AuthorTopic: Monsta-rama's monsterous delights  (Read 8142 times)

Offline monsta666

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Monsta-rama's monsterous delights
« on: December 31, 2012, 10:04:35 AM »
In this thread I will post any random articles from the blog, most likely economically related. Feel free to add any blog posts if it is relevant to any of  the posts I make.

Offline RE

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2013-Nostradamus Monsta Predicts!
« Reply #1 on: January 01, 2013, 02:12:16 AM »
Monsta's 2013 Predictions now UP as a Feature Article on the Diner Blog!

Glad Monsta went out on this limb, I've been WRONG so often on these sort of predictions I am gun shy now. LOL

RE
« Last Edit: January 01, 2013, 02:16:08 AM by RE »
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Offline g

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Re: Monsta-rama's monsterous delights
« Reply #2 on: January 01, 2013, 04:16:51 AM »
Great article Monsta, reasonable logical outlook.

My only quibble is with your forecast of the US consumer not getting hit too hard in the pocket with food prices this year.
My understanding is we are in for a shocker when we see the prices of meat, poultry and dairy next year, how I hope my sources are in error and you are correct.

Offline Petty Tyrant

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Re: Monsta-rama's monsterous delights
« Reply #3 on: January 01, 2013, 05:24:20 AM »
""fact I am willing to lay my neck on the line and try and predict what may come about in the following year. I just hope my predictions are not so bad so I end up being a head shorter.""


For the avg sudanese that is still 6'4


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Offline monsta666

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Re: Monsta-rama's monsterous delights
« Reply #4 on: January 01, 2013, 10:58:04 AM »
Great article Monsta, reasonable logical outlook.

My only quibble is with your forecast of the US consumer not getting hit too hard in the pocket with food prices this year.
My understanding is we are in for a shocker when we see the prices of meat, poultry and dairy next year, how I hope my sources are in error and you are correct.

You could well be right GO. It was a tricky call to make. In any case though the US consumer will not be hit as hard as the people in the poorer nations who depend on US food exports. If the Americans suffer from this drought then the suffering of those nations that depend on those exports will be that bit higher.

For the avg sudanese that is still 6'4

LOL! Too bad I am below average at only 5'11 (180cm)

Offline pansceptic

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Re: Monsta-rama's monsterous delights
« Reply #5 on: January 01, 2013, 07:14:16 PM »
monsta, thanks for a European persective on the continued survival of the Euro.  From a pessimistic American's perspective I have been surprised how relatively strong the Euro has been, and I guess I will be surprised to see the currency union hold together yet another year  :-\

Offline buzzard

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Re: Monsta-rama's monsterous delights
« Reply #6 on: January 02, 2013, 06:00:05 AM »
Monsta- Can't disagree with your general Theses. I only have one nit to pick. I would submit that I and others don't suffer from ' doomer fatigue' but from Collapse fatigue. (I'll never tire of being a doomer.)  ;D

Offline monsta666

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Re: Pigmen rejoice at discovery of ZERO POINT ENERGY
« Reply #7 on: January 05, 2013, 03:57:27 PM »
Some scientist's claim to have made a particle go below the point of absolute zero and claim this new particle can achieve things that violate the laws of thermodynamics such as above 100% efficiency, negative entropy AND that it exists in infinite number of energetic states. If true this would mean they have found the holy grail of ZERO POINT ENERGY. Now I remain deeply sceptical this is really occurred and most likely it is some kind of trick or misinterpretation of the results from the experiment but on first glance I cannot see where it is bogus. I encourage other Diners to read the story to refute the claims made in this article.

Absolute Zero? Scientists Push
Atoms Colder, To Record-Setting
'Negative Temperature' Realm

Posted: 01/04/2013 7:49 am EST

By: Charles Choi, LiveScience Contributor
Published: 01/03/2013 02:34 PM EST on LiveScience

Absolute zero is often thought to be the coldest temperature possible. But now researchers show they can achieve even lower temperatures for a strange realm of "negative temperatures."

Oddly, another way to look at these negative temperatures is to consider them hotter than infinity, researchers added.

This unusual advance could lead to new engines that could technically be more than 100 percent efficient, and shed light on mysteries such as dark energy, the mysterious substance that is apparently pulling our universe apart.

An object's temperature is a measure of how much its atoms move — the colder an object is, the slower the atoms are. At the physically impossible-to-reach temperature of zero kelvin, or minus 459.67 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 273.15 degrees Celsius), atoms would stop moving. As such, nothing can be colder than absolute zero on the Kelvin scale.

Bizarro negative temperatures

 To comprehend the negative temperatures scientists have now devised, one might think of temperature as existing on a scale that is actually a loop, not linear. Positive temperatures make up one part of the loop, while negative temperatures make up the other part. When temperatures go either below zero or above infinity on the positive region of this scale, they end up in negative territory. [What's That? Your Basic Physics Questions Answered]

With positive temperatures, atoms more likely occupy low-energy states than high-energy states, a pattern known as Boltzmann distribution in physics. When an object is heated, its atoms can reach higher energy levels.

At absolute zero, atoms would occupy the lowest energy state. At an infinite temperature, atoms would occupy all energy states. Negative temperatures then are the opposite of positive temperatures — atoms more likely occupy high-energy states than low-energy states.

"The inverted Boltzmann distribution is the hallmark of negative absolute temperature, and this is what we have achieved," said researcher Ulrich Schneider, a physicist at the University of Munich in Germany. "Yet the gas is not colder than zero kelvin, but hotter. It is even hotter than at any positive temperature — the temperature scale simply does not end at infinity, but jumps to negative values instead."

 As one might expect, objects with negative temperatures behave in very odd ways. For instance, energy typically flows from objects with a higher positive temperature to ones with a lower positive temperature — that is, hotter objects heat up cooler objects, and colder objects cool down hotter ones, until they reach a common temperature. However, energy will always flow from objects with negative temperature to ones with positive temperatures. In this sense, objects with negative temperatures are always hotter than ones with positive temperatures.

Another odd consequence of negative temperatures has to do with entropy, which is a measure of how disorderly a system is. When objects with positive temperature release energy, they increase the entropy of things around them, making them behave more chaotically. However, when objects with negative temperatures release energy, they can actually absorb entropy.

Negative temperatures would be thought impossible, since there is typically no upper bound for how much energy atoms can have, as far as theory currently suggests. (There is a limit to what speed they can travel — according to Einstein's theory of relativity, nothing can accelerate to speeds faster than light.)

Wacky physics experiment

 To generate negative temperatures, scientists created a system where atoms do have a limit to how much energy they can possess. They first cooled about 100,000 atoms to a positive temperature of a few nanokelvin, or billionth of a kelvin. They cooled the atoms within a vacuum chamber, which  isolated them from any environmental influence that could potentially heat them up accidentally. They also used a web of laser beams and magnetic fields to very precisely control how these atoms behaved, helping to push them into a new temperature realm. [Twisted Physics: 7 Mind-Blowing Findings]

"The temperatures we achieved are negative nanokelvin," Schneider told LiveScience.

Because temperature depends on how much atoms move — how much kinetic energy they have. The web of laser beams created a perfectly ordered array of millions of bright spots of light, and in this "optical lattice," atoms could still move, but their kinetic energy was limited.

Temperature also depends on how much potential energy atoms have, and how much energy lies in the interactions between the atoms. The researchers used the optical lattice to limit how much potential energy the atoms had, and they used magnetic fields to very finely control the interactions between atoms, making them either attractive or repulsive.

Temperature is linked with pressure — the hotter something is, the more it expands outward, and the colder something is, the more it contracts inward. To make sure this gas had a negative temperature, the researchers had to give it a negative pressure as well, tinkering with the interactions between atoms until they attracted each other more than they repelled each other.

"We have created the first negative absolute temperature state for moving particles," said researcher Simon Braun at the University of Munich in Germany.

New kinds of engines

egative temperatures could be used to create heat engines — engines that convert heat energy to mechanical work, such as combustion engines — that are more than 100-percent efficient, something seemingly impossible. Such engines would essentially not only absorb energy from hotter substances, but also colder ones. As such, the work the engine performed could be larger than the energy taken from the hotter substance alone.

Negative temperatures might also help shed light on one of the greatest mysteries in science. Scientists had expected the gravitational pull of matter to slow down the universe's expansion after the Big Bang, eventually bringing it to a dead stop or even reversing it for a "Big Crunch." However, the universe's expansion is apparently speeding up, accelerated growth that cosmologists suggest may be due to dark energy, an as-yet-unknown substance that could make up more than 70 percent of the cosmos.

In much the same way, the negative pressure of the cold gas the researchers created should make it collapse. However, its negative temperature keeps it from doing so. As such, negative temperatures might have interesting parallels with dark energy that may help scientists understand this enigma.

Negative temperatures could also shed light on exotic states of matter, generating systems that normally might not be stable without them. "A better understanding of temperature could lead to new things we haven't even thought of yet," Schneider said. "When you study the basics very thoroughly, you never know where it may end."

The scientists detailed their findings in the Jan. 4 issue of the journal Science.

Offline Snowleopard

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Re: Monsta-rama's monsterous delights
« Reply #8 on: January 05, 2013, 05:02:10 PM »
Quote
It continues to amaze me how senior economists such as Stephanie Flanders can continue to be baffled that service jobs paying £6 an hour for 30 or less hours a week cannot create a recovery! It is times like this where I almost want to hide the fact I studied economics…

Isn't it the purpose of a public economist to baffle the beasties with bullshit, while the pigmen pick their pockets??
"A man sees what he wants to see and disregards the rest." -  Simon and Garfunkel

Offline WHD

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Re: Monsta-rama's monsterous delights
« Reply #9 on: January 05, 2013, 05:06:40 PM »
Quote
At absolute zero, atoms would occupy the lowest energy state. At an infinite temperature, atoms would occupy all energy states. Negative temperatures then are the opposite of positive temperatures — atoms more likely occupy high-energy states than low-energy states.

Monsta,

I'm no scientist, but this quote strikes me somehow, as like talking out of the ass.

Clearly, we are at some kind of zero-point. I keep hearing about 3D printing too, like it is the HOLY GRAIL. Not being uber-smart like these techie-scientists, I can't tell if it's happy talk to avoid facing realities, or some NEW REALITY. I'll believe it when they achieve some kind of scale, after which things change radically, either initiating the promised utpoia or destroying the planet, I suppose.



Offline monsta666

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Re: Monsta-rama's monsterous delights
« Reply #10 on: January 05, 2013, 06:50:42 PM »
Isn't it the purpose of a public economist to baffle the beasties with bullshit, while the pigmen pick their pockets??

I do think that can be the case. The thing is Flanders is not a stupid person; when she talks about certain economic matters she can present some decent economic analysis (she wouldn't be hired by the BBC if she was a complete mug) trouble is she often fails to think outside the box. It is quite puzzling really, I mean if I have a personal theory but see that reality does not support the theory I have about how things are supposed to work then I go back and rethink my theory and find the fault. She appears incapable of doing this and seems to just fall into a state of cognitive dissonance whenever reality conflicts with her world view. I have noticed this trait in several highly educated people often who often hold Masters or PhD's. If their world theory seems to be put into question they choose to ignore the contradicting information. This trait in endemic in the field of economists. Economist do not argue they ignore people and reality to maintain their personal vision of how the world works. I think this is as much an ego thing as it is about being bought out or being forced into following a certain party line.

My thoughts are that there are a good number of well intentioned economists who genuinely believe the garbage they spout out. Let us not forget that it is also the economists who are fooled by the people who set these curriculum. I seen it with my own eyes, where many of people who can see the flaws tend to leave after the graduate level and the ones who become indoctrinated into the teachings tend to go on to pursue the Masters and even PhD's. It is those PhD's - the most deluded bunch - who usually end up with the top posts. It is a little ironic but the "selection process" of attaining the top qualifications in economics tend to remove the more sensible, rational and critical thinking economists and leave only the deluded ones who lack common sense to make it to the top. The economists are deluded but I don't think, for the most part, they come out of uni wanting to hurt people. They actually believe the rubbish they speak out!

Monsta,

I'm no scientist, but this quote strikes me somehow, as like talking out of the ass.

Clearly, we are at some kind of zero-point. I keep hearing about 3D printing too, like it is the HOLY GRAIL. Not being uber-smart like these techie-scientists, I can't tell if it's happy talk to avoid facing realities, or some NEW REALITY. I'll believe it when they achieve some kind of scale, after which things change radically, either initiating the promised utpoia or destroying the planet, I suppose.

Agree with pretty much everything you said. If it is the real deal then it should scale. I think these outlandish claims over 3-D printers, free energy, shale oil/gas are all symptoms of some depression that has hit society. Instead of confronting difficult truths they prefer to deal in delusions. It is as Mencken said:

"It is the nature of the human species to reject what is true but unpleasant, and to embrace what is obviously false but comforting."
« Last Edit: January 13, 2013, 08:08:07 PM by monsta666 »

Offline monsta666

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Re: Drones Over New York City?
« Reply #11 on: January 13, 2013, 07:58:48 PM »
From Zero Hedge:

Drones Over New York City?

Submitted by Tyler Durden on 01/13/2013 22:24 -0500

In a world in which the NSA has access to everything, including - soon - one's bank accounts, because "the government is there to protect you", it was only a matter of time before the logical extension of abdicating all privacy was enforced in the city that never sleeps, and which ended up with 24/7 vigilant "alarm clocks" in the form of unmanned aerial vehicles, aka drones, "for the sake of security." From RT: "The head of the New York City Police Department announced this week that the largest local law enforcement agency in the United States might soon rely on spy drones for conducting surveillance. During an open conversation held Thursday between Reuters editor-in-chief Stephen Adler and NYPD Commissioner Ray Kelly, the chief of police confirmed that New York’s boys in blue aren’t entirely opposed to acquiring an unmanned aerial vehicle for the sake of security. “We’re looking into it," Kelly reportedly told an audience at the 92nd Street Y Thursday evening. “Anything that helps us.”

More:

Jill Colvin, a producer for the website DNAinfo, says Kelly told his crowd that adding an UAV to their arsenal of surveillance tools could come in handy during future mass protests in the Big Apple. For starters, she reports, Kelly said cops could begin with using basic civilian models that are available for purchase online and in stores.

 "You can go to Brookstone and buy a drone," Kelly told the crowd.

 “The only thing we would do is maybe use the cheap $250 ones to take a look and see the size of the demonstration or something along those lines,” Colvin quotes him as saying.
...
Should New York City secure a drone of their own, there is little one could do that isn’t already possible in NYC. As of last year, the NYPD had access to around 2,000 surveillance cameras on just the island of Manhattan.

   

And maybe attach a few missiles (not sold at Brookstone just yet) to said drone, just in case a little additional militarized firepower was necessary in addition to looking and "seeing the size or something."And why not: it's not like there is a law in the US preventing the government for going all Ezekiel 25:17 on any US citizen just because the pilot at Creech Air Force Base in Nevada, didn't like the angle of attack on some guy's mustache.

Because, remember, "they hate us for our freedoms."

Offline monsta666

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Re: I can't find a nursing job!
« Reply #12 on: January 14, 2013, 05:14:32 PM »
For nursing jobs, new grads need not apply
By Annalyn Kurtz @CNNMoney January 14, 2013: 10:33 AM ET

Ronak Soliemannjad, 26, has been looking for a nursing job since she graduated, but finds most job postings say "no new grads." Click here for more stories of out-of-work nurses.

NEW YORK (CNNMoney)
Since the recession, health care has been the single biggest sector for job growth, but that doesn't mean it's easy to get hired.

Registered nurses fresh out of school are coming across thousands of job postings with an impossible requirement: "no new grads."

It's a problem well documented by the nursing industry. About 43% of newly licensed RNs still do not have jobs within 18 months after graduation, according to a survey conducted by the American Society of Registered Nurses.

"The process has become more and more discouraging, especially since hospitals want RNs with experience, yet nobody is willing to give us this experience," said Ronak Soliemannjad, 26, who has been searching for a nursing job since she graduated in June.

New grads have taken to posting their frustrations on allnurses.com, a social network for nurses.

"It is a tough market for a new grad RN. A 'year experience required' or 'not considering new grads at this time' is pretty much the norm," wrote one.

"It's like new grads have a disease or something," said another.

How can this be, at a time when health care jobs are booming and a supposed shortage of RNs sent many career seekers running to nursing school?

The recession is to blame, says Peter Buerhaus, a registered nurse and economist who teaches at the Vanderbilt University School of Nursing. In a paper he co-authored in the New England Journal of Medicine last year, he shows an interesting phenomenon happens in the demographics of the nursing workforce when the economy is weak.

About 90% of nurses are women, 60% are married, and roughly a quarter are over 50 years old. It's typical for many nurses to take time off to raise children in their 30s, and given the long days spent working on their feet, many often retire in their late 50s.

Prior to the recession, about 73,000 nurses left the profession each year due to childbearing, retirement, burning out or death.

But when the recession hit, spouses lost jobs, 401(k)s lost money, and facing financial uncertainty, fewer nurses chose to leave work, Buerhaus said.

"Many of those nurses are still in the workforce, and they're not leaving because we don't see a convincing jobs recovery yet," Buerhaus said. "They're clogging the market and making it harder for these new RNs to get a job."

Related: I can't find a nursing job!

At the same time, enrollment in nursing colleges has exploded in recent years. In the 2010-2011 school year, 169,000 people were enrolled in entry-level baccalaureate nursing programs. That's more than double the 78,000 students from a decade earlier, according to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing.

There just aren't enough jobs to go around for all these new grads.

Annah Karamp heads recruiting for six hospitals in the Daughters of Charity Health System in Los Angeles. Each hospital has a program in place aimed at hiring at least 10 new grads a year, but the competition is fierce. Karam often receives more than 1,000 applications for each post. For other positions, the hospitals prefer experienced nurses.

"We're new grad friendly but with the challenges we face in the hospital world, we often need seasoned nurses," Karam said. "We hire thousands of nurses across the whole system, yet a very small percentage are new grads."

Eventually, nursing grads should have great job prospects.

Demand for health care services is expected to climb as more baby boomers retire and health care reform makes medical care accessible to more people. As older nurses start retiring, economists predict a massive nursing shortage will reemerge in the United States.

"We've been really worried about the future workforce because we've got almost 900,000 nurses over the age of 50 who will probably retire this decade, and we'll have to replace them," Buerhaus said.

But for recent grads like Soliemannjad, that's not particularly encouraging.

"It just seems that when the experts talk about the economy getting better, they're not talking about it improving in two or three months. They're talking about years," she said. "You have new grads with student loans to pay off. We simply can't not work for another year and half."

Offline Petty Tyrant

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Re: Monsta-rama's monsterous delights
« Reply #13 on: January 14, 2013, 06:17:21 PM »
Oversupply of new nurses usually does not last long. My guess is that more than half nurses over 40 try and find something else to do out of hospital wards in the healthcare system, like disabilities, diabetes, weighing and measuring waistlines. Then a shortage of local nurses gets filled with imports, because few locals are interested.
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Offline luciddreams

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Re: Monsta-rama's monsterous delights
« Reply #14 on: January 14, 2013, 06:46:22 PM »
there are ways around that nursing problem.  For instance, an RN can challenge the national registry of EMT's paramedic testing.  If they pass the tests they get awarded an emt-p certification.  There is a nation wide shortage of paramedics and ems agencies typically could care less if you are experienced.  The agency I worked for hired kids right out of school with absolutely no experience in healthcare much less on a bus.  The problem these nurses are having is probably the type of nursing jobs they are applying for.  Most don't apply to work on medsurg wiping asses.  Work can be found if your willing to wipe ass.  Or you can work as a medic for a while and get your foot in the door that way. 

Hell as far as that goes you could get hired working as an er tech at a hospital.  They don't require any experience and nothing more than a high school diploma or GED.  Foot in the door, er experience, next thing you know you're working as a nurse. 

Not saying there isn't a problem, just saying there are ways around that problem.  I've met a lot of dumb ass nurses working in health care.  They ain't rocket scientists.  It doesn't surprise me that nurse grads have a hard time figuring out how to get work in healthcare. 

 

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