AuthorTopic: Crazy Weather  (Read 102036 times)

Offline Surly1

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Apparently you can predict when the likelihood will be greater for tornadic activity, but you still can't predict exactly when or where they will touch down until briefly before they actually do that.  At that point, what can you really do?  Nada, just hunker down in the basement while your mobile home is turned into Matchsticks or warehouse into Razorblades.

Improve the building codes?  Yea good idea except it will cost a FORTUNE to put up buildings everywhere in Tornado Alley capable of withstanding an EF3 or higher.  The likelihood a tornado actually touches down on YOUR street remains fairly small, so you "risk it", build a storm shelter and buy insurance, right?  But will your insurance company pay out, totaling your home and build you a new one?  How often do you think that happens?

RE

For people in vulnerable areas, Gensini said the best thing to do might be to establish strong building codes and phase out weak-framed structures that are easily blown apart.

I find myself thinking about this more than a little. Building codes? Maybe... I remember last year after a hurricane, one structure built more ruggedly was left standing while its neighbors were flattened. Can't recall the specifics but you may remember.

Perhaps like most things in life, it will go on until it can't. When insurance companies can no longer gouge a profit out of their marks, you can rest assured that insurance will no longer be available at any price.

No buildings. Problem solved.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Surly1

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Re: Crazy Weather
« Reply #811 on: May 29, 2019, 04:42:15 PM »
Also...monolithic domes.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline RE

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I find myself thinking about this more than a little. Building codes? Maybe... I remember last year after a hurricane, one structure built more ruggedly was left standing while its neighbors were flattened. Can't recall the specifics but you may remember.

Perhaps like most things in life, it will go on until it can't. When insurance companies can no longer gouge a profit out of their marks, you can rest assured that insurance will no longer be available at any price.

No buildings. Problem solved.

They probably will stiffen the building codes in many of these places, but that will just end up making housing still more unaffordable.

Far as insurance goes, I suspect most of the people who had their homes flattened don't have any whether available or not for tornado destruction.  These are folks living on fixed incomes or low wage jobs, as cheap as they can.  An additional insurance rider is probably out of the budget.

Not living in that neighborhood at all is also not an option.  Tornado Alley is a HUGE section of the country going all the way from TX to IA  to the Dakotas to the north and as far east as OH and PA.  It's the Grain belt.  Where do all the farm workers live?  Where do you put the barns for all the animals?

The best alternative remains the Monolithic Domes, but while they are comparatively reasonable in price, still out of range for many living in mobile homes.

Your best bet is probably to live in a tent and dig out a hole in th ground as a storm shelter.  Weather gets bad, take down the tent and hole up.


RE
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Offline RE

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🌪️ Nostradamus RE (Roland Emmerich, Master of Disaster)
« Reply #813 on: May 29, 2019, 06:49:51 PM »
From "The Day After Tomorrow".  Tomorrow is now today.

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Offline RE

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🌪️ Third House Republican blocks massive disaster aid package
« Reply #814 on: May 31, 2019, 12:39:52 AM »
Flyover Country will not be happy about this.

RE

Third House Republican blocks massive disaster aid package

By JENNIFER SCHOLTES

05/30/2019 04:41 PM EDT

Updated 05/30/2019 04:48 PM EDT


Conservative House Republicans succeeded again Thursday in their campaign to derail passage of a $19.1 billion disaster aid package.

Rep. John Rose (R-Tenn.) objected to passing the bill by voice vote. Rep. Thomas Massie (R-Ky.), who derailed the same measure earlier this week, was by Rose's side.

The move means the measure will not be sent to President Donald Trump for his signature until the House returns from recess Monday and takes a roll call vote.

This is the third time a member of the GOP’s most conservative wing has risen to block the bill from becoming law during the 10-day Memorial Day recess, sparking public scorn from some members of their own party.

The dissenting lawmakers argue that such a massive emergency aid package should not be passed without a recorded vote and that the funding should be offset by other spending reductions, rather than increasing the federal deficit.
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Offline RE

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🌪️ Dissecting the meteorology of a BIG Tornado
« Reply #815 on: June 01, 2019, 03:35:30 AM »
Fascinating, but with the takeaway you are FUCKING NUTS to be chasing these things.

RE

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Offline azozeo

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It looks like 2019 could be the worst year for U.S. agriculture in modern American history by a very wide margin.  As you will see below, millions upon millions of acres of U.S. farmland will go unused this year due to cataclysmic flooding.  And many of the farmers that did manage to plant crops are reporting extremely disappointing results.  The 12 month period that concluded at the end of April was the wettest 12 month period in U.S. history, and more storms just kept on coming throughout the month of May.  And now forecasters are warning of another series of storms this week, and following that it looks like a tropical storm will pummel the region.  As Bloomberg has pointed out, we have truly never seen a year like this ever before…

    There has never been a spring planting season like this one. Rivers topped their banks. Levees were breached. Fields filled with water and mud. And it kept raining.

Many farmers just kept waiting for the flooding and the rain to end so that they could plant their crops, but that didn’t happen.

At this point it is too late for many farmers to plant crops at all, and it is now being projected that 6 million acres of farmland that is usually used for corn will go completely unsown this year…

    There has never been weather like this, either. The 12 months that ended with April were the wettest ever for the contiguous U.S. That spurred other firsts: Corn plantings are further behind schedule for this time of year than they have been in records dating to 1980 and analysts are predicting an unheard-of 6 million acres intended for the grain may simply go unsown this year.

And we could actually see even more soybean acres go unplanted, because the latest crop progress report shows that soybean planting is even further behind…

    The Crop Progress indicated just 67% of corn was planted in 18 key corn-producing states. The 2014-18 average for corn planted by June 2nd is 96%, so planting is off 30.2% in comparison.

    Corn planting has been at an all-time low percentage for the last three reports and remains behind schedule in 17 of the 18 states monitored.

    Soybean planting is behind in 16 of the 18 key soybean-producing states, according to the report. So far, just 39% of soybean planting has taken place, compared to the five-year average of 79% by June 2nd, meaning soybean planting is off 50.6%.

In the end, we could easily see more than 10 million acres of U.S. farmland go completely unused this year.

And please don’t assume that the acres that have been planted are going to be okay.  In Nebraska, farmer Ed Brummels said that conditions are so bad that it is “like we are trying to plant on top of a lake!”…

    It’s like we are trying to plant on top of a lake! Planting will be over soon as farmers continue to be frustrated with these very saturated conditions.

When you plant fields that are absolutely saturated with water, the results can be extremely disappointing, and that is what we are hearing all over the nation.

Here is just one example…

    In Keota, Iowa, Lindsay Greiner sowed his 700 acres of corn toward the end of April — and then wasn’t able to get into his soaked fields for five weeks. He’s expecting much lower yields this year than last.

    The crop right now is yellow. “It should be green,” he said. “It looks so bad.”

Farmers in the middle of the country desperately need things to dry out for an extended period of time.

But that is not going to happen any time soon.

In fact, meteorologists are telling us that more storms are going to hammer the middle of the country over the next few days…

    The situation does not look to improve for farmers in the U.S. Corn Belt. AccuWeather is predicting the pattern of rounds of showers and thunderstorms to continue, with storms over part of the flood-stricken areas into midweek. Also, the southern half of the Corn Belt is in the path of downpours expected later this week.

    “If you’re along the Ohio River and you don’t have your corn planted by Wednesday, you may not plant anything additional because you may get three inches of rain between Thursday and Saturday,” said AccuWeather senior meteorologist Jason Nicholls.

Sadly, some areas could see “up to 5 inches of rain”, and needless to say that could be absolutely devastating for many farmers.

And then after that, a weather system that could soon be named “Tropical Storm Barry” is likely to move into the region…

    To make matters worse, rain from a developing tropical storm in the Gulf of Mexico could bring additional rainfall to the region: “Tropical moisture from the western Gulf of Mexico may begin impacting parts of south Texas on Tuesday,” the National Weather Service said.

    The weather system, which would be named Tropical Storm Barry if its winds reach 39 mph, is now sitting in the Gulf just east of Mexico.

2019 is turning out to be a “perfect storm” for U.S. farmers, and many of them will never recover from this.

Meanwhile, flooding continues to intensify along the major rivers in the middle of the country.  According to Missouri Governor Mike Parson, almost 400 roads have now been closed in his state…

    Missouri Gov. Mike Parson was touring flooded areas Monday in the northeast part of the state, where there have been around a dozen water rescues. Statewide, nearly 400 roads are closed, including part of U.S. 136.

    Locks and dams upstream of St. Louis are shut down as the Mississippi River crests at the second-highest level on record in some communities. Midwestern rivers have flooded periodically since March, causing billions of dollars of damage to farmland, homes and businesses from Oklahoma and Arkansas and up to Michigan.

This flooding has been going on for months, and there is no end in sight.

In recent days, multiple levees in the state of Missouri have been breached, and a number of small towns are now totally under water…

    The small town of Levasy in northwest Missouri’s Jackson County was under water Saturday after a levee breach along the Missouri River. Officials there were conducting water rescues by boat, according to the Associated Press, but no injuries were reported.

    In Howard County in central Missouri, the river topped a levee prompting evacuations in Franklin, New Franklin and a stretch along Highway 5 from the Boonville Bridge to New Franklin, AP reported. The zone essentially covers all of the Missouri River bottom from Petersburg to Rocheport.

    In West Alton and Alton, where the Missouri and Mississippi rivers meet, floodwaters are expected to rise another 3 feet by Wednesday, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported. Some buildings in Alton are already surrounded by water, and the flood plain in West Alton is covered.

This is a nightmare that never seems to end, but many Americans living on both coasts don’t seem to be taking this disaster very seriously.

But they should be taking it seriously because if farmers don’t grow our food, we don’t eat.

The food that we are eating right now is from past production.  The crops that are being grown now represent food that we will be eating in the future, and right now it looks like a whole lot less food will be produced than we expected.

That means that food prices will start going up, and they will probably keep going up for the foreseeable future.

We are moving into extremely uncertain times, but most Americans don’t seem to understand this yet.

For a very long time we have been able to take stability for granted, but now everything is starting to change.  Those that are wise will be able to adapt to the changing conditions, but unfortunately it appears that most Americans believe that there is simply nothing to be concerned about.


http://endoftheamericandream.com/archives/due-to-cataclysmic-flooding-millions-upon-millions-of-acres-of-u-s-farmland-will-not-be-planted-with-crops-this-year
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline RE

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🏖 It was 113 degrees in France today, an all-time record high
« Reply #817 on: June 28, 2019, 02:20:09 PM »
80F is plenty hot enough for me!  I'd be dead by the end of the day at 113F.  At least they have nice Topless Beaches in France though!  ;D

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Forecast has high for 83F in the late afternoon today, hotter tomorrow.  No 90s yet, thank god.

RE

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/weather/2019/06/28/europe-heat-wave-france-hits-all-time-heat-record-french-media-says/1595935001/

It was 113 degrees in France today, an all-time record high, French media says
Associated Press Published 12:47 p.m. ET June 28, 2019 | Updated 2:46 p.m. ET June 28, 2019

Record-setting heat is scorching Europe. Red and orange alerts were issued in several European countries including France and Austria. USA TODAY

PARIS — Schools are dousing kids with water and nursing homes are equipping the elderly with hydration sensors as France and other nations battle a record-setting heat wave baking much of Europe.

Several people have died around the continent in incidents that authorities are linking to the exceptional weather. A major wildfire raged Friday in Spain, sparked when a pile of chicken dung spontaneously combusted in the heat.

Several countries have reported record temperatures this week, and France hit its all-time heat record Friday: 113 degrees in the small southern town of Villevieille, according to French media.

The French national weather service activated its highest-level heat danger alert for the first time, putting four regions around Marseille and Montpellier in the south of the country under special watch Friday.

Fourth of July weather forecast: Hot as a firecracker for most of US, severe storms in Upper Midwest

Previously: Extreme heat continues to scorch Europe; France braces for possible all-time record high Friday

Those schools that stayed open worked to keep kids cool. Teachers at the Victor Hugo Primary School in Colombes near Paris abandoned suffocating classrooms and are keeping children outside all day, spraying them with water and organizing quiet activities in the shade.

"I make them go in the playground with books, in the shade, they must stay seated," said teacher Valerie Prevost. "We tell them to dampen their caps, to drink regularly."

About 4,000 schools closed because they couldn't ensure safe conditions, and local authorities canceled many end-of-school-year carnivals.

Some criticized the government for going overboard, but Prime Minister Edouard Philippe defended the efforts after 15,000 people died in a heat wave in 2003 that woke France up to the risks.

"This heat wave is exceptional by its intensity and its earliness," he told reporters.

"Measures have been taken for the most vulnerable people," he said "But given the intensity of the heat wave, it's the entire population who must be careful today ... both for oneself and for loved ones and neighbors."

Italy put 16 cities under alerts for high temperatures, and civil security services distributed water to tourists visiting famed sites around Rome under a scorching sun.

Heat was blamed for the deaths of two people in Spain, private news agency Europa Press reported Friday.
People enjoy the sun on the Trocadero gardens near the Eiffel Tower in Paris, Friday, June 28.

People enjoy the sun on the Trocadero gardens near the Eiffel Tower in Paris, Friday, June 28. (Photo: Lewis Joly, AP)

An 80-year-old man collapsed and died in the street in Valladolid, in northwest Spain, the agency said, and a 17-year-old boy died in the southern city of Cordoba after diving into a swimming pool and losing consciousness.

In photos: Heat wave scorches Europe

Four people have drowned so far in France this week, and a 12-year-old girl drowned in a river near Manchester, England. France's health minister and British police warned people to swim only in authorized areas.

France has also seen an uptick in so-called street-pooling, or illegally opening fire hydrants. A 6-year-old child is in life-threatening condition after being hit by water shooting from a cracked-open fire hydrant in the Paris suburb of Saint-Denis, broadcaster France-Info reported.

More than 600 firefighters and six water-dropping aircraft were battling the worst fire in two decades in the Catalonia region Friday, as Spain is forecast to endure the peak of its heat wave, with temperatures expected to exceed 104 degrees.

In Berlin, a police unit turned water cannons — usually used against rioters — on city trees, to cool them down.
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Offline RE

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We made 86F today on the Last Great Frontier.  Still haven't broken the 90F mark.  Down to a somewhat more tolerable 78F now at 11PM AKT.  Forecast is for the Heat Wave to continue all week.

RE

Europe’s Extreme Heat Wave Just Gave France Its Hottest Day on Record

By Taylor Mahlandt
June 28, 20196:19 PM


People cool off in the Trocadero Fountain in front of the Eiffel Tower in Paris on Friday.
Zakaria Abdelkafi/Getty Images


Temperatures have skyrocketed into the triple digits throughout Europe, breaking records for some of the hottest days that France, Germany, and Spain have recorded since a heat wave killed an estimated 70,000 people across the continent in 2003. Thermometers started clocking hellish temperatures on Wednesday, and some locations will have seen temperatures above 110 degrees Fahrenheit by the time the heat wave subsides in the coming days.

Extreme heat in Catalonia in northeastern Spain is likely to blame for the worst wildfire in 20 years. The blaze may have started when a pile of manure “generated enough heat to explode and produce sparks,” according to regional interior minister Miquel Buch. The fire has now forced 50 people to evacuate their homes and has the potential to wipe out 50,000 acres of land.

The heat wave has caused paralysis and chaos all over the continent. Thursday saw France’s hottest day in the country’s history, at a high of 113.2 degrees. More than 4,000 schools across France have closed, and in Marseilles, Paris, and Lyons, the most polluting cars have been banned from hitting the roads. Still, the heat hasn’t stopped the Women’s World Cup from continuing , although spectators are now permitted to bring water bottles into the stadiums. In Germany, the famously unregulated Autobahn is now subject to speed limits ranging between 62 mph to 75 mph, which were imposed to prevent the roads from cracking under extreme pressure in the heat. All-time temperature records were also set in the Czech Republic and Poland.

Meteorologists say the heat wave originated with hot winds blowing up from Northern Africa that created high pressure in the central European atmosphere. That, combined with a storm brewing over the Atlantic Ocean, brought the oppressive conditions that have the continent in a stranglehold. In a grim illustration of what Europeans are up against, a French meteorologist posted a picture last week of a heat map that resembled a “screaming heat skull of death.”

The temperatures pose a serious health risk to people and animals, especially when much of the continent doesn’t have air conditioning. (Less than 5 percent of people in France have air conditioning in their homes, while the number is under 2 percent in Germany.) Now, three deaths have already been attributed to the heat wave, including a 72-year-old Romanian homeless man whose body was discovered on Thursday morning near Milan’s central train station.

In response, officials throughout Europe have canceled events, declared heat advisories, and set up cooling stations around their cities. Europeans have been plunging into public fountains, running naked down grocery store freezer aisles, and eating frozen treats in hopes of cooling down. At zoos, caretakers have been freezing fruits and vegetables into ice blocks to help the animals beat the heat.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2019, 12:27:05 AM by RE »
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Offline John of Wallan

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Alaska On Fire?
« Reply #819 on: July 09, 2019, 01:43:54 AM »
RE: whats going on up there in the arctic circle?
Is this report correct?
Hotter your part of the world than in most of Australia right now!

Adelaide
Windy with showers 16°Min 8°
Brisbane
Mostly sunny 24° Min 12°
Canberra
Frost then sunny 11° Min -1°
Darwin
Sunny 32° Min 19°
Hobart
Late shower 15° Min 8°
Melbourne
Windy with showers 16° Min 9°
Perth
Mostly sunny 19° Min 10°
Sydney
Sunny 18° Min 7°

JOW

http://arctic-news.blogspot.com/

Sam Carana
ALASKA ON FIRE

Fires are raging over Alaska. The satellite image shows the situation on July 8, 2019. Nullschool images show carbon monoxide (as high as 43,443 ppb) and carbon dioxide (as high as 561 ppm) at the same spot on July 8, 2019.
The situation looks set to further deteriorate as high temperatures are forecast for Alaska. For July 10, 2019, temperatures as high as 35.5°C or 95.8°F are forecast. ...

Offline RE

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Re: Alaska On Fire?
« Reply #820 on: July 09, 2019, 04:56:02 AM »
RE: whats going on up there in the arctic circle?
Is this report correct?
Hotter your part of the world than in most of Australia right now!

Yes, it's accurate.  It's HOTTER THAN HELL up here for the last 10 days or so.  4th of July Fireworks were cancelled all over the state due to fire danger.  We had one burning near me, some evacuations although not me.  Anchorage has never had a 90F day in all recorded weather history but may hit it tomorrow.  In the Valley where I live, we brushed close at 89F but still haven't broken the mark this time yet.  Several years ago we had one day one summer which topped 90F.

Forecast is for rain on Thu-Mon, much needed at the moment.

RE
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