AuthorTopic: Eddie's Life Lessons and Remembered Aphorisms  (Read 426 times)

Online Surly1

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Re: Eddie's Life Lessons and Remembered Aphorisms
« Reply #15 on: August 12, 2018, 10:01:59 AM »
“I think most of us are looking for a calling, not a job. Most of us, like the assembly-line worker, have jobs that are too small for our spirit. Jobs are not big enough for people.”

                                   ------ Studs Terkel, from Working

I read this book when I was much younger. Terkel is one worth re-reading. He really got it. I look around now at the profession that calls itself journalism, and I wonder where the Studs of this generation is hiding out.

Maybe down in Mexico somewhere, drinking beer with Morris Berman, Fred Reed, or maybe off by himself in a corner in some dusty cantina, having  a conversation with the ghost of Ambrose Bierce.


Great book. A friend of mine got it for me for a birthday, and I drank it up.

I remember this one:

“Most people were raised to think they are not worthy. School is a process of taking beautiful kids who are filled with life and beating them into happy slavery. That's as true of a twenty-five-thousand-dollar-a-year executive as it is for the poorest."
Bill Talcott - Organizer”

Note that at the time, $25K was a lot of money.

Later I encountered this quote, which awoke a number of perceptions that changed the direction of my career:

“People are hungry for stories. It's part of our very being. Storytelling is a form of history, of immortality too. It goes from one generation to another.”
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Ashvin

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Re: Eddie's Life Lessons and Remembered Aphorisms
« Reply #16 on: August 12, 2018, 04:56:08 PM »
"Much unhappiness has come into the world because of bewilderment and things left unsaid." - FD

I was reading Notes from the Underground and C&P recently. A lesson to take away from this brilliant man is that you should always try to build up an opponent's argument into its best version before trying to take it down. Much easier said than done.

Offline John of Wallan

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Re: Eddie's Life Lessons and Remembered Aphorisms
« Reply #17 on: August 13, 2018, 03:38:18 AM »
Before you diagnose yourself with depression or low self-esteem, first make sure that you are not, in fact, just surrounded by assholes.

JOW

Offline Eddie

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Re: Eddie's Life Lessons and Remembered Aphorisms
« Reply #18 on: August 13, 2018, 04:18:04 AM »
Nice! LOL.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Eddie

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Re: Eddie's Life Lessons and Remembered Aphorisms
« Reply #19 on: August 13, 2018, 05:29:26 AM »
Okay, today's nugget is probably too well understood by most of us to be really profound, but it bears an honorable mention.

Time, as experienced by humans, is fairly constant, with some minor seasonal variations. But time is experienced by humans as fluid. This has always been known, but those who, in modern times, have experimented with psychedelics, have gotten a crash course in understanding what a central idea this is, to our perception of reality.

Childhood lasts almost forever, and old age goes by in a flash.

As deadlines approach, time always appears to speed up.

Smoking DMT takes you on a trip that can seem to last almost an eternity, from what I'm told, but it's over in 20 minutes by the clock. This is an extreme case, but drugs are hardly necessary to confirm that this phenomenon is true. We all notice it from time to time.

This week, I'm noticing it, because I'm catching a plane to go see RE on Wednesday evening, and I have a list of to-do's that need to be handled before I go. Time and tide.....

Last night I slept 6 hours, but this morning it seemed like it'd only been 6 minutes.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: Eddie's Life Lessons and Remembered Aphorisms
« Reply #20 on: August 13, 2018, 06:17:40 AM »
Okay, today's nugget is probably too well understood by most of us to be really profound, but it bears an honorable mention.

Time, as experienced by humans, is fairly constant, with some minor seasonal variations. But time is experienced by humans as fluid. This has always been known, but those who, in modern times, have experimented with psychedelics, have gotten a crash course in understanding what a central idea this is, to our perception of reality.

Childhood lasts almost forever, and old age goes by in a flash.

As deadlines approach, time always appears to speed up.

Smoking DMT takes you on a trip that can seem to last almost an eternity, from what I'm told, but it's over in 20 minutes by the clock. This is an extreme case, but drugs are hardly necessary to confirm that this phenomenon is true. We all notice it from time to time.

This week, I'm noticing it, because I'm catching a plane to go see RE on Wednesday evening, and I have a list of to-do's that need to be handled before I go. Time and tide.....

Last night I slept 6 hours, but this morning it seemed like it'd only been 6 minutes.

Does this come under your desire to protect and educate the children, as your negative derogatory commentary about my postings on Gold??

       


Side effects
A person is having a surreal hallucination with clocks.
The primary effect of DMT is the experience of intense hallucinations that alter the individual's perception of the world around them.

The main effect of DMT is psychological, with intense visual and auditory hallucinations, euphoria, and an altered sense of space, body, and time.

Many users describe profound, life-changing experiences such as visiting other worlds, talking with alien entities known as "DMT elves" or "machine elves," and total shifts in the perception of identity and reality.

When smoked, DMT produces brief yet intense visual and auditory hallucinations that have been described by users as an alternate reality, otherworldly, or a near-death experience.

In comparison to other psychedelic drugs, such as LSD, ketamine, and magic mushrooms, recreational users of DMT consider it to have the lowest side effect profile.

Possible side effects of DMT include:

    increased heart rate
    increased blood pressure
    chest pain or tightness
    agitation
    dilated pupils
    rapid rhythmic movements of the eye
    dizziness

When taken orally, DMT can cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.

Depending on the individual user, the DMT experience can range from intensely exciting to overwhelmingly frightening. The experience can be so powerful that users may have difficulty processing and integrating the "trip" into their real life.

Mental side effects may linger for many days or weeks after ingestion of the drug.

Risks

DMT is structurally related to the neurotransmitter serotonin and, because of this, a condition called serotonin syndrome is a potentially lethal health risk associated with its use. Individuals taking antidepressants are at highest risk for this complication.

Serotonin syndrome occurs when the body accumulates an excessive amount of serotonin. The condition is often caused by taking a combination of different drugs.

Too much serotonin in the body can lead to a range of symptoms, such as:

    agitation
    confusion
    high blood pressure
    loss of muscle coordination
    a headache

At higher doses, DMT can cause seizures, respiratory arrest, and coma.

DMT could have serious adverse consequences for users with pre-existing psychological problems or a mental illness, such as schizophrenia.

Due to limited research data, DMT is not known to cause physical dependence or addiction, although frequent recreational users may develop psychological cravings for the drug. The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) suggests that, unlike other hallucinogens, DMT use does not seem to induce tolerance of the drug.

Although it is not considered an addictive substance, DMT has several health risks, can produce terrifying hallucinations, and might lead to psychological dependency.

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/306889.php :icon_study:


Offline Eddie

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Re: Eddie's Life Lessons and Remembered Aphorisms
« Reply #21 on: August 13, 2018, 03:18:56 PM »
Okay, today's nugget is probably too well understood by most of us to be really profound, but it bears an honorable mention.

Time, as experienced by humans, is fairly constant, with some minor seasonal variations. But time is experienced by humans as fluid. This has always been known, but those who, in modern times, have experimented with psychedelics, have gotten a crash course in understanding what a central idea this is, to our perception of reality.

Childhood lasts almost forever, and old age goes by in a flash.

As deadlines approach, time always appears to speed up.

Smoking DMT takes you on a trip that can seem to last almost an eternity, from what I'm told, but it's over in 20 minutes by the clock. This is an extreme case, but drugs are hardly necessary to confirm that this phenomenon is true. We all notice it from time to time.

This week, I'm noticing it, because I'm catching a plane to go see RE on Wednesday evening, and I have a list of to-do's that need to be handled before I go. Time and tide.....

Last night I slept 6 hours, but this morning it seemed like it'd only been 6 minutes.

Does this come under your desire to protect and educate the children, as your negative derogatory commentary about my postings on Gold??

       


Side effects
A person is having a surreal hallucination with clocks.
The primary effect of DMT is the experience of intense hallucinations that alter the individual's perception of the world around them.

The main effect of DMT is psychological, with intense visual and auditory hallucinations, euphoria, and an altered sense of space, body, and time.

Many users describe profound, life-changing experiences such as visiting other worlds, talking with alien entities known as "DMT elves" or "machine elves," and total shifts in the perception of identity and reality.

When smoked, DMT produces brief yet intense visual and auditory hallucinations that have been described by users as an alternate reality, otherworldly, or a near-death experience.

In comparison to other psychedelic drugs, such as LSD, ketamine, and magic mushrooms, recreational users of DMT consider it to have the lowest side effect profile.

Possible side effects of DMT include:

    increased heart rate
    increased blood pressure
    chest pain or tightness
    agitation
    dilated pupils
    rapid rhythmic movements of the eye
    dizziness

When taken orally, DMT can cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.

Depending on the individual user, the DMT experience can range from intensely exciting to overwhelmingly frightening. The experience can be so powerful that users may have difficulty processing and integrating the "trip" into their real life.

Mental side effects may linger for many days or weeks after ingestion of the drug.

Risks

DMT is structurally related to the neurotransmitter serotonin and, because of this, a condition called serotonin syndrome is a potentially lethal health risk associated with its use. Individuals taking antidepressants are at highest risk for this complication.

Serotonin syndrome occurs when the body accumulates an excessive amount of serotonin. The condition is often caused by taking a combination of different drugs.

Too much serotonin in the body can lead to a range of symptoms, such as:

    agitation
    confusion
    high blood pressure
    loss of muscle coordination
    a headache

At higher doses, DMT can cause seizures, respiratory arrest, and coma.

DMT could have serious adverse consequences for users with pre-existing psychological problems or a mental illness, such as schizophrenia.

Due to limited research data, DMT is not known to cause physical dependence or addiction, although frequent recreational users may develop psychological cravings for the drug. The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) suggests that, unlike other hallucinogens, DMT use does not seem to induce tolerance of the drug.

Although it is not considered an addictive substance, DMT has several health risks, can produce terrifying hallucinations, and might lead to psychological dependency.

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/306889.php :icon_study:

 As Oscar Wilde said on his deathbed, ""Either this wallpaper goes, or I go."
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

 

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