AuthorTopic: How Blockchain Will Rule Your World  (Read 9532 times)

Offline Eddie

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Re: How Blockchain Will Rule Your World
« Reply #300 on: June 22, 2019, 10:11:51 AM »
Yeah, well....

Another good argument for the "One Man, One Boat" approach to shelter and transportation.
« Last Edit: June 22, 2019, 10:14:05 AM by Eddie »
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Offline RE

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Re: How Blockchain Will Rule Your World
« Reply #301 on: June 22, 2019, 10:22:01 AM »
Yeah, well....

Another good argument for the "One Man, One Boat" approach to shelter and transportation.

A good principle.  Although, Old Seadog's boat accumulated a LOT of rust and broken parts in just ONE Pacific crossing.  He JUST spent weeks prior to the trip cleaning up rust and getting the boat ship-shape for the Voyage!

RE
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Offline Eddie

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Re: How Blockchain Will Rule Your World
« Reply #302 on: June 22, 2019, 10:25:22 AM »
I'll post some boats on the boat thread. I've run cross some amazing boats in the last few days. Hope the crypto lottery keeps paying out.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

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Re: How Blockchain Will Rule Your World
« Reply #303 on: June 22, 2019, 10:29:10 AM »
I'll post some boats on the boat thread. I've run cross some amazing boats in the last few days. Hope the crypto lottery keeps paying out.

One man, one boat one house.  Sell off the Toothstead, you can buy the boat of your dreams.

RE
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Offline RE

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💻 Hackers Used Two Firefox Zero Days to Hit a Crypto Exchange
« Reply #304 on: June 23, 2019, 12:10:30 AM »
https://www.wired.com/story/firefox-vulnerability-coinbase-ransomware-border-hack/

Security News This Week: Hackers Used Two Firefox Zero Days to Hit a Crypto Exchange


Tricia Hipps; Getty Images

The week began with a tricky Google Calendar phishing scam, and ended with Iran ramping up its cyberattacks against the US, as talk of war with that nation mounts. That, as they say, escalated quickly.

Before things took a turn for the geopolitical, we walked you through a dead simple way to stop data breaches with... database encryption. We explained why Google is getting retro when it comes to ways to encrypt data sets. We reported that a Minnesota cop who spied on his colleague’s private DMV data was fined $585,000. And we implored you to switch to a private browser, finally.

But back to war. Tensions with Iran’s ally Russia are also worryingly high, and we explained why it appears the US is doing the exact wrong thing if the goal is to avoid a cyberwar. We went in-depth on the message the US is sending Russia about its nuclear experiments: Do as we say, not as we do. And then, just as the week was ending, Iran went and shot a $220 million US surveillance drone out of the sky, which didn’t really help alleviate tensions.

Of course, that’s not all that happened in the privacy and security world this week. Every Saturday we round up the stories we didn’t break or report on in-depth, but which you should know about nonetheless. Click on the headlines to read the full articles, and be safe out there.
Coinbase Narrowly Escapes Hacking Attempt Using Two Firefox Zero-Days

Cryptocurrency exchanges are a juicy target for hackers, for at least one obvious reason: They’re full of money that can be drained remotely. This week, it came out that currency exchange Coinbase successfully fought off an attack that targeted its employees in an apparent attempt to do just that. The attack, according to ZDNet, exploited two zero-day bugs in Firefox. The first zero-day made headlines midweek when Mozilla confirmed that it had patched a bug which would allowed hackers to gain remote access to a Firefox browser and execute code. In order for that first bug to work, though, hackers needed a second bug to let it execute the code. Turns out, before Mozilla’s patch, the hackers had both, and had attempted to compromise Coinbase employees so they could breach their network and steal money. Luckily, not only did Coinbase and an outside researcher notice the bugs, but Coinbase picked up on the attack before any money could be stolen or the network could be infiltrated.
That Customs and Border Hack Revealed Much More Than the Government Admitteded

When Customs and Border Protection confirmed last week that one of its biometric surveillance contractors had been breached, it apparently underplayed how bad the situation was. And to be honest, it already sounded bad. At the time, the agency said that 100,000 images of faces and license plates of immigrants, citizens, and asylum seekers had been stolen and leaked online, but that none had shown up on the dark web. Now The Washington Post says there is actually far more sensitive information from the breach spreading across the internet. “So much material, totaling hundreds of gigabytes, that The Washington Post required several days of computer time to capture it all,” the Post writes. Rather than showing the product of a single government surveillance contractor, the Post reports that the documents reveal a vast surveillance network the government is hoping to keep under wraps. The data includes details of ongoing surveillance—including nondisclosure agreements with Microsoft and Northrop Grumman, Homeland Security handbooks, surveillance budgets, hardware blueprints, and schematics—as well as future plans for expanding facial recognition programs. All told, the data reveals the inner workings of a vast surveillance network at the border, and how it relies on a small group of private companies and contractors.
Ransomware Hackers Got a Big Payday in Florida

Baltimore is fighting the good fight. Since ransomware attackers took over its networks on May 8, the Maryland metropolis has vowed not to pay them, struggling to provide city services as its networks remain frozen. Not so in Florida, where the city of Riviera Beach opted instead to pay the hackers who have held their computers hostage for the past three weeks the $600,000 they’d demanded. The Palm Beach suburb’s leaders said they felt they had no choice but to pay.
« Last Edit: June 23, 2019, 12:12:06 AM by RE »
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Offline Eddie

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Re: How Blockchain Will Rule Your World
« Reply #305 on: June 23, 2019, 04:56:57 AM »
Coinbase, the biggest US exchange...now insures your deposits against theft. It does not, however, pay out if if some hacker has your login info and password and just uses those to take your money.

So...use a strong password and 2F ID and keep your own machine secure. I do not access my cryptos from the same machine I use to surf the net. I also made a different email.

And don't keep your coin on the exchange. (However, at this moment I do have some coin on Coinbase,) I haven't figured out which EOS wallet I like best....Need to get on that, hehe.

Coinbase secures customer digital currency through a combination of secure, online servers and offline (“cold”) storage. Coinbase maintains 98% or more of customer digital currency in cold storage, with the remainder in secure online servers as necessary to serve the liquidity needs of our customers.

Coinbase maintains commercial criminal insurance in an aggregate amount that is greater than the value of digital currency we maintain in online storage. Our insurance policy is made available through a combination of third-party insurance underwriters and Coinbase, who is a co-insurer under the policy.

The policy insures against theft of digital currency that results from a security breach or hack, employee theft, or fraudulent transfer.

Our policy does not cover any losses resulting from unauthorized access to your personal Coinbase or Coinbase Pro account(s). It is your responsibility to use a strong password and maintain control of all login credentials you use to access Coinbase and Coinbase Pro. Digital currency is not legal tender and is not backed by the government. Digital currency, such as Bitcoin, Litecoin, and Ethereum, is not subject to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) or Securities Investor Protection Corporation protections./i]


https://www.coinbase.com/legal/insurance

It is getting more common for exchanges to make customer losses from hacking whole. Binance recently covered a large hack and nobody lost their money who was affected.

At the moment Binance is about to stop serving the US market (along with many other decent exchanges, unfortunately ) due to the difficulty of complying with US regulatory standards. This is even affecting the prices of some cryptos, which aren't available on any US exchange (Like VET, which I own.) Shortt term problem, hopefully.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Eddie

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Re: How Blockchain Will Rule Your World
« Reply #306 on: June 26, 2019, 07:02:23 AM »
Bitcoin is on another real tear. Not content to break 10K, it is now, just a few day later,  above 12.5K and maybe not done yet.

it is so far above the MA's now that it surely is a bull trap. All the frustrated alt coin longs are selling and piling into BTC in my opinion, to catch this mighty momo wave, and I look for a reversion to the mean shortly that will drink their milkshake. It's nosebleed overbought.

My alt coin pick VET announced a supply chain deal yesterday with Walmart China, and it pumped nearly 40% before giving back a tiny bit.

What I hope right now is that Bitcoin can hold these levels at least long enough for some of  the typical alts that follow it to pump higher, before a big short takes EVERTHING down together, as will surely happen if BTC reverses suddenly.

I'm not in Bitcoin, and the coins I call my "bitcoin trackers" are still lagging, but I look for them to pump pretty soon. Even without that, I'm up another 5K this morning.

Not a bad way to enjoy one's coffee.
« Last Edit: June 26, 2019, 07:45:08 AM by Eddie »
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Eddie

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Re: How Blockchain Will Rule Your World
« Reply #307 on: June 26, 2019, 01:54:51 PM »
Since I posted this morning Bitcoin is up another thousand bucks. Un-fuckin'-believable.

Gold and Bitcoin have been moving together, but today BTC is leaving gold in the,,,,well, in the dust.

I am actually down on my portfolio from the morning pump, but up still, although none of my coins is killing it like BTC, The same situation as this morning exists for a crash off this extreme upside move, and even more so now.....but if BTC does hold these levels then I expect a lot of alts to be dragged higher. The jury is out though.

This is not "normal" market action, even for cryptos.

In general, bitcoin is going parabolic again, way sooner than anybody anticipated, There could be a number of explanations for that, but it's a little unnerving to me.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Eddie

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Re: How Blockchain Will Rule Your World
« Reply #308 on: June 26, 2019, 02:25:50 PM »
And some minutes later, BTC has painted a big fat red candle (predicted by me early this morning) and lost $1300 of notional value in seconds.

Several exchanges have been going haywire today and rumors are out about possible hacks....doubtful but maybe, It happens.

One exchange that's been off line a good part of the day is Bitrue, which is a newer popular exchange that pays high interest to depositors and claims to be fully insured.

We shall see,

Addendum: My coins took a hit on the BTC mini-crash, which I had been worried about. I'm now down about 10K on my portfolio from the morning high. Not that bad for one of these take-downs, assuming it's over.
« Last Edit: June 26, 2019, 02:57:20 PM by Eddie »
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Offline RE

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🏦 Central bank plans to create digital currencies receive backing
« Reply #309 on: June 30, 2019, 03:01:24 PM »
CBs gear up to PRINT MOAR MONEY! 🤑  (digitally, of course)

Basel Fats Agustin Carstens is now on board!

RE

https://www.ft.com/content/428a0b20-99b0-11e9-9573-ee5cbb98ed36

Cryptocurrencies
Central bank plans to create digital currencies receive backing
Market may evolve ‘sooner than we think’ says Agustín Carstens


Agustín Carstens has been dismissive of the first wave of cryptocurrencies, such as bitcoin © AFP

Claire Jones in Frankfurt 10 hours ago


Global central banks may have to issue their own digital currencies sooner than expected, the general manager of the Bank for International Settlements has said, after Facebook recently unveiled plans to create its own stablecoin.

Agustín Carstens, who heads the BIS, known as the central bankers’ bank, told the Financial Times that the organisation supported the efforts of the world’s central banks in creating digital versions of state currencies.

“Many central banks are working on it; we are working on it, supporting them,” Mr Carstens told the Financial Times.

“And it might be that it is sooner than we think that there is a market and we need to be able to provide central bank digital currencies.”

A number of central banks, including Sweden’s Riksbank, are working on their own versions of digital currencies, which would work by offering the public direct access to central bank money. At present, only private sector lenders can borrow directly from monetary authorities.

Central bankers, including Mr Carstens, have been dismissive of the first wave of cryptocurrencies, viewing the likes of bitcoin and ethereum as speculative instruments that cannot be described as money due to the volatility of their value against the most widely used state currencies, such as the US dollar and the euro.

However Facebook’s plans to create Libra — a stablecoin with its value pegged to a basket of as yet unspecified currencies backed by as yet unspecified assets — have attracted attention from officials, including at the Basel-based BIS.

The BIS said in an extract on digital currencies, taken from its annual report, that coins backed by tech giants could “rapidly establish a dominant position” in global finance and pose a potential threat to competition, stability and social welfare.

“The issue is how will the currency be used? Will there be discovery of information, or data that can be used in credit provision and how will data privacy be protected?” Mr Carstens said. “A very simple way to regulate this is to start with anti-money laundering rules. That is a very immediate and very obvious concern.”

However, Mr Carstens acknowledged that developments in the rest of the currency market would influence the extent to which central banks pursued their stablecoin projects.

“There needs to be evidence for demand for central bank digital currencies and it is not clear that the demand is there yet,” he said. “Perhaps people can do what they want by using electronic wallets provided by banks or fintech companies. It depends on the development of payment systems.”

The BIS used its annual report, published on Sunday, to call on governments to take some of the weight off central banks in supporting the economy by unveiling more fiscal policies and structural reforms.

“The effectiveness of very aggressive monetary policy dwindles through time. It will always have some impact, it is effective to combat downturns — but it is not a pillar for higher sustainable growth,” Mr Carstens said. He added that keeping monetary policy ultra-loose for longer created greater financial risks.

A number of central banks that are BIS members — including the US Federal Reserve and the European Central Bank — are considering launching a fresh round of additional monetary easing to boost flagging confidence in the global economy.

The Fed looks set to cut interest rates and ECB president Mario Draghi has hinted that his governing council could cut rates or restart the expansion of its €2.6tn quantitative easing programme of bond buying in response to investors’ fears that growth is set to slow sharply.
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Martin Wolf: Facebook enters dangerous waters with Libra cryptocurrency

But Mr Carstens said: “The slowdown is mostly generated by trade tensions. Monetary policy is neither adequate, nor the best policy to counteract this.”

The fears are based on geopolitical uncertainty — primarily over the consequences of US president Donald Trump’s anti-globalisation “America First” policies.

Mr Trump has attacked both Mr Draghi and Fed chair Jay Powell in recent weeks — the former over his desire to loosen monetary policy, the latter for not cutting rates quickly enough.

Mr Carstens said he thought there was still broad public support for central bankers to set monetary policies as they see fit.

“My own very personal view is that there is support in the population for central banks to protect the value of the currency and have the capacity to support growth,” he said.
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