward a more standard NG or Diesel boiler arrangement and put it toward that instead.  You also can't install a wood heater in most rental units even if you had the money to do it, which most renters do not have.



So you need to use more portable forms of heat generation which come cheaper than that for emergencies.  I mentioned in the first article I am a Candle Freak and used Tea Light Candles as a heat source while my electricity was off too.  A Tea Light puts out about 100 BTU/hr, whereas a typical 1500W Oil filled space heater puts out around 5000 BTU/hr.  So to actually match that output, you would need to be burning 50 candles, which actually isn't as outrageous as it sounds and can be done with relative safety utilizing the Tuna Can method illustrated in the header photo.  3 Tuna Cans in the 4 corners of the room will do the trick.



However, depending how well insulated your room is, what its size is and how long the outage goes for matters a lot here, and you probably don't need that many to maintain the internal temperature at a livable level.  One thing to remember when burning any open flames indoors is to make sure the room is well ventilated and to run a Carbon Monoxide detector to see if there is any buildup going on.  CO can be quite deadly of course.



Cost as I mentioned runs about $.07/tea light, and they last about 4 hours.  However, you can bring the cost down from there and have longer lasting heat if you DIY your own Votive Candles, which are the size of a Shot Glass, and in fact often are sold in shot glasses which you get as a Bonus after you finish burning the candle. 🙂



A Votive size candle will burn for around 12 hours, and you can buy a new pack of 6 of them ON SALE for $5, so about $.85/candle.  That is a good deal more expensive than the 3 Tea Lights it replaces over the 12 hours, which costs you $.21.  However, that is just the new version.  The trick to getting the cost down with these is to refill them and make a new candle.  How do you do that?  It's quite EZ, does not take much in the way of apparatus and I am constantly making new candles while I sit at the computer and keyboard out the Doom.  Illustrated below is my Candle Making setup I use by the computer.






Basic Candle Making Apparatus



All it takes is some kind of stand to be melting your wax, animal fat (tallow) or vegetable shortening like Crisco, and then wicking material which you can either make by waxing twine or just buy rolls of it already pre-waxed.  It's not expensive to buy it pre-made,and I keep a couple of 200' rolls on hand which will last until after I am pushing up daisies.  For the stand, I use a metal toothbrush holder, purchased at Walmart new for $5.  If you find one at a yard sale, you could probably pick it up for $.50.  Or you could use a portable Sterno Folding Camping stove instead, although the toothbrush holder looks nicer and fits on my desk better.



Image result for pouring off bacon fat The cost for each Candle when you DIY varies tremendously, from Zero to maybe $.50 depending on the combustible material you use to make the candle.  If you use commercially available paraffin and beeswax to make a real "professional" pretty looking candle with a colored dye and a scent added, you will pay top dollar for this.  This stuff is sold in small quantities mainly to candle making hobbyists, and they charge a premium price for it.  It's cheaper just to melt down Tea Lights and then use that wax to rebuild a votive candle.  Then it costs the same as the Tea Lights, $.21.  But you can get quite a bit cheaper than this also.



What I do is save animal fat like Bacon Fat  from cooking in a coffee can by the stove, and use that as one of my ingredients in the candle.  It comes to me basically for free, since I paid for the bacon I ate, not the fat which otherwise would have been thrown out.  Then I save the leftover paraffin from burning tea lights, which there always is at the bottom of the teal light holder and add that to the mix. Finally, I'll add a scoop or two of Crisco Vegetable shortening.  This mixture is quite stiff and won't spill, so you can keep the candle stored this way until you need it.  I usually fill it this way about 3/4s full, and then when I am ready to burn it, I top it off with some cheap Wesson Vegetable Oil to burn in there as well.  Done this way, you bring your cost down to about $.10/votive candle, or about $.033/tea light equivalent.  At right you see a Votive candle topped off with vegetable oil. If you have some source to get all scrap oil such as cooking oil from a fast food joint or motor oil from changing out you car oil, you can get it down to nothing.  Same if you slaughter your own pigs or nail a bear during hunting season, you can render all the excess fat trimmings for tallow.  One pig will make a shit load of candles, lord only knows how many.



The same setup you use for candle making is useful for other tasks as well in normal times.  You can use it as a warmer to keep your coffee piping hot, or even heat up a can of soup with it, though that takes a while, about 30 minutes for a can of Chunky Soup.  I use it as a room Humidifier in the winter, keeping my stainless steel camping mug filled with water and steaming over the set up all day.  Winter air is very dry and this helps keep your lips from chapping and nasal passages from drying up, which can lead to getting more colds in the winter.






Candle Room Humidifier



If your candles aren't doing the job of keeping your domicile warm enough through the emergency, you can add more powerful heat generators like Oil Lanterns which have larger wicks and put out about 3X as much heat as a candle. Many of these are quite decorative and a decent source of light as well, so you can use them in normal times to give a nice warm light effect to the room and save on electricity.  For some real PUNCH though in the world of portable heat, go to Sterno cooking fuel.  Sterno burns HOT,  A can of Sterno puts out about 2500 BTU/hour, so only 2 of them burning will be equivalent to a 1500W electric space heater.  A 16 oz can of Sterno will last about 4 hours burning continuously.  It's relatively expensive though, but it does substitute for 25 Tea Lights, which would cost you $1.75 anyhow.  So not too much difference there.  It's also a lot more convenient to light one can of Sterno than 25 Tea Lights.



Image result for sterno



Mr. Heater  Buddy  225 sq. ft. Portable Heater  Propane Related image Finally, there are both Kerosene and Propane indoor-safe heaters that put out 20,000 BTU and more available.  The "Mr.Buddy" heaters are quite popular and widely sold, utilizing camping propane cannisters as fuel.  This is pretty expensive emergency heating though by the can, the kerosene comes in much cheaper than that.  These units all have automatic shut offs if they tip over, and some have built in CO detectors as well.  In any case ALWAYS BURN IN A WELL VENTILATED SPACE AND RUN A CO DETECTOR when you do any burning at all indoors.  Also be aware that fire department regulations often prohibit the use of such devices inside your domicile, although in an emergency situations such regulations are generally overlooked.  I can't really see a need for so much emergency heat though, for the size room I was working with during this exercise (25'x35'), 5000 BTU was enough with the exterior Temperature around 25F (-4C) to keep the room at 67F, so about a 40F gradient there.  Remember also you can substantially lower the room comfort temperature by self-insulating, aka putting on layers of warm clothing.  That should always be your first step in your emergency heating plan.  A good Sleeping Bag will also reduce the need for keeping the temperature this high when you are asleep.



OK Diners, that's it for the Doomsday Preparation Diary for today.  Stay Warm and Stay Safe, and BE PREPARED.  Collapse is coming soon to a theater near you.



Image result for coming soon to a theater near you


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Offline jdwheeler42

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A: When they are bigger than the original earthquake.
Making pigs fly is easy... that is, of course, after you have built the catapult....

Offline RE

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Re: ⛰️ Quake Update: Aftershocks
« Reply #429 on: December 09, 2018, 11:04:15 AM »
Another big one, 2minutes ago.  Short lived though.  I'll update when I have numbers.

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Re: ⛰️ Quake Update: Aftershocks
« Reply #430 on: December 09, 2018, 11:11:24 AM »
Another big one, 2minutes ago.  Short lived though.  I'll update when I have numbers.

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5.0, 12m North of Elmendorf.  That puts it about 20 miles south of me.

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Offline azozeo

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A: When they are bigger than the original earthquake.

If a person gets their ass kicked once & goes back for more, it's another ass kickin' not an afterthought/shock.

Johnny Quest, glad your still vertical  :icon_sunny:

I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline RE

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⛰️ Anchorage family facing foreclose after earthquake causes major damage
« Reply #432 on: December 10, 2018, 12:24:39 AM »
https://www.ktva.com/story/39609364/anchorage-family-facing-foreclose-on-home-after-earthquake-causes-major-damage

News
Anchorage family facing foreclose on home after earthquake causes major damage
Friday, December 7th 2018, 11:40 PM AKST
Updated: Saturday, December 8th 2018, 9:24 AM AKST
By: Cassie Schirm


Hundreds of homes in Southcentral were damaged by the Nov. 30 earthquake, according to the Federal Emergency Management Agency. The toll of the destruction is rising as inspectors make their way around the region.

Homeowners picking up the pieces left in the quake's wake are finding high costs and low hopes for help funding repairs. 

Keith and Monica Anderson say they're worried about their earthquake-damaged house in Sand Lake, a home that's sinking into the ground. The more it sinks, the deeper their financial hole goes. With each aftershock, the Andersons say their home is slowly slipping away.

"It's just getting bigger and bigger," Monica said.

The Andersons were in Seattle when the quake hit and saw their house for the first time Monday.

"We both just instantly teared up. I tear up just thinking about it," Keith said.

With no earthquake insurance, the Andersons are left with more questions than answers.

"I'm trying to stay strong and stay strong for [my family], but nobody prepares for this and there's nothing we can do," Keith said. "It's horrible."

The Andersons' home has cracks in its foundation, doors that are stuck and a large crack surrounding it. Keith said the house shifted and split, meaning it will take a lot of time and money to repair.

 

 

The home is empty now because they no longer live there. It was set to sell the week after the quake and the buyer has pulled out of the deal.

"We were supposed to sign the papers and be gone," Keith said. "We were supposed to make a little money and now we're looking $200,000 to $250,000 the opposite way. Two mortgages later, financially you know, we are stuck big time."

Even if they spent the money to repair it, the Andersons know the house still won't sell.

"Would you want to buy a house that can't handle an earthquake with your kids in it?" Keith asked. "I don't want to put my kids back in here."

After living in the house for seven years, the Andersons are left in financial turmoil. Keith and Monica say they will most likely have to file for bankruptcy and foreclose on their foregone home.

Theirs is not the only story of a house left in ruin, nor is it the only story of Alaskans standing strong. The Andersons thank their friends, softball community AK Krush and family who have supported them. A  GoFundMe page has been set up to help the family.

The couple is waiting to find out what assistance their bank along with state and federal disaster relief can offer before deciding where to go from here.

Questions remain over what government help is available. State and FEMA officials told the Anchorage Assembly this week residents whose homes sustained damage could apply for state individual assistance programs and those eligible for could receive up to $17,450. Federal assistance programs could provide up to $34,900, but state and federal awards cannot be combined.

FEMA regional administer Michael O’Hare says it's too early to say whether Alaskans will be eligible for federal help under the individual assistance program. The agency has yet to receive a major declaration disaster request from the state.

Homeowners with damage can file for assistance at ready.alaska.gov.
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Offline RE

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Re: Alaska Quake Diary: Page 2
« Reply #433 on: December 10, 2018, 02:13:53 AM »
Now UP on Global Economic Intersection!

http://econintersect.com/pages/opinion/opinion.php?post=201812092214

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SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

 

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