AuthorTopic: Crazy Weather  (Read 90496 times)

Offline RE

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Re: Crazy Weather
« Reply #735 on: February 13, 2019, 12:42:15 PM »
Some of the SUV's are made in the US, and the quality is not as good as the ones from der Deustcheland, like the E Class cars.

So he can specify to the Dealer he only wants one that was manufactured in Krautland.

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Offline Eddie

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Re: Crazy Weather
« Reply #736 on: February 13, 2019, 01:23:40 PM »
GLS and GLE models are ONLY made in Venice Alabama by this guy.





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Offline RE

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Re: Crazy Weather
« Reply #737 on: February 13, 2019, 01:45:32 PM »
GLS and GLE models are ONLY made in Venice Alabama by this guy.



Well, my suggestion would be instead of a used 4WD Mercedes SUV, he should buy a used 4WD Ford, Chevy or Dodge Pickup and a  plow attachment on Craig's List for it.


It probably comes in at less than 1/2 the price of the Mercedes INCLUDING the plow attachment, and he can plow out the whole fucking Cul-de-Sac and driveways and charge his Chinese neighbors through the nose for the service.  He can make extra money and pay for the machine this way over a few winters.  He's not gonna be driving it all the time, he has his Sedan for that most of the time.

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Offline Nearingsfault

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Re: Crazy Weather
« Reply #738 on: February 13, 2019, 02:45:35 PM »
When we moved here I swore to myself my business card would never have " and plowing" at the end of it. Lots of construction types around here do plowing in the winter. Its very tough on equipment and it destroys your sleep patterns.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/uYXEt7xOh1M" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/uYXEt7xOh1M</a>
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Offline RE

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Re: Crazy Weather
« Reply #739 on: February 13, 2019, 03:12:27 PM »
When we moved here I swore to myself my business card would never have " and plowing" at the end of it. Lots of construction types around here do plowing in the winter. Its very tough on equipment and it destroys your sleep patterns.

It's Big Bizness around here of course.  One of the dads of my gymmies was a Commercial Fisherman doing the Charter biz in the summer and a Plowboy in the Winter.  Lived in a real nice McMansion, and his Dodge Ram was a real nice truck, about 5 years old I think but still in good shape.  He hadda be doing pretty good because his wife was a stay at home gym mom and besides the McMansion cost and food cost and everything else cost around here, I'm guessing he was grossing around $150K all together.  His Fishing boat was real nice too.  I couldn't find a precise duplicate on the Google search, but this is close.


His had an aluminum hull though.

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Offline K-Dog

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Re: Crazy Weather
« Reply #740 on: February 13, 2019, 05:46:39 PM »
We have had seven different Mercedes used cars and have a regular mechanic.  He told me to stay away from the SUVs.  They don't last.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/wn7dAqvMEIc" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/wn7dAqvMEIc</a>

Here you can see me making a landing pad in the cul-de-sac to back into.  Then I'll drive along ruts to get out to the clear street.  It is wet heavy and melting but it will take days to melt so I have to do this.

« Last Edit: February 13, 2019, 05:49:40 PM by K-Dog »
Under ideal conditions of temperature and pressure the organism will grow without limit.

Offline RE

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Re: Crazy Weather
« Reply #741 on: February 13, 2019, 06:00:02 PM »
We have had seven different Mercedes used cars and have a regular mechanic.  He told me to stay away from the SUVs.  They don't last.

Here you can see me making a landing pad in the cul-de-sac to back into.  Then I'll drive along ruts to get out to the clear street.  It is wet heavy and melting but it will take days to melt so I have to do this.

Great Video!  My back is killing me just watching it!  :o

We already nixed the Mercedes SUV in favor of a used pickup truck with a plow attachment from Craig's list.

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🐮 Over 1,800 dairy cows killed in freak blizzard in Washington
« Reply #742 on: February 14, 2019, 01:14:13 AM »
Fortunately not near Roamer's Dairy in Wisconson.  We get all of our Dairy products from WA though.  There was one Dairy in the valley when I got here, but it closed a while back.

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https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/over-1-800-dairy-cows-killed-freak-blizzard-washington-state-n971371

Over 1,800 dairy cows killed in freak blizzard in Washington state, hurting struggling farmers
“It’s been four years of thin margins and losses. We’ve been struggling financially for four years and now Mother Nature is throwing another twist," said one farmer who lost 200 cows.


Dairy cows feed in their pen at a farm in Mattawa, Washington, on Jan. 2, 2004.E.B. McGovern / AP file

Feb. 13, 2019, 4:07 PM AKST
By Phil McCausland

A surprise blizzard in Washington State caused the death of more than 1,800 dairy cows across a little more than a dozen farms, leaving farmers to find a way to dispose of cattle that were a key source of their livelihood.

An arid region of the state, Yakima Valley is host to a number of dairy farms that use open lots for their cows, meaning their buildings are without walls. That’s typically not a problem because the area only gets six to eight inches of rain per year.

But on Saturday farmers said that a storm forecast to bring three to five inches of snow, already a large snowfall by their standards, suddenly dropped 18 to 24 inches with winds of 40 to 50 mph and gusts of up to 80 mph.

Jason Sheehan, 44, has run a dairy farm of 5,000 cattle for 17 years in the valley. On Saturday, more than 200 of his cows were killed in the storm. He has never seen anything like it, he said, adding it is only the latest challenge for struggling dairy producers.

“It’s been four years of thin margins and losses,” said Sheehan, who employs 35 people on his dairy farm. “We’ve been struggling financially for four years, and now Mother Nature is throwing another twist. It’s a tough time to take this on.”
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Most of the farms in the area are medium to large dairies that milk 3,000 to 5,000 cows apiece, according to Stuart Turner, an agronomy consultant for farms in the region.

Turner said that farmers weren’t prepared for a storm of this magnitude, but did what they could to protect their herds. Some went so far as to build walls out of hay bales to provide the cows some shelter.

But to stay warm in the dropping temperatures, the cows clustered together and some were trampled or crushed in the process. Farmers couldn’t get the animals, which each weigh around 1,200 pounds on average, to move.

“It’s just brutal” for dairy farmers, which is already "the toughest corner in agriculture," Stuart said. "Compared to 2013, total farm income on average is down 40 percent. Name an industry that has to maintain the same cost base and take a 40 percent hit and keep going.”

The cows themselves are worth on average $2,000 each, meaning that the farms collectively lost millions of dollars as well as their animals.

Sheehan said that during the storm his farm had to stop milking for the first time since it opened in 1978. It was also the first time he ever remembers milk trucks not making the rounds to pick up milk, as the area usually is spared such extreme weather.
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"There were a whole bunch of dairymen working in that storm, trying to do whatever they could for all these animals,” Sheehan said. “We have a really great team of people around here, and all these employees put their heart and soul in this and there are a lot of tears around here.”

But farmers did not have time to mourn their losses, as many had to go right back to work as well as figure out what to do with the cows that died.

“What people are hearing about right now is the devastation caused by the storm, but what they don’t realize is that these farms have to keep running,” said Kimmi Devaney, director of community relations for the Dairy Farmers of Washington, who pointed out that cows have to be milked two to three times a day.

“It really showcases the spirit of the dairy community that farmers who weren’t heaviest hit have come out to help those who are in hard times,” she said.

While no definite plans had been made as of Wednesday, Steven George, the issue management coordinator for the Washington State Dairy Federation, said farmers are attempting to compost the bodies in lieu of a mass grave, which could negatively impact groundwater.
'Hard to believe it's over': The last days of an American dairy farm
June 29, 201808:51

“There is on-farm compositing of mortalities,” George said. “That is an accepted practice, but this is probably going to overwhelm that. They are used to doing a couple a day. We are looking at some other potential options.”

George said possibilities include composting the carcasses at a pork facility in Sunnyside, Washington, or at a landfill across the state border in Oregon.

Shaheen, meanwhile, said he and his employees are remaining focused on the cows they still have.

“We have to take care of what’s living and make sure they’re comfortable and watered and milked and everything,” he said. “We’ve tried to focus on what‘s left instead of getting down about what didn’t make it through the storm.”
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Offline RE

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🌨️ Is It Getting Too Late for a Strong Nor'easter?
« Reply #743 on: February 14, 2019, 01:26:35 AM »
I bet on at least 1 before spring.

RE

https://weather.com/safety/winter/news/2019-02-13-is-it-getting-too-late-for-a-strong-noreaster

Is It Getting Too Late for a Strong Nor'easter?
By Brian Donegan14 hours agoweather.com


This is the typical setup for a nor'easter during the winter months.

At a Glance

    A classic nor'easter has not yet struck the Northeast this winter.Most cities in the region are running below average for snowfall.Time is running out, but last year's four nor'easters in March prove it isn't too late.

Winter only has about five weeks remaining, and so far, the Northeast has escaped the season without a blow from a classic nor'easter to produce heavy snow, strong winds and coastal flooding across the region.

While all of the major cities along the Interstate 95 corridor have picked up accumulating snow on a few occasions this winter, none of the snowmakers have been particularly heavy, and more often than not, rain has been the dominant precipitation type from storms moving through the Northeast.

As a result, most cities in the region are running below average for snowfall this season.

(MORE: What Is a Nor'easter?)

Baltimore (11.1 inches) is nearly 3 inches below average, Philadelphia (10.3 inches) is 4 inches below average and New York City (8.7 inches) is more than 7 inches below average. Boston's meager 4.7 inches of snow through Feb. 12 – 2.2 inches of which fell Tuesday from Winter Storm Maya – is nearly 2 feet below average.

One exception has been Washington D.C., where its 14 inches of snow is nearly 3 inches above average. Most of that snow fell during Winter Storm Gia Jan. 12-13, when Reagan National Airport measured 10.3 inches.

You might be wondering if it's too late for these Northeast cities to make up for their snowfall deficits.

A typical nor'easter weather pattern, depicted on the map at the top of this article, features a southward plunge of the jet stream over the central and eastern United States. An area of low pressure then forms near or off the East Coast and gets steered north or northeastward by the jet-stream winds aloft.

That pattern has been hard to come by this winter, which is why we haven't yet seen that "blockbuster" Northeast snowstorm that many snow lovers wish for every year.

Although time is running out, note that snow-packed nor'easters can still happen into March, as last year proved, though that was an anomaly.

From March 2-22, 2018, a parade of four nor'easters hammered the northeastern U.S., dumping heavy snow, knocking out power to millions and causing severe coastal flooding.

(MORE: Four Nor'easters in Three Weeks)


Four nor'easters impacted the Northeast in less than three weeks in March 2018.

The climatological peak for major Northeast snowstorms is from late January through February, according to NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information.

However, two of the three highest-rated snowstorms on the Northeast Snowfall Impact Scale (NESIS) occurred in early March, with the clear front-runner being the Superstorm of March 12-14, 1993.

NESIS ranks the impact of Northeast snowstorms based on snowfall amounts and the population affected. In general, widespread heavy snowfall over highly populated areas produces a high NESIS value.

So if you're still patiently awaiting a classic nor'easter before the warm weather arrives, there's a chance March may deliver, but nothing is guaranteed in weather.
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Offline Surly1

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Re: 🌨️ Is It Getting Too Late for a Strong Nor'easter?
« Reply #744 on: February 14, 2019, 04:02:30 AM »
I bet on at least 1 before spring.

RE

https://weather.com/safety/winter/news/2019-02-13-is-it-getting-too-late-for-a-strong-noreaster

Is It Getting Too Late for a Strong Nor'easter?
By Brian Donegan14 hours agoweather.com

//
So if you're still patiently awaiting a classic nor'easter before the warm weather arrives, there's a chance March may deliver, but nothing is guaranteed in weather.

Living on this part of the country, that's like betting on sunrise.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline azozeo

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Re: 🌨️ Is It Getting Too Late for a Strong Nor'easter?
« Reply #745 on: February 14, 2019, 04:58:31 AM »
I bet on at least 1 before spring.

RE

https://weather.com/safety/winter/news/2019-02-13-is-it-getting-too-late-for-a-strong-noreaster

Is It Getting Too Late for a Strong Nor'easter?
By Brian Donegan14 hours agoweather.com

//
So if you're still patiently awaiting a classic nor'easter before the warm weather arrives, there's a chance March may deliver, but nothing is guaranteed in weather.

Living on this part of the country, that's like betting on sunrise.


I don't know about your nor easters.... We have a nor wester over us now so it's a wet & sloppy valentines
at the grand canyon today.  :coffee:
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline Nearingsfault

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Re: 🌨️ Is It Getting Too Late for a Strong Nor'easter?
« Reply #746 on: February 14, 2019, 05:17:00 AM »
I bet on at least 1 before spring.

RE

https://weather.com/safety/winter/news/2019-02-13-is-it-getting-too-late-for-a-strong-noreaster

Is It Getting Too Late for a Strong Nor'easter?
By Brian Donegan14 hours agoweather.com


This is the typical setup for a nor'easter during the winter months.

At a Glance

    A classic nor'easter has not yet struck the Northeast this winter.Most cities in the region are running below average for snowfall.Time is running out, but last year's four nor'easters in March prove it isn't too late.

Winter only has about five weeks remaining, and so far, the Northeast has escaped the season without a blow from a classic nor'easter to produce heavy snow, strong winds and coastal flooding across the region.

While all of the major cities along the Interstate 95 corridor have picked up accumulating snow on a few occasions this winter, none of the snowmakers have been particularly heavy, and more often than not, rain has been the dominant precipitation type from storms moving through the Northeast.

As a result, most cities in the region are running below average for snowfall this season.

(MORE: What Is a Nor'easter?)

Baltimore (11.1 inches) is nearly 3 inches below average, Philadelphia (10.3 inches) is 4 inches below average and New York City (8.7 inches) is more than 7 inches below average. Boston's meager 4.7 inches of snow through Feb. 12 – 2.2 inches of which fell Tuesday from Winter Storm Maya – is nearly 2 feet below average.

One exception has been Washington D.C., where its 14 inches of snow is nearly 3 inches above average. Most of that snow fell during Winter Storm Gia Jan. 12-13, when Reagan National Airport measured 10.3 inches.

You might be wondering if it's too late for these Northeast cities to make up for their snowfall deficits.

A typical nor'easter weather pattern, depicted on the map at the top of this article, features a southward plunge of the jet stream over the central and eastern United States. An area of low pressure then forms near or off the East Coast and gets steered north or northeastward by the jet-stream winds aloft.

That pattern has been hard to come by this winter, which is why we haven't yet seen that "blockbuster" Northeast snowstorm that many snow lovers wish for every year.

Although time is running out, note that snow-packed nor'easters can still happen into March, as last year proved, though that was an anomaly.

From March 2-22, 2018, a parade of four nor'easters hammered the northeastern U.S., dumping heavy snow, knocking out power to millions and causing severe coastal flooding.

(MORE: Four Nor'easters in Three Weeks)


Four nor'easters impacted the Northeast in less than three weeks in March 2018.

The climatological peak for major Northeast snowstorms is from late January through February, according to NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information.

However, two of the three highest-rated snowstorms on the Northeast Snowfall Impact Scale (NESIS) occurred in early March, with the clear front-runner being the Superstorm of March 12-14, 1993.

NESIS ranks the impact of Northeast snowstorms based on snowfall amounts and the population affected. In general, widespread heavy snowfall over highly populated areas produces a high NESIS value.

So if you're still patiently awaiting a classic nor'easter before the warm weather arrives, there's a chance March may deliver, but nothing is guaranteed in weather.
My sister was born in Montreal on march 4th in the biggest snowstorm ever recorded there... snowmobiles instead of ambulances...

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Offline RE

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🌧️ Atmospheric river fuels torrential rain in California
« Reply #747 on: February 15, 2019, 12:47:44 AM »
Cry me an Atmospheric River...

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https://www.accuweather.com/en/weather-news/atmospheric-river-fuels-torrential-rain-in-california-unleashing-flash-flooding-mudslides/70007433



February 15, 2019

Atmospheric river fuels torrential rain in California unleashing flash flooding, mudslides

By Alex Sosnowski, AccuWeather senior meteorologist
A storm is bringing life-threatening flash flooding, mudslides and an avalanche risk across California as it is loaded with subtropical moisture from an atmospheric river. California will be bombarded with heavy rain and fluctuating snow levels through Thursday night.

An atmospheric river is a term to used to describe a plume of tropical moisture in the atmosphere that can result in heavy rainfall or snowfall in a narrow swath. Use of the term is most common along the West Coast of the United States, but the setup can occur anywhere that persistent winds can transport moisture from the tropics to a mid-latitude location.

Two homes were destroyed and at least 50 others were evacuated after a mudslide occurred in a neighborhood in Sausalito, California, Thursday morning.

Evacuations were also ordered near the Woolsey Fire and Holy Fire burn scar areas. Later, evacuation orders were lifted for areas near the Woolsey Fire.


The storm has been potent enough to create dangerous conditions for motorists, especially near burn scar locations and along streams that are prone to flooding.

A general 2-3 inches of rain will fall along the coast from San Diego to Crescent City, California, from the storm. However, rainfall of 3-6 inches is likely along the seaside-facing slopes of the coast ranges and the western slopes of the lower and intermediate elevations of the Sierra Nevada. In these mountainous areas, an AccuWeather Local StormMax™ of 12 inches can occur.

Palm Springs, California, recorded its third wettest day on record on Thursday with over 3.5 inches of rain.

Rain X


Where there are several inches to a few feet of snow on the ground, there is the potential for the snowcover to liquefy and add to the already heavy rainfall. Rapid flooding along the small streams and short-run rivers flowing out of the mountains at intermediate and low elevations is likely.

Enough rain will fall in the major cities of Los Angeles, San Francisco, Sacramento, San Diego and others to lead to incidents of urban flooding. The rain, along with ponding and blowing spray, will force motorists to slow down and add to commute times.

AP Image LA Flooding from Feb. 2, 2019.

Despite the potential for damaging their vehicles and putting themselves and others at risk, motorists made their way through flooded streets of Panorama City section of the San Fernando Valley in Los Angeles Saturday, Feb. 2, 2019. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)


Motorists are reminded never to attempt driving through flooded areas. The water may be much deeper than it appears and/or the road surface may have been washed away beneath the water.

On secondary roads in the mountains and canyons, motorists should anticipate closures due to flash flooding, mudslides and other debris flows.

RELATED:
Mudslide ransacks homes in Sausalito as an atmospheric river fuels flooding across California
What you should do if you get stuck driving in floodwaters
How to survive a power outage in winter
Why trees topple in high winds

Snow levels that had surged above Donner Pass, California, for a time, have now begun to fall. Heavy snow is expected for the duration of the storm over the summit along I-80 with difficult travel.

Over the peaks and ridges of the Sierra Nevada, where snow will linger into this weekend, a general 3-6 feet of snow will fall with an AccuWeather Local StormMax™ of 10 feet with this storm.

Avalanches 3 pm


With the fluctuating temperatures, some of the ski slopes may be very dangerous due to the risk of avalanches.

Farther inland, rain will fall on locations such as Palm Springs, California, Phoenix, Las Vegas and Reno, Nevada, and Salt Lake City. Palm Springs has already receive a half a year's worth of rain from this single storm in about 10 hours with more into Thursday night.

Heavy snow will fall on the northern and central Rockies as well as the ridges in the Wasatch Range.

The storm will also pack a punch in terms of wind with gusts over 100 mph over the passes and high country of the Sierra Nevada. Gusts reaching 60 mph are likely over the passes in Southern California with gusts between 40 and 50 mph along much of the California coast.


Winds this strong can cause some high-profile vehicles to lose control and roll over. Trees can topple over in the saturated soil and lead to power outages.

Conditions will improve over the lower elevations during Friday and Saturday. However, there will still be spotty rain showers in the region.

It is possible that freezing levels dip enough to allow a bit of snow and slippery travel over the passes in Southern California to end the week and during the first part of the weekend.

US Weekend


"It appears that additional storms will either continue to drop southward along the West Coast and/or pivot inland from the Pacific through the end of February," according to AccuWeather Long-Range Meteorologist Jack Boston.

The pattern will continue to bring rounds of low-elevation rain and mountain snow in the coming weeks with the dangers as well as the long-term drought relief benefits.

Reservoirs will continue to take on water from this storm and others to follow.

Download the free AccuWeather app to see the latest forecast and advisories for your area.

Few things reflect the power of nature and weather like avalanches. This week host, Regina Miller talks to Mark Staples, director of the Utah Avalanche Center, and Dan Burnett, Group Mission coordinator for the Summit County Rescue Group in Breckenridge, Colorado. They discuss recent deaths on the slopes, the weather situations that can contribute to an avalanche, the dangers of human interaction, and how best to survive.

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Offline Surly1

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Climate of North American cities will shift hundreds of miles in one generation
« Reply #748 on: February 16, 2019, 03:13:47 AM »
Climate of North American cities will shift hundreds of miles in one generation

Under current high emissions the average urban dweller is going to have to drive more than 500 miles to the south to find a climate similar to their home city by 2080. Credit: Matthew Fitzpatrick/University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

In one generation, the climate experienced in many North American cities is projected to change to that of locations hundreds of miles away—or to a new climate unlike any found in North America today.

A new study and interactive web application aim to help the public understand how climate change will impact the lives of people who live in urban areas of the United States and Canada. These new climate analyses match the expected future climate in each city with the current climate of another location, providing a relatable picture of what is likely in store.

“Under current high emissions the average urban dweller is going to have to drive more than 500 miles to the south to find a climate like that expected in their home city by 2080,” said study author Matt Fitzpatrick of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science. “Not only is climate changing, but climates that don’t presently exist in North America will be prevalent in a lot of urban areas.”

The study found that by the 2080s, even if limits are placed on emissions, the climate of North American urban areas will feel substantially different, and in many cases completely unlike contemporary climates found anywhere in the western hemisphere north of the equator.

If emissions continue unabated throughout the 21st century, the climate of North American urban areas will become, on average, most like the contemporary climate of locations about 500 miles away and mainly to the south. In the eastern U.S., nearly all urban areas, including Boston, New York, and Philadelphia, will become most similar to contemporary climates to the south and southwest. Climates of most urban areas in the central and western U.S. will become most similar to contemporary climates found to the south or southeast.

“Within the lifetime of children living today, the climate of many regions is projected to change from the familiar to conditions unlike those experienced in the same place by their parents, grandparents, or perhaps any generation in millennia,” said Fitzpatrick. “Many cities could experience climates with no modern equivalent in North America.”

The climate of cities in the northeast will tend to feel more like the humid subtropical climates typical of parts of the Midwest or southeastern U.S. today—warmer and wetter in all seasons. For instance, unless we take action to mitigate emissions, Washington, D.C. will feel more like northern Mississippi. The climates of western cities are expected to become more like those of the desert Southwest or southern California—warmer in all seasons, with changes in the amount and seasonal distribution of precipitation. San Francisco’s climate will resemble that of Los Angeles. New York will feel more like northern Arkansas.

Scientists analyzed 540 urban areas that encompassed approximately 250 million inhabitants in the United States and Canada. For each urban area, they mapped the similarity between that city’s future climate expected by the 2080s and contemporary climate in the western hemisphere north of the equator using 12 measures of climate, including minimum and maximum temperature and precipitation during the four seasons.

The study also mapped climate differences under two emission trajectories: unmitigated emissions (RCP8.5), the scenario most in line with what might be expected given current policies and the speed of global action, and mitigated emissions (RCP4.5), which assumes policies are put in place to limit emissions, such as the Paris Agreement.

Climate-analog mapping is a statistical technique that matches the expected future climate at one location—your city of residence, for instance—with the current climate of another familiar location to provide a place-based understanding of climate change. Combining climate mapping with the interactive web application provides a powerful tool to communicate how climate change may impact the lives of a large portion of the population of the United States and Canada.

“We can use this technique to translate a future forecast into something we can better conceptualize and link to our own experiences,” said Fitzpatrick. “It’s my hope that people have that ‘wow’ moment, and it sinks in for the first time the scale of the changes we’re expecting in a single generation.”


This article is asummary of“Contemporary climatic analogs for 540 North American urban areas in the late 21st century,”by Matt Fitzpatrick of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science and Robert Dunn of North Carolina State University, published in Nature Communications on February 12, 2019.

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline RE

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❄️ Monster winter storm snarls travel, cancels school across the Midwest...
« Reply #749 on: February 20, 2019, 02:53:10 AM »
Looks like numerous Diners will be impacted by this one.  Roamer in WI, Surly in VA and C5 in Nova Scotia.

RE


February 20, 2019
Live updates: Monster winter storm snarls travel, cancels school across the Midwest and mid-Atlantic
By Chaffin Mitchell, AccuWeather staff writer
00:1901:08

More than 200 million Americans, roughly 60 percent of the population of the United States, will be impacted by a major storm that is set to bring snow, rain, ice or a wintry mix to every state east of the Mississippi River.

The National Weather Service said Tuesday that a swath of heavy snow is expected from Oklahoma into the Midwest, Ohio Valley, mid-Atlantic and the Northeast through Wednesday.


A NOAA satellite loop of the continental U.S. taken on Tuesday, Feb. 19. As much as 60 percent of the U.S. population will be impacted by some form of winter weather as a new storm sweeps northward across the nation. (NOAA)


The large storm will pass the Tennessee and Ohio valleys midweek, bringing snow, ice and difficult travel to the Midwest and Northeast. Then, the storm will reorganize along the mid-Atlantic coast before heading toward the Maritime provinces of Canada.

Several inches of snow is likely before changing to sleet and freezing rain.
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