AuthorTopic: Eddie's Life Lessons and Remembered Aphorisms  (Read 390 times)

Offline Eddie

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Eddie's Life Lessons and Remembered Aphorisms
« on: August 11, 2018, 06:13:22 PM »
I've been thinking about making a list of pithy sayings I have known an loved. You know, the quotes I heard along the way that resonated with me.

And not just that, but the kind of real wisdom old people have learned the hard way. Life lessons are important to me. I have learned a few. I probably have some more to get. The best lessons seem to come with some pain attached to press the message home.

But you have to think. Right?

I think about such things, but maybe most people aren't that introspective. I dunno for sure.

What would you say if someone asked you what were/are the biggest lessons of your life? Feel free to share it/them on this thread, if you'd like. Otherwise I'll just have to do it solo.

I'm making this thread mostly for me, so if I think of enough cool stuff  to write a book like "10 Great Ways to Enjoy the End of Industrial Civilization and the Coming Death of the Planet" I can archive it here, where plagiarists will never think to look for it.

« Last Edit: August 11, 2018, 08:23:11 PM by Eddie »
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Online RE

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Re: Eddie's Life Lessons and Remembered Aphorisms
« Reply #1 on: August 11, 2018, 06:16:14 PM »
I've been thinking about making a list of pithy sayings I have known an loved. You know, the quotes I heard along the way that resonated with me.

And not just that, but the kind of real wisdom old people have learned the hard way. Life lessons are important to me. I have learned a few. I probably have some more to get. The best lessons seem to come with some pain attached to press the message home.

But you have to think. Right?

I think about such things, but maybe most people aren't that introspective. I dunno for sure.

What wold you say if someone asked you what were/are the biggest lessons of your life? Feel free to share it/them on this thread, if you'd like. Otherwise I'll just have to do it solo.

I'm making this thread mostly for me, so if I think of enough cool stuff  to write a book like "10 Great Ways to Enjoy the End of Industrial Civilization and the Coming Death of the Planet" I can archive it here, where plagiarists will never think to look for it.

"Live Fast, Die Young, Leave a Good Looking Corpse"

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Offline Eddie

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Re: Eddie's Life Lessons and Remembered Aphorisms
« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2018, 06:27:18 PM »
Not bad. Not my lesson, but it's an aphorism I've heard all my life. I never knew the origin. Here it is:



The saying “Live fast, die young and leave a good-looking corpse!” is often wrongly attributed to actor James Dean.

Dean didn’t actually say it — at least not in his movies.

If you’re a classic movie buff, you may know that “Live fast, die young and have a good-looking corpse!” is actually a famous line said by actor John Derek in the film Knock On Any Door, which premiered on February 21, 1949 and was released nationwide the next day.

It was the first major film role for Derek, who later married and guided the early film career of Bo Derek.

He plays Nick Romano, a young Italian hoodlum from the Chicago slums who is accused of killing a cop. Humphrey Bogart plays his attorney, Andrew Morton.

In the film, Nick tells his girlfriend that “Live fast, die young and have a good-looking corpse!” is his motto in life.

This great noir movie is generally given credit as the origin of the famous line — which is now usually misquoted as “…leave a good-looking corpse!” (Instead of “have.”)

And, certainly, the movie made it a popular saying (either with “have” or “leave”).

However, Nick’s motto was first used two years earlier in the book the film was based on, Knock on Any Door by the African-American novelist Willard Motley (1912-1965).
In Motley’s 1947 novel, Nick Romano says his motto several times.

Back then, it was unusual for an African-American author to write a book in which the central characters were white. But Motley was ahead of his time in terms of color-blind thinking and the book became a popular bestseller.

When some color-sensitive critics complained about a “Negro” writing about white folks, Motley responded: “My race is the human race.”

Indeed, that empathetic concept is a central theme of the book and movie.

It is memorably summed up by Bogart in the film, when he says to the jury who will decide if Nick is executed: “Until we do away with the type of neighborhood that produced this boy, ten will spring up to take his place, a hundred, a thousand. Until we wipe out the slums and rebuild them, knock on any door and you may find Nick Romano.”

Quotation expert Ralph Keyes speculates in his book The Quote Verifier that Motley may have been “recycling street talk” when he wrote the line “Live fast, die young and have a good-looking corpse.”

I did some extensive online searching and found uses and variations of the phrase “live fast and die young” dating back to the early 1900s.

But I didn’t find any uses of the longer saying mentioning a corpse prior to the publication of Knock on Any Door. So, I think Motley’s book probably is the origin of that fatalistic slogan.


http://www.thisdayinquotes.com/2010/02/real-origin-of-live-fast-die-young-and.html

Yeah. THAT John Derek. Who knew?
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Nearingsfault

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Re: Eddie's Life Lessons and Remembered Aphorisms
« Reply #3 on: August 11, 2018, 08:05:10 PM »
I always liked " Living well is the best revenge"

And a reminder to myself;
I learned long ago, never to wrestle with a pig. You get dirty, and besides, the pig likes it. George Bernard Shaw
If its important then try something, fail, disect, learn from it, try again, and again and again until it kills you or you succeed.

Offline Eddie

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Re: Eddie's Life Lessons and Remembered Aphorisms
« Reply #4 on: August 11, 2018, 08:20:32 PM »
That's interesting David. "Living well is the best revenge" is one of my very favorites, and I've repeated it more times than I can remember.

I'm not sure who I was  taking revenge on, though. The cool kids who didn't invite me to their parties?

I guess it's a blanket statement that covers a lot of slings and arrows of outrageous fortune. One thing is for sure. I've lived VERY well, and that's been a good justification.

« Last Edit: August 11, 2018, 08:25:19 PM by Eddie »
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline cernunnos5

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Re: Eddie's Life Lessons and Remembered Aphorisms
« Reply #5 on: August 11, 2018, 08:46:13 PM »
That is a hard call I could muse over for weeks

On the fly,


Humans have a tendency toward evil. Its problematic


or....



I started out wanting to be Luke Skywalker. I ended up being Han solo. The reluctant hero....

...The chicks seem to dig it. Look back to my first advice

Ah, its the mood...

Offline Eddie

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Re: Eddie's Life Lessons and Remembered Aphorisms
« Reply #6 on: August 11, 2018, 11:08:58 PM »
So...I think it would be cool to make a movie to play at my funeral.

Hi y'all. thanks for coming.  I made this movie a while back, so I could have the pleasure of saying goodbye to the people I love. As I'm making it, it occurs to me that I have no idea how long from now you'll be watching this. Hopefully, it was a good long while. Do I look young in this? Good.

Just kidding. But I wanted you to know I appreciate you coming. I never much went out of way to make a lot of friends, and if you're here, you probably knew me well. Thanks for being there for me, all these years. You made my life a lot better, I and should have been more grateful.

Some of the people I hoped would be here today to see me off are already gone. One of my regrets is that I didn't get to say goodbye to some of them. I miss them, and I expect some few of you might miss me. I hope you won't grieve excessively. I had a good life, and I enjoyed myself a great deal. Nobody gets out of this world alive. Death means my life has come full circle now. This is the natural way of living things.

Life is hard to fathom, but death is even harder. As I contemplate my own mortality, it occurs to me that some utterly banal afternoon I might suddenly feel a little dizzy and then pass out...and then just be gone. End of story. That's the hardest part. The finality.

Life is about walking through time. Every day of your life the sun comes up and you go about your existence, working, going to school, falling in love, maybe being sick at times, feeling all the feelings humans have, like hunger and lust and loneliness and maybe occasionally feeling triumphant. It's hard to realize that this incarnation is finite, and that when it's over, there isn't a part two or another chapter or a sequel.

But my experience is that the dead, if their consciousness persists at all, aren't obsessed with staying in contact with the living. Maybe it's like the Tibetan Book of the Dead says, and death is a portal into full realization, or failing that, into rebirth. I don't know...

I don't think any of us living really knows. But being dead now, maybe I have my answer to that question. Hehehe.

Or maybe the idea of consciousness beyond death is a vain human construct, and I'm just headed back to dust with my recently defunct body.

Those would seem to me to be the possibilities here. One or the other, and there's no way to know until your dead.

It seems more comforting to me, now, while I yet breathe, to believe that consciousness is primary, and that my consciousness is the magnet that pulled the molecules of my body together from random space and made me human. And if I was wrong about that, what have I lost by hoping for that? If I'm just worm food, it doesn't matter that my faith might have been misplaced. So what?

If I have hope for what comes next for me, though, part of that hope is that the love I have for you, my family and my friends, will endure. They say that love never dies, and I believe that. If there is a force that guides the universe through time/space and births the stars and and planets and life forms, I suspect that love is that force. So as you leave my mortal remains to be buried or burned, take my love with you and wear it like a favorite old sweater.  Let it keep you warm when your bones feel the chill of life's winter storms.

I do like the idea of rebirth. It makes better sense to me than the idea that God separates us into the worthy and the unworthy in some kind of judgment. I believe that if judgment is a part of it, that we judge ourselves, and are our own worst critics. The Eastern idea, that we all find our way to realization, in our own time and perhaps after getting it wrong plenty of times first, is very comforting to me.

My life was made instantly better years ago when I accepted that I didn't have to to ace the final exam in this one lifetime to reach some perfect heaven. I expect it might take me several more tries to get it right.

If it's been a long time since I made this little film, probably the only ones here are my children. This is a good chance for me to drop in a little apology. I know I let you down a lot. Fatherhood was not always something I did well. I'm not sure how your mother was so good at parenthood, but she always carried more than her share of the weight. But I always loved you, and that love remains, although I am no longer with you.

Take care of each other and cherish each other. That is my only directive.

I remember the day we buried my father. I remember it in a fond bittersweet way. He was a big believer in going to funerals. When i was a kid I didn't quite get it, butI finally realized at some point in my life that it was an important social responsibility  to him, and more than that, a social opportunity, a time to touch base with far-flung family and friends and share stories and food and celebrate the lives of the departed.

That day I remember I sat and visited with one of my uncles with whom I had never been especially close, and he told me stories about my Dad, many things I never even knew,  and answered many questions I had, and I looked at him and saw my father living in him. Both in his long memory of days long past , way before my time, and in his eyes and the cut of his jaw and the many similarities that the two brothers shared.

It seemed like hundreds of people came to pay their respects that day. All those people remembered the times he'd showed up for them and theirs. It was the biggest funeral I ever attended, and guys who worked for and with my Dad lined up in a long line after the service  and it must have taken me an hour to shake hands with them all and say thanks for coming.

In my time, I have never held on tightly to the ones I loved. I haven't been the best friend to many of my best friends. I haven't attended many funerals and I'm not connected to the kind of huge social network my father had.

I expect you are a very small group. But that's okay. Besides, I'm already gone, as you are no doubt coming to grips with now. My life narrative is complete, and you must go on with your lives without me. I wish you all the best.  My belief is that the future for our way of life and our species and for our planet is very bleak. I'm sorry if you are going to have to live through difficult times and have to struggle and experience a lot of death and destruction.

I believe I have lived at the very peak of human civilization, such as it has been, and that we are all witnessing the beginning of the end of a lot of things we take for granted.

I have many regrets. Chief among them is that I did not choose a path early in life that might have been more oriented toward making the world a better place. I chose to try to build a comfortable and pleasant life for myself and my immediate family, and I have been somewhat successful at that. I wish that I and a lot of other people had kept on working more for the common good of all species and the earth in the way we seemed to be once starting to embrace in my youth, when many more possibilities existed to save things.

I am happy to have lived at all. Life has often been very sweet. I can't help but feel that all of us humans have a special role in this unfolding of the universe, for we seem to be the only ones of all the living things who could ever see the big picture, or understand our own mortality. We are animals, just like the other creatures here in many ways, and perhaps it would have been asking too much for us to have evolved into a race that could have overcome our own collective human character defects. I'm still not sure.

I have fallen short, and I hope you will forgive me for not having done more. I forgive all of you, and I forgive myself. And I ask for God's forgiveness as well. May he show me more mercy than I deserve.

If you loved me, and I know some of you did, spend some time today sharing some stores about me, and please raise a glass to me if it suits you, but don't run off the road on the way home. Carry my memory in you hearts. As long as some of you remember me, I will live on.

Well, time to really say goodbye now. Parting, as the bard said, is such sweet sorrow. But you have to move on. I leave you what courage I have, in addition to what worldly goods of mine might remain. I don't expect that's much, but use it as you see fit.

Right now, as I make this film, I'm still alive and in sound body and mind, as they say, so I raise my glass to you. I hope to be reunited with you again. So long and thanks for coming.











« Last Edit: August 12, 2018, 09:32:03 AM by Eddie »
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Agent Graves

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Re: Eddie's Life Lessons and Remembered Aphorisms
« Reply #7 on: August 12, 2018, 03:03:45 AM »

 :exp-angel:
Lucky you supplied coffee becuase that was a long speech Ed, I got hungry, those sandwiches better be good. Heres that fifty bucks i didnt get round to returning, actually you dont need it now. Mind if I ask out the widow? ok Ill take some flowers in case I get a date. You look peaceful, ill just check your pulse. Argh! oh its your watch. Go toward the light mate.

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Online RE

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Re: Eddie's Life Lessons and Remembered Aphorisms
« Reply #8 on: August 12, 2018, 04:01:28 AM »
So...I think it would be cool to make a movie to play at my funeral.
...

Right now, as I make this film, I'm still alive and in sound body and mind, as they say, so I raise my glass to you. I hope to be reunited with you again. So long and thanks for coming.

You could easily use that as my Obit also, my brother.

All you have to do is change "I hope to be reunited with you again" to "See You on the Other Side".

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/-9yYJ6ZAYns" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/-9yYJ6ZAYns</a>

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Offline AJ

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Re: Eddie's Life Lessons and Remembered Aphorisms
« Reply #9 on: August 12, 2018, 04:10:29 AM »
That was great Eddie, I wish I had thought of it. There won't be many at my funeral and if the SHTF soon we might all have unattended funerals.
My favorite saying: Nullius in Verba I actually got a tattoo of it on my arm.
Not original (Royal Society motto and before that the Roman Horace), but it sums up my direction in life. Don't take anybody's word and especially not that of authority, demand evidence.

Offline Eddie

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Re: Eddie's Life Lessons and Remembered Aphorisms
« Reply #10 on: August 12, 2018, 07:41:51 AM »
That was great Eddie, I wish I had thought of it. There won't be many at my funeral and if the SHTF soon we might all have unattended funerals.
My favorite saying: Nullius in Verba I actually got a tattoo of it on my arm.
Not original (Royal Society motto and before that the Roman Horace), but it sums up my direction in life. Don't take anybody's word and especially not that of authority, demand evidence.

Not many pithy sayings are worth tattooing on your arm. That one definitely is. I like it.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Eddie

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Re: Eddie's Life Lessons and Remembered Aphorisms
« Reply #11 on: August 12, 2018, 07:43:43 AM »

 :exp-angel:
Lucky you supplied coffee becuase that was a long speech Ed, I got hungry, those sandwiches better be good. Heres that fifty bucks i didnt get round to returning, actually you dont need it now. Mind if I ask out the widow? ok Ill take some flowers in case I get a date. You look peaceful, ill just check your pulse. Argh! oh its your watch. Go toward the light mate.

I never wore a watch. Check for an explosive device immediately.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Eddie

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Re: Eddie's Life Lessons and Remembered Aphorisms
« Reply #12 on: August 12, 2018, 07:59:05 AM »
“I think most of us are looking for a calling, not a job. Most of us, like the assembly-line worker, have jobs that are too small for our spirit. Jobs are not big enough for people.”

                                   ------ Studs Terkel, from Working

I read this book when I was much younger. Terkel is one worth re-reading. He really got it. I look around now at the profession that calls itself journalism, and I wonder where the Studs of this generation is hiding out.

Maybe down in Mexico somewhere, drinking beer with Morris Berman, Fred Reed, or maybe off by himself in a corner in some dusty cantina, having  a conversation with the ghost of Ambrose Bierce.
« Last Edit: August 12, 2018, 09:41:56 AM by Eddie »
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Eddie

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Re: Eddie's Life Lessons and Remembered Aphorisms
« Reply #13 on: August 12, 2018, 08:08:25 AM »
So...I think it would be cool to make a movie to play at my funeral.
...

Right now, as I make this film, I'm still alive and in sound body and mind, as they say, so I raise my glass to you. I hope to be reunited with you again. So long and thanks for coming.

You could easily use that as my Obit also, my brother.

All you have to do is change "I hope to be reunited with you again" to "See You on the Other Side".

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/-9yYJ6ZAYns" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/-9yYJ6ZAYns</a>

RE

Thanks. But I'll be taking more time with your obit, if I truly do get to write it. It'll be the best I can scribble, I promise you that.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Eddie

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Re: Eddie's Life Lessons and Remembered Aphorisms
« Reply #14 on: August 12, 2018, 08:21:42 AM »
Okay, here's my own personal observation of the day, and then I'll stop spamming the forum.

Why is it that if you run out of coffee you always wish you just had one more cup.......

And then...... if you ask if anyone wants more, they always do, but then when you make a fresh pot, nobody ever seems to drink it? Including you.

There is a fundamental quality of human nature hiding in there somewhere, I'm pretty sure.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

 

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