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Offline Eddie

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Re: Marching around with guns on your chest? That’s all about fear.
« Reply #255 on: January 21, 2020, 06:11:55 AM »


This looks like a mix.....a little playing soldier, maybe combined with a shot of doomsday prepping for the Zombie
Apocalypse.

Yeah, probably a splash of "Let's re-fight the Civil War and see if we can get another ass-whuppin' from a superior force intent on world hegemony." in there too.



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Offline Eddie

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Re: Marching around with guns on your chest? That’s all about fear.
« Reply #256 on: January 21, 2020, 06:28:10 AM »


This looks like a mix.....a little playing soldier, maybe combined with a shot of doomsday prepping for the Zombie
Apocalypse.

Yeah, probably a splash of "Let's re-fight the Civil War and see if we can get another ass-whuppin' from a superior force intent on world hegemony." in there too.

Two radios. Check.
Zip ties. Check
Camo sunglasses. Check
Black mask and black hoodie. Check
Tactical vest. Check
AR-15 copy with red dot sights. Check.

I don't see fear. I see serious stupidity.

You just can't fix stupid.

Ex-Police in action.

http://www.nbc.com/saturday-night-live/video/xpolice/3007498
« Last Edit: January 21, 2020, 06:31:27 AM by Eddie »
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Offline Surly1

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Re: Marching around with guns on your chest? That’s all about fear.
« Reply #257 on: January 21, 2020, 07:57:22 AM »


This looks like a mix.....a little playing soldier, maybe combined with a shot of doomsday prepping for the Zombie
Apocalypse.

Yeah, probably a splash of "Let's re-fight the Civil War and see if we can get another ass-whuppin' from a superior force intent on world hegemony." in there too.

Two radios. Check.
Zip ties. Check
Camo sunglasses. Check
Black mask and black hoodie. Check
Tactical vest. Check
AR-15 copy with red dot sights. Check.

I don't see fear. I see serious stupidity.

You just can't fix stupid.

Ex-Police in action.

http://www.nbc.com/saturday-night-live/video/xpolice/3007498

Yes indeed.

So-called grown adults decked out in pretend soldier gear engaging in militia cosplay outside the Virginia Capitol. And of course, Alex Jones, he who otherwise revels in harassing the parents of murdered children, was seen and heard riding around Richmond with a bullhorn spouting his paranoid fever dream nonsense. Using a gun to menace others, threatening violence in order to intimidate government, is not "self defense." It's terrorism. Or, at minimum, the will to intimidate.
So then we are left to determine root causes...


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Offline Eddie

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Re: Who They Are...
« Reply #258 on: January 21, 2020, 08:36:11 AM »
These guys aren't from ANY privilege, imho. They are the remains of the white labor class, now largely made redundant. They  used to build things and make things (as long as somebody else hired them and trained them and paid them)  but now they're more oriented toward tearing things down. They feel betrayed and abandoned and powerless.

We've argued about this before, and I am frustrated because I can't seem to get my point across. Even though we agree on most of this.
In the colonial West Indies, the English owner class used slavery system that developed as an outgrowth of the demand for sugar and other crops. The Spanish had found that the resident natives were't useful labor; imprisoned, they withered up and died. So, as we all know, they imported Africans to keep the British upper crust in luxury goods like sugar, tobacco, and coffee. All produced using slave labor.

Many Irish were also imported in Barbados and Jamaica as indentured services. their lives as bondsmen were also pretty awful, similar to the blacks, with the marked exception that the indenture eventually ended, whereas the African slaver remained a slave until death, un less he was freed. May freed Irish became overseers of slaves. With the message being, "No matter hw low you may be in my eyes, and you are, you are still not as bad off as THEM."

That's what I mean by white privilege being structural.


They buy guns as a substitute for having any real power (or meaning) in their existential lives. They are a bunch of losers, and I mean that in a very real sense.

They played high school sports, but now they just watch football on TV. Maybe a few of them deer hunt. A lot of them are cops and ex-cops and ex-military. They go to church and call themselves Christians and they tie yellow ribbons out the wazoo supporting the troops.

Yeah, I'd say most of them are racists. But I'd also say MOST PEOPLE are racist on some level. Diversity is a fake virtue that only exists on college campuses, in government buildings, and in the hearts of liberal journalists. Everyone else is biased toward their own race.

To call them privileged ignores the fact that there ARE plenty of privlieged white people...and a smaller but significant number of privileged black and brown people. But (to me anyway) it isn't these guys. Being an assistant manager at Kroger's and struggling to pay rent or a mortgage and a car payment is not privilege.
Definitely more part of the problem than they are any solution.

To my point above, theirs is there "privilege" of the Irish overseer. At least they aren't black. I disagree with you about "diversity." I learned as a grade school kid about the so-called "melting pot," and that's why e pluribus unum. Of course this was the 50s. I think you see this much more in urban areas where people are more obliged to share space.

Anybody dead yet in Richmond? If nobody dies, it'll be a miracle.

I'm writing at 5:38 EST, and I can 't see that anyone was killed. One arrest, of a woman who had her face covered with a bandanna. Police said she was arrested after she continued to wear it after an officer warned her twice to uncover her face. Numerous armed rally attendees were also seen covering their faces without being confronted by police. But they were men.

White men.

This is privilege. (See the link)

https://www.austinhomesearch.com/Listing/ListingSearch.aspx

 I'm putting a link to a local real estate search.  I'm only searching for houses worth more than 2.5 million. Right now there are 158 of them just in my local area.  To own this kind of castle,  you have to have real privilege. Not many dentists are in this category, Perhaps a few who invested very well at just the right time.

Some of the people who own houses like this are in some kind of tech, and many of them built and sold tech businesses. Real estate people make this kind of money, if they get lucky. Car dealers. Oil and gas money.

Most of the people who buy homes like this are white.(But not all. A fair number of financially successful American blacks do hit this lottery.) 

But my point is just that most white people have exactly zero chance of ever having this kind of wealth.

So, I would just continue to say, "Privilege is in the eye of the beholder."

Yes, we have (and aways have had) classism in this country. And black people are generally at the bottom and get the worst treatment. By cops, By racist whites, of whom there are many.

In some places hispanics get treated poorly. (Here, it can go either  way, In some places in Texas, whites get treated poorly by a hispanic majority.)

In the Caribbean, whites often get treated poorly in places like the grocery store, especially if they act like they're from NYC. If you're respectful and friendly the tolerance level is better.

My main point is that "white privilege"  is bad semantics, because it implies all whites are privileged to the same extent, which is completely erroneous.
« Last Edit: January 21, 2020, 08:39:08 AM by Eddie »
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Offline Surly1

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Re: Who They Are...
« Reply #259 on: January 21, 2020, 01:48:30 PM »
Quote from: Eddie
So, I would just continue to say, "Privilege is in the eye of the beholder."

On this we can absolutely agree.

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Offline Surly1

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That Pro-Gun Rally in Virginia Wasn’t Exactly “Peaceful”
« Reply #260 on: January 23, 2020, 03:34:24 AM »
More on the domestic terrorist next door.

That Pro-Gun Rally in Virginia Wasn’t Exactly “Peaceful”
The threat of violence in Richmond—and arrest of neo-Nazis—sent other groups into hiding.


A swastika made of AR15s
Photo Illustration by Alicia Tatone

On Monday, the streets of Richmond, Virginia, were flooded with a spectacular arsenal of weaponry; some 22,000 people from all over the country had turned up to protest the gun control laws recently passed by the Virginia State Senate. Fearing a repeat of the deadly violence that had gripped the city of Charlottesville, Virginia, three years earlier, governor Ralph Northam declared a state of emergency and barred weapons from the Capitol grounds. Some 6,000 protesters grumblingly abided. But just outside the legions of police barricades, twice that number of people roamed the streets of Richmond bearing a bristling mass of rifles, from AR-15s to massive Barrett sniper rifles. Some wore skull masks; others waved Confederate flags. Members of hate groups like the League of the South and the American Guard, as well as the Proud Boys, mingled openly; some of the latter were wearing patches that said “RWDS”—an acronym for “Right-Wing Death Squad.” Conspiracy theorist Alex Jones gave a speech from a Terradyne battle tank. Adding to the bellicose mood, some attendees paraded with a massive guillotine as a prop, and others held up an effigy strung on a noose, emblazoned with the slogan, “Thus always to tyrants.”

No one was shot—a frankly extraordinary turn of events given the sheer amount of weaponry, the density of the crowd, and the weapons stuffed casually into backpacks or held loosely in the crooks of pale arms. This happy vicissitude of fate led right-wing groups to declare the event a triumph—in the words of fringe-right publications Gateway Pundit and InfoWars, a “peaceful protest.” Mainstream media, too, bought into this analysis: “Pro-gun rally by thousands in Virginia ends peacefully,” was the assessment of the Washington Post. Having made Northam the butt of their rhetorical ire during the rally, conservative groups further condemned his choice to declare a state of emergency in the state’s capital: “Gov. Northam fantasizes he saved Virginia from volatile situation,” crowed a headline at Breitbart.

All this confidence belied the fact that bloodshed—great and heavy and perhaps unprecedented on American soil—was narrowly averted. A federal motion for detention released Tuesday revealed that three members of neo-Naziterror group The Base had planned to attend Monday’s rally in Virginia, kitted out with a home-built, functioning fully-automatic rifle capable of firing several rounds at a time; survival gear; and 1,500 rounds of ammunition. They had planned to open fire into the crowd.

According to the affidavit, one of the men had postulated that there were enough “radicalized” individuals slated to be in Richmond that “all you gotta do is start making things go wrong and Virginia can spiral out to fucking full blown civil war.” Their goal, one of the men stated in a video, was to “bring the collapse…If you want the white race to survive, you’re going to have to do your fucking part.” The three men were arrested four days before the Richmond rally—held at bay from fulfilling the fantasies they had described of “literally hunting people” in a heavily armed crowd, and setting into motion a chain of violent events that would extend far beyond Richmond.

But even with the Base threat—which was thoroughly ignored by right-wing media—neutralized, it seems myopic at best to describe the Monday event as “peaceful.” There was, it was true, an absence of immediate bloodshed; but what abounded, in that armed and insurrectionist sea of humanity, was the promise that bloodshed might happen at any time, should the will of the mob be thwarted. America’s exceptional tolerance towards armed white gunmen—its brooking of gun-toting militias around the country, and the po-faced seriousness with which the media takes claims of “freedom” when it comes to the right to own weapons of mass slaughter—is entirely restricted to this demographic. Famously, California enacted gun-control legislation prohibiting the open carrying of firearms after a demonstration of armed Black Panthers on the steps of the state house; this swift reactive prohibition was enacted by then-governor Ronald Reagan. The threat of white supremacist violence, despite resulting in multiple shooting massacres against black people, Jews, and Latinos in the last several years, has yet to pierce the national consciousness as the vast and threatening specter it is. Terrorists were intercepted on the way to this rally with the open goal of sparking civil war; the thousands of armed individuals roaming the streets of an American city openly proclaimed their intent not to obey laws they might disagree with. Yet their very whiteness rendered them invisible as a threat: in America, if you are white, you can wear a mask and carry a gun and hang a governor in effigy, and go home quietly at the end of the day, unmolested.

On Monday, itself the sea of armed men kept the city in a kind of artificial stillness—not safety but fear. There is a difference between peace that consists of calm and security, and the false peace of being held under threat. One may be silent when held at gunpoint, but it is not the silence of contentment; it is the silence of mortal terror.

Reporter friends who planned to attend the event went in with a sense of dread, a war-zone fatalism at what might happen. Molly Conger, a Virginia-based leftist activist and citizen journalist, told me that she had cautioned other activists to stay far from the capital and avoid counterprotest. She attended, she told me, because she felt an obligation to document the event, rather than to protest it. “I still think it was the right thing to do,” she told me Tuesday, of her decision to warn other activists away. “I would be distraught if I had the power to keep people away and didn’t and they died in a mass shooting.” At the event, she said, “the crowd was so thick I got knocked in the face and chest with rifle barrels.”

The effects on locals amounted to a sweeping petrification. Due to Monday’s event, Richmond natives closed their businesses downtown—from a 7-11 near the Capitol to a barbershop to the entirety of Virginia Commonwealth University, which suspended all activities for the day, including internships and clinical placements; a university statement made clear that this was in response to the threat, not the federal holiday. NBC reported that some residents of Jackson Ward, a historically black neighborhood in the city, left town entirely for the day—which was Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

Due to the state of emergency declared by the governor, legislative business slowed to a crawl; nonessential personnel stayed away from the capitol. So did other political groups that had planned to lobby the legislature on Monday, part of a “Lobby Days” tradition that dates back decades. The Northern Virginia Association for the Deaf had planned to lobby the legislature in support of a bill that would require movie theaters to include captions. Its president, Maryrose Gonzalez, told me they’d stayed home to avoid “getting caught up with the gun people.”

The Coalition to Stop Gun Violence, a group that had hosted a Martin Luther King Jr. Day event in Richmond for 28 years, canceled its vigil. “Advocates have faced armed individuals trying to intimidate us each year,” wrote the group’s president, Lori Haas, in a press release. “But this year is different; we have received information that heavily armed white supremacists will be seeking to incite violence, and our organization has decided that the safety of our volunteers, advocates, and staff, many of whom are survivors of gun violence, must be our top priority.”

An annual, long-planned march for the rights of undocumented Virginians, coordinated by New Virginia Majority, an advocacy group for working-class Black and Brown Virginians, was cancelled on the Friday before the gun lobby group. Ibby Han, a representative of the organization Virginia Student Power, which had partnered in the MLK Jr. Day event since 2015, told me that the New Virginia Majority event had expected around 1,000 attendees, many of whom were undocumented. The advocacy event was centered around drivers’ licenses for undocumented immigrants and criminal justice reform. “We are enraged,” the organization wrote, “that we cannot use our voices today at the General Assembly.”

That the zeal of armed activists should crush the rights of others to advocate is neither novel nor unexpected, for all their loudly proclaimed adoration of “freedom.” Americans weary of mass shootings at malls, churches, kindergartens, concerts, nightclubs, abortion clinics, hospitals, universities, and movie theaters—in short, in any place where people gather—have long pointed out that the fear marring any movement through the commons constitutes an infringment of the right to pursue life, liberty, and happiness. We speak the names of towns that have become synonymous with mass shootings like a litany, a kaddish for the dead. This state of affairs is enforced by a minority that is both well-heeled and well-armed. As if to underscore the point, the NRA handed out 1,000 free 30-round magazines to gun owners before the rally. The event on Monday served the only possible purpose thousands of armed men gathering en masse can serve: it served as a threat, in this case against democracy itself.

The Virginia state legislature that rally-goers were eager to call “tyrants” had been elected, democratically, the previous year, in a wave election that shook off a 20-year Republican chokehold on the legislative body of the state. One of the major issues that propelled Democrats to victory was the promise of gun-control legislation, particularly after a mass shooting in Virginia Beach left 12 city residents dead and four others wounded in May 2019. For all their loud objection to “tyranny,” the purpose of the armed crowd was to thwart the will of an electorate that had outvoted them. Virginians’ overall enthusiasm for gun control measures has not waned since last year’s election; a poll conducted in December revealed that Virginia voters strongly support requiring background checks on all gun sales, 86% to 13%, and passing a “red flag” law to remove guns from someone who may harm someone, 73% to 23%. A majority, 54% to 44%, support banning assault-style weapons.

Nonetheless, in advance of Monday’s event, socialist state legislator Lee Carter, the target of a whirlwind of pro-gun conspiracy theories, went into hiding. Carter’s bill had been proposed in a prior legislative session, intended to support teachers’ rights to strike; responding to safety concerns about the potential of police strikes, he had amended it to maintain the status quo prohibiting law enforcement officers from public-sector striking. This was interpreted, in a whirl of YouTube rants and conspiracy chatter, as a bill to punish sheriffs who might refuse to enforce gun-control laws. The death threats were so relentless, he told GEN, that he chose to hide out in an undisclosed safe house on the day of the rally. “I’m not interested in becoming a martyr,” he said. The message was clear enough, it has been clear enough for years: to oppose the monopoly of gun owners over the American commons is to risk death.

The rally was, as one attendee put it to Vice reporter Tess Owen, intended to be“a show of force.” Not the force of popular will, nor the force of solidarity, but the kind of force that comes packed into magazines, with barrels cocked, effigies hung in nooses, white skulls etched on black masks. It was a force that silenced others who sought to raise their voices, and was meant to. Monday was a day of a clenched fist raised in menace; rather than be lulled by the temporary absence of bloodshed, Americans would do better to be poised for the inevitable falling of the blow.

Talia Lavinis a writer based in Brooklyn. Her first book, Culture Warlords, is forthcoming in 2020 from Hachette Books.


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Offline Eddie

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Re: Who They Are...
« Reply #261 on: January 23, 2020, 04:28:31 AM »
Anybody who shows up at an event like that one, for any purpose, including "counter-protest", is bat-shit crazy.

The passing of the half-ass, watered down gun control legislation is hardly anything to brag about. It's too little and already too late, probably.

The will be other rallies like that one now, and not all of them will happen without innocent blood being shed, If there is a real breakdown of the rule of law, which is what the real racist radicals want, it will probably start with an event like that one. That is a real threat. It won't play out exactly like the Nazis want, but it will be one more breakdown of a failing society, when it inevitably happens.

This is a society in serious decline now. Nothing is going to be fixed or resolved.

What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline K-Dog

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Re: Who They Are...
« Reply #262 on: January 23, 2020, 09:55:48 PM »


I want one.

Heavy Weight Metal/Wood Construction
Post Globe Front Sight; Adjustable Rear Sight
750FPS with lead .177 pellet
Fixed Barrel w/Cocking Lever
.177 Caliber Pellets
« Last Edit: January 23, 2020, 10:00:10 PM by K-Dog »
Under ideal conditions of temperature and pressure the organism will grow without limit.

Offline Surly1

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Re: Who They Are...
« Reply #263 on: January 24, 2020, 02:02:55 AM »


I want one.

Heavy Weight Metal/Wood Construction
Post Globe Front Sight; Adjustable Rear Sight
750FPS with lead .177 pellet
Fixed Barrel w/Cocking Lever
.177 Caliber Pellets

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Offline Eddie

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Re: Who They Are...
« Reply #264 on: January 24, 2020, 08:58:06 AM »


I want one.

Heavy Weight Metal/Wood Construction
Post Globe Front Sight; Adjustable Rear Sight
750FPS with lead .177 pellet
Fixed Barrel w/Cocking Lever
.177 Caliber Pellets

I got a Gamo after spending some time comparing. They're constantly changing and upgrading their models, but mine is a prior generation model similar to the one in the link below. I like .177 better than .22 . The newer air guns are quite a bit more powerful than the one you posted, Mine claims 1300 FPS.

This is comparable to the muzzle velocity of a "light" .22 rifle round.

Mine is a single shot.....this was always one of the negatives on air rifles.....but I see they're making one now that has a 10 shot magazine.. I'd call that a major innovation, if it works well. Dunno.


https://www.cabelas.com/product/GAMO-AIR-RIFLE-W-SCOPE-SWARM-FUSION/3368464.uts?slotId=2
« Last Edit: January 24, 2020, 09:01:20 AM by Eddie »
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Offline Eddie

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Re: Who They Are...
« Reply #265 on: January 24, 2020, 09:13:09 AM »


I want one.

Heavy Weight Metal/Wood Construction
Post Globe Front Sight; Adjustable Rear Sight
750FPS with lead .177 pellet
Fixed Barrel w/Cocking Lever
.177 Caliber Pellets



Daisy is still profiting off that movie and still cranking these out. ($35)

My mother, who (I'm pretty sure) coined the phrase "you''ll shoot your eye out" around 1961, was never credited.

                Gateway Drug


« Last Edit: January 24, 2020, 11:08:06 AM by Eddie »
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Surly1

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Re: Who They Are...
« Reply #266 on: January 24, 2020, 02:46:58 PM »


I want one.

Heavy Weight Metal/Wood Construction
Post Globe Front Sight; Adjustable Rear Sight
750FPS with lead .177 pellet
Fixed Barrel w/Cocking Lever
.177 Caliber Pellets



Daisy is still profiting off that movie and still cranking these out. ($35)

My mother, who (I'm pretty sure) coined the phrase "you''ll shoot your eye out" around 1961, was never credited.

                Gateway Drug

 :icon_mrgreen: :icon_mrgreen:

Jean Shepherd's book came out in 1966, so he may have stolen it from her. But maybe not.
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Billings legislator insists Constitution says it’s OK to shoot socialists
« Reply #267 on: February 04, 2020, 06:07:42 AM »
Billings legislator insists Constitution says it’s OK to shoot socialists


HELENA — A Billings Republican legislator said Saturday he believes the U.S. Constitution calls for the shooting or jailing of those who identify as socialists.

State Rep. Rodney Garcia, from House District 52 on the South Side, first made a statement in the form of an unprompted question at a state party gathering in Helena Friday meant to kick off election season and offer training for party members and candidates. 

In his question after a speech by former Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke, who was Montana’s representative in the U.S. House for two years, Garcia said he was concerned about socialists “entering our government” and socialists “everywhere” in Billings, before saying the Constitution says to either shoot socialists or put them in jail.

The Montana Republican Party later condemned Garcia's remarks.

In this year's presidential election, President Donald Trump has often called Democrats "radical socialists" in an attempt to use the term socialism, which is defined as theories about collective or government ownership and operation of the means of production and distribution, as a boogeyman-like phrase to criticize proposals from Democrats where the federal government would play a larger role in areas like health care or education.

All but one of the Democratic Party candidates have repeatedly explained they are not socialists, while Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders calls himself a democratic socialist.

After Zinke responded with a non sequitur “You know, Montana’s a great state,” Garcia said back: “We have to do something.”

Zinke’s answer to Garcia didn’t engage in Garcia's statement and pivoted to talk about the former Secretary's effort to open satellite offices of the Interior department in the western part of the U.S.

On Saturday, a reporter asked Garcia to clarify his remarks.

“So actually in the Constitution of the United States (if) they are found guilty of being a socialist member you either go to prison or are shot,” Garcia said.

Garcia could not to point to where in the Constitution it says socialists could be shot or jailed.

Asked to clarify if he thought it was fair to shoot or jail a socialist, including those who live in Montana, Garcia said yes.

“They’re enemies of the free state,” Garcia said. “What do we do with our enemies in war? In Vietnam, (Afghanistan), all those. What did we do?”

Asked if that was an appropriate response to his opponent from the last election cycle, Garcia said “according to the Constitution, I’m telling you.”

“I agree with my Constitution,” Garcia said. “That’s what makes us free. We’re not a democracy, we’re a Republic Constitution.”

Marquez said Saturday she is associated with the Montana Democratic Party and is an eastern member at-large with the party’s executive board. She said she is also a democratic socialist and her political views align with those of Sanders.

Marquez said Saturday after being told about Garcia's statements she wished the state legislator would spend more time talking to his constituents about their needs.

“I wish Rep. Garcia would continue to focus on the issues rather than this constant worry over things that are somewhat ludicrous,” Marquez said.

Garcia said he views what he sees as an influx of socialism in Montana as a “very dangerous” situation and that socialism has destroyed countries like Venezuela.

“They’re teaching that to kids. Thank God my grandkids know it’s wrong because I teach them. And it’s a very dangerous situation," Garcia said.

Garcia added he believes socialism is growing, citing advertising he says is done by socialists on Facebook.

Garcia is not new to controversy. During the 2019 state legislative session in the midst of debate over child protective services, he went on a conservative radio show to accuse child protection workers of kidnapping children. He was forced to return a $3,000 campaign contribution in 2018. He also proposed a bill during the 2019 session that would have had the state of Montana buy the Colstrip power plant. It was tabled in committee.

The Montana Republican Party issued a statement Saturday censuring Garcia’s comments. When Garcia spoke Friday there was laughter after his question; some of those asked by a reporter about it said it was a response to an uncomfortable situation.

“The Montana Republican Party wholeheartedly condemns the comment that was made and under no circumstance is violence against someone with opposing political views acceptable,” said Spenser Merwin, the MT GOP executive director. “It’s disappointing that this isolated incident took away from the weekend’s events which showcased the strength of our statewide candidates and the importance of the upcoming election.”

The Montana Democratic Party on Saturday evening released a statement decrying Garcia.

"Rodney Garcia has brazenly flaunted his conviction for a domestic dispute, called single moms deadbeats, and was only elected because he created an illegal campaign cash scam. Now he's publicly calling for people to be shot,” said party chair Robyn Driscoll, adding she thinks candidates who were at the event should condemn Garcia.

Garcia in 2018 told the Billings Gazette he was involved in a domestic dispute with his ex-wife that led to his arrest and conviction. Garcia told the Gazette two years ago he made a phone call to his ex-wife but that he didn't do anything wrong.

Billings Gazette reporter Mari Hall contributed to this story.
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As others stand at attention for anthem, Trump fidgets, points, pretend-conducts
« Reply #268 on: February 04, 2020, 06:23:08 AM »
Hypocrisy is just part of the skill set.

As others stand at attention for anthem, Trump fidgets, points, pretend-conducts the band

https://www.miamiherald.com/news/politics-government/article239918518.html
[The video is hosted on the Miami Herald site, and to see it you have to follow the link, and endure their ads.]

President Trump's Super Bowl party

[url=https://www.miamiherald.com/news/politics-government/article239918518.html]https://www.miamiherald.com/news/politics-government/article239918518.html[/url]

An Instagram post appears to show the president fidgeting, pointing and pretending to lead the band while others stand at attention during the anthem. The video appears flipped, or mirrored, likely because it is recorded with a phone’s selfie camera.By Instagram

President Donald Trump has repeatedly said all Americans should “stand proudly” during the national anthem, and publicly chastises those who don’t as disrespectful of the troops and the flag.

But during the national anthem at his own Super Bowl watch party Sunday night, a brief video posted to Instagram shows Trump greeting guests, adjusting his chair, and straightening his suit jacket as other attendees — including first lady Melania Trump and their teenage son — stand with their hands over their hearts. As “The Star Spangled Banner” crescendoes, Trump raises both of his hands in the air, and twirls them around as if conducting the music.

The video was included in an Instagram story by a real estate agent for a Russian-American firm who frequents Mar-a-Lago and other Trump properties and events.

Trump entered his party at Trump International Golf Club in West Palm Beach as Demi Lovato was introduced to sing the national anthem at Hard Rock Stadium, videos of the moment show. It’s unclear from the video of Trump “conducting” whether the anthem you hear is Lovato, projected on screens around the room, or if a live performer is singing at the club.

(The video appears flipped,or mirrored, likely because it is an Instagram video recorded with a phone’s selfie camera. That is why Melania Trump appears to have her left hand across her chest and there is a backward numeral 4 in the video. The Herald chose to retain the original orientation as it was posted on the social media site.)

The White House declined to provide an on-the-record response to requests for comment. The Trump Organization did not immediately respond. Copies of the video were sent along with the Herald’s inquiries.

For years, Trump has publicly attacked NFL players who chose to kneel in protest during the anthem.

“You have to stand, proudly, for the national anthem or you shouldn’t be playing. You shouldn’t be there. Maybe you shouldn’t be in the country,” Trump said in a 2018 interview with “Fox and Friends.” He has frequently tweeted about the issue, blaming kneeling players for a downturn in league attendance and ratings.

Donald J. Trump@realDonaldTrump

...NFL attendance and ratings are WAY DOWN. Boring games yes, but many stay away because they love our country. League should back U.S.

86.2K people are talking about this

The protest movement was started by former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick in August 2016 when he refused to stand during the pregame ritual. He described his choice as a protest against racism and police brutality. Within months, other players joined Kaepernick, taking a knee and bowing their heads during the anthem.

Kaepernick is no longer in the league and claims he was blackballed for his actions.

Trump and many others called the protests disrespectful to the flag and to the troops. In 2018, the NFL announced it would begin to fine players on the field for not standing during the anthem, but would allow them to stay in the locker room if they preferred.

Megan Rapinoe, co-captain of the U.S. Women’s World Cup team, refused to participate in the anthem during the 2019 World Cup, provoking Trump’s ire. At Sunday’s Super Bowl in Miami Gardens, Beyoncé and Jay-Z stayed seated during the anthem, drawing rebukes from many, especially conservative pundits.

“Maybe they should try another country that allows them a little more freedom & success?” Fox Nation host Tomi Lahren wrote on Twitter.

Tomi Lahren@TomiLahren

Beyoncé & Jay-Z (former crack dealer)sit for the national anthem because apparently the United States of America has oppressed them with millions upon millions of dollars & fans. Sounds rough. Maybe they should try another country that allows them a little more freedom & success?

25.8K people are talking about this

The Super Bowl watch party at Trump International Golf Club in West Palm Beach, just miles from Mar-a-Lago, is a tradition that predates the Trump presidency. It has taken on a new price tag in recent years due to the need for presidential security and travel budgets. Taxpayers will shell out $3.4 million for Trump’s visit to Palm Beach this past weekend, according to an analysis by the HuffPost.

Last year’s party stirred controversy when Trump inadvertently posed for a selfie with a woman who turned out to be Li “Cindy” Yang, founder of the massage parlor where New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft allegedly paid for sex.

Sarah Blaskey is an investigative and data reporter at the Miami Herald. She holds a master’s degree from the Columbia University School of Journalism and is a recent recipient of a Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting grant for her work on shark fishing and human trafficking in Central America.

"...reprehensible lying communist..."

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Christopath to sue NFL because Shakira and J-Lo endangered his eternal soul
« Reply #269 on: February 05, 2020, 09:58:27 AM »
Grabbing women by the pussy gets a bye, apparently. Another triggered snowflake.

Christian activist plans to sue NFL because Shakira and J-Lo performances endangered his eternal soul



By Matthew Chapman February 5, 2020
The halftime show at this year’s Super Bowl, featuring Shakira and Jennifer Lopez dancing in daring outfits onstage, drew fury from right-wing Christians — as two middle-aged women of color showing skin is apparently more shameful to them than the president of the United States bragging about assaulting women.

But according to Right Wing Watch, one Christian activist, Dave Daubenmire, is taking things even further. On his “Pass the Salt” podcast, Daubenmire said that he plans to sue the National Football League because the halftime show threatens to prevent him “from getting into the kingdom of Heaven.”

“I think we ought to sue,” said Daubenmire. “Would that halftime show, would that have been rated PG? Were there any warnings that your 12-year-old son—whose hormones are just starting to operate – was there any warning that what he was going to see might cause him to get sexually excited?”

“Could I go into a courtroom and say, ‘Viewing what you put on that screen put me in danger of hellfire’?” he continued. “Could the court say, ‘That doesn’t apply here because the right to [produce] porn overrides your right to [not] watch it’? Yeah, well, you didn’t tell me I was gonna watch it! You just brought it into my living room. You didn’t tell me there were gonna be crotch shots! That’s discriminatory against the value I have in my house. You can’t just do that. I wanna sue them for about $867 trillion.”

In addition to its raciness, the halftime performance has also generated buzz for its possibly political undertones, with Lopez and her daughter uniting from within a device that resembled a cage — theorized to be a reference to President Donald Trump’s family separation policy.
"...reprehensible lying communist..."