AuthorTopic: 19th Century Compressed Air Vehicles Gone & Forgotton  (Read 421 times)

Offline azozeo

  • Sous Chef
  • ****
  • Posts: 6846
    • View Profile
19th Century Compressed Air Vehicles Gone & Forgotton
« on: June 12, 2018, 12:36:20 PM »
https://www.stolenhistory.org/threads/19th-century-compressed-air-cars-and-street-cars-gone-and-forgotten.96/


For me it all started with this hard to explain streetcar setup, where a streetcar was being pulled by a horse. This is one of those instances where an official explanation was running into a sharp contradiction with common sense. I was always wondering why people would go through the hurdles of developing, producing and installing a whole rail system to just use it in a horsecar combination. This of course, had to include the development, and production of the actual car. Just like I mentioned, the rig became known as a horsecar.

Wikipedia contains its own explanation of this horsecar occurrence, “The horse-drawn tram (horsecar) was an early form of public rail transport that developed out of industrial haulage routes that had long been in existence, and from the omnibus routes that first ran on public streets in the 1820s, using the newly improved iron or steel rail or tramway.”

The above sort of gibberish language and bogus explanation could never sit well with me. Common sense was suggesting that a normal person would never go the length required to produce the entire rail system to just pull cars with horses. Indeed, none of us would think that the below provided setups were intended to be used as presented.

click on link for the rest....
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline Eddie

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 15809
    • View Profile
Re: 19th Century Compressed Air Vehicles Gone & Forgotton
« Reply #1 on: June 12, 2018, 01:05:18 PM »
https://www.stolenhistory.org/threads/19th-century-compressed-air-cars-and-street-cars-gone-and-forgotten.96/


For me it all started with this hard to explain streetcar setup, where a streetcar was being pulled by a horse. This is one of those instances where an official explanation was running into a sharp contradiction with common sense. I was always wondering why people would go through the hurdles of developing, producing and installing a whole rail system to just use it in a horsecar combination. This of course, had to include the development, and production of the actual car. Just like I mentioned, the rig became known as a horsecar.

Wikipedia contains its own explanation of this horsecar occurrence, “The horse-drawn tram (horsecar) was an early form of public rail transport that developed out of industrial haulage routes that had long been in existence, and from the omnibus routes that first ran on public streets in the 1820s, using the newly improved iron or steel rail or tramway.”

The above sort of gibberish language and bogus explanation could never sit well with me. Common sense was suggesting that a normal person would never go the length required to produce the entire rail system to just pull cars with horses. Indeed, none of us would think that the below provided setups were intended to be used as presented.

click on link for the rest....

The Amish power their machine shops and ceiling fans with compressed air. It's a way to harness wind power, for them.

I've never been sure why it's okay with God to use compressed air but not electricity. Maybe because its a  DIY tech that doesn't require an "outside" power grid, so they aren't tied to BAU, which seems to be a big deal for the Amish.

The ceiling fans are available for sale online , but they are not cheap.
« Last Edit: June 12, 2018, 01:13:24 PM by Eddie »
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Online RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 33726
    • View Profile
Re: 19th Century Compressed Air Vehicles Gone & Forgotton
« Reply #2 on: June 12, 2018, 01:32:24 PM »

I've never been sure why it's okay with God to use compressed air but not electricity. Maybe because its a  DIY tech that doesn't require an "outside" power grid, so they aren't tied to BAU, which seems to be a big deal for the Amish.

Perhaps they look at it as just moving the wind from one place to another mechanically.  There is no transformation of energy types, and also no use of chemistry to store electricity in batteries.

RE
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline Surly1

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 14110
    • View Profile
    • Doomstead Diner
Re: 19th Century Compressed Air Vehicles Gone & Forgotton
« Reply #3 on: June 12, 2018, 01:35:10 PM »
https://www.stolenhistory.org/threads/19th-century-compressed-air-cars-and-street-cars-gone-and-forgotten.96/


For me it all started with this hard to explain streetcar setup, where a streetcar was being pulled by a horse. This is one of those instances where an official explanation was running into a sharp contradiction with common sense. I was always wondering why people would go through the hurdles of developing, producing and installing a whole rail system to just use it in a horsecar combination. This of course, had to include the development, and production of the actual car. Just like I mentioned, the rig became known as a horsecar.

Wikipedia contains its own explanation of this horsecar occurrence, “The horse-drawn tram (horsecar) was an early form of public rail transport that developed out of industrial haulage routes that had long been in existence, and from the omnibus routes that first ran on public streets in the 1820s, using the newly improved iron or steel rail or tramway.”

The above sort of gibberish language and bogus explanation could never sit well with me. Common sense was suggesting that a normal person would never go the length required to produce the entire rail system to just pull cars with horses. Indeed, none of us would think that the below provided setups were intended to be used as presented.

click on link for the rest....

Some interesting context--
http://americanhistory.oxfordre.com/view/10.1093/acrefore/9780199329175.001.0001/acrefore-9780199329175-e-28
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline azozeo

  • Sous Chef
  • ****
  • Posts: 6846
    • View Profile
Re: 19th Century Compressed Air Vehicles Gone & Forgotton
« Reply #4 on: June 12, 2018, 01:48:47 PM »
Those folks had it goin' on....

"It Got Took" From Us !
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline agelbert

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 11523
    • View Profile
    • Renewable Rervolution
Re: 19th Century Compressed Air Vehicles Gone & Forgotton
« Reply #5 on: June 12, 2018, 01:49:08 PM »
https://www.stolenhistory.org/threads/19th-century-compressed-air-cars-and-street-cars-gone-and-forgotten.96/

For me it all started with this hard to explain streetcar setup, where a streetcar was being pulled by a horse. This is one of those instances where an official explanation was running into a sharp contradiction with common sense. I was always wondering why people would go through the hurdles of developing, producing and installing a whole rail system to just use it in a horsecar combination. This of course, had to include the development, and production of the actual car. Just like I mentioned, the rig became known as a horsecar.

Wikipedia contains its own explanation of this horsecar occurrence, “The horse-drawn tram (horsecar) was an early form of public rail transport that developed out of industrial haulage routes that had long been in existence, and from the omnibus routes that first ran on public streets in the 1820s, using the newly improved iron or steel rail or tramway.”

The above sort of gibberish language and bogus explanation could never sit well with me. Common sense was suggesting that a normal person would never go the length required to produce the entire rail system to just pull cars with horses. Indeed, none of us would think that the below provided setups were intended to be used as presented.

click on link for the rest....

The Amish power their machine shops and ceiling fans with compressed air. It's a way to harness wind power, for them.

I've never been sure why it's okay with God to use compressed air but not electricity. Maybe because its a  DIY tech that doesn't require an "outside" power grid, so they aren't tied to BAU, which seems to be a big deal for the Amish.

The ceiling fans are available for sale online , but they are not cheap.


Actually, the Amish have no problem with using electricity, as long as they harvest it themselves. and don't connect with the "culture undermining" grid.  :icon_sunny:

Quote
19 Oct 2015

The Amish Are Going Solar? 

By Jenny Lou Bement | Green Energy
 
Have you seen solar panels on rooftops in Amish country? According to NPR, the Amish population in Ohio is steadily adding solar power technology to their homes. In fact, it reports that 80% of the Amish in Holmes County, Ohio, are embracing this renewable energy. Although a handful of families refuse to take advantage of solar electricity, even some of the more orthodox Amish are excited about the incorporation of solar power. At first glance, it seems strange but, believe it or not, it makes sense.

If there's a community that has held tight to its traditions, it's the Amish. With their own language, way of life and near-absolute separation from mainstream culture, or "English" as they call it, the Amish are famously known for their strong ability to live off the fruits of their labor rather than technology. In general, they live without cars, television or electricity but with advancements in energy generation, some of this is changing. Like many eco-conscious, tech-savvy folks across the world, the Amish are reaping the benefits of solar energy.

Why the Amish are embracing solar


One reason why solar is becoming increasingly popular among Amish communities is the fire risk of their traditional lighting methods such as kerosene lamps and candles – especially for the elderly and younger members of their communities. It also gives their communities the ability to have cheaper, cleaner electricity with the perk of remaining off the grid. In a nutshell, solar is a win-win for the Amish – they remain off the grid, preserving their culture while reaping the benefits of clean renewable energy when needed.

The Amish use electricity?

It's not that the Amish aren't allowed to use electricity, it's that they believe too much reliance on electricity or access to public power grids will tie them too closely to the rest of the world and hurt their well-preserved culture. It's not necessarily against their beliefs to have power. Before solar panels became readily available, the Amish used gasoline or diesel generators to produce their own electricity for a handful of luxuries – lighting and, in some cases, household appliances such as washing machines.

The Amish don't believe electricity is bad; they believe having ready access to it will create temptation that can lead to television and other electrical luxuries that could hurt their values. Their culture values hard work and while they may appreciate appliances and tools that can make their jobs easier, the general consensus in their community is if they have complete access to these technologies, it will compromise their children's work ethic and could lead to a tarnished version of their way of life over generations. With solar, there's less risk of diminished values and mainstream culture, just as with generators. The big difference is – it's better for the world and 100% renewable.

https://www.saveonenergy.com/green-energy/amish-going-solar/
Leges         Sine    Moribus      Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

Offline Eddie

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 15809
    • View Profile
Re: 19th Century Compressed Air Vehicles Gone & Forgotton
« Reply #6 on: June 12, 2018, 01:57:20 PM »
I understand their worry that electricity can lead to television. Definitely a bad outcome there, and I'm not being the least bit tongue-in-cheek.

I hope they don't let that happen. Solar PV is fairly new. I wondered if they would embrace it. They've been using compressed air for a long, long time, and no one else seems to use it.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline azozeo

  • Sous Chef
  • ****
  • Posts: 6846
    • View Profile
Re: 19th Century Compressed Air Vehicles Gone & Forgotton
« Reply #7 on: June 12, 2018, 02:16:18 PM »
That's the Amish' 1st mistake, leading with fear.
It's not the electricity's fault that leads to TV or whatever. And believe me, I am Pro Amish & they're style of piss-off da' goobermint.

My point in posting this thread is again, we had it all & it was taken from us, more so in the cities rather than rural America.
They're still the ability to live free from Uncle Cracker. At least out here. The north side of my county across the canyon lives
little house on the prairie-Esq. P-ups have taken the place of buck boards & building code changes is about the only change.
The land has been owned since it's original
offering back in the 1800's by the same Mormons.

They're isn't much area left in this land to live such a lifestyle. Going the way of the buggy whip.   
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline agelbert

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 11523
    • View Profile
    • Renewable Rervolution
Re: 19th Century Compressed Air Vehicles Gone & Forgotton
« Reply #8 on: June 12, 2018, 02:16:49 PM »
I understand their worry that electricity can lead to television. Definitely a bad outcome there, and I'm not being the least bit tongue-in-cheek.

I hope they don't let that happen. Solar PV is fairly new. I wondered if they would embrace it. They've been using compressed air for a long, long time, and no one else seems to use it.


The French came up with a compressed air (very small) car about a decade ago.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/uRpxhlX4Ga0" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/uRpxhlX4Ga0</a>
A car that runs on air 515,130 views  mrgoding  Published on Apr 22, 2008

They claimed it would be cheap and easy to fuel renewably with electric compressors powered by renewable energy sourced (PV and/or wind) electricity.

Tata motors is licensed to build it, but apparently they haven't decided to build it.

Also, don't forget that every mechanic out there, who has a shop and changes tires routinely, uses compressed air powered tools.

Compressed air power has its niche in civilization. I don't think it will ever go away, simply because it is so cheap to store energy in the form of compressed air for immediate, on demand use, even if compressed air cars never become part of the transportation picture.
« Last Edit: June 12, 2018, 02:22:25 PM by agelbert »
Leges         Sine    Moribus      Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

Offline Eddie

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 15809
    • View Profile
Re: 19th Century Compressed Air Vehicles Gone & Forgotton
« Reply #9 on: June 12, 2018, 02:28:52 PM »
Interesting.

I have a big compressor, but my wife made me take it out of the garage because it was really noisy. It's in storage. I have a few air tools, from the days when I thought I wanted to learn to paint cars. More recently, all the power tool makers have come out with alternatives to air tools. I have an electric impact wrench, for instance. When I was young there were no electric impact wrenches, or at least I never saw one.

The high speed air turbine is still my default dental drill (handpiece, we call it), but they have good electrics on that too now, which some people prefer.

The Amish use windmills to compress air, which is kinda cool.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline agelbert

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 11523
    • View Profile
    • Renewable Rervolution
Re: 19th Century Compressed Air Vehicles Gone & Forgotton
« Reply #10 on: June 12, 2018, 02:52:24 PM »
Interesting.

I have a big compressor, but my wife made me take it out of the garage because it was really noisy. It's in storage. I have a few air tools, from the days when I thought I wanted to learn to paint cars. More recently, all the power tool makers have come out with alternatives to air tools. I have an electric impact wrench, for instance. When I was young there were no electric impact wrenches, or at least I never saw one.

The high speed air turbine is still my default dental drill (handpiece, we call it), but they have good electrics on that too now, which some people prefer.

The Amish use windmills to compress air, which is kinda cool.


Agreed. 

And that sound of that high speed dental drill is something no person who has ever been to the dentist can ever forget!  ;D

I've often wondered why compressors are so noisy. Sure, the physics involves all the vibration frequencies that are blasted in every direction from air that don't wanna be compressed, so to speak, but there is a sneaky way to get around that. I know they use that with mufflers. As you know, if you can get two sound wave frequencies to interlace a certain way, they cancel each other out. If they can do it with car mufflers, why not with compressors? If you put your thinking cap on, I'll bet you can make your noisy compressor purr like a kitty so your wife won't ban you from using it. 
Leges         Sine    Moribus      Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

Offline agelbert

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 11523
    • View Profile
    • Renewable Rervolution
Re: 19th Century Compressed Air Vehicles Gone & Forgotton
« Reply #11 on: June 12, 2018, 03:10:23 PM »
Interesting.

I have a big compressor, but my wife made me take it out of the garage because it was really noisy. It's in storage. I have a few air tools, from the days when I thought I wanted to learn to paint cars. More recently, all the power tool makers have come out with alternatives to air tools. I have an electric impact wrench, for instance. When I was young there were no electric impact wrenches, or at least I never saw one.

The high speed air turbine is still my default dental drill (handpiece, we call it), but they have good electrics on that too now, which some people prefer.

The Amish use windmills to compress air, which is kinda cool.


Agreed. 

And that sound of that high speed dental drill is something no person who has ever been to the dentist can ever forget!  ;D

I've often wondered why compressors are so noisy. Sure, the physics involves all the vibration frequencies that are blasted in every direction from air that don't wanna be compressed, so to speak, but there is a sneaky way to get around that. I know they use that with mufflers. As you know, if you can get two sound wave frequencies to interlace a certain way, they cancel each other out. If they can do it with car mufflers, why not with compressors? If you put your thinking cap on, I'll bet you can make your noisy compressor purr like a kitty so your wife won't ban you from using it.
 

HEY! This guy already posted the MUFFLER sound wave interference pattern solution!  ;D

Check it out!

Easy Trick to Make Your Air Compressor Quieter

165,803 views

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/DnH7oqDBB6c" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/DnH7oqDBB6c</a>

Arnold's Design

Published on Oct 11, 2017

Visit and like the Arnold's Design page on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/arnoldsdesign

Here I show you a mod to make your air compressor a few decibels quieter. I reduced the noise by 4 decibels. What's left is mostly valve noise, and that noise can only be reduced by putting a wall between me and the compressor. This technique will work for any compressor, such as Eaton, Polar Air, Ingersoll Rand, Campbell Hausfeld, Quincy, etc. This technique will not affect your cfm.
Leges         Sine    Moribus      Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

Offline agelbert

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 11523
    • View Profile
    • Renewable Rervolution
Re: 19th Century Compressed Air Vehicles Gone & Forgotton
« Reply #12 on: June 12, 2018, 03:29:48 PM »
Here's another sound reducing method. This is the old "Dissimilar Materials" sound proofing technique with many applications. He also forces the sound to make two 90 degree turns. This quiets the compressor down much more.

5x quieter :o generator or compressor sound reduction quiet box
29,832 views

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/_qPRIq-9U-4" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/_qPRIq-9U-4</a>

Quote
Usefulgizmos

Published on Jan 22, 2018

For plans, click "Show More" below. --- Make your generator or air compressor 5x quieter using a box  that can be disassembled and stored.  I also show the exhaust system that prevents carbon monoxide poisoning.   I show a video of my 3500 watt  generator running alone, and while it continues to run I assemble a quiet box that I built, around it. The video shows the audio waveform of the generator's sound decreasing as the box is assembled, and my video editor's "db full scale" meter is also shown in real-time. Finally I show the generator running alone and compare it to the generator running in the quiet box in 3 second bursts to allow you to hear the before and after difference.

I also show the exhaust system that vents the generator's exhaust high up above the roof to insure that carbon monoxide will not get into the house no matter which direction the wind blows.  Because of this, the generator can be run in our carport out of the rain.  An additional benefit is that the exhaust system helps with quieting the generator without adding a secondary muffler, by routing the "exhaust sound" above the roof.  Two benefits for the price of one.

Finally I show how the panels of the disassembled quiet box can be arranged for storage in the bottom of a small clothes closet -or- in a small footprint configuration for storage in an even smaller footprint space.

UPDATE:
I was not planning to do this but because of requests to buy plans for my quiet box, I put a package together that consists of plans and step-by-step instructions for building my quiet box and both sound baffles. Also included are a video, plans for 2 larger size quiet boxes, and the Sketchup files for my quiet box and baffles.  If interested with no obligation to purchase, send a request for details to usefulgizmos@gmail.com. If not interested, please just ignore this update.  Thank you.
Leges         Sine    Moribus      Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

Offline Nearingsfault

  • Waitstaff
  • ***
  • Posts: 771
    • View Profile
Re: 19th Century Compressed Air Vehicles Gone & Forgotton
« Reply #13 on: June 12, 2018, 06:13:51 PM »
I know diesel generators and diesel compressors are common in mennonite and amish communities. Often buried in pits in greenhouses. I've also seen numerous small engine powering the hay bailer pulled by horses. I find it a fascinating mix of old and new. I had not heard of their move to local solar but that makes sense. I did read the article at the origin of the thread. I don't see much conspiracy there just rapidly evolving technologies that squeezed them out. right from the beginning the confusion over horse pulled railcars confused me. Rails make perfect sense. Rails predate locomotives by hundreds of years on docks, mines and quarries.  A good history is here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wagonway  .Rails would require a fraction of the energy of a wheeled vehicle allowing the horse to pull a much heavier trolley for long stretches of time with very little human oversite. I've read accounts of milkmen who delivered by horse cart where the horse knew the route perfectly. By the time horses were displaced the electrics and steam engines were advanced enough to squeeze out the air carts so they just never really got their shot. I find that a more plausible answer then suppression. I have seen an air bicycle of all things with a scuba tank as reservoir, a mechanics air grinder as a motor and a centrifugal clutch off a chainsaw to transfer power. From a design standpoint I think air's problem is the rapid loss of efficiency as you compress to higher and higher pressure. A compressor able to store air at 100-200 psi is pretty easy to build and a back of the envelope calculation says roughly 30 percent efficient. That is in line with internal combustion engines so maybe that makes sense. As you increase the pressure so the storage vessel does not have to become enormous the compressor becomes much more complex and the efficiency would shrink. Its ability to match an internal combustion engine would evaporate as you try to tack on range to it. Add to that you would be double transforming from some energy source to mechanical energy to air storage and back to mechanical energy with all the efficiency losses that would entail. Better to use the original energy, probably electric, and charge a battery. Maybe in a future age of scarcity where compression is still possible but batteries are not. I enjoyed the article though.
Cheers, David
« Last Edit: June 12, 2018, 06:26:00 PM by David B. »
If its important then try something, fail, disect, learn from it, try again, and again and again until it kills you or you succeed.

Offline Golden Oxen

  • Golden Oxen
  • Contrarian
  • Master Chef
  • *
  • Posts: 12054
    • View Profile
Re: 19th Century Compressed Air Vehicles Gone & Forgotton
« Reply #14 on: June 12, 2018, 06:53:59 PM »
Hi David, Have always been fascinated by the Amish.

While knowing nothing about the mechanics you are posting about, all my instincts tell me that the Amish are probably very well equipped to deal with the kind of Doom I expect, mainly a financial event that causes much hardship.

They will manage with empty supermarket shelves, no gas or rationed gas, no autos and Uber, as well as a dark boob tube and it's endless sporting events for the dim Colosseum crowd.

                               

                             


                             


                             

 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
5 Replies
870 Views
Last post November 27, 2015, 02:12:35 PM
by Eddie
32 Replies
2062 Views
Last post December 20, 2016, 07:02:25 AM
by jdwheeler42
0 Replies
310 Views
Last post July 21, 2017, 09:11:54 AM
by Surly1