AuthorTopic: Crazy Weather  (Read 83044 times)

Online RE

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❄️ More than 200,000 without power in Mass. amid nor’easter
« Reply #585 on: March 13, 2018, 05:13:31 PM »
Nothing from GO since early this morning.  Wonder how he is doing?  ???   :icon_sunny:

RE

Maybe he lost power?

RE

https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2018/03/13/snow-now-falling-across-boston-area-nor-easter-moves-region/NLgnmStd9gtZ4IeV2rcF3J/story.html

More than 200,000 without power in Mass. amid nor’easter


By John R. Ellement, Martin Finucane and Danny McDonald Globe Staff  March 13, 2018

More than 200,000 homes and businesses were without power Tuesday night as a nor’easter lashed Massachusetts with high winds and swiftly falling snow, whipping up blinding blizzard conditions in some areas.

Forecasters said that the storm would continue into Tuesday evening — meaning more layers of snow to shovel for winter-weary residents who have endured three nor’easters in less than two weeks.

The National Weather Service said the brunt of the storm was expected to pass Greater Boston in the mid- to late evening. Light snow was expected to fall in the region through the overnight, meteorologist Bill Simpson said.
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Online RE

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🌩️ The Controversial Link Between Epic Storms and a Warming Arctic
« Reply #586 on: March 14, 2018, 03:23:06 AM »
https://www.wired.com/story/the-controversial-link-between-epic-storms-and-a-warming-arctic/

The Controversial Link Between Epic Storms and a Warming Arctic


Drew Angerer/Getty Images

It’s that time of the year again, when massive winter storms lash the eastern United States and your uncle posts on Facebook about how it proves climate change is a hoax. After all, why would you still need a good coat on a warming planet?

The fallacy is, of course, that weather is not the same as climate—though the two are intertwined in sometimes surprising ways. And one controversial theory argues that weirdly enough, it’s a warming arctic that’s causing extreme winter weather in the eastern US. A new study out today in Nature Communications purports to bolster that argument, but the idea has sharply divided climate scientists. Arguing aside, though, the debate might be great for public understanding of climate change.
LEARN MORE
The WIRED Guide to Climate Change

The researchers monitored temperatures in the arctic and compared them to what’s known as the Accumulated Winter Season Severity Index, which takes into account temperature and snowfall. Based on data from 12 cities, they found that when the arctic is warm, severe winter weather is two to four times more likely than when the arctic is cold.

That's a bit odd, given that climate researchers have traditionally looked toward the tropics as a driver of global weather. “I think that's kind of this engrained dogma in the field,” says MIT climatologist Judah Cohen, lead author of the paper. “There's this maybe built in bias or prejudice that's skeptical of the role of the arctic, and I think that's played a big part in the controversy.”

Now, this was an observational analysis, because it’s not like the researchers could tweak temperatures in the arctic and see how that affected weather in the US. So while they could show a correlation between activities in the two regions, they couldn’t definitively demonstrate that a warming arctic is causing changes in weather down south. They admitted as much in the paper, but to help strengthen their argument, the researchers worked out a “lag correlation": They looked at peaks in arctic temperatures and found that these anticipated severe weather by five days, which would suggest a link.

But not so fast, says climate scientist James Screen of the University of Exeter. In some of those locations, there doesn't appear to be any lag, and in others the indication seems to be weak. “It's better than nothing, I guess, but it doesn't convince me,” Screen says.

Again, just because two things are correlated doesn’t mean they’re playing off each other. “It could be that the arctic circulation and the US circulation are changing simultaneously, and there's just a bit of a lag between the changes in the circulation and this weather index,” Screen adds. “I would say it's suggestive, but it doesn't totally convince me.”

But say a warming arctic is responsible for wacky winter weather in the United States. What could be driving it? One theory points to the jet stream. The arctic is of course cold, and the lands to the south of it are less so. “That temperature difference between the cold arctic and the area farther south is one of the sources of energy that drives the winds of the jet stream,” says Rutgers University climatologist Jennifer Francis, a co-author on the paper.

The problem is, the arctic is warming faster than the rest of the planet, known as arctic amplification. The contrast between cold air and warmer air, then, is getting less extreme, which would decrease the energy of the jet stream. “What we see typically when the jet stream is slow is that it tends to take these bigger meanders north and south,” says Francis. “When it does that, say it dips way south over Florida, for example, then it allows the cold air from the arctic to plunge much farther south.”

But what if it’s actually the other way around? What if the eastern US is actually influencing the arctic? “You can't even say which is the cause of which,” says climate scientist Ted Shepherd of the University of Reading. “Is it the warm causing the cold or is it the cold causing the warm? They're just two sides to the same coin.”

To answer that question, climate scientists would need to simulate massively complex processes. Researchers can do this long-term to parse various happenings with the climate, or on a smaller scale with weather, like TV forecasters have been doing all these years. But you can’t run a weather model for very long—it’s just too computationally expensive.

“We can't really run a weather model on climate time scales, so there are some approaches to try to embed a weather model within a climate model,” says Shepherd. The work isn't definitive, though. “In the absence of that, we're stuck with climate models that don't really simulate the weather regimes very well,” he says.

But with every study, climate scientists are better understanding how a warming planet may lead to profound and sometimes counterintuitive changes. Which is why your uncle might be confused. “I think one of the silver linings on this bad news cloud is that the bizarre weather that we've been having has really gotten the public's attention,” says Francis. “We've been able to tell a real story, a science story, about why people are experiencing this bizarre weather now and connecting it to climate change.”

Shepherd may not agree with the conclusions of this new study, but he sees a similar bigger picture in climate influencing weather. “It’s a great story actually in a way,” he says, “because you can be very honest about it and raise a lot of the open questions and people might actually find it fascinating ... I would hope.”

Scientists disagreeing over the link between the arctic and extreme weather in the US doesn’t mean scientists disagree about the existence of climate change. They don’t. Researchers arguing about this complex problem is science doing what it does best: ferreting out the truth by way of disagreement, ideally not of the icy variety. Never hurts to bring a coat, though, just in case.
More Climate science

    Study by study, the particulars of climate change get a lot clearer. One key metric in particular may now be a lot less uncertain.

    If you think parsing global climate change is hard, try modeling what it would be like to engineer the planet to stop warming without killing a bunch of species.

    Ideally, though, we could just cut emissions. Enter the carbon tax and the colleges that are championing it.
« Last Edit: March 14, 2018, 03:46:59 AM by RE »
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Online RE

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🌨️ Another week, another Nor'easter
« Reply #587 on: March 19, 2018, 04:46:27 AM »
This is God's Punishment for voting for Trumpovetsky.  :icon_mrgreen:

RE

https://www.wunderground.com/cat6/tornadoes-possible-mid-south-monday-serious-flood-threat-looms-socal

Tornadoes Possible in Mid-South Monday; Serious Flood Threat Looms for SoCal

Bob Henson  ·  March 19, 2018, 2:24 AM EDT


Above:  In this forecast for winds at the 250-millibar level (about 34,000 feet high) for 8 pm EDT Wednesday, March 22, 2018, the polar jet stream was predicted to send a powerful atmospheric river into Southern California while arcing around a potential nor’easter (not shown) just off the northeast U.S. coast. The forecast was produced by the GFS model at 0Z Monday. Image credit: tropicaltidbits.com.

An energetic polar jet stream ripping across the United States will lead to yet another nor’easter this week (see below), as well as a chance of tornadic supercells in and near northern Alabama and the potential for major flash flooding in coastal Southern California, especially in the wildfire-scarred hills of Ventura and Santa Barbara counties.

Monday’s severe weather is not expected to cover a vast area, but it could be intense. Early Monday, the NOAA/NWS Storm Prediction Center issued an enhanced-risk outlook for severe weather (the third highest of five threat categories), with a slight risk extending further southeast (see Figure 1). Within the enhanced-risk area, SPC noted a chance of significant tornadoes—EF2 or stronger on the Enhanced Fujita Scale—and very large hail (larger than 2”). The situation bears watching for any potential upgrade in later outlooks on Monday.


Severe weather outlook for Monday, March 19, 2018, issued at 06Z (1 am CDT) Monday
Figure 1. Severe weather outlook for Monday, March 19, 2018, issued at 06Z (1 am CDT) Monday. Image credit: NOAA/NWS/SPC.

The most likely location for isolated tornadic supercells will be near and just south of a warm front expected to stretch from a surface low in western Tennessee into Georgia. Tornadoes are also possible just north of the warm front, but storms may be too numerous there to allow individual supercells to form. Other strong storms may roll along the warm front into Georgia toward evening. Northern Alabama will likely see the most serious combination of strong vertical wind shear and adequate instability, assuming the atmosphere is not kept too cool by early-day clouds or rain.

Climatology favors the South for late-winter and early-spring twisters, and storms could be racing eastward at 40-50 mph, so residents should take this event seriously.
Atmospheric river expected to smash into Southern California later this week

A channel of rich moisture surging from the tropical Pacific in “Pineapple Express” fashion will be aimed squarely at the coastal terrain of Southern California from late Tuesday through Thursday, setting the stage for a prolonged and intense rain event. The 00Z Monday GFS model predicts that the atmosphere will be hauling 1.2” to 1.4” of precipitable water (the amount of moisture in a column above ground level) into coastal sections from San Diego to Santa Barbara. If those amounts come to fruition, they will challenge the region’s March records for atmospheric moisture going back to the 1940s, as noted by Daniel Swain at California Weather Blog (see below).
Integrated water vapor transport at 18Z (11 am EDT) Thursday, March 22, 2018, as predicted by the 18Z Sunday run of the GFS model


Figure 2. This depiction of integrated water vapor transport (IVT)—a measure of the amount of water vapor in a channel crossing an imaginary perpendicular threshold every second—shows a narrow plume of rich moisture impinging on the southern California coast at 18Z (11 am EDT) Thursday, March 22, 2018, as predicted by the 18Z Sunday run of the GFS model. Image credit: NOAA/ESRL.

Rains of 2-4” will be widespread from Tuesday through Thursday across coastal Southern California and nearby valleys, including the Los Angeles area, which has suffered through one of its driest winters on record thus far.

Amounts of 4-6” or more are possible at higher terrain, especially hillsides that face the incoming atmospheric river. This includes the scorched terrain of Ventura and Santa Barbara counties, where the largest wildfire ever recorded in California raged last December. On January 9, flash flooding driven by heavy rains across the fire-scarred hillsides killed 21 people, most of them in the hard-hit coastal city of Montecito. Rainfall in the burn area could be more intense and/or prolonged with this system than in January, so flash flood watches and evacuations are a strong possibility. A pre-evacuation advisory for burn areas was issued on Saturday by the Santa Barbara County Office of Emergency Management.
Another week, another nor’easter…

Winter-weary residents of the northeast U.S. will have to contend with at least one more round of cold rain and/or snow later this week. Details had yet to fully congeal in the forecast models as of Sunday night, but the surface low moving through the mid-South on Monday is expected to gather strength off the mid-Atlantic coast from Tuesday into Wednesday. Impulses traveling along the strong polar jet will make for a prolonged and complex set-up.

Upper levels will be quite cold for late March, which means snow could fall a bit further south than in other recent storms—from southern New England and the New York City area well into Virginia, with a band of heavier snow possible for Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. Working against big accumulations will be marginal surface temperatures, the strengthening sun of late March, and relatively warm ground temperatures. Still, a few inches of snow will be possible in some areas if the ingredients and timing align. Once again, strong winds and flooding may rear their heads from the mid-Atlantic to New England. See the weather.com article on this storm for frequent updates.
Jeff Masters will have a post later Monday on February’s global climate report.
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Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: 🌨️ Another week, another Nor'easter
« Reply #588 on: March 19, 2018, 05:30:20 AM »
This is God's Punishment for voting for Trumpovetsky.  :icon_mrgreen:

RE

Thanks Dungeon Master, Your what a Chinaman calls a PLICK. Make that a big Plick!  :icon_mrgreen:


                                       

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Winter Storm Toby Will Lash the East Coast as a Nor'easter
« Reply #589 on: March 19, 2018, 03:14:05 PM »
Punishment for Gold Bugs INCOMING!   Schaudenfreud is GREAT!  ;D

RE

https://weather.com/storms/winter/news/2018-03-19-winter-storm-toby-fourth-march-noreaster-northeast-snow

Winter Storm Toby Will Lash the East Coast as a Nor'easter Midweek and Also Blanket the Ohio Valley, Appalachians
Mar 19 2018 05:00 PM EDT
weather.com


Winter Storm Toby Becomes Fourth Nor'easter On the Way

Meteorologist Heather Tesch follows Winter Storm Toby moving towards the Northeast.

Story Highlights

Toby will be the fourth nor'easter this month to affect the Northeast.

Accumulating snow, strong winds gusts and coastal flooding are once again possible along the Northeast seaboard.

Snow will also blanket parts of the Ohio Valley and central Appalachians.

Winter Storm Toby will spread snow across the Ohio Valley and Appalachians before forming into another nor'easter that will bring more snow, wind, and coastal flooding to the East Coast Tuesday-Thursday.

(MORE: What is a Nor'easter)

This will be the fourth nor'easter in less than three weeks this month.

There has been uncertainty the last several days surrounding the snowfall potential along the Interstate 95 corridor in the mid-Atlantic and Northeast, but recent guidance has trended towards a snowier forecast. Changes to the forecast are still possible depending on the exact track of a low-pressure system that is expected to intensify off the Eastern Seaboard Wednesday-Thursday.

Winter storm watches have now been posted by the National Weather Service throughout the Northeast Interstate 95 corridor, from Washington, D.C. to New York City and Boston. Winter storm watches, winter storm warnings and winter weather advisories have also been hoisted in parts of central Appalachians and upper Ohio Valley.

Winter Weather Alerts

Winter Weather Alerts

From the National Weather Service.

(MORE: Winter Storm Central)

Here are the forecast details for Winter Storm Toby.
Forecast Timing

Tuesday

    Snow or a rain and snow mix should affect a narrow zone in the mid-Atlantic and central Appalachians, including Philadelphia, Baltimore, and at least the northern and western suburbs of the Washington D.C. metro.
    The greatest chance for any accumulating snow during the daytime will be west of the Interstate 95 corridor from southern New Jersey and southern Pennsylvania to northern Virginia.
    By Tuesday night, the second area of low pressure should begin to take shape along the mid-Atlantic coast.
    Snow or a rain and snow mix could affect a swath from the upper Ohio Valley into the mid-Atlantic region, including Washington D.C. and Baltimore, perhaps extending northward into Philadelphia and New York City, as well.

Tuesday's Forecast

Tuesday's Forecast

Areas in darkest teal have the best chance of snow. Areas in pink may see either rain or snow. Areas shown in green are expected to see mainly rain.

Wednesday

    The second area of low pressure will gain strength off the Northeast seaboard.
    This will result in snow or rain changing to snow from the upper Ohio Valley to the Appalachians, mid-Atlantic, coastal and southern New England. Rain may change to snow overnight as far south as parts of northern North Carolina and southern Virginia.
    Snow may be heavy at times in along the Northeast coastline at rates of an inch or more per hours.
    Snow may also persist Wednesday night in New England, particularly coastal New England.
    Strong winds should build from Delaware and the Jersey Shore to Long Island, and New England Wednesday, tapering off farther south Wednesday night. For now, these winds don't look nearly as strong as this month's earlier nor'easters, but may still lead to some power outages and tree damage when combined with accumulating snow.
    Coastal flooding and beach erosion, yet again, is possible from the Delaware coast to New England Tuesday through Thursday.

(FORECAST: Boston | NYC | Philly | Baltimore | Washington D.C. | Pittsburgh)

Wednesday's Forecast

Wednesday's Forecast

Areas in darkest teal have the best chance of snow. Areas in pink may see either rain or snow. Areas shown in green are expected to see mainly rain.

Thursday

    Snow may linger in parts of northern New England, particularly Maine.
    Some gusty winds are also likely to linger in these areas, diminishing slowly through the day.

Snowfall Forecast

    Northeast I-95 corridor: Snow totals of 6 inches or more are possible from Philadelphia to New York City and Boston Wednesday-Wednesday night. This snowfall forecast is likely to change, given lingering uncertainty throughout this region.
    Mid-Atlantic: Several inches of snow could accumulate in the Washington, D.C. and Baltimore metros, mainly Tuesday night-Wednesday. Heavy snow is most likely in the Appalachians and areas to the north and west of the Washington and Baltimore metro areas.
    Upper Ohio Valley: Most areas can expect totals of 6 inches or less, including Cincinnati and Columbus, Ohio.

Snowfall Outlook Through Wednesday Night

Snowfall Outlook Through Wednesday Night

It's too early to determine exact forecast snowfall totals. This outlook shows where accumulating snow is possible during the first half of this week.

Coastal Flooding

    Coastal flood watches have been issued for parts of the Delaware coast, Jersey Shore, Long Island and southeastern Massachusetts.
    Minor to moderate coastal flooding is possible in these areas at times of high tide on Wednesday.
    On the Jersey shore, the most impactful high tides are late morning Wednesday and again late evening Wednesday night (just before midnight). In Massachusetts, the most impactful high tide is between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m. Thursday morning.

Coastal Flood Alerts

Coastal Flood Alerts

From the National Weather Service.

 
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http://www.ibtimes.com/tornado-hits-jacksonville-alabama-hail-storm-cause-widespread-damage-photos-videos-2664096

Tornado Hits Jacksonville, Alabama: Hail, Storm Cause Widespread Damage [Photos, Videos]
By Pritha Paul @ZiggyZina143 On 03/19/18 AT 11:09 PM


0:00
0:39
HD
Footage Shows Tornado Swirling Above Town In Northern China

Update: 1:20 a.m. EDT — The Wesley Foundation at Jacksonville State University has set up temporary shelters for people left homeless due to the storm. Pi Kappa Phi House is open with food and water as well.

Shelter is also available at the Jacksonville Public Safety Complex, located in the New Police and Fire Department Building, behind the Wal-Mart in Jacksonville, Calhoun County Emergency Management Agency tweeted.

Meanwhile several dorms inside the university campus suffered extensive damages due to the storm. According to latest reports, two of the dorms had their roofs blown off and two student housing complexes were badly damaged.

Jacksonville Fire Marshal Lee Batey assured citizens emergency services are working overtime to restore the city, in the aftermath of the storm.

Update: Tuesday, 12 a.m. EDT — Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey said in a statement: “There has been significant damage tonight in parts of Alabama. We are sending state resources to those affected areas, especially to Jacksonville and Calhoun County. We will continue to monitor and respond to needs in other areas as needed."

Pictures on social media showed extensive damage to the Jacksonville State University campus as well as the city prison. The Dollar General store in the city was also destroyed.

The university released the following statement: “Our campus and our community were hit this evening by severe storms. It has only just become safe for university police to come out of shelter and they are out assessing the damage and going dorm to dorm checking on residents.”

Update: 11:15 p.m. EDT — Athletic Director at Jacksonville State University Greg Seitz tweeted confirming Jacksonville’s Coliseum has indeed incurred extensive damages due to the tornado.

“My bestfriend is stuck at the Reservse [sic] in Jacksonville right now. Other tenants came to her apartment because theirs was flooding. At her apartment water started coming under the door and out of light sockets,” a Twitter user wrote.

“My brother lives in the Reserve apts near the coliseum at JSU and says after coming out of the innermost room, most of their apt is gone,” tweeted another.

Another social media user snapped a picture of a Dollar Tree store in Cullman, Alabama, with water leaking from its roof.

According to Alabama Power, about 15,000 people in the state are without electricity at the moment as the storm moves to the northernmost part of Alabama.

Original story:

A powerful storm tore through the southeast on Monday, spawning several tornadoes that brought widespread structural damages in Alabama and threatened the lives of 29 million people living in its path.

The National Weather Service issued a tornado warning for northern Alabama and southern Tennessee and a tornado watch for northern Georgia.

People from Limestone County, and Alabama County in the Tennessee border took to social media to the post photos of hailstones the size of tennis balls falling in the area. Some of the videos posted showed severe snow storms and tornado winds blowing roofs off of the tops of buildings.

According to latest reports, one of the tornados is moving toward Jacksonville, Alabama, and people were warned to keep away from the outdoors. A Tornado warning was issued for St. Clair County, Jacksonville.

There are also reports of extensive damage to Jacksonville’s Coliseum. Buildings in the Gamecock Village and Reserve Apartments have been affected by the tornado and a car was blown into a tree in the area.

Although no injuries have been reported so far, a group of students is reportedly trapped inside the unit 510 of the Reserve in Jacksonville. Mobile networks have stopped working and there is no response so far from emergency services.

Alabama Emergency Management Executive Operations Officer Jeff Smitherman raised the threat level and increased staffing at Alabama's emergency management agency.

Schools from central Tennessee to Birmingham, Alabama, closed down early so that students and staff will have enough time to safely make it back home before the storm hits.

Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey urged Alabamians to get to a safe location and stay put until the weather clears up. "We are not taking the situation lightly," Ivey said, US News reported. "Severe weather is unpredictable and that is why it is paramount we prepare ahead of time."

This is a developing story.
« Last Edit: March 20, 2018, 12:10:36 AM by RE »
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Offline John of Wallan

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Re: Crazy Weather
« Reply #591 on: May 26, 2018, 06:01:27 PM »
Cyclones around Arabian Peninsula starting to form for first time.
Good video as well.
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Man missing, search underway after massive flooding in Ellicott City, Md.
« Reply #592 on: May 28, 2018, 10:45:17 AM »
Man missing, search underway after massive flooding in Ellicott City, Md.

The National Weather issued a flash flood emergency for Ellicott City, Md., on May 27, after 3-6 inches of rain fell in just two hours.

Authorities are searching for a 39-year-old man reported missing by his family after a flash flood raged through historic Ellicott City, Md., Sunday evening, severely damaging storefronts and buildings and sending residents and tourists scrambling for higher ground.

Howard County government spokesman Mark Miller said relatives of Eddison Alexander Hermond, of Severn, reported him missing at 12:30 a.m. Monday. He was last seen at 5:20 p.m. in the parking lot of La Palapa Grill & Cantina in downtown Ellicott City, which was similarly ravaged by massive flooding in the summer of 2016. Two people died in that flooding.

“There is an active search” for Hermond, Miller said Monday morning.

The National Weather Service called the flooding an “extremely dangerous and potentially catastrophic situation.” The Howard County fire department warned people trapped on the Main Street to climb to the second floors of buildings as they awaited rescue.

Hundreds of rescuers had converged from as far away as Northern Virginia, officials said, and Howard opened an emergency operations center to manage its response.

Baltimore Gas and Electric said late Sunday that there would likely be “extended outages” of gas and electricity service until infrastructure could be fully inspected and “in some cases rebuilt.”

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (R) declared a state of emergency.

Monday morning, residents, tourists and news reporters gathered at the intersection on Main Street and Court Avenue to see the destruction. Three cars lay crumpled under a bridge over a swollen creek, the banks of which had been washed away. Another car a few yards away on the bank was full of mud, its trunk door open.

State troopers in all-terrain vehicles and wearing helmets drove up and down Main Street and blocked anyone from entering. They warned that buildings were potentially unstable and said experts were still surveying the damage.

There were reports that a historic stone cottage had collapsed in the flood, but buildings along Main Street appeared to be standing — if badly damaged in some cases.

Most roads into town were blocked by police and littered with broken tree branches and rocks.

It was the third major flood since 2011 in Ellicott City, which was founded in 1772 at the site of a grist mill along the banks of the Patapsco River. The enclave grew into a major milling and manufacturing town and, starting in 1830, was the terminus of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad line.

Ellicott City was designated a national historic district in 1976, according to Preservation Maryland, with more than 200 buildings that dated to the 1800s or earlier. Its location in a valley, where the river converges with two major creeks, has made it particularly susceptible to flooding.

Videos taken on Ellicott City’s Main Street on Sunday show roiling brown water flowing down, carrying debris and trash. The water spilled into doors and windows and twisted traffic lights. Some people on Twitter reported cars floating down streets.

Loretta Moran was returning with her husband to their house on Main Street from their son’s wedding the night before when they noticed the Tiber River was running extremely high. They parked their car in front of their house and soon noticed some of their tenants trapped on their house’s upper floors.

As they rushed across Main Street, the water went from a trickle at their feet to their knees.

Loretta, 64, and her husband, Tim, 66, led the eight stranded tenants — including a 2-year-old child — and a dog out through their back exit.

“We have a deck that goes into the woods, and we knew that was an escape route to Church Road,” she said.

The group of 10 then scrambled uphill through the woods toward the Castle Angelo, a castle-like home built in the 1830s into the rocks above Ellicott City, overlooking the Patapsco River.

“It was horrible,” Moran said of the scramble through the woods. “The ground was washing away beneath us.”

When she looked back, she said, she could see water as high as 15 feet. She saw workout equipment washing down the street, leading her to believe a gym had collapsed.

When she reached her son on the phone, the newlywed asked her why they had gotten out of the car.

“People don’t understand,” she said, on the verge of tears, “it happens so quickly.”

Abigail Conte, 19, was at the Bean Hollow coffee shop in the historic section of the city when the rain began Sunday afternoon. She said the staff announced they were closing around 3:45 because of a flood warning.

She left the shop and began to make her way to her car about a half-mile away.

“As I was walking outside, the street was becoming a river,” Conte said. She came to an intersection where it became too dangerous to continue. She eventually sought shelter at Cottage Antiques. She hunkered down in a backroom, worried a telephone pole might fall on the shop and was trapped for hours.

She said she saw a garbage can and other detritus flowing down Main Street but nothing larger.

“It’s just flooded,” said a woman who answered the phone at A Journey From Junk. “I’m trying to work through my own panic attack.”

Before declaring a state of emergency, Hogan activated the state’s emergency response, which sends extra rescue personnel to the scene from various state agencies, said his spokeswoman Amelia Chasse.

“The governor sends his thoughts and deepest sympathies to those impacted, including residents and businesses in Ellicott City,” Chasse said.

Jeff Halverson, professor of meteorology at the University of Maryland Baltimore County and a contributor to the Capital Weather Gang, said the storm pattern had essentially stalled over Ellicott City, the same phenomenon that caused massive flooding in the city of Frederick two weeks ago.

“To say lightning strikes twice is basically what’s happening,” Halverson said.

He said the storm could drop 10 or so inches of rain total before it wound down. He said he thought the flooding could ultimately be worse than the storm that killed two people in Ellicott City in 2016. Joe Blevins, a father of three, was swept away as he climbed with his girlfriend from their flooding car. His body was spotted by a hiker the next morning on the shore of the Patapsco River. The body of another tourist, Jessica Watsula, was found near the Ilchester Bridge.

During that flooding, houses along Main Street shook as residents filmed the devastation out their windows. Some formed human chains to rescue those stranded in their cars as the rising waters roared through the historic downtown.

Howard County officials estimated that flooding caused at least $22.4 million in damages.

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Palloy2

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Re: Crazy Weather
« Reply #593 on: May 28, 2018, 11:48:28 AM »
Ellicott City is not a real city, only having a populaton of 65,000, and it is VERY floodprone having major floods in 1817, 1837, 1868,[5] 1901, 1917, 1923, 1938, 1942, 1952, 1956, 1972 (Hurricane Agnes), 1975 (Hurricane Eloise), 1989, 2011, 2016, and 2018. This flood was caused by 5" of rain in 2 hours, caused by nothing much at all.
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Re: Crazy Weather
« Reply #594 on: May 28, 2018, 03:38:05 PM »
Ellicott City is not a real city, only having a populaton of 65,000, and it is VERY floodprone having major floods in 1817, 1837, 1868,[5] 1901, 1917, 1923, 1938, 1942, 1952, 1956, 1972 (Hurricane Agnes), 1975 (Hurricane Eloise), 1989, 2011, 2016, and 2018. This flood was caused by 5" of rain in 2 hours, caused by nothing much at all.

I'll be sure to pass that along to the friend of mine down from New York, visiting children and grandchildren who live there. He has no need to worry about his family since "Ellicott City is not a real city, only having a populaton of 65,000." So their flooding really doesn't matter, and his family doesn't have to worry.

Your empathy duly noted, along with your eagerness to criticize others.

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

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Re: Crazy Weather
« Reply #595 on: May 28, 2018, 04:04:22 PM »
Ellicott City is not a real city, only having a populaton of 65,000, and it is VERY floodprone having major floods in 1817, 1837, 1868,[5] 1901, 1917, 1923, 1938, 1942, 1952, 1956, 1972 (Hurricane Agnes), 1975 (Hurricane Eloise), 1989, 2011, 2016, and 2018. This flood was caused by 5" of rain in 2 hours, caused by nothing much at all.

I'll be sure to pass that along to the friend of mine down from New York, visiting children and grandchildren who live there. He has no need to worry about his family since "Ellicott City is not a real city, only having a populaton of 65,000." So their flooding really doesn't matter, and his family doesn't have to worry.

Your empathy duly noted, along with your eagerness to criticize others.

'Just another small town flood, please move along".

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Offline Surly1

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« Reply #596 on: May 28, 2018, 04:47:09 PM »
Massive flooding in Ellicott City leaves man missing, again damages homes and businesses

 
 

After flood waters ripped through historic Ellicott City, Md., on May 27, shredding buildings and flipping cars along Main Street.(Jon Gerberg, Erin Patrick O'Connor/The Washington Post)

Eddison “Eddie” Hermond was told by a friend to pop over to a restaurant in Ellicott City on Sunday for the owner’s birthday party. As they celebrated, the rainstorm outside morphed into a relentless downpour, fueling what soon became a river that flooded buildings and dislodged parked cars. When a woman came into La Palapa Grill & Cantina and said her cat was stranded in a nearby pet store, Hermond, a sergeant in the National Guard, offered to help.

“He’s that kind of guy,” said his close friend Kenneth Josepha, a State Department analyst from Northern Virginia. “If we called him right now saying we needed help looking for someone, Eddie would be there in five minutes.”

Authorities said Hermond, 39, who lived in Severn, Md., was swept away while trying to help the woman find her cat. He remained missing Monday. Family members requested privacy and said on Twitter that they “remain hopeful that he will be found safe.”

The sudden and widespread flooding, which prompted a state of emergency declaration from Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (R), was a frustrating, all-too-soon sequel to a similar storm in the summer of 2016 that left two people dead.

 

“It really is hard for us to be down here for a second time, seeing the same thing over again,” said Lt. Jeff Carl of the Howard County Department of Fire and Rescue Services. “It’s a deja vu feeling.”

Once again, many storefronts and buildings up and down the historic downtown were severely damaged, including homes and businesses that had only recently recovered from the flooding two years ago. Since then, officials have tried to insulate Ellicott City from another pounding. But they said Monday that only 30 percent of a flood mitigation project initiated after the previous flood had been completed.

Frustrated residents said the county should have made far more progress. When asked at a news conference about those concerns, Howard County Executive Allan H. Kittleman (R) said, “We have plenty of time to address those issues. Right now, we’re talking about people’s lives.” He added: “You can’t get that much done in 22 months. It’s not like we’ve done nothing.”

Sally Tennant, owner of Discoveries, a craft store on Main Street, said she and other residents met with officials a few weeks ago and complained that development around Ellicott City over the past 10 years has made the town vulnerable. Sunday’s was the third major flood since 2011.

 

“The devastation is far worse than last time,” she said in an interview. “If they don’t do the mitigation they need to, we’d be idiots to reopen. We might be idiots to reopen anyway.”

Officials were planning to issue credentials for residents and business owners who need to reenter the town while keeping out members of the public and limiting the number of people who would be in or around potentially dangerous structures.

Howard County officials said they received 1,100 calls to 911 between 4 p.m. and 10 p.m. At least two dozen people were temporarily stranded by the flood. Baltimore Gas and Electric said 450 electric customers and 270 gas customers remained without service in downtown Ellicott City as of Monday afternoon.

Mojan Bagha, owner of Main Street Oriental Rugs, said it took him three months to fix the damage in 2016. He built a retaining wall — but water poured into his 120-year-old building anyway.

He believes climate change is at least partly to blame for two so-called “thousand-year floods” in two years. Yet he is optimistic about rebuilding once more.

“This is a great community and a great country,” he said. “Like a phoenix, it will rise from the ashes. Let’s be positive. Let’s think how we can rebuild.”

Here’s what the flooding in Ellicott City looks like

View Photos
A flash flood swept through the city, causing severe damage.

 

Police allowed Bagha inside his shop Monday, where he saw thousands of dollars of rugs soaked by the storm — “worse than last time,” he said.

But, like other locals, he wasn’t allowed to linger long enough to remove any of the merchandise. Now he is worried it will be ruined.

Simon Cortes, La Palapa’s owner, said his restaurant suffered some water damage, but its hilltop location prevented significant destruction. Most customers stayed inside, where Cortes offered refuge for wedding guests celebrating at the nearby Main Street Ballroom.

He, too, said Sunday’s flood seemed far worse than the one in 2016.

“After Eddie left, I saw a woman come in later who was frantic,” he said. “She was so frantic because she witnessed Eddie get swept away.”

Ellicott City was founded in 1772 at the site of a grist mill along the banks of the Patapsco River. The enclave grew into a major milling and manufacturing town. In 1830, it became the terminus of the first section of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. According to Preservation Maryland, Ellicott City has more than 200 buildings that date to the 1800s or earlier and was designated a national historic district in 1976. Its location in a valley where the river converges with two major creeks has made it particularly susceptible to flooding.

Monday morning, at the intersection of Main Street and Court Avenue, three cars lay crumpled and wedged at odd angles under a bridge over the swollen Tiber Creek, the banks of which had been washed away. Another car a few yards away on the bank was full of mud, its trunk open.

Cars and debris lie crumpled under a bridge over the Tiber Creek at the intersection of Main Street and Court Avenue in Ellicott City. (Michael E. Miller/The Washington Post)
Crews work to remove cars from Tiber Creek on Monday. (Michael E. Miller/The Washington Post)
 

A huge tangle of debris washed downstream by the flood hinted at lives upended. Amid splintered wooden beams lay a spray bottle of deodorant, a flower pot, a front door. A white soccer ball rested on top of a smashed silver sedan.

A hundred yards upstream, a 20-foot section of Ellicott Mills Drive had collapsed into the creek. A small stone building — reportedly the old courthouse, built in 1840 — had completely collapsed, its shingled roof lying on the ground.

State troopers in all-terrain vehicles and wearing helmets drove up and down Main Street and blocked anyone from entering. They warned that buildings were potentially unstable and said experts were still surveying the damage.

 

 
Eddison “Eddie” Hermond, a National Guardsman, is believed missing in the wake of Sunday's flash flood. (Kenneth Josepha)
 

Meanwhile, friends of Hermond were blasting out his photo on Facebook and Twitter, hoping it would aid the search. According to the Maryland National Guard, Hermond was assigned to Camp Fretterd Military Reservation in Reistertown, Maryland. He was not on active duty at the time of his disappearance. He joined the Air Force in 1996 and served for 10 years, then joined the National Guard in 2009.

Loretta Moran was returning with her husband to their house on Main Street on Sunday night when they noticed the creek was running extremely high. They parked their car in front of their house and soon noticed some of their tenants trapped on their house’s upper floors.

As they rushed across Main Street, the water went from a trickle at their feet to a river that reached their knees.

Loretta, 64, and her husband, Tim, 66, led the eight stranded tenants — including a 2-year-old child — and a dog out through their back exit.

“We have a deck that goes into the woods, and we knew that was an escape route to Church Road,” she said.

The group of 10 scrambled uphill through the woods toward the Castle Angelo, a castle-like home built in the 1830s into the rocks above Ellicott City, overlooking the Patapsco. Looking back, Moran said, she saw water as high as 15 feet.

“It was horrible,” Moran said of the scramble through the woods. “The ground was washing away beneath us.”

On Monday, she and her husband were at a shelter run by the Red Cross. She said she was worried about getting medication for her husband, who is recovering from a brain aneurysm and heart attack suffered before the flood.

“We need to get him his meds,” she said. “Everything we need is in the trunk of our car, but they won’t let us near.”

Like other locals, she wondered whether officials had done enough in the two years since the last flood.

“There’s a lot that could have been done to prevent this,” she said.

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Palloy2

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Re: Crazy Weather
« Reply #597 on: May 28, 2018, 05:10:17 PM »
Quote
Surly: Your empathy duly noted, along with your eagerness to criticize others.

Your eagerness to criticize me for critizing others has made you see that as a criticism, but it wasn't.  It was a flash flood in a small town, after not much rain, and everyone that lives there would have known it could happen, so not much sympathy.  We have had 5 days with 150+ mm here so far this year.

Quote
RE: 'Just another small town flood, please move along".

Not a true quote, see above.

As Surly so eloquently put it to RE on May 17:
Quote
Here's your apology: go fuck yourself.

I will leave it to the two or three remaining readers to weigh in as to whether or not I have accurately summarized your body of work.
You are a rock-ribbed misogynist, and your record trails behind you.
You sir, have a remarkable case of selective memory and a penchant for inventing alternative histories that is positively Trumpian.
« Last Edit: May 28, 2018, 05:18:52 PM by Palloy2 »
"The State is a body of armed men."

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Re: Crazy Weather
« Reply #598 on: May 28, 2018, 05:16:43 PM »
Quote
Surly: Your empathy duly noted, along with your eagerness to criticize others.

Your eagerness to criticize me for critizing others has made you see that as a criticism, but it wasn't.  It was a flash flood in a small town, after not much rain, and everyone that lives there would have known it could happen, so not much sympathy.  We have had 5 days with 150+ mm here so far this year.

Quote
RE: 'Just another small town flood, please move along".

Not a true quote, see above.

How did I just KNOW this would be followed up by a "we get that much rain in 24 hours here in the Tropical Rain Forest every day" post?  ???  :icon_scratch:

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Offline Palloy2

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Re: Crazy Weather
« Reply #599 on: May 28, 2018, 05:33:40 PM »
I don't expect, or get, any sympathy when it happens, because it is NOT Crazy Weather.  Elicott City has had 17 major floods in the last 200 years, so it isn't Crazy Weather there either.  The whole "news" angle is based on people's fascination with pictures of death and destruction happening to someone else.
"The State is a body of armed men."

 

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