AuthorTopic: Crazy Weather  (Read 77792 times)

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 32347
    • View Profile
Violent 'bomb cyclone' sends high tide to near record levels in downtown Boston
« Reply #555 on: January 04, 2018, 02:43:29 PM »
Bean Town is getting hammered.  Wonder how GO is doing? ???

RE

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2018/01/04/winter-storm-fed-bomb-cyclone-invades-northeast/1002810001/

Violent 'bomb cyclone' sends high tide to near record levels in downtown Boston; motorists stranded
Doyle Rice and Doug Stanglin, USA TODAY Published 7:11 a.m. ET Jan. 4, 2018 | Updated 5:25 p.m. ET Jan. 4, 2018


A 'bomb cyclone' sweeping the Northeast triggered flooding in Boston and unprecedented high tides along the Massachusetts coast. USA TODAY
GTY 901151192 A WEA USA NY

(Photo: Drew Angerer, Getty Images)
CONNECTTWEET 14 LINKEDIN 28 COMMENTEMAILMORE

A violent winter storm dubbed as a "bomb cyclone" roared into New England with hurricane-like wind gusts Thursday, pushing high tide to near-record levels and stranding inundated motorists on downtown Boston streets.

The brutal storm raced up the East Coast, forcing school closings, canceling flights and knocking out power to thousands.

Scattered reports of fatalities were reported, including a car passenger who died after a vehicle on Thursday couldn’t stop at the bottom of a steep, snow-covered hill and slammed into a commuter train on its way to Philadelphia.

Around Boston, the National Weather Service reported that howling winds sent the icy high tide to historic levels. On Boston’s Atlantic Avenue and other areas of the city, severe flooding forced emergency response teams to rescue motorists with boats.

Winter weather watches and warnings remained in place along hundreds of miles from the Mid-Atlantic to northern Maine.

High winds and snow usher in the first major winter storm of 2018. Brrrr! USA TODAY

Forecasters offered little respite from the cold weather for the weekend, predicting a brutal blast of new arctic air from Canada that could break records in more than two dozen cities and bring wind chills as low as 40 degrees below zero

Snow was on the ground in every state along the Eastern Seaboard on Thursday morning, from Florida to Maine, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

New York's JFK International Airport was shut down for several hours into the evening because of the bad weather. New York's LaGuardia Airport announced that more than 90% of its flights Thursday would be canceled because of the storm.

Charles Orloff (@charlesorloff) | Twitter

Nationwide, about 4,900 flights were canceled as of early Thursday, FlightAware reported. And 77,000 customers were without power in several states, CBS News said.
Workers clear the early snow from Times Square in New York City on Jan. 4, 2018.

Workers clear the early snow from Times Square in New York City on Jan. 4, 2018. (Photo: Robert Deutsch, USA TODAY)

Facing the brunt of the storm, Gov. Charlie Baker of Massachusetts warned of possible lengthy and widespread power outages as winds make it almost impossible for crews to work.

More than 5,500 homes and businesses lost power Thursday morning in Provincetown, Mass., on the outermost tip of Cape Cod, which was being lashed with hurricane-force wind gusts, the Eversource electric utility said. Much of that power was restored by early afternoon.

Gusts of up to 76 mph and 75 mph were reported Thursday on Nantucket and Cape Cod, respectively.

The National Weather Service said on Twitter it’s getting “inundated” with reports of coastal flooding all along the eastern coast of Massachusetts.

“Some of the worst in recent history being observed in Boston,” the service said.

The cold stretched all the way south to Florida, where stunned iguanas were reported dropping out of trees as temperatures dipped below 40 degrees.
Sponsored by Spin Life
Afikim / AfiScooter Canopy
See more →

In Connecticut, Gov. Dannel Malloy said more than 100 warming centers were open in 34 towns. Malloy says the state has 634 state plow trucks and 250 contractors working to clear the highways.

The storm strengthened at an astonishing rate since Wednesday, surpassing the meteorological criteria to be considered a so-called “bomb cyclone," according to the Capital Weather Gang.

Bombogenesis is said to occur when a storm's central barometric pressure drops at least 24 millibars in 24 hours. (A millibar is a way of measuring pressure.) The lower the pressure, the more powerful the storm.

This storm’s pressure dropped 53 millibars in 21 hours, Weather Channel meteorologist Jon Erdman said, which ranks it among the most explosive East Coast storms ever seen.

Whether you call it a "snow hurricane" or "bombogenesis", this storm packs a punch worthy of its namesake. USA TODAY

The heaviest snow was falling in Delaware and New Jersey on Thursday. The National Weather Service said Atlantic City, N.J., could get up to 18 inches of snow.

Wind gusts of 60-70 mph, strong enough to cause downed trees and power lines, were predicted in coastal New Jersey, eastern Long Island, N.Y., and coastal New England.

Blizzard warnings were in effect for coastal areas of the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast.

The storm caps a week of brutal cold across the nation that has left at least 17 people dead. Authorities in North Carolina say two men died Wednesday night when their pickup truck overturned into a creek in Moore County, southwest of the Raleigh-Durham area.

And authorities say the fatal accident involving a car and a commuter train in Pennsylvania happened during extreme snow conditions.

A spokeswoman for the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority says none of the passengers on board the West Trenton line train were injured. The train was about 20 miles north of downtown Philadelphia.
Facebook
Twitter
Google+
LinkedIn
Snow and cold linger across U.S.
 Fullscreen
A dog is seen in the driver's seat as two men help free a car stuck near the entrance to the Ben Franklin Bridge as a 'cyclone bomb' brings snowfall in in Camden, N.J Jan. 4, 2018.  Joe Lambert, USA TODAY NETWORK

In Boston, where forecasters predicted 12 to 19 inches of snow, Mayor Marty Walsh announced that public schools would be closed on Thursday. New York City schools were also closed, as were schools in Philadelphia and Washington, D.C.

As the storm gripped the East Coast, governors in New Jersey, Virginia, Maryland and Georgia all declared a state of emergency in their states.

This new wave of cold weather this weekend will be close to the level of cold experienced at the end of 2017 and start of 2018 in the Midwest, central Appalachians and interior South, according to forecasters.
A vehicle is stopped on Interstate 26, near Savannah, Ga., on Jan. 3, 2018.

A vehicle is stopped on Interstate 26, near Savannah, Ga., on Jan. 3, 2018. (Photo: Robert Ray, AP)

AccuWeather forecasts that temperatures may reach their lowest point of the season so far in coastal areas of the Northeast, such as Washington, D.C., Philadelphia, New York City and Boston.

At least 28 major cities across New England, eastern New York and the Mid-Atlantic states will have record low temperatures by dawn on Sunday, the National Weather Service said.

Contributing: The Associated Press
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 32347
    • View Profile
Even the Eyelashes Freeze: Russia Sees Minus 88.6 Degrees F
« Reply #556 on: January 17, 2018, 02:32:31 AM »
Now THAT is FUCKING COLD!

RE

Jan. 16, 2018, at 2:44 p.m.
Even the Eyelashes Freeze: Russia Sees Minus 88.6 Degrees F

Temperatures in the remote Russian region of Yakutia have dropped to near record lows, plunging to minus 67 degrees Celsius ( minus 88.6 degrees Fahrenheit) in some areas.

The Associated Press

In this photo taken on Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018, Anastasia Gruzdeva poses for selfie as the Temperature dropped to about -50 degrees (-58 degrees Fahrenheit) in Yakutsk, Russia. Temperatures in the remote, diamond-rich Russian region of Yakutia have dropped to near-record lows, plunging to -67 degrees Centigrade (-88.6 degrees Fahrenheit) in some areas. (sakhalife.ru photo via AP) The Associated Press

MOSCOW (AP) — Even thermometers can't keep up with the plunging temperatures in Russia's remote Yakutia region, which hit minus 67 degrees Celsius (minus 88.6 degrees Fahrenheit) in some areas Tuesday.

In Yakutia — a region of 1 million people about 3,300 miles (5,300 kilometers) east of Moscow — students routinely go to school even in minus 40 degrees. But school was canceled Tuesday throughout the region and police ordered parents to keep their children inside.

In the village of Oymyakon, one of the coldest inhabited places on earth, state-owned Russian television showed the mercury falling to the bottom of a thermometer that was only set up to measure down to minus 50 degrees. In 2013, Oymyakon recorded an all-time low of minus 71 degrees Celsius (minus 98 Fahrenheit).

Over the weekend, two men froze to death when they tried to walk to a nearby farm after their car broke down. Three other men with them survived because they were wearing warmer clothes, investigators reported.

But the press office for Yakutia's governor said Tuesday that all households and businesses in the region have working central heating and access to backup power generators.

Residents of Yakutia are no strangers to cold weather and this week's cold spell was not even dominating local news headlines Tuesday.

But some media outlets published cold-weather selfies and stories about stunts in the extreme cold. Women posted pictures of their frozen eyelashes, while YakutiaMedia published a picture of Chinese students who got undressed to take a plunge in a thermal spring.
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 32347
    • View Profile
Wild winter wind storm pummels Europe, killing at least seven 🌬️
« Reply #557 on: January 19, 2018, 02:18:40 AM »
https://www.nbcnews.com/news/weather/wild-winter-wind-storm-pummels-europe-killing-least-seven-n838986

Wild winter wind storm pummels Europe, killing at least seven

by Associated Press


THE HAGUE, Netherlands — A powerful storm pummeled Europe with high winds and snow Thursday, killing at least seven people in three countries, grounding flights, halting trains, ripping roofs off buildings and flipping over trucks.

The Dutch national weather service recorded wind gusts of up to 87 mph in the southern port of Hook of Holland as the storm passed over.
[Deadly storm makes crossing the street a battle in the Netherlands]
Deadly storm makes crossing the street a battle in the Netherlands 0:42

Amsterdam's Schiphol briefly halted flights for an hour in the morning, and airline KLM scrapped more than 200 flights even before the storm arrived. Trains were halted across the nation and in Germany.

Falling trees killed two 62-year-old men in the Netherlands, a woman south of the Belgian capital of Brussels, a 59-year-old man camping in the German town of Emmerich and a firefighter in the German town of Bad Salzungen.

In Lippstadt, in western Germany, a driver died when he lost control of his van in strong winds and drove into oncoming traffic. In German's eastern state of Brandenburg, police said a gust of wind flipped a truck over a highway, killing the driver.
Image: German Weather
A truck crashed during heavy storms at the motorway A 71 near Erfurt, central Germany on Jan. 18, 2018. Jens Meyer / AP

Police spokeswoman Jose Albers told Dutch national broadcaster NOS that authorities also were investigating whether the powerful gusts were to blame for the death of a 66-year-old man who fell through a plexiglass roof in the central town of Vuren.

Social media in the Netherlands was flooded with images of people being blown from their bicycles, cargo containers falling off a ship and damage to buildings, including a roof that peeled off an apartment block in Rotterdam.

Water authorities in the low-lying nation closed an inflatable storm barrier east of Amsterdam to prevent flooding as the storm pushed up water levels.

Traffic on Dutch roads was plunged into chaos, with the wind blowing over tractor trailers, toppling trees and hampering efforts to clean up the mess. In Amsterdam, authorities temporarily halted all trams and closed the city's zoo.
People walk with a bicycle through fierce winds in Rotterdam, The Netherlands, on January, 2018, during the second western storm of the year.

Before halting all trains, the Dutch rail service reported numerous incidents including a collision between a train and a trampoline.

In neighboring Belgium, the port of Ghent closed down because of the high winds and tram traffic was halted in parts of Brussels.

In Germany, police reported several injuries as well as the four deaths and the national railway company suspended long-distance trains across the country as train tracks were littered with fallen trees. Deutsche Bahn's announcement Thursday afternoon came hours after all trains in two of Germany's populous western areas, North Rhine-Westphalia and Lower Saxony, were halted.

Deutsche Bahn spokesman Achim Stauss told n-tv television that the measure would remain all day Thursday as a precaution. He said regional and local trains were still running in Berlin, Bavaria and the far north.

In western Germany, some 100,000 people were left without electricity and schools closed down. The square in front of Cologne's famous Cathedral was partially cordoned off amid fears that masonry could be blown loose. A supermarket roof peeled off in Menden.

The storm toppled a crane in Kirtorf, central Germany.
Image: German Weather
Heidi, the dog, has her ears fluttering in the wind as she is walked by her master Eberhard on January 18, 2018 in Reutlingen, southern Germany, as many parts of the country are hit by cyclone "Friederike". Sebastian Gollnow / dpa via AFP - Getty Images

In Britain, power was knocked out to thousands of homes. Gale-force winds damaged overhead power lines that supply trains and brought trees crashing onto the tracks, causing severe delays for thousands of commuters. Even Prince Harry and his fiancee Meghan Markle were delayed in their train trip to Cardiff in Wales.

In Romania, snowstorms and high winds forced the closure of dozens of schools, several main roads and Black Sea ports in the east. Interior Minister Carmen Dan said 32,000 people were left without power. Authorities also had to free a bus carrying 22 people that was stranded in snowdrifts in Romania's eastern Galati region.
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 32347
    • View Profile
📹 Paris flooding: barges on the Seine in trouble (1:09 Video)
« Reply #558 on: January 26, 2018, 12:55:30 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/7sg6JoMPsh8" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/7sg6JoMPsh8</a>
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 32347
    • View Profile
⛈️ Crazy Weather: The Rain in Chicago comes even in February
« Reply #559 on: February 21, 2018, 05:17:42 AM »
Rain?  In Chicago?  In February?   :o

RE

http://www.wpxi.com/news/national-news/ap-top-news/states-could-face-severe-flooding-other-problems-in-midwest/704049709

States could face severe flooding, other problems in Midwest
Updated: Feb 21, 2018 - 2:28 AM


1 of 11

CHICAGO (AP) - Several states could see severe flooding and other weather-related problems amid a storm system that has brought rain, ice and snow to the Midwest and Great Plains.

The weather already was blamed for several fatalities, including the deaths of four people in a crash in Nebraska.

Melting snow and heavy rain prompted the National Weather Service to issue flood warnings for parts of northern Illinois and flood watches for central Illinois. The fear of a rising Illinois River forced the evacuation late Tuesday of the LaSalle County Nursing Home in Ottawa.

In the Chicago area, as much as 4 inches (10 centimeters) of rain fell overnight Monday into Tuesday and forecasters expected another 1 to 3 inches (2.5 to 7.6 centimeters) by Tuesday evening.

Parts of Michigan's Lower Peninsula were seeing flooding and road closures. In Kalamazoo in southwestern Michigan and the surrounding area, some roads were closed Tuesday due to high water. Temperatures have warmed and the weather service said rainfall was expected to total 3 inches (7.6 centimeters) or more in places.

Flood warnings have been in effect in Illinois, Indiana and Michigan, with flood watches in Texas and Arkansas. The weather service issued winter weather advisories for parts of Oklahoma, Kansas, North Dakota, Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota and Wisconsin.

A 52-year-old Bourbonnais, Illinois, woman was found dead Tuesday in a submerged car in Peotone, south of Chicago. Peotone Fire Protection District Deputy Chief Bruce Boyle said the woman apparently lost control of her car on southbound Illinois Route 45 and ended up in a rain-filed ditch.

In eastern Nebraska, speed and slippery pavement caused a crash between a pickup truck and a semitrailer Tuesday that killed four people on Interstate 80, police said. The three men and one woman killed were from Colorado, authorities said.

The Kansas Highway Patrol said a 38-year-old woman died and two other people were injured in a collision on an icy highway late Monday. In Minnesota, state police said winter weather contributed to 400 crashes and 250 spinouts, including two fatal accidents.

The storm system stretched to Texas, where weather service officials said three weaker EF0 tornadoes hit. One struck early Tuesday in a rural area near Joshua, destroying at least two mobile homes and severely damaging several others. A mother and her disabled daughter were injured when one twister demolished their mobile home.

After the tornadoes came the rain. Up to 4.5 inches (11.4 centimeters) of it fell in the Dallas-Fort Worth area by 8 p.m. Tuesday, causing some flooding.
« Last Edit: February 21, 2018, 05:19:17 AM by RE »
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline Eddie

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 14332
    • View Profile
Re: Crazy Weather: The Rain in Chicago comes even in February
« Reply #560 on: February 21, 2018, 05:24:31 AM »
Rain?  In Chicago?  In February?   :o

RE

http://www.wpxi.com/news/national-news/ap-top-news/states-could-face-severe-flooding-other-problems-in-midwest/704049709

States could face severe flooding, other problems in Midwest
Updated: Feb 21, 2018 - 2:28 AM


1 of 11

CHICAGO (AP) - Several states could see severe flooding and other weather-related problems amid a storm system that has brought rain, ice and snow to the Midwest and Great Plains.

The weather already was blamed for several fatalities, including the deaths of four people in a crash in Nebraska.

Melting snow and heavy rain prompted the National Weather Service to issue flood warnings for parts of northern Illinois and flood watches for central Illinois. The fear of a rising Illinois River forced the evacuation late Tuesday of the LaSalle County Nursing Home in Ottawa.

In the Chicago area, as much as 4 inches (10 centimeters) of rain fell overnight Monday into Tuesday and forecasters expected another 1 to 3 inches (2.5 to 7.6 centimeters) by Tuesday evening.

Parts of Michigan's Lower Peninsula were seeing flooding and road closures. In Kalamazoo in southwestern Michigan and the surrounding area, some roads were closed Tuesday due to high water. Temperatures have warmed and the weather service said rainfall was expected to total 3 inches (7.6 centimeters) or more in places.

Flood warnings have been in effect in Illinois, Indiana and Michigan, with flood watches in Texas and Arkansas. The weather service issued winter weather advisories for parts of Oklahoma, Kansas, North Dakota, Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota and Wisconsin.

A 52-year-old Bourbonnais, Illinois, woman was found dead Tuesday in a submerged car in Peotone, south of Chicago. Peotone Fire Protection District Deputy Chief Bruce Boyle said the woman apparently lost control of her car on southbound Illinois Route 45 and ended up in a rain-filed ditch.

In eastern Nebraska, speed and slippery pavement caused a crash between a pickup truck and a semitrailer Tuesday that killed four people on Interstate 80, police said. The three men and one woman killed were from Colorado, authorities said.

The Kansas Highway Patrol said a 38-year-old woman died and two other people were injured in a collision on an icy highway late Monday. In Minnesota, state police said winter weather contributed to 400 crashes and 250 spinouts, including two fatal accidents.

The storm system stretched to Texas, where weather service officials said three weaker EF0 tornadoes hit. One struck early Tuesday in a rural area near Joshua, destroying at least two mobile homes and severely damaging several others. A mother and her disabled daughter were injured when one twister demolished their mobile home.

After the tornadoes came the rain. Up to 4.5 inches (11.4 centimeters) of it fell in the Dallas-Fort Worth area by 8 p.m. Tuesday, causing some flooding.

The kids have had flooding in their apartment, which is a basement/1st floor studio.  Snow builds on the roof, and when the sun comes out on these unusually warm days it melts, but the ancient gutters remain frozen and the roofs can't drain. The water finds the easiest route downhill, which is into the walls of the building and between the floors. It's a mess.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 32347
    • View Profile
Re: Crazy Weather: The Rain in Chicago comes even in February
« Reply #561 on: February 21, 2018, 05:27:54 AM »
The kids have had flooding in their apartment, which is a basement/1st floor studio.  Snow builds on the roof, and when the sun comes out on these unusually warm days it melts, but the ancient gutters remain frozen and the roofs can't drain. The water finds the easiest route downhill, which is into the walls of the building and between the floors. It's a mess.

Sounds ugly.  :(

At least it's only a studio though and not a big McMansion.  Less space to clean up.  Do they have renter's insurance?

RE
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline Eddie

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 14332
    • View Profile
Re: Crazy Weather
« Reply #562 on: February 21, 2018, 05:56:50 AM »
I doubt it. They have a lot of books, which his bride had to move in the middle of the night the other night while my kid was driving down. He's back home and getting things back on track now. His work is slow, so he has time at the moment to handle the issues. The landlord is not horrible, but it's hard to fix these problems in the winter.

They are struggling. The DIL's non-profit job can't pay her the money they owe her because she doesn't have a visa. They owe her like 10K. They are waiting for the stupid gov't to hopefully give her a work permit. Immigrants are getting the shaft right now. She isn't a Dreamer, per se, but she has lived primarily in the states since she was in middle school. Now she's in her thirties, and a grad of one of the best schools in the country, has a steady job, pays taxes, etc., etc. Doesn't matter to the Donald.
« Last Edit: February 21, 2018, 06:14:09 AM by Eddie »
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 32347
    • View Profile
North Pole surges above freezing in the dead of winter, stunning scientists
« Reply #563 on: February 27, 2018, 03:29:38 AM »
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/capital-weather-gang/wp/2018/02/26/north-pole-surges-above-freezing-in-the-dead-of-winter-stunning-scientists/

North Pole surges above freezing in the dead of winter, stunning scientists
By Jason Samenow February 26 at 1:52 PM Email the author


GFS model analysis of temperature difference from normal (in Celsius) on Sunday over the Arctic. The temperature is above freezing at the North Pole. (University of Maine Climate Re-analyzer)

The sun won’t rise at the North Pole until March 20, and it’s normally close to the coldest time of year, but an extraordinary and possibly historic thaw swelled over the tip of the planet this weekend. Analyses show that the temperature warmed to the melting point as an enormous storm pumped an intense pulse of heat through the Greenland Sea.

Temperatures may have soared as high as 35 degrees Fahrenheit (2 degrees Celsius) at the pole, according to the U.S. Global Forecast System model. While there are no direct measurements of temperature there, Zack Labe, a climate scientist working on his PhD at the University of California at Irvine, confirmed that several independent analyses showed “it was very close to freezing,” which is more than 50 degrees (30 degrees Celsius) above normal.

GFS model analysis of temperatures (in Celsius) on Sunday over the Arctic. (University of Maine Climate Re-analyzer)

The warm intrusion penetrated right through the heart of the Central Arctic, Labe said. The temperature averaged for the entire region north of 80 degrees latitude spiked to its highest level ever recorded in February. The average temperature was more than 36 degrees (20 degrees Celsius) above normal. “No other warm intrusions were very close to this,” Labe said in an interview, describing a data set maintained by the Danish Meteorological Institute that dates back to 1958. “I was taken by surprise how expansive this warm intrusion was.”

    The extreme event continues to unfold in the high #Arctic today in response to a surge of moisture and "warmth"

    2018 is well exceeding previous years (thin lines) for the month of February. 2018 is the red line. Average temperature is in white (https://t.co/kO5ufUWrKq) pic.twitter.com/cLeMxSxvWo

    — Zack Labe (@ZLabe) February 25, 2018

Such extreme warm intrusions in the Arctic, once rare, are becoming more routine, research has shown. A study published last July found that since 1980, these events are becoming more frequent, longer-lasting and more intense.

“Previously this was not common,” said lead author of the study Robert Graham, from the Norwegian Polar Institute, in an email. “It happened in four years between 1980-2010, but has now occurred in four out of the last five winters.”

[Arctic temperatures soar 45 degrees above normal, flooded by extremely mild air on all sides]

Graham explained that these warming events are related to the decline of winter sea ice in the Arctic, noting that January’s ice extent was the lowest on record. “As the sea ice is melting and thinning, it is becoming more vulnerable to these winter storms,” he explained. “The thinner ice drifts more quickly and can break up into smaller pieces. The strong winds from the south can push the ice further north into the Central Arctic, exposing the open water and releasing heat to the atmosphere from the ocean.”

Scientists were shocked in recent days to discover open water north of Greenland, an area normally covered by old, very thick ice. “This has me more worried than the warm temps in the Arctic right now,” tweeted Mike MacFerrin, an ice sheet specialist at the University of Colorado.

    There is open water north of #Greenland where the thickest sea ice of the #Arctic used to be. It is not refreezing quickly because air temperatures are above zero confirmed by @dmidk's weather station #KapMorrisJesup. Wacky weather continues with scary strength and persistence. pic.twitter.com/YMnvCD8XvL

    — Lars Kaleschke (@seaice_de) February 25, 2018

Such warm water is appearing to have an effect on air temperatures. At the north tip of Greenland, about 400 miles to the south of the North Pole, the weather station Cape Morris Jesup has logged a record-crushing 61 hours above freezing so far this calendar year. The previous record, dating to 1980, was 16 hours through the end of April in 2011, according to Robert Rohde, a physicist at Berkeley Earth, a nonprofit that conducts temperature analysis. At one point, the temperature was as high as 43 degrees (6.1 degrees Celsius).

    In 2018, there have already been 61 hours above freezing at Cape Morris Jesup, Greenland.

    The previous record was 16 hours before the end of April in 2011. pic.twitter.com/BCgcxAtKng

    — Robert Rohde (@rarohde) February 26, 2018

Kent Moore, a professor of atmospheric physics at the University of Toronto, who published a study in 2016 linking the loss of sea ice to these warm events in the Arctic, said a number of factors may have contributed to the latest warming episode.

For one, he said, recent storms have tracked more toward the North Pole through the Greenland Sea, drawing heat directly north from lower latitudes, rather than through a more circuitous route over the Barents Sea. He also said ocean temperatures in the Greenland Sea are warmer than normal. “The warmth we’re seeing in the Greenland Sea is definitely enhancing the warm events we’re seeing,” Moore said. “I’m surprised how warm it is, but I am not sure why.”

NASA satellite imagery shows a strong storm near Greenland on Feb. 23 that drew a major pulse of warm air into the Arctic.

The rise in Arctic temperatures is probably also tied to a sudden warming of the stratosphere, the atmospheric layer about 30,000 feet high — above where most weather happens — that occurred several weeks ago, Moore said.  Why these stratospheric warming events happen is poorly understood, as are their consequences. However, they tend to rearrange warm and cold air masses, and this latest one has also been linked not only to the Arctic warmth but also to the “Beast from the East” cold spell over Europe.

Moore stopped short of saying that the warm spikes observed in the Arctic in recent years are a sure sign that they are becoming a fixture of the winter Arctic climate; more data is needed, he cautioned.

Whether a blip or indicative of a new normal, scientists have uniformly expressed disbelief at the current Arctic temperatures and the state of the sea ice.

“This is a crazy winter,” said Alek Petty, a climate scientist at NASA, in an interview. “I don’t think we’re sensationalizing it.”

“It’s never been this extreme,” Ruth Mottram, a climate scientist at the Danish Meteorological Institute, told Reuters.
2:08
Government's dire climate change report blames humans
Embed
Share

The government’s National Climate Assessment cited human influence as the "dominant cause of the observed warming since the mid-20th century." (Patrick Martin/The Washington Post)
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 32347
    • View Profile
Storm Emma to blast Britain with blizzards and gales before mercury starts to ri
« Reply #564 on: February 28, 2018, 02:58:13 AM »
https://weather.com/en-GB/unitedkingdom/weather/news/2018-02-28-uk-weaher-storm-emma-blast-blizzards-gales

Storm Emma to blast Britain with blizzards and gales before mercury starts to rise
By Brett Gibbons4 hours agoTrinity Mirror


A mix of bitter gale force winds, substantial snowfall and freezing rain are set to mark the arrival of Storm Emma.

The ​mass of low pressure arriving from the south-west will mean the current ​bone-chilling cold snap ​will eventually ease slightly  as less-cold moist air is dragged north to the UK​​.

​But not before the country is blasted by more snow and temperatures plunge below freezing because of the Siberian wind chill.

Expected wind speeds at noon on Thursday
Expected wind speeds at noon on Thursday
(The Weather Company)

The cold snap will really bite on Wednesday and Thursday.

Bitter easterly winds from northern Scandinavia and north west of Russia will continue to cross the UK and even without the wind chill, values will struggle to edge above freezing during daytime and plunge significantly below zero overnight, with lows of -8C in places. It could even drop to -14C in the Scottish Highlands.

A deluge of snow is expected on Thursday and Friday, as Storm Emma - named by the Portuguese Met Service - pushes into southern England from the continent. This could lead to significantly disruptive snow across southern UK, while gales and freezing rain may pose additional major hazards.

Predicted snow accumulation on Friday
Predicted snow accumulation on Friday
(The Weather Company)

Multiple Amber and Yellow weather warnings remain in place for the rest of the week for large parts of the country.

However, the arrival of the effects of Storm Emma will see temperatures starting to creep upwards with values eventually returning to near-normal levels in the south, but staying colder in northern areas.

Before then it’s time to batten down the hatches in preparation for the latest wintry blast.

Expected snow depth in the UK on Saturday
Expected snow depth in the UK on Saturday
(The Weather Company)

Forecaster Hannah Findley, of The Weather Channel, said: “An area of low pressure named as Storm Emma will become positioned to the south-west of the British Isles by Friday morning.

“As the frontal systems push into the very cold air in north-western Europe, heavy snowfall is expected through Thursday night and Friday.

“By the end of Friday, parts of Wales and western England could have 10-15cm of snow on the ground, 15-20cm locally in north-west England, and up to 30cm in central Scotland.”
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 32347
    • View Profile
Nor’easter forecast to topple flood record in Boston as winds push 80 mph
« Reply #565 on: March 02, 2018, 11:34:45 AM »
Looks like Bean Town is getting hammered again.  ::) Howz your weather GO?

RE

Capital Weather Gang
Nor’easter forecast to topple flood record in Boston as winds push 80 mph


By Angela Fritz March 2 at 2:00 PM Email the author
0:40
Nor'easter brings severe flooding to Boston suburb
Embed
Share

Video shows floodwaters moving through roads and into houses on March 2 in the city of Quincy in the outskirts of Boston. (Storyful)

For the second time this year, a powerful nor’easter is tearing up the Atlantic coast with a brutal storm surge and lashing the Northeast with destructive winds. Heavy snow is creating whiteout conditions on the roads, some of which are blocked by fallen trees and downed power lines.

The coastal flooding on Friday and Saturday could be worse than what New England experienced during the “bomb cyclone” in early January. Storm surge in eastern Massachusetts seems likely to match or exceed the levels of the early January storm, as well as the Blizzard of 1978. With a massive, damaging wind field, it will mimic the impact of Hurricane Sandy in 2012.

    The worst coastal flooding will come during high tides, and the storm will last through at least three high tides
    Wind gusts have topped 60 mph in the Mid-Atlantic and will climax in the Northeast late Friday afternoon
    Snow is plastering the Northeast from New Jersey to New Hampshire; rain along and near the coast will eventually change to snow on Friday

[Visual story | What’s a nor’easter? We wrote a weather dictionary to answer that question]
2:00 p.m.—Snowfall surpasses 2 feet in Upstate New York

Snow extends from New Jersey to northern Vermont, but most of it has been focused on Upstate New York on Friday. Closer to the coast where the temperature is warmer, precipitation is falling as heavy rain and has topped 2 inches on Long Island and in Boston.

Jefferson, N.Y. — 24 inches
Mayfield, N.Y. — 18 inches
Clinton, N.Y. — 16 inches
Beach Lake, Pa. — 10 inches
Green Pond, N.Y. — 5 inches

    Cicero, NY today… photo from Tera Bohannon pic.twitter.com/nWfETCR08p

    — James Spann (@spann) March 2, 2018

1:43 p.m.—Storm meets “bomb” criteria

It’s not hyperbole—this nor’easter is now considered a “bomb cyclone” due to its rapid intensification. A cyclone’s strength depends on its air pressure; the lower the pressure, the stronger the storm. If the storm’s pressure drops 24 millibars in 24 hours, it’s considered a bomb because of how fast that strengthening occurred. It usually means severe impacts are being felt along the coast in the form of damaging winds, heavy precipitation and coastal storm surge.

Typical air pressure on a nice day is around 1010 millibars. On Friday afternoon, the nor’easter had a central pressure of around 970 millibars.

    The ferocious seas off #Scituate. Thanks MA Coastal Coalition for sending the video. pic.twitter.com/wuCim4RqON

    — Robert Goulston (@rgoulston) March 2, 2018

1:13 p.m.—Wind gusts are close to 80 mph

Peak wind gust reports

Wellfleet, Mass. — 78 mph
Marston Mills, Mass. — 71 mph
Dulles International Airport (Va.) — 71 mph
Woods Hole, Mass. — 77 mph
Nantucket — 66 mph
JFK Airport — 63 mph
Washington National Airport — 59 mph
Boston — 58 mph

Scenes like this one are playing out across the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast on Friday. Police in Watertown, Mass., are asking residents to avoid streets with power lines down. In some cases, the wires may still be live. Hundreds of thousands of customers were without power Friday afternoon, potentially closing in on 1 million. Nearly 500,000 were without power in the Washington region alone.

    Please avoid Arsenal St until further notice. pic.twitter.com/sCKFJK8aqt

    — Watertown Police (@WatertownPD) March 2, 2018

12:28 p.m.—Storm is No. 3 in Boston, still climbing ranks

At 11:12 a.m., the water level at Boston Harbor reached 14.67 feet, more than two feet above flood stage. That crest makes this storm the third-worst on record for Boston. The high tide at midnight will likely push this storm to No. 1 on the list. Recent forecasts suggest water levels could reach 15.4 feet Friday night.

Top water crests in Boston

    15.16 feet on Jan 4., 2018
    15.10 feet on Feb. 7, 1978
    14.67 feet on March 2, 2018

Water level at Boston Harbor. The blue line is what’s actually happened, and the purple dotted line is the forecast. (NOAA/USGS)
11:55 a.m.—71-mph gust in Northern Virginia

Dulles Airport in northern Virginia just reported a gust of 71 mph. It’s the strongest wind gust report we’ve seen so far in this storm. Around 380,000 customers are without power in the D.C. region due to this storm. Winds are obviously reaching their peak in the Mid-Atlantic. In the Northeast, winds could top 70 mph on Friday evening.
11:30 a.m.—First round of flooding strikes Boston

The water level at Boston Harbor has reached 14.36 feet, which already makes this storm the third-worst for coastal flooding in Boston. If the water level reaches 15.4 feet — as it’s forecast to do today or tonight — it will be the highest water levels on record for the location, topping the Jan. 2018 “bomb cyclone” and the Blizzard of 1978.

    Coming into the ballfields in the North End pic.twitter.com/xqdtbCVAIT

    — Eric Fisher (@ericfisher) March 2, 2018

    A St pier (bayside) in Hull, Ma@ericfisher @KevinBoston25 @PeteNBCBoston @JimCantore pic.twitter.com/tHx0qeIfoC

    — Kevin Schiffman (@BostonSwifty) March 2, 2018

    Major flooding along North River in #salemma. This is Bridge Street. @WCVB @wbz @ericfisher pic.twitter.com/kb270qOxc1

    — Damon Cassell (@dcassell) March 2, 2018

10:26 a.m.—Water tops Scituate sea wall

The sea wall in Scituate, Mass., is already being overtopped by waves as the first high tide of the storm rolls in. This storm coincides with the full moon, when tides are at their highest. On Friday and Saturday, 3 to 5 feet of storm surge will be added on top of high tides. There will also be extra inundation from waves, which are expected to reach a height of 30 feet offshore.

    Waves already crashing over Scituate walls pic.twitter.com/Q7Ffds9Tw1

    — Terry Eliasen (@TerryWBZ) March 2, 2018

Moderate flooding is expected in Boston late Friday morning during high tide. On Friday night, peak water level is forecast to surpass 15 feet — more than three feet above flood stage. Over the next 24 to 36 hours, shoreline roads will be flooded — some with more than three feet of water — and largely impassable. Large debris will be washed ashore. Basements will flood, sea walls could be damaged, and beaches will be severely eroded, the National Weather Service predicts.

Southern New England will bear the brunt of the coastal flooding, with onshore winds forecast to last through at least Saturday evening.

Wind gusts have brought down trees and power lines across the Northeast. Peak wind gusts have topped 60 mph so far, and gusts could reach 75 mph in eastern Massachusetts during the height of the storm.

Peak gusts through 10 a.m.

Washington (Catholic University) — 66 mph
Nantucket — 64 mph
Great Gull Island — 60 mph
Boston — 54 mph
Rockport, Mass. — 53 mph
Brandywine Shoal Lighthouse, N.J. — 53 mph
Milton, Mass. — 50 mph
Cape May, N.J. — 49 mph

    Scituate, Massachusetts pic.twitter.com/HM1kMoxvzu

    — Brynn Gingras (@brynnCNN) March 2, 2018
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline Surly1

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 12794
    • View Profile
    • Doomstead Diner
Looks like Bean Town is getting hammered again.  ::) Howz your weather GO?

RE

Capital Weather Gang
Nor’easter forecast to topple flood record in Boston as winds push 80 mph

From what I could tell, Boston is going to get three 15 foot tides in the next 24. But its the winds that are the worst.

If we lose GO, it may be that they lost power. The winds are strong down here, but it is still clear. But the local power monopoly is already running crews to deal with outages. can only imagine it's worse in the northeast.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 32347
    • View Profile
If we lose GO, it may be that they lost power.

That's what backup batts, inverters and generators are for.

RE
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline Golden Oxen

  • Golden Oxen
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 11504
    • View Profile
Looks like Bean Town is getting hammered again.  ::) Howz your weather GO?

RE

Capital Weather Gang
Nor’easter forecast to topple flood record in Boston as winds push 80 mph

From what I could tell, Boston is going to get three 15 foot tides in the next 24. But its the winds that are the worst.

If we lose GO, it may be that they lost power. The winds are strong down here, but it is still clear. But the local power monopoly is already running crews to deal with outages. can only imagine it's worse in the northeast.

Thanks for asking, Terrible. Just saw your posting on my Ipad, Was laid up in bed wrapped up in blankets scared shitless from the wind and rain.

There is a sound from that friggin wind which is hard to describe, it's like a massive train going by the house and the ground shakes and windows quiver. I'm petrified a window or two is going to blow out.

Im in a lucky spot to, that's how bad it is. Boston proper is a total horror with all time record flooding.

They are calling this one life threatening. Wait till you see the pictures of this horror in the news tomorrow.

What gets my ass is I was bull shitting with Surly last week on the forum about how spring was just around the corner and had my bermuda shorts out, it was 65 Wed and I was walking around basking in the sun. :icon_scratch: :-\ :-\ :-\

Not a peep of this horror by the weather people either, popped out of nowhere, some folks thought it was a joke for spring. Crazy weather indeed.

Forget to mention in our BS session RE that Lobster is my favorite dish as well, any way you want to prepare it fine with me, but the old fashioned way boiled with melted butter for dipping is my favorite.

Also, amazing how alike we are in certain areas, linguini with clam sauce, white sauce preferred over red is in my top ten list as well.

Now if you could only become a Gold Bug, you and your nemesis GO might even become buddies, a team, like Laurel and Hardy, or Abbot and Costello.

Me Abbot that is You Lou.  :laugh: ;D

Talking seriously though it's great to have a place like the Diner to drop in and get things like this horrible weather off your mind for a while.

Just turned to snow in Boston, there talking a quick six inches with high tide tonight creating another horror. 

Going to put a dish of linguini together and open a Chianti so I can sleep through wind noise and lose my fear. My wife is saying the Rosary and talking with one of my daughters on the cell phone and doesn't want to cook or eat, just pray and watch the weather station on the boob tube.

Wish me luck, and watch out Surly, this storm is raising hell with trees, branches littering the streets, big ones.

                                   <a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/f7pMYHn-1yA" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/f7pMYHn-1yA</a>


 

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 32347
    • View Profile
🌬️ Crazy Weather: UK Gets Hammered
« Reply #569 on: March 03, 2018, 05:34:23 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/dsIz3nsh424" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/dsIz3nsh424</a>
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
5 Replies
1230 Views
Last post February 25, 2015, 04:57:38 AM
by Eddie
3 Replies
1074 Views
Last post June 21, 2016, 01:44:29 PM
by azozeo
1 Replies
315 Views
Last post May 09, 2017, 05:42:22 PM
by Palloy2