AuthorTopic: Who They Are...  (Read 5151 times)

Offline Surly1

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Re: Who They Are...
« Reply #135 on: May 22, 2019, 05:00:37 PM »
I am fully read in on this guy, as he used to be Virginia's AG under Former Virginia Governor Bob "Transvaginal Ultrasound" McDonnell. This fuck attempted to make oral sex a felony in Virginia. He was a leading exponent of "trap laws" designed to make abortion clinics meet the same construction requirements as hospital. A real piece of work, so watch this space. He is perfect for the Trumpers. Will be interesting to see who they set him loose to immiserate.

https://www.mediamatters.org/blog/2019/05/21/right-wing-pundit-ken-cuccinelli-anti-lgbtq-bigot-and-trump-set-appoint-him-senior-dhs-position/223760

Right-wing pundit Ken Cuccinelli is an anti-LGBTQ bigot, and Trump is set to appoint him to a senior DHS position

Blog ››› ››› ERIC HANANOKI
Melissa Joskow / Media Matters

Ken Cuccinelli, a former CNN commentator and Virginia attorney general, will reportedly be named to a senior position at the Department of Homeland Security, where he will coordinate immigration policies. Cuccinelli has a long history of anti-LGBTQ bigotry, including claiming that the “homosexual agenda ... brings nothing but self-destruction, not only physically but of their soul."

The New York Times reported today that President Donald Trump is expected to name Cuccinelli “as his choice to coordinate the administration’s immigration policies” and that he “is expected to be based in the Department of Homeland Security.”

Cuccinelli worked for CNN as a legal and political commentator but was cut after the Times report. Cuccinelli also heads the political action committee Senate Conservatives Fund and its affiliated group Senate Conservatives Action.

If he works in a senior position in the federal government, Cuccinelli could potentially affect the lives of numerous LGBTQ individuals. The Human Rights Campaign, for example, has documented "the precarious position of transgender immigrants and asylum seekers" and how "the crisis at the border is an LGBTQ issue."

Here is a history of some of his worst remarks and actions regarding LGBTQ issues.

Cuccinelli criticized the Supreme Court decision in Obergefell v. Hodges, which legalized same-sex marriage in the U.S., saying it would lead to more “applied tyranny using this case.” During an NPR interview in 2015, Cuccinelli said the Supreme Court’s ruling in Obergefell v. Hodges “isn't good for our country” and added: “The clear implication is that when you leave the parking lot of that church, it's no holds barred by the government against you. … You will see that sort of applied tyranny using this case.”

Cuccinelli issued anti-LGBTQ opinions during his final days as attorney general. As The Virginian-Pilotnoted, in his final days as Virginia’s attorney general, Cuccinelli “released a pair of nonbinding opinions that can be read as legal arguments against Gov. Terry McAuliffe's campaign pledges to fight for gay rights and undo abortion restrictions”:

In one, Cuccinelli, who lost to McAuliffe in the 2013 governor's race, says a governor can't order state officials to permit legally married gay couples to file joint Virginia tax returns because the state bans same-sex marriage and formal recognition of it.

The other asserts that a governor lacks authority to "issue a policy directive to suspend a regulation that was properly adopted pursuant to a statutory mandate." It appears to target intended protections for gay state employees and efforts to invalidate strict licensing rules for abortion clinics.

Cuccinelli has campaigned for the criminalization of sodomy. In 2003, the Supreme Court struck downsodomy laws prohibiting gay sex as unconstitutional in Lawrence v. Texas. In 2013, Cuccinelli prioritized restoring Virginia's anti-sodomy law and campaigned on the issue during his gubernatorial run (he failed on both counts).

Cuccinelli fought against policies that banned discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation in public colleges and universities. The Washington Postreported in 2010 that Cuccinelli “urged the state's public colleges and universities to rescind policies that ban discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation, arguing in a letter sent to each school that their boards of visitors had no legal authority to adopt such statements. In his most aggressive initiative on conservative social issues since taking office in January, Cuccinelli (R) wrote in the letter sent Thursday that only the General Assembly can extend legal protections to gay state employees, students and others -- a move the legislature has repeatedly declined to take as recently as this week.”

Cuccinelli has said that “homosexual acts” are “intrinsically wrong” and “not healthy to society.” Cuccinelli said in 2009: "My view is that homosexual acts, not homosexuality, but homosexual acts are wrong. They're intrinsically wrong. And I think in a natural law based country it's appropriate to have policies that reflect that. ... They don't comport with natural law. I happen to think that it represents (to put it politely; I need my thesaurus to be polite) behavior that is not healthy to an individual and in aggregate is not healthy to society." In 2013, he was asked by PBS journalist Judy Woodruff during a debate if he still believed same-sex acts are “against nature and harmful to society.” He responded: "My personal beliefs about the personal challenge of homosexuality haven't changed."

Cuccinelli said the “homosexual agenda … brings nothing but self-destruction, not only physically but of their soul.” The Washington Postreported in 2008 that Cuccinelli said: "When you look at the homosexual agenda, I cannot support something that I believe brings nothing but self-destruction, not only physically but of their soul."

Cuccinelli said, “You can’t have safe homosexual sex.” In 2005, after a pro-choice student group at George Mason University organized a sexuality and health fair event that included information about sexual orientation, Cuccinelli said: “You can’t have safe homosexual sex. There is no such thing and yet one of the sponsoring groups is the homosexual group on campus.”

Cuccinelli said, “The militant homosexual agenda generally threatens the stability of our families and our society.” In 2004, as the Virginia-based Connection Newspapers reported, Cuccinelli pushed for an amendment "guaranteeing that marriage is between one man and one woman. … If his bill became law, he said, gays' ‘sex-based relationships wouldn't be forced on the rest of society as if those relationships were normal. It's time that somebody started standing up for families. The militant homosexual agenda generally threatens the stability of our families and our society. I want a resolution to say we want to keep things the way they are in Virginia.’”

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Surly1

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Roy Cohn Documentary to Debut in 2019
« Reply #136 on: May 24, 2019, 05:34:05 AM »
Roy Cohn Documentary to Debut in 2019
https://www.hbo.com/hbo-news/roy-cohn-documentary


Roy Cohn Documentary to Debut in 2019

Director Ivy Meeropol, whose grandparents Julius and Ethel Rosenberg were prosecuted by Cohn, will take a closer look at the controversial lawyer and fixer.

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Legendary and controversial attorney Roy Cohn was a power broker in the rough and tumble world of New York City business and politics. Senator Joseph R. McCarthy’s top counsel during investigations into Communist activities in the 1950s, Cohn is also known for being Donald Trump’s former personal lawyer, fixer and mentor.

Focusing on key periods of his life, and drawing on extensive, newly unearthed archival material, a new documentary on Cohn’s life will debut on HBO in 2019. Director Ivy Meeropol (Indian Point, Heir to an Execution: A Granddaughter’s Story) spent much of her life feeling both repelled and fascinated by the man who prosecuted her grandparents, Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, in what became known as the “atomic spies” case; Cohn obtained their convictions in court and then insisted on their executions.

The currently untitled film features recently discovered audiotapes of candid discussions between Cohn and journalist Peter Manso, recorded at the height of Cohn’s career. With a lens on Cohn’s family, friends, colleagues, employees and lovers, as well as those targeted by him, it includes his time in Provincetown, Massachusetts, where he shared a house with Manso and Norman Mailer, and was considerably more open about his sexuality than in other settings.

Playwright Tony Kushner, whose Pulitzer Prize- and Tony-winning play Angels in Americafeatures Cohn as a main character, and actor Nathan Lane, who starred in it as Cohn, also provide interviews, with Lane giving insights into how Cohn wielded power through invective and innuendo.

The documentary was directed and produced by Ivy Meeropol; producers, Julie Goldman, Christopher Clements and Carolyn Hepburn; co-producer, Peter Manso; director of photography, Dan Gold; editor, Anne Alvergue. For HBO: executive producers, Nancy Abraham and Lisa Heller.

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Surly1

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2 Texas Men Die Trying to Jump Car Over Open Drawbridge
« Reply #137 on: May 25, 2019, 05:12:57 AM »
Darwin Awards Season Begins: 2 Texas Men Die Trying to Jump Car Over Open Drawbridge


A Texas driver and his passenger are dead after they tried to jump the ramps on a closed drawbridge. Louisiana State Police

A Texas driver and his passenger are dead after they tried to jump the ramps on a closed drawbridge.

Louisiana State Police say it happened shortly after 2 a.m. Friday at the Black Bayou Bridge about six miles south of Lake Charles.

Investigators say a boat on the Intracoastal Waterway was passing under the bridge, so it was closed to traffic.

Witnesses say the car's passenger pushed the gate arm up and they drove up to the raised ramps. Then they backed up, and then accelerated forward, trying to jump to the other side. The vehicle landed in the water instead, and sank.

Both men were pronounced dead at the scene. Their names have not been released.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Surly1

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“I CAN’T GET THE ASSHOLE OFF THE PHONE...”
« Reply #138 on: May 29, 2019, 06:34:06 PM »
“I CAN’T GET THE ASSHOLE OFF THE PHONE”: IN MICHAEL WOLFF’S NEWEST, EVERYONE—EVEN RUPERT—THINKS TRUMP IS BEYOND CRAZY
Siege is overflowing with botched initiatives, bragging about sexual conquests, Trumpian insults, and ally after ally who, privately, can’t stand the president while publicly going along. Even Mueller is no hero.



Last year, after Michael Wolff published Fire and Fury, the epic, sales-smashing, unforgiving gossip-dump depicting the can’t-make-this-stuff-up chaos and disarray of the Trump administration, the conventional wisdom was that Wolff wouldn’t be able to pull off another White House tell-all. Fire and Fury, which has reportedly sold more than 4 million copies to date, was simply too down-and-dirty, too explosive, too scandalous for any sources to be willing to talk to Wolff again. Surely he’d burned all of his bridges, the thinking went.

Apparently not. As Axios recently reported, Wolff interviewed some 150 people for the Fire and Furysequel—out June 4 from Henry Holt—more than two-thirds of whom were repeat customers. (Former senior officials, Trump pals, etc.) And once again, the dirt is abundant. Donald Trump insults everyone in his orbit, repeatedly, viciously, and—always privately—they return the favor.

“I can’t get the asshole off the phone,” Rupert Murdoch once said of Trump, “holding out the phone as the president’s voice rambled into the air,” according to Wolff. The same section of the book details tensions between Rupert and James Murdoch, resulting from the latter’s disgust over the Fox News prime-time lineup, namely Sean Hannity. “Father and son had screaming fights over Hannity and Trump,” Wolff writes in Siege, a copy of which I got my hands on a few days ago. “The Murdoch family had become collaborators, declared the younger Murdoch. The world would remember. The future of their company was at stake.” Wolff also writes, of Hannity, that the 9 P.M. anchor’s “cheerleading had begun to wear thin, and Trump started to turn on him. . . . For all of Hannity’s flattery, for all of his zealous commitment to the president, Trump, in almost equal proportion, had become disdainful of him. This was partly standard practice. Sooner or later, Trump felt contempt for anyone who showed him too much devotion.” (A spokesman for Rupert Murdoch didn’t immediately have a comment Wednesday morning. Through a spokeswoman, James Murdoch declined to comment. Hannity, through a spokeswoman, reiterated a previous statement about his interactions with Trump: “Nobody has ever gotten my relationship with Donald Trump right, ever.”)

At 315 pages, Siege is overflowing with such titillating material, which is sure to make it another tour de force for the Trump resistance, while inviting dismissive barbs from an administration that will presumably seek to portray the tome as the corrosive mudslinging of a fabulist—one who, it is worth noting, was given extensive, arguably unprecedented access to the West Wing and its top officials when he was working on Fire and Fury two years ago. Wolff will also presumably weather further criticism from his naysayers in the journalism community, who would argue that he plays loose and fast with opaquely sourced, uncorroborated rumors. And Steve Bannon is once again at the center of this book, though he’s no longer at the center of the West Wing, much as he aspires to be. He’s a kind of co-narrator.

“Michael Wolff’s first book was destroyed for its countless inaccuracies, made up accounts, and use of shady sources with personal political agendas that even the author himself admitted to,” said White House spokesman Hogan Gidley. “This latest book is just another attempt by Wolff to line his own pockets by pushing lies and pure fantasy aimed at attacking the President.”

Wolff’s book began making headlines a week before its publication, when its most incendiary revelations leaked out via The Guardian:Robert Mueller’s team, at the urging of top special-counsel prosecutor Andrew Weissmann, drew up a three-count obstruction-of-justice indictment last year, only to back off because of fears that Trump might do something rash like shut down the Russia probe. “As much as Andrew Weissmann wanted to indict the president, Bob Mueller wanted to stay in business,” Wolff writes.

In a firm denial, special-counsel spokesman Peter Carr told The Guardian that draft indictment documents “do not exist.” But in the book, Wolff describes them in detail, and Guardian correspondent Edward Helmore indicates in his story that he viewed them as well. Are readers to believe that someone shopped Wolff bogus docs? That Carr is obfuscating? Or that, certainly, there must be some middle-ground truth to account for the glaring discrepancy? These are all intriguing questions.

Beyond the Mueller heat, there are many other details that will fire up the chattering classes. In a chapter about Jamal Khashoggi, for instance, Wolff reports that Jared Kushner, in an off-the-record conversation with a reporter, remarked of the murdered Saudi Arabian dissident and newspaper columnist, “This guy was the link between certain factions in the royal family and Osama. We know that. A journalist? Come on. This was a terrorist masquerading as a journalist.” (Kushner’s spokesman didn’t immediately return an emailed request for comment.)

Wolff offers a new take on the infamous “catch-and-kill” exercise in which David Pecker’sNational Enquirer, working with Michael Cohen—and edited by Dylan Howard at the time—paid $150,000 for former Playboy model Karen McDougal’s story of allegedly having an affair with Trump. “McDougal,” Wolff writes, “was not willing to share evidence [of the affair.] Her phone, theoretically with texts from Trump, was in storage. The friends in whom she had confided were unavailable. Her receipts were lost. In other words, there just wasn’t enough solid material for a story. . . . [To] Howard, quite an expert in scandal, there did not seem to be the necessary elements for a credible takedown. Was this, Howard wondered to friends, a Cohen and Pecker setup? Were Cohen and Pecker, each in a perpetually subservient and unrequited relationship with Trump, in cahoots to increase their standing or leverage with Trump?”

When Howard played ball with prosecutors in exchange for partial immunity in their probe of the payout, according to Wolff, he was shown an email in which Pecker said, “Dylan doesn’t know about this.” Someone who was in the room told Wolff that Howard “broke down in tears, realizing then that he had likely been a hapless instrument of Pecker and Cohen trying to please or manipulate Donald Trump.” (A spokesman for The National Enquirer declined to comment. A spokeswoman for Cohen didn’t immediately have a comment. McDougal could not be reached.)

Wolff also revisits one of his earlier book’s biggest controversies. While promoting Fire and Fury in early 2018, during an appearance on Real Time with Bill Maher, Wolff plugged a blind item that he’d slipped into the book, and he encouraged viewers to “read between the lines.” The carefully worded passage in one of the final chapters seemed to suggest Trump was having an affair with Nikki Haley,his then-United Nations ambassador. Haley went public, furiously rebutting the rumor—“highly offensive”; “disgusting”—and Wolff was roundly criticized for what many saw as an unwarranted smear. In Siege, he supplies an explanation for how the Trump–Haley chatter might have gotten going in the first place—as an idle and not particularly believable Trump boast about a sexual liaison: “What was true here is that this was what he had said; it was a species of his famous locker-room talk. What was far from certain was that what he had said was true, and few around him gave it much credence.” (Haley’s spokeswoman didn’t immediately return emailed requests for comment.)

The rollout of Fire and Fury was clouded by the attention given to a number of arguably small but not-insignificant factual errors, which would seem to portend intense scrutiny of Wolff’s every last word once Siege hits shelves. In the acknowledgments, Wolff says he used two research assistants, a fact-checker, and someone “who checked the check.” (Fun fact: that person is the journalist Chris de Kretser, an Australian News Corp. veteran and the father of Wolff’s friend and former research assistant, Leela de Kretser.)

Wolff also expresses strong gratitude to Bannon, who lost his White House gig in the wake of comments that he made in Fire and Fury, describing as “treasonous” Donald Trump Jr.’s infamous Trump Tower meeting with Russian operatives. Despite the professional consequences, Bannon continued to be a key source for Wolff. “Donald Trump’s wrath helped cost Bannon the backing of his patrons, billionaire Bob Mercer and his daughter Rebekah, and forced his departure from Breitbart News,” Wolff writes. “It is a measure of Bannon’s character that he stood by his remarks in Fire and Fury without complaint, quibbles, or hurt feelings. In all my years in this business, I have encountered few sources who, after revealing themselves, didn’t blame the person who exposed them.”

Of the many other people who helped shape the narrative of Siege, Wolff writes, “Dealing with sources in the Trump White House has continued to offer its own unique set of issues. A basic requirement of working there is, surely, the willingness to infinitely rationalize or delegitimize the truth, and, when necessary, to outright lie. In fact, I believe this has caused some of the same people who have undermined the public trust to become private truth-tellers.”

As one of those people—described by Wolff as a “staff member who has spent almost countless hours with the president”—put it: “I have never met anyone crazier than Donald Trump.”

This article has been updated.

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Surly1

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Boston’s Straight Pride Parade Is Even Worse Than You Think
« Reply #139 on: June 05, 2019, 06:32:25 PM »
Incels, Proud Boys and frog twitter on the march to proclaim their victimhood, because equality for the traditionally oppressed comes right out of my pocket.

Boston’s Straight Pride Parade Is Even Worse Than You Think
The organizers of the parade are not your average aggrieved white men. They are members of a far-right organization with a penchant for anti-Semitic and racist rhetoric.


Will Sommer
Published 06.05.19 5:05PM ET




Boston’s Straight Pride Parade is even worse than you think

The internet went wild on Tuesday with the news that Boston would host a Straight Pride Parade for straight people who claim they’re an “oppressed majority.” One Twitter jokester recommended that the parade take a “straight” route right into the Boston harbor.  


While the idea of a few dozen angry straight people marching might be funny, the actual origins of Straight Pride Parade are not. The event is a front for a far-right group founded by notorious right-wing brawler Kyle “Based Stickman” Chapman.

Image

Screenshot via Facebook

Straight Pride organizer Mark Sahady announced the parade on Facebook, claiming he received permits for the event that would likely take place on August 31.


But Sahady isn’t just a particularly aggrieved straight dude. Instead, he has a long history participating in controversial right-wing events around Boston as an organizer for Resist Marxism, a group Chapman founded at the height of the fame he earned attacking left-wing anti-fascist activists with his eponymous “stick.”


Chapman appears to no longer be involved with the group now that he’s facing felony charges in two states over two assaults. But Sahady has taken up his position, organizing Resist Marxism events around the Boston area.


In Facebook posts, Sahady has endorsed the far-right “helicopter” meme, which calls for liberals to be thrown from helicopters as in Augusto Pinochet’s Chile.


“We may get to throw anti-American communists from helicopters sooner than we thought,” Sahady wrote in one Facebook post.


Resist Marxism’s politics get even uglier, though. In leaked internal chats published in 2018, members frequently made anti-Semitic jokes and used anti-Semitic slurs. At least one Resist Marxism event had security provided by Patriot Front, a white-nationalist hate group.


Sahady isn’t the only Straight Pride Parade organizer with ties to Resist Marxism. Another promoter, John Hugo, unsuccessfully ran for Congress last year with an endorsement and organizing support from the group.


It’s not clear that the parade will even happen, in part because Sahady has a history of failing to pull off his events. Last August, Sahady tried to organize a National March Against Far-Left Violence. The event’s Facebook page linked to a website offering free T-shirts for attendees, as long as they provided their names and addresses. The T-shirt site was later revealed to be an antifascist sting against Sahady and his compatriots, some of whom had accidentally handed their names and addresses over to their ideological enemies.


A source familiar with the Boston government’s permitting process told Right Richter that Sahady had not been granted permit so far. Sahady didn’t respond to a request for comment.

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline K-Dog

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Re: Who They Are...
« Reply #140 on: June 05, 2019, 11:23:20 PM »
I heard about this in my garage on the MFN Mainstream Fake News.  A totally different story.  Or Mother F............ News.  You choose.  Their point was that straights have not been discriminated against according to an unnamed LGBT spokesperson.  Nobody ever bothered straights so they don't deserve a parade.  That is how it was spun.  Beyond 180 degrees, more like a 270 degree spin I see.
« Last Edit: June 05, 2019, 11:34:55 PM by K-Dog »
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