AuthorTopic: Crazy Weather  (Read 101766 times)

Offline Eddie

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Re: Crazy Weather - 7 named storms, Is Day After Tomorrow Upon Us ?
« Reply #645 on: September 15, 2018, 09:09:53 AM »

Is something extremely unusual happening to our planet? At this moment, Hurricane Florence is just one of seven named storms that are currently circling the globe. That matches the all-time record, and it looks like that record will be broken very shortly as a couple more storms continue to develop. Back in 2004, a Hollywood blockbuster entitled “The Day After Tomorrow” depicted a world in which weather patterns had gone mad. One of the most impressive scenes showed nearly the entire planet covered by hurricane-type storms all at once. Of course things are not nearly as bad as in that film, but during this hurricane season we have definitely seen a very unusual number of hurricanes and typhoons develop. As our planet continues to change, could this become “the new normal”?

http://www.shtfplan.com/headline-news/a-record-7-named-storms-are-swirling-across-the-globe-has-the-day-after-tomorrow-arrived_09142018

It could become the new normal for the month of September. Sure could.
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https://www.npr.org/2018/10/23/659992157/austin-boil-water-mandate-could-last-less-than-a-week-as-city-faces-possible-sho

Environment
Austin Boil-Water Mandate Could Last Less Than A Week As City Faces Possible Shortage

October 23, 20186:07 PM ET

Vanessa Romo


Austin Water
‏Verified account @AustinWater

We need your help! All #AustinWater customers should minimize water use as much as possible to ensure water is available for basic needs.


Travis County emergency management officials told Austin residents on Tuesday they'll need to boil their tap water for the next several days, and urged residents to cut water consumption as the city faces a potential shortage.

In a meeting with county commissioners, Chief Emergency Management Coordinator Eric Carter said Austin Water could take 10 to 14 days to stabilize all three treatment plants and restore production to last week's preflood levels.

But Austin Water Director Greg Meszaros shared a more conservative estimate, that "based on current information we do not anticipate our water issues to last beyond a handful of days." But he added that consumption demands and weather could prolong the citywide mandate to boil all water intended for drinking, cooking or any type of ingestion.

"We aren't necessarily at a water shortage, we just have a situation where we have to take an extra step to make sure our water is safe for us to drink," said Meszaros, according to NPR member station KUT.

Local forecasts indicate a strong likelihood of rain on Wednesday — a factor that could further overwhelm the city's water infrastructure.

In the interim, officials are urging the public to reduce personal water consumption by 15 to 20 percent. "Immediate action is needed to avoid running out of water," the utility company said in a statement, explaining that water levels are reaching "minimal levels."
Article continues after sponsorship

The utility has been struggling to treat floodwaters since last week's historic deluge throughout Central Texas. Silt, mud and debris in the city's water supply lakes have diminished the system's water treatment capacity.

Carter told the Travis County Commissioners Court that "lakes Travis and Austin have seen levels of silt that are five times higher than Austin's water utility has ever seen," KUT reported.

Austin Water says the local water treatment plants can currently produce approximately 105 million gallons of water per day. Current customer use is about 120 million gallons per day.

KUT's Mose Buchele described the condition of the water in the city's lakes and reservoirs to NPR's Here & Now as looking like "chocolate milk."

Buchele explained that the utility company is struggling to filter the thick, "dark brown" water "to a level that would be a good standard for drinking."

"That takes a lot longer," than processing the quality of water normally in the city's supply, he said.

Until further notice the city has prohibited all outdoor water use. Customers may not:

    Use water for irrigation or testing of irrigation equipment
    Wash vehicles, including at commercial car wash facilities
    Wash pavement or other surfaces
    Add water to a pool or spa
    Conduct foundation watering, or
    Operate an ornamental fountain or pond, other than aeration necessary to support aquatic life

Restaurants and coffee shops are also heavily restricted. Buchele reported restaurants are no longer serving ice and many of the city's coffee shop businesses have shut down completely "because most of them are not boiling the amount of water they would need to in order to serve the volume they typically serve," Buchele reports.

As Matt Largey reported for NPR on Monday, "Austin Independent School District is encouraging students to bring water bottles with them. In an email Monday morning, the school district also said all cafeteria managers are following boil instructions and that lunch menus have been adjusted to ensure safety. That includes eliminating all salad bars for now."

The boil-water advisory coupled with its uncertain longevity triggered a frantic run on bottled water throughout the city on Monday. But as the Texas Statesman reported shipments of water from San Antonio helped stabilize the situation.

Still, Travis County Judge Sarah Eckhardt hoped to stem another rush by advising those who can to boil water rather than buy bottled water. According to Stateman reporter Taylor Goldenstein, Eckhardt said that store-bought water should be reserved for vulnerable populations, including children, schools and the elderly.

"We're a community of sharing, not hoarding," she said.
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Offline Eddie

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https://www.npr.org/2018/10/23/659992157/austin-boil-water-mandate-could-last-less-than-a-week-as-city-faces-possible-sho

Environment
Austin Boil-Water Mandate Could Last Less Than A Week As City Faces Possible Shortage

October 23, 20186:07 PM ET

Vanessa Romo



Austin Water
‏Verified account @AustinWater

We need your help! All #AustinWater customers should minimize water use as much as possible to ensure water is available for basic needs.


Travis County emergency management officials told Austin residents on Tuesday they'll need to boil their tap water for the next several days, and urged residents to cut water consumption as the city faces a potential shortage.

In a meeting with county commissioners, Chief Emergency Management Coordinator Eric Carter said Austin Water could take 10 to 14 days to stabilize all three treatment plants and restore production to last week's preflood levels.

But Austin Water Director Greg Meszaros shared a more conservative estimate, that "based on current information we do not anticipate our water issues to last beyond a handful of days." But he added that consumption demands and weather could prolong the citywide mandate to boil all water intended for drinking, cooking or any type of ingestion.

"We aren't necessarily at a water shortage, we just have a situation where we have to take an extra step to make sure our water is safe for us to drink," said Meszaros, according to NPR member station KUT.

Local forecasts indicate a strong likelihood of rain on Wednesday — a factor that could further overwhelm the city's water infrastructure.

In the interim, officials are urging the public to reduce personal water consumption by 15 to 20 percent. "Immediate action is needed to avoid running out of water," the utility company said in a statement, explaining that water levels are reaching "minimal levels."
Article continues after sponsorship

The utility has been struggling to treat floodwaters since last week's historic deluge throughout Central Texas. Silt, mud and debris in the city's water supply lakes have diminished the system's water treatment capacity.

Carter told the Travis County Commissioners Court that "lakes Travis and Austin have seen levels of silt that are five times higher than Austin's water utility has ever seen," KUT reported.

Austin Water says the local water treatment plants can currently produce approximately 105 million gallons of water per day. Current customer use is about 120 million gallons per day.

KUT's Mose Buchele described the condition of the water in the city's lakes and reservoirs to NPR's Here & Now as looking like "chocolate milk."

Buchele explained that the utility company is struggling to filter the thick, "dark brown" water "to a level that would be a good standard for drinking."

"That takes a lot longer," than processing the quality of water normally in the city's supply, he said.

Until further notice the city has prohibited all outdoor water use. Customers may not:

    Use water for irrigation or testing of irrigation equipment
    Wash vehicles, including at commercial car wash facilities
    Wash pavement or other surfaces
    Add water to a pool or spa
    Conduct foundation watering, or
    Operate an ornamental fountain or pond, other than aeration necessary to support aquatic life

Restaurants and coffee shops are also heavily restricted. Buchele reported restaurants are no longer serving ice and many of the city's coffee shop businesses have shut down completely "because most of them are not boiling the amount of water they would need to in order to serve the volume they typically serve," Buchele reports.

As Matt Largey reported for NPR on Monday, "Austin Independent School District is encouraging students to bring water bottles with them. In an email Monday morning, the school district also said all cafeteria managers are following boil instructions and that lunch menus have been adjusted to ensure safety. That includes eliminating all salad bars for now."

The boil-water advisory coupled with its uncertain longevity triggered a frantic run on bottled water throughout the city on Monday. But as the Texas Statesman reported shipments of water from San Antonio helped stabilize the situation.

Still, Travis County Judge Sarah Eckhardt hoped to stem another rush by advising those who can to boil water rather than buy bottled water. According to Stateman reporter Taylor Goldenstein, Eckhardt said that store-bought water should be reserved for vulnerable populations, including children, schools and the elderly.

"We're a community of sharing, not hoarding," she said.

It's bullshit. No threat. My Municipal Utility District (MUD) is not even issuing a boil warning. They culture the water every day, and nothing scary has grown out. It's strictly a precaution. Pain in the ass is what it is. Restaurants are serving on paper plates and serving bottled water. Just hype.

All our drinking water at home goes through a Berkey anyway. The government here is a total nanny state. They advised Williamson County residents not to buy bottled water so Travis County residents could get it without the stores running short. Right. So thoughtful.
« Last Edit: October 24, 2018, 09:24:26 AM by Eddie »
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Offline RE

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🚱 Central Texas’s torrent of floods overwhelms water-treatment systems
« Reply #648 on: October 25, 2018, 03:30:58 AM »
https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/water-water-everywhere-/2018/10/24/9150a644-d721-11e8-a10f-b51546b10756_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.bf9cf577d9cd

National
Central Texas’s torrent of floods overwhelms water-treatment systems
By Eva Ruth Moravec and
Frances Stead Sellers
October 24 at 8:13 PM


Barton Creek meets the dirty waters of the rain-swollen Lady Bird Lake in Austin

AUSTIN — The rains started innocently enough — a refreshing break from a summer-long drought that had parched the landscape and sent residents of this water-loving city for relief, swimming and boating in its spectacular man-made lakes.

But what has happened is more insidious: The season has become one of the wettest autumns on record, causing five deaths in the Central Texas region and tainting an entire city’s water supply.

This city of one million people took the unprecedented step this week of asking residents to boil drinking water for three minutes to kill any bacteria, the culmination of a series of floods that have deposited large amounts of sediment from the soil, as well as oil and other pollutants into its water system, overwhelming its water-treatment plants.

The warning intensified Tuesday, when the contamination triggered a state-mandated boil-water notice.

Texas’s rainfall this autumn has been historic: Since Sept. 1, Central Texas has seen anywhere from 200 to 500 percent of the normal rainfall it receives, according to the National Weather Service. Austin has received 15 inches so far, marking the 18th wettest fall.

“Most of the state was in drought,” said meteorologist Brett Williams. “And that’s basically all been wiped out in a matter of several weeks.”

The floods led to the deaths of four people who were swept away from an RV park in Junction, a town about 140 miles west of Austin. A fifth person died in a low water crossing.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott (R) has put the State Operations Center on heightened readiness as floods this month rampaged through the nearby Hill Country, washing away a bridge and ripping into homes.


Austin, Texas, issues boil water notice after historic flooding
The dramatic measures reflect the challenges to a city familiar with the historic hazards of sudden flooding that have been exacerbated by unusual weather patterns, creating a high-velocity torrent that swept across a vast rural region and kept sediment suspended as it raced toward the city.

“Because of changes in the climate, big floods have become more frequent,” said Raymond Slade, an Austin-based hydrologist.

Residents who in the past left water worries to engineers and other experts are now feeling the effects on their daily lives. On Wednesday, Austin opened seven water distribution centers for them. “We’re giving out water to people who can’t boil it or can’t afford any more bottled water,” said Bryce Bencivengo, a spokesman for the city. Bencivengo said most of the water was purchased, some was donated and some was provided by the state.

Wearing a neon yellow vest and holding a rainbow umbrella, Robert Aleman stood next to a blue signs bearing the words “WATER AGUA,” directing motorists to a distribution site in Southwest Austin, where city employees from a smattering of departments loaded cases of bottled water into vehicles.

Sabrina Lau Marquez, 37, came to pick up water with her mother. She is used to boiling water for formula for her 1-year-old son, she said, but she was grateful for the bottles as a backup. Originally from New York City, Marquez said she was impressed by the civility of her fellow residents.

“If this was New York, there would have been a riot already,” she said.

The distribution centers will be open until the boil-water advisory is lifted.

Help in addressing Austin’s water crisis has come from various places. A few breweries gave out water they had boiled to brew beer, and several businesses handed out free water, too.

Since Monday, the San Antonio Water System has supplied water for institutions including the Travis County Jail, the city’s animal shelter and the Emergency Operations Center, Bencivengo said. More bulk water from San Antonio and trucks from Fort Worth were expected to arrive soon.

Central Texans know their floods. Flash Flood Alley, as this area is sometimes called, is one of the most flood-prone regions of the country thanks to a combination of geography and geology. Heavy rainfall is created when moisture from the ocean meets the cooler mountain air of the Hill Country. The rain swooshes rapidly off the granite and limestone landscape, funneling into mounting torrents as it rushes downward.

Among the most memorable floods was in 1935, when Colorado’s swelling tributaries destroyed the bridge in Llano before splitting Austin in two and rushing, unhindered, toward the sea.

The response has been to create a massive chain of dams that form the Highland Lakes. They act as drinking-water reservoirs, provide a source of hydroelectric power and are part of a system of waterways that course like veins through Central Texas, supporting life and offering recreational opportunities. Lakefront property is a coveted escape from the summer heat.
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Lady Bird Lake, which anchors downtown Austin, is often filled with paddleboarders, kayakers and rowing teams at practice. Just days after thousands filled Zilker Park for the annual Austin City Limits music festival, floodwater turned the lake into a turbulent vat of what resembled chocolate milk. Someone put an orange life vest on a statue of musician Stevie Ray Vaughan, his back to the debris-filled morass. The popular hike-and-bike trail was temporarily closed.

But above all, Austin’s lakes protect the city from the Colorado River by capturing water, which, according to John Hofmann, executive vice president of water at the Lower Colorado River Authority, is entering the upper end of the system at a rate of “250 Olympic swimming pools of water every minute.”

That astounding feat 0f engineering has succeeded despite mounting challenges in what the Texas Demographic Center calls one of the fastest growing regions in the United States.

“It only becomes a flood when there are people nearby” said Don Riley, former deputy commander of the Army Corps of Engineers, noting that the excess water often goes unnoticed when it washes over farmland.

The floods have already required some rescues. On Oct. 8, Jamie McDonald — who is running across the U.S. to raise $1 million for charity under the name “Adventureman” — awoke in his hotel room about 40 miles outside Austin to “loads of shouting and screaming,” the Briton said in a phone interview.

Outside on the balcony, a crowd had formed, yelling encouragement to a naked man holding onto a tree limb in the water. Soon, a helicopter came and swooped him up, depositing him on solid ground.

“It was spectacular to see how they dealt with it,” said McDonald. “It definitely put a little bit of a fear factor in me.”

That was when the water started to rise — first 10 feet one day, then 24 feet another, and finally 39 feet, said Briley Mitchell, executive director of the Llano Chamber of Commerce.

“The ground was just saturated,” he said. “That just created the perfect storm.”

Moravec reported from Austin. Sellers reported from Washington.
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Offline Eddie

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Re: 🚱 Central Texas’s torrent of floods overwhelms water-treatment systems
« Reply #649 on: October 25, 2018, 08:56:41 AM »
https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/water-water-everywhere-/2018/10/24/9150a644-d721-11e8-a10f-b51546b10756_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.bf9cf577d9cd

National
Central Texas’s torrent of floods overwhelms water-treatment systems
By Eva Ruth Moravec and
Frances Stead Sellers
October 24 at 8:13 PM


Barton Creek meets the dirty waters of the rain-swollen Lady Bird Lake in Austin

AUSTIN — The rains started innocently enough — a refreshing break from a summer-long drought that had parched the landscape and sent residents of this water-loving city for relief, swimming and boating in its spectacular man-made lakes.

But what has happened is more insidious: The season has become one of the wettest autumns on record, causing five deaths in the Central Texas region and tainting an entire city’s water supply.

This city of one million people took the unprecedented step this week of asking residents to boil drinking water for three minutes to kill any bacteria, the culmination of a series of floods that have deposited large amounts of sediment from the soil, as well as oil and other pollutants into its water system, overwhelming its water-treatment plants.

The warning intensified Tuesday, when the contamination triggered a state-mandated boil-water notice.

Texas’s rainfall this autumn has been historic: Since Sept. 1, Central Texas has seen anywhere from 200 to 500 percent of the normal rainfall it receives, according to the National Weather Service. Austin has received 15 inches so far, marking the 18th wettest fall.

“Most of the state was in drought,” said meteorologist Brett Williams. “And that’s basically all been wiped out in a matter of several weeks.”

The floods led to the deaths of four people who were swept away from an RV park in Junction, a town about 140 miles west of Austin. A fifth person died in a low water crossing.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott (R) has put the State Operations Center on heightened readiness as floods this month rampaged through the nearby Hill Country, washing away a bridge and ripping into homes.


Austin, Texas, issues boil water notice after historic flooding
The dramatic measures reflect the challenges to a city familiar with the historic hazards of sudden flooding that have been exacerbated by unusual weather patterns, creating a high-velocity torrent that swept across a vast rural region and kept sediment suspended as it raced toward the city.

“Because of changes in the climate, big floods have become more frequent,” said Raymond Slade, an Austin-based hydrologist.

Residents who in the past left water worries to engineers and other experts are now feeling the effects on their daily lives. On Wednesday, Austin opened seven water distribution centers for them. “We’re giving out water to people who can’t boil it or can’t afford any more bottled water,” said Bryce Bencivengo, a spokesman for the city. Bencivengo said most of the water was purchased, some was donated and some was provided by the state.

Wearing a neon yellow vest and holding a rainbow umbrella, Robert Aleman stood next to a blue signs bearing the words “WATER AGUA,” directing motorists to a distribution site in Southwest Austin, where city employees from a smattering of departments loaded cases of bottled water into vehicles.

Sabrina Lau Marquez, 37, came to pick up water with her mother. She is used to boiling water for formula for her 1-year-old son, she said, but she was grateful for the bottles as a backup. Originally from New York City, Marquez said she was impressed by the civility of her fellow residents.

“If this was New York, there would have been a riot already,” she said.

The distribution centers will be open until the boil-water advisory is lifted.

Help in addressing Austin’s water crisis has come from various places. A few breweries gave out water they had boiled to brew beer, and several businesses handed out free water, too.

Since Monday, the San Antonio Water System has supplied water for institutions including the Travis County Jail, the city’s animal shelter and the Emergency Operations Center, Bencivengo said. More bulk water from San Antonio and trucks from Fort Worth were expected to arrive soon.

Central Texans know their floods. Flash Flood Alley, as this area is sometimes called, is one of the most flood-prone regions of the country thanks to a combination of geography and geology. Heavy rainfall is created when moisture from the ocean meets the cooler mountain air of the Hill Country. The rain swooshes rapidly off the granite and limestone landscape, funneling into mounting torrents as it rushes downward.

Among the most memorable floods was in 1935, when Colorado’s swelling tributaries destroyed the bridge in Llano before splitting Austin in two and rushing, unhindered, toward the sea.

The response has been to create a massive chain of dams that form the Highland Lakes. They act as drinking-water reservoirs, provide a source of hydroelectric power and are part of a system of waterways that course like veins through Central Texas, supporting life and offering recreational opportunities. Lakefront property is a coveted escape from the summer heat.
ADVERTISEMENT

Lady Bird Lake, which anchors downtown Austin, is often filled with paddleboarders, kayakers and rowing teams at practice. Just days after thousands filled Zilker Park for the annual Austin City Limits music festival, floodwater turned the lake into a turbulent vat of what resembled chocolate milk. Someone put an orange life vest on a statue of musician Stevie Ray Vaughan, his back to the debris-filled morass. The popular hike-and-bike trail was temporarily closed.

But above all, Austin’s lakes protect the city from the Colorado River by capturing water, which, according to John Hofmann, executive vice president of water at the Lower Colorado River Authority, is entering the upper end of the system at a rate of “250 Olympic swimming pools of water every minute.”

That astounding feat 0f engineering has succeeded despite mounting challenges in what the Texas Demographic Center calls one of the fastest growing regions in the United States.

“It only becomes a flood when there are people nearby” said Don Riley, former deputy commander of the Army Corps of Engineers, noting that the excess water often goes unnoticed when it washes over farmland.

The floods have already required some rescues. On Oct. 8, Jamie McDonald — who is running across the U.S. to raise $1 million for charity under the name “Adventureman” — awoke in his hotel room about 40 miles outside Austin to “loads of shouting and screaming,” the Briton said in a phone interview.

Outside on the balcony, a crowd had formed, yelling encouragement to a naked man holding onto a tree limb in the water. Soon, a helicopter came and swooped him up, depositing him on solid ground.

“It was spectacular to see how they dealt with it,” said McDonald. “It definitely put a little bit of a fear factor in me.”

That was when the water started to rise — first 10 feet one day, then 24 feet another, and finally 39 feet, said Briley Mitchell, executive director of the Llano Chamber of Commerce.

“The ground was just saturated,” he said. “That just created the perfect storm.”

Moravec reported from Austin. Sellers reported from Washington.

Barton springs is about 200 yds upstream from where the creek meets the river in that first photo. It flows about 40 million cubic feet of water per day.

As you can see the limestone karst formations here filter the water pretty damn well.  There is a running trail that goes right beside the creek and the aroma of the pure water is actually quite noticeable when you are down there. It's a magic place. In the old days they had a dance pavilion and summer nights down there made Austin a very different city from any other in this part of the country.
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🌊 Venice Under Water While Flooded With Stranded Tourists
« Reply #650 on: October 31, 2018, 02:36:10 AM »
https://www.forbes.com/sites/ceciliarodriguez/2018/10/30/venice-under-water-while-flooded-with-stranded-tourists/#52d5c466499d

Venice Under Water While Flooded With Stranded Tourists

19,940 viewsOct 30, 2018, 05:07pm

Venice Under Water While Flooded With Stranded Tourists

Cecilia Rodriguez
 
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Tourist in flooded Venice carrying luggage over their heads and wearing boots and other waterproof gear as floodwaters reach historic highs    Photo: AFP/Getty ImagesGetty

With 75% of the lagoon-city under water due to the worst flood in the last decade and hundreds of tourists stranded,  Venice has been placed on “red alert” as large sections of Italy are battered by intense storms, flooding and howling winds.

Due to the record levels of flooding in the historic city, one of the most visited in the world, the majority of tourist attractions were closed and rain-soaked visitors were asked to leave renowned areas including St. Mark’s Square.

 

A man walks in the flooded St. Mark's Square during a high-water alert.  The flooding, caused by a convergence of high tides and a strong Sirocco wind, reached around 150 centimetres on Monday     Photo: Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images

Photo: Matteo Chinellato/Corbis via Getty Images

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The “acqua alta” (high water) reached  more than  five feet, a record touched only five times in the history of the city.

Governor Luca Zaia warned that the floods could reach levels as high as those in 1966 that struck Venice and also devastated the historic center of Florence, another of Italy's jewels.

Tourists and residents have been asked to wear high boots to walk the streets and water transport services were halted across the city except for water buses to outlying islands, leaving hundreds of people stranded.

People walk on footbridges in the flooded St Mark Square      Photo: Migel Medina/AFP/Getty Images

“Residents and visitors were seen wading through waist-high water in St. Mark's Square before the mayor gave orders to evacuate the area,” The Telegraph reported. “Police wearing hip waders carried a number of children to safety as stranded tourists waited to be ferried to higher ground.”

Schools and hospitals have been closed and officials have advised citizens not to leave their homes.

An estimated 13,000 professional and amateur runners participating in the Venice Marathon were forced to trudge through ankle-deep water to complete the course in what organizers have called “the worst-ever conditions.”

Tourists walking in the flooded streets near Rialto Bridge     Photo: Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images

High water in Venice     Photo: Matteo Chinellato/Corbis via Getty Images

Flooding in Venice is not infrequent, occurring when high winds push water from the lagoon into the canals. When that happens, about four times a year, the city has a complex monitoring system for measuring the ebb and flow of water. When the level reaches 43 inches, the officials issue warnings and residents and businesses respond by barricading their doors with metal or wooden panels to stop water from flowing in.

This time, the inclement weather and rain have brought the levels to highs last seen in November, 2012, and are forecast to rise even higher - to nearly 63 inches - prompting Venice’s mayor, Luigi Brugnaro, to complain that the floods could have been prevented if a long-planned series of barriers in the lagoon actually had been finished.

A runner participating in the Venice Marathon    Photo: Giacomo Cosua/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The project, dubbed Moses, was started in 2003 when Italy began construction of a massive system of protective gates around Venice. But 15 years and €5.5 billion later, the project is still unfinished due to cost overruns and corruption scandals.

Streets, schools and public transportation have been closed across Italy due to floods and landslides, while coastal cities and mountain regions have been declared on high alert.

I'm a dual Colombian-Luxembourgish freelance journalist, inveterate traveler and writer based in the world's only Grand Duchy. I write a column on European affairs for the editorial page of El Tiempo, Colombia's main newspaper. I have been a columnist for Newsweek and writte...

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⚡ Thousands without power after severe storms tear through Florida
« Reply #651 on: November 03, 2018, 02:05:39 AM »
My juice is back though.  :icon_sunny:

RE

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/thousands-without-power-after-severe-storms-tear-through-floridas-tampa-area-2018-11-02/

 By Manuel Bojorquez CBS News November 2, 2018, 6:33 PM
Thousands without power after severe storms tear through Florida's Tampa area


PINELLAS PARK, Fla. — Severe storms tore through the Tampa Bay area Friday, including at least one tornado. Trees and wires went down, while roofs were ripped off homes.

Cellphone video captured the late afternoon tornado as it ripped through Seminole, Florida, about 24 miles west of Tampa. The line of heavy rain and wind uprooted trees, knocked down power lines and caused major damage to several homes and businesses.

"There are no injuries everyone is safe we have cleared all of the buildings that have damage," siad Seminole Fire Chief William Morelli.

For several hours, at least five counties were under a tornado warning. After the storm, road crews started clearing streets blocked by fallen trees. Some neighbors were shocked by the damage. Chuck DiMarco said he was at the supermarket during the storm, and received a panic call from his wife.

"She said 'Come home now, tornado.' That's all she said," DiMarco said.

Once he got home, he said he wasn't sure what he would see.

"I was walking that way toward my house and I was praying that I would find my house so we were spared," DiMarco said.

Nearly 60,000 people were without power Friday. The good news is the National Weather Service has given this area the all clear for any other possible storms.
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Looks like Surly is in for some more Weather Fun!  ::)  Break out the sled!


RE

https://www.foxnews.com/us/winter-storm-slams-south-with-heavy-snow-power-outages-as-over-1000-flights-canceled-out-of-charlotte

Winter storm slams South with heavy snow, power outages as over 1,000 flights canceled out of Charlotte
Travis Fedschun
By Travis Fedschun | Fox News


A Duke Energy crew works to restore power in Raleigh, N.C,. as snow continues to fall Sunday morning, Dec. 9, 2018. (Travis Long/The News & Observer via AP)

Heavy snow storm pounds Virginia and the Carolinas

Some areas have seen up to a foot of snow, thousands without power. Bryan Llenas reports from Asheville, North Carolina.

A storm system that's bringing heavy snow and freezing rain across a large section of the South is leaving thousands without power Sunday as wintry precipitation blasts the region.

Over 190,000 customers in North Carolina are without power as of 11:30 a.m. ET Sunday as snow and freezing precipitation continue to fall, according to North Carolina Emergency Management.

"North Carolina is in the cold, icy grip of a mammoth winter storm," North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper said at a news conference. "Enjoy the beauty but respect the danger. Don't be fooled. This storm is treacherous."

The majority of the power outages are in North Carolina, where the highest amounts of snowfall are expected to fall. The National Weather Service said that more than a foot of snow is possible from North Carolina into south-central Virginia.

"Travel will be severely affected across much of these areas, and some power outages are likely," the NWS said in its advisory.
A Duke Energy crew works to restore power in Raleigh, N.C,. as snow continues to fall Sunday morning, Dec. 9, 2018.

North Carolina Emergency Management said that the threat of ice and freezing rain increased Sunday, especially along the Interstate 85 corridor. There is now a "high probability" of widespread power outages as icy conditions develop across the central part of the state.

In the western part of North Carolina, officials told FOX Carolina that some areas had been 14 to 15 inches of snow, creating “treacherous" travel and leaving crews unable to get to some areas.

Governors and local officials in several states declared emergencies ahead of the storm crossing several Southern states and poised to hit particularly hard in portions of North Carolina and Virginia.
A motorist needed help after at least six inches of snow fell across parts of North Carolina on Sunday.

A motorist needed help after at least six inches of snow fell across parts of North Carolina on Sunday. (Durham County Sheriff's Office)

Cooper said most of the power outages are in western North Carolina, the Triangle area and in Mecklenburg County. State troopers have responded to more than 500 crashes so far since the storm began.

One tractor trailer ran off a road and into a river, Cooper said.

"Stay put if you can," Cooper said. "Wrap a few presents, decorate the tree, watch some football."

MIGRANT MAN DROWNS IN CALIFORNIA CANAL AFTER ILLEGALLY CROSSING US-MEXICO BORDER DURING STORM, OFFICIALS SAY

Charlotte Douglas International Airport, the sixth busiest airport in the country, said American Airlines would reduce its operations starting Saturday evening and scattered cancellations are expected through Monday morning.
The storm was expected to bring up to a foot of snow in parts of North Carolina and Virginia.

The storm was expected to bring up to a foot of snow in parts of North Carolina and Virginia. (Durham County Sheriff's Office)

Over 1,100 flights were canceled as of Sunday, according to flight-tracking website FlightAware.

"Travelers are encouraged to frequently check with their air carrier for any cancellations or delays before coming to the airport," the airport said.

Officials have warned residents to prepare emergency kits and staff off roads in impacted areas.

"Roads are slick and driving is not something you want to attempt this morning," the Durham County Sheriff's Office said. "Keep roads clear for plows and emergency vehicles."

More than 82,000 were without power in South Carolina, while a total of about 75,000 outages were reported across Tennessee, Alabama, and Mississippi.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.
Travis Fedschun is a reporter for FoxNews.com. Follow him on Twitter @travfed
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☃️Thousands still without power after deadly snowstorm blankets the South
« Reply #653 on: December 11, 2018, 12:06:38 AM »
https://www.cbsnews.com/news/winter-storm-thousands-still-without-power-after-deadly-snow-storm-blankets-the-south/

By Meg Oliver CBS News December 10, 2018, 6:31 PM
Thousands still without power after deadly snowstorm blankets the South


CHAPEL HILL, N.C. — A paralyzing storm in the South dumped up to two feet of snow and claimed the lives of at least two people. More than 327,000 homes and businesses lost power in six states, with most of the outages in North Carolina.

Highways turned into ice rinks as treacherous conditions sent cars sliding across Raleigh. The powerful storm also whipped across Virginia and South Carolina.

The early blast of winter nearly shattered records across the region. Richmond, Virginia, received more than 11 inches of snow, the most in over 100 years. South Carolina saw its average annual snowfall in just one day. In North Carolina, Durham saw 14 inches of snow, while parts of Raleigh and Chapel Hill collected up to eight inches.

The weather caused more than 500 accidents, with over 1,000 calls of service since midnight. Heavy snow crushed a gas station awning in Morganton, North Carolina. While the snow has stopped, snow coated trees keep falling, cutting off power to more homes and businesses across the south. Duke Energy said it could still be a day or two before power is restored.

North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper is urging residents to use caution.

"First responders stand ready to assist you as needed, but don't risk your safety and theirs by making them come to your rescue," Cooper said.

Starting Monday night, every southern state affected by this storm from Alabama to North Carolina will see freezing temperatures, raising the concern for black ice and a dangerous morning commute.
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☃️ Brutally cold weather to follow blockbuster weekend snowstorm
« Reply #654 on: January 18, 2019, 04:11:37 PM »
Collapse is a good time to be a Lineman for the County.  This one looks like a big Power Outage event in the making.  Lotta Ice hitting major population centers, followed by frigid temperature.  Break out the Mr. Buddy heaters and Candles🕯️!

https://www.accuweather.com/en/weather-news/brutally-cold-weather-to-follow-blockbuster-weekend-snowstorm/70007185

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/AxSarBcsKLU" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/AxSarBcsKLU</a>

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Re: Crazy Weather
« Reply #655 on: January 18, 2019, 06:44:08 PM »
We have our eye on this one. Not a good time to be in Ontario. I heard from Farmgal today. They are expecting 40below and beyond. I told her this is why I chose to stay close to an ocean.

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☃️ Winter storm disrupts travel across U.S.
« Reply #656 on: January 20, 2019, 12:49:33 AM »
Break out the Snow Plows and Salt!

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Winter storm disrupts travel across U.S.

Updated on: January 19, 2019 / 11:42 PM / CBS/AP

A large, powerful and dangerous winter storm is taking aim at about one-third of the nation this weekend. It rapidly moved from the Central Plains to the Midwest and is moving toward the Northeast and New England. Some northern areas of New England could see up to 18 inches of snow.


The storm is expected to drop snow, sleet, freezing rain and ice in many places. After that, temperatures are expected to turn bitterly cold.
Follow along below for updates:
​Fast facts:

    States of emergencies declared in New Jersey and Pennsylvania.
    11,065 flights delayed Saturday, 2,512 flights canceled across U.S., according to FlightAware.com.
    Amtrak is operating on a modified service in several states. (Full listing)
    13,204 power outages in Ohio, according to local utility companies.

Slick road leads to 15-vehicle Missouri pileup

A 15-vehicle crash has blocked a section of Interstate 55 in southeastern Missouri as snow from a massive winter storm swept through the area and slicked roads.

The Missouri Department of Transportation issued the news of the pileup near Ste. Genevieve on its Twitter page around 4 p.m. Saturday. The department says the interstate was blocked because of the crash, which included a responding firetruck. Motorists were urged to find an alternate route. There was no immediate word on injuries.

Transportation officials said crews hoped to clear the interstate's lanes within a few hours, but said snowfall was slowing that work.

Officials say many roads in Missouri have been slicked over with ice from rain earlier in the day before conditions turned to snow and plummeting temperatures.
Plane skids from runway at Chicago airport

A United Airlines plane has skidded off a runway at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport amid snowy and icy weather. Chicago fire officials say the incident occurred Saturday morning. No injuries were reported. The flight came into the airport from Phoenix and 129 people were on the plane.

A massive winter storm has brought up to 10 inches of snow to some parts of the Midwest and is expected to hit the Northeast on Sunday.

The storm prompted the cancellation of nearly 1,000 flights at Chicago's airports on Saturday. The average delay at O'Hare International Airport was nearly an hour on Saturday afternoon.
Winter storm doesn't stop some Midwesterners

Many people across the Midwest woke up to see a coating of snow or ice on Saturday. Areas where the storm had already moved out by midday faced bitter cold and strong winds.

Some Midwesterns didn't let it keep the indoors. Celeste Tremmel was outside in Detroit on Saturday training for a marathon. The 56-year-old chugged slowly through the several-inch-deep snow.

"When you run a marathon, you run no matter the weather," she said.

Tremmel said running in snow is "like running in sand, so you have to go a lot slower."
Connecticut governor to hold news briefing

Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont held a news briefing Saturday at 6:30 p.m. ET to update residents as the state prepares for the storm.

Lamont announced on Saturday that he will "partially activate" Connecticut's Emergency Operations Center starting at 6:00 p.m. to monitor storm conditions.

"Forecasts are showing a range of accumulating snow, sleet, and freezing rain," his office said in a news release Saturday.
1,600 plows being deployed across NYC

Salt spreaders are hitting the streets as the Tri-State area prepares for the winter weather headed its way, CBS New York reported.

About 700 spreaders and 1,600 plows will be deployed this weekend across New York City. Extra precautions are being taken to make sure the city is better prepared than it was just a few months ago, when thousands of drivers were stalled in traffic all night during a minor snowstorm.

This time, public works and utility crews were getting prepared on Friday.
Officials warn of flight disruptions

Officials have warned of flight disruptions at airports, as well as possible changes in train schedules.

By Saturday morning, 1,135 flights within, into or out of the U.S. were canceled for Saturday, according to flight-tracking service FlightAware.

Chicago's O'Hare International Airport reported that airlines there canceled nearly 470 flights "due to overnight snow and strong winds expected throughout the day." It advised travelers to get updates from airlines.


Amtrak canceled some trains Saturday from Chicago to Washington and New York and between New York and Boston and Pennsylvania on Sunday.

Chicago is forecast to receive as much as 8 inches by Saturday and wind gusts in the Chicago area are expected to reach 35 mph.
N.J. and Pennsylvania declare states of emergency

On Friday, New Jersey and Pennsylvania declared states of emergency.

"This storm has the potential to deliver every, every winter weather option that mother nature has," Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolfe said at a news conference.

In New Jersey, the state of emergency will go into effect at noon Saturday. "Our top priority is the safety of New Jerseyans, and we urge residents to stay off the roads and prepare for potential power outages," said Gov. Phil Murphy.
Winter storm warnings issued for the weekend

The National Weather Service has issued winter storm warnings for the weekend from the Dakotas across the Great Lakes states and into New England. It warned that conditions in the Northeast "could approach blizzard criteria."

The National Weather Service in Albany, New York, said snow could fall at a rate of 1 to 3 inches an hour, creating "difficult to impossible travel conditions" in areas. Ice was also a possibility in some areas in the path of the storm, which was forecast to dump up to 2 feet of snow.

In New York City, the worst of the storm is expected from Saturday afternoon through Sunday afternoon, with snow accumulations of 3-6 inches followed by rain that could turn to ice as temperatures drop later Sunday. Single-digit temperatures could last into Monday.

First published on January 19, 2019
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Offline g

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Re: Crazy Weather
« Reply #657 on: January 20, 2019, 06:15:17 AM »
Was a decent winter until this weekend.

Five inches of snow outside wet and heavy, gonna rain like hell for three hours and then the temperature crash from 36 to zero with high winds and a high of nine degrees for tomorrow.  :-\

I'm too nice a guy to suffer like this.   :'( :'(

                                             

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Re: Crazy Weather
« Reply #658 on: January 20, 2019, 09:29:09 AM »
Was a decent winter until this weekend.

Five inches of snow outside wet and heavy, gonna rain like hell for three hours and then the temperature crash from 36 to zero with high winds and a high of nine degrees for tomorrow.  :-\

I'm too nice a guy to suffer like this. 

Break Out the Ice Pick!

Got Generator yet?

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Another Winter's Day in the New Normal::)

More Pics at the link.

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https://weather.com/news/news/2019-01-20-winter-storm-harper-impacts-midwest-northeast

Winter Storm Harper: Thousand of Flights Canceled, Hundreds of Crashes, 6 Dead
By Pam Wright and Ron Brackettless than an hour agoweather.com
01:23


Major Impacts from Winter Storm Harper Across the Country
Meteorologist Heather Tesch takes a look at the impacts of Winter Storm Harper from coast to coast.
At a Glance

    The storm is responsible for at least 6 deaths.Thousands of flights have been canceled.The storm caused hundreds of crashes.Power was knocked out to tens of thousands of customers.

As Winter Storm Harper pushed into the Northeast Sunday, the storm left behind a trail of thousands of flight cancelations, hundreds of crashes and at least six people dead.

Power outages began stacking up Sunday, too, with more than 28,000 customers still without electricity in Connecticut and more than 12,800 in Virginia as of 4:45 p.m., according to PowerOutage.us.

In addition to ice and snow, several states were dealing with coastal flooding on Sunday.

A falling tree killed a utility subcontractor about 3:15 p.m. Sunday in Middletown, Connecticut, WVIT reported. Middletown Police said the Eversource subcontractor had finished repairing a line when the tree fell on him. His name was not released.

On Saturday, a Kansas Department of Transportation worker was killed in a rollover crash during snow removal operations on southbound U.S. 69 in Johnson County. No other vehicles were involved in the crash.

The driver was identified as 25-year-old Stephen Winder. He died after the rig he was driving rolled over around 6 a.m. local time. Windler was reportedly thrown from the vehicle, which then landed on top of him. The crash is under investigation.

The Missouri State Highway Patrol reported two deaths from weather-related crashes.

The storm had already claimed two lives in California earlier this week.
Troubled Landings

A United Airlines jetliner slid off the runway Saturday morning after landing at O'Hare International Airport, the Chicago Tribune reports. No one was injured when United Airlines flight 656 from Phoenix to Chicago rolled off the concrete surface into a grassy area.

On Friday, Southwest Airlines 1643 slid off the runway at Eppley Airfield after landing about 2:05 p.m. local time, according to the Omaha World-Herald. Freezing drizzle was falling at the time.

The airport, which closed for several hours because of the accident, tweeted: "There are no injuries and airport fire crews are working with Southwest to deplane the passengers and take them to the terminal."

"It seemed like it would be OK, but then once we were slowing down to turn, you could feel them trying to get the brakes going and it was just too slick. So we ended up off the runway in the grass," Ali Schwanke tweeted Friday.

More than 2,000 flights have been canceled as of Sunday afternoon, flightaware.com reports. Thousands of flights have also been delayed.
New England

From about 6 p.m. Saturday until about 7:30 Sunday morning, Connecticut State Police responded to 72 crashes, some with minor injuries. Troopers assisted 133 motorist whose vehicles had spun out, gotten stuck or broke down.

Snow and sleet also was causing power outages in the state. More than 30,000 customers were without electricity as of 3 p.m., PowerOutage.us reported. There were a number of reports of trees falling over power lines.

The speed limit alongs parts of the Massachusetts Turnpike were reduced to 40 mph because of the weather, the Massachusetts Department of Transportation announced. The reduction was in effect from the New York border to Wilbraham and from Hopkinton to Weston.

Coastal flooding was pushing water into streets in Duxbury, Massachusetts. Seaside houses in Scituate were boarded up as waves crashed over the seawall, WHDH reported.

Exit 14 on Interstate 93 in Boston was also closed because of tidal flooding.
New York

A ban on tractor-trailers and buses on most highways in the state began at 3 p.m. ET Saturday.

"Safety is our number one priority and with the anticipated storm impacting most of New York State, we are implementing this ban on tractor trailers and buses so our plow operators, fire, law enforcement and emergency personnel can keep roads clean and respond to emergencies as quickly as possible," Cuomo said. "I am also urging drivers to stay off the roads unless absolutely necessary."

(MORE: Winter Storm Harper: Everything We Know)
Pennsylvania

All train service into and out of Pittsburgh were halted Sunday morning after overhead power lines were frozen, the Port Authority of Allegheny County tweeted.

The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation temporarily reduced the speed limit to 45 mph on several highways in Allegheny, Beaver, and Lawrence counties because of the hard freeze early Sunday morning.

PennDOT also shut down commercial access to Interstates 70, 76 and 80 beginning at noon Saturday. The ban was lifted at 7 a.m. Sunday for several roadways. Bans remain on I-80 west of I-81, I-81 north of I-80, I-84, I-86, I-90, I-99, I-180 and I-380, PennDOT said.

“We want to be aggressive in managing this storm, during which snowfall rates could exceed one to two inches per hour," Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf said. "Our top concern is the safety of residents. If you do not have to travel during the storm, please avoid it. Please heed warnings from emergency responders and personnel, and remember to check on your neighbors, especially the elderly.”
Midwest

At least five Ohio counties instituted Level 3 snow emergencies on Saturday, WKYC reported. Roadways were closed to all non-emergency travel in Erie, Huron, Sandusky, Ottawa and Crawford counties. Lorain, Summit, Medina, Wayne, and Ashland counties were at Level 2 which meant that only people who thought it was necessary to drive should be on the roads.

U.S. 24 was closed near Napoleon, Ohio after a big rig slid off the road and blocked lanes.

At one point Sunday morning, more than 13,000 Ohio customers were without power, according to poweroutage.us.

In Indiana, a jackknifed tractor-trailer was blocking southbound lanes Saturday afternoon on Interstate 65, south mile marker 231. Crews began removing abandoned commercial vehicles from the interstate on Sunday morning.
The Plains

The storm caused travel woes across the Plains on Friday as it pushed toward the Midwest.

A 15-vehicle pileup on Interstate 55 near Thayer, Missouri, which temporarily closed a section of the interstate in the southeastern side of the state.

The Missouri State Highway Patrol reported 1608 calls for service, 575 stranded motorists, 285 crashes and 43 injuries in addition to the two fatalities.

Michael J. Fox, 48, of Sunrise Beach, Missouri, died when his Polaris off-road vehicle ran off the road and rolled over at 12:40 a.m. Saturday on Route F, south of Sunrise Beach, the Highway Patrol reported.

James Haase, 30, of Reeds Spring, Missouri, was killed when he lost control of his Honda Accord on a snow-covered Route OO near Kimberling City and it slid into the path of an oncoming pickup truck shortly before noon Saturday, according to the Highway Patrol.

The Minnesota Department of Transportation said Saturday at least five snowplows had been hit by passing vehicles in the past 24 hours.

A jackknifed semitrailer truck shut down part of Interstate 35 in Minnesota on Friday afternoon from the Clarks Grove exit to near Albert Lea, the Albert Lea Tribune reported. It was one of a number of crashes affecting traffic on I-35 and Interstate 90.

The Kansas Highway Patrol said there were several crashes and vehicles sliding off the road on Interstate 70 in Geary and Riley counties. The interstate was partially blocked near mile marker 316.

No injuries were reported after a vehicle collided with a snowplow Friday on a South Dakota road.

"Early this morning a driver tried to pass a snow plow and collided with the wing blade in a white out," the South Dakota Highway Patrol tweeted Friday. "Now we have 1 less (snowplow) to clear the road. Poor driving decisions affect us all!"

Friday afternoon, a second snowplow was hit by a car. No injuries were reported in that crash.

In Nebraska, numerous spin outs were reported on I-29 outside Omaha, including three tractor-trailers that slid into ditches.
Travel Interruptions

Amtrak announced Friday that it would be modifying its service in the Midwest and Northeast because of the storm.

(MORE: Winter Storm Harper Latest Forecast)

On Sunday, five Acela trains and six Northeast Regional trains are canceled between New York and Boston. Six Keystone trains will not operate between New York and Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Two Pennsylvanian trains between New York and Pittsburgh are canceled. Two Vermonter trains on Sunday will not operate between St. Albans, Vermont, and New Haven, Connecticut, the Associated Press reports.

Service between New York and Washington will run as scheduled.

In anticipation of the storm, airlines including American, Southwest, United and Frontier are waiving change fees for cities impacted by the storm.
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