AuthorTopic: EXTREME Fastest Wooden House Build Skills - Amazing Intelligent Log House  (Read 228 times)

Offline azozeo

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Online Eddie

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Log houses are esthetic and human friendly, but not the best insulated. R-8 unless you add insulation, which covers up the pretty walls. Adequate for here in BAU, but wasteful. Unless you build your house like an open rain forest house, and use no conventiional AC or central heat. You can live like that here. I haven't done it. But it's often humid here in summer and an open-to-the-oudoors, high ceiling structure is the only way to be cool (in the shade, anyway) without AC.  Not many people live without AC here. Almost zero.


Monolithic domes are R-80 or higher unless they have a lot of glass.

One thing we learned, is that you need thermal mass on the inside, and insulation outside of that. If you have a conventional styled roof (no roof on a dome, or more like it's all roof) then an air space under it with the deck under that is worthwhile, as I'm sure it is where you live. Hot places, you need a roof that protects you from heat. Reflective, ventilated. Lots of insulation in the decking part.

My idea is to use those many rocks you once mentioned to build rock inner walls, or a giant central hearth (rocket heater, probably). The outer walls will be cordwood stacked and chinked with cob or masonry mortar. If you make an outer wall and and inner wall and fill the hollow space with insulation you can get to R-50, from what I've read. Good enough for me.

Nobody I know of has built a locally sourced cordwood cob house here that looks like the one I'm envisioning, but strawbales were real popular for a while. I was trying to brainstorm a way to use the junipers on my place, which are invasive and badly need to be thinned way down anyway. It's a win/win.

I like the idea of having a local company put up a metal building structure with a metal roof and a slab and then filling in the cob walls after framing out the doors and windows. That could be a very fast build to get started, and then you could take your time building the walls yourself, with no deadline hanging over you. No subs to hire.

The alternative would be to build the pole roof with native juniper poles and sheet metal. That could also allow some artistic license. I could envision an homage to the Harbin temple that Sunray Kelly built. They used wood shakes, looks like. But round designs with yurt engineering lend themselves to interesting designs, maybe not always  practical, but possessing their own beauty.




Before the fire


After the 2015 fire.



A nice cordwood house with R-50 (claimed, anyway).
« Last Edit: October 28, 2018, 02:49:47 PM by Eddie »
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Offline Nearingsfault

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Log houses are esthetic and human friendly, but not the best insulated. R-8 unless you add insulation, which covers up the pretty walls. Adequate for here in BAU, but wasteful. Unless you build your house like an open rain forest house, and use no conventiional AC or central heat. You can live like that here. I haven't done it. But it's often humid here in summer and an open-to-the-oudoors, high ceiling structure is the only way to be cool (in the shade, anyway) without AC.  Not many people live without AC here. Almost zero.


Monolithic domes are R-80 or higher unless they have a lot of glass.

One thing we learned, is that you need thermal mass on the inside, and insulation outside of that. If you have a conventional styled roof (no roof on a dome, or more like it's all roof) then an air space under it with the deck under that is worthwhile, as I'm sure it is where you live. Hot places, you need a roof that protects you from heat. Reflective, ventilated. Lots of insulation in the decking part.

My idea is to use those many rocks you once mentioned to build rock inner walls, or a giant central hearth (rocket heater, probably). The outer walls will be cordwood stacked and chinked with cob or masonry mortar. If you make an outer wall and and inner wall and fill the hollow space with insulation you can get to R-50, from what I've read. Good enough for me.

Nobody I know of has built a locally sourced cordwood cob house here that looks like the one I'm envisioning, but strawbales were real popular for a while. I was trying to brainstorm a way to use the junipers on my place, which are invasive and badly need to be thinned way down anyway. It's a win/win.

I like the idea of having a local company put up a metal building structure with a metal roof and a slab and then filling in the cob walls after framing out the doors and windows. That could be a very fast build to get started, and then you could take your time building the walls yourself, with no deadline hanging over you. No subs to hire.

The alternative would be to build the pole roof with native juniper poles and sheet metal. That could also allow some artistic license. I could envision an homage to the Harbin temple that Sunray Kelly built. They used wood shakes, looks like. But round designs with yurt engineering lend themselves to interesting designs, maybe not always  practical, but possessing their own beauty.




Before the fire


After the 2015 fire.



A nice cordwood house with R-50 (claimed, anyway).
any idea where that Lego set house was put up? It's nowhere local to me for sure. Its reframed inside then insulated but only to r12 I think. I did not spot a vapor barrier so another strike. Pretty but a continuous heating and cooling liability. This second one is closer to conventional. I'd be interested to know how they insulated the walls because the roof insulation sucked. there was only 2 inches of rigid foam so r14 on a 6 12 slope so roughly r20... nice technique though.  I really like those  curving roof pattern pictures you posted. I helped on a job once that had one but was too junior to be much involved in the math. It was as much art as math. Cordwood... depends on who builds it. The r50 rating is... highly questionable. The problem with cordwood comes with the countless seams of mortar to wood causing air infiltration as the wood contracts and expands with changes in humidity. I've seem a few cases of humidity wicking through the length of wood as well and you get a sort of salt sweating through the wood and some rot in the centre where the condensation point ends up... that is here I don't know how the Texas climate makes it react. The double wall cordwood is an interesting variation. I have not seen that one before. What about termites? I've had great success with the high insulation shell with mass incorporated inside the structure. Ceramics, double drywall partition walls, thick slabs, cement board under the tile etc. Not as artistic probably and I don't deal with the climate reversal you get. No ac here just heat for 5 months. Good so far this year. I'm letting the radiant floors do the heat. Still not cold enough for a fire except 2 nights. The endless variation of local conditions is what makes building so fun. There is no perfect solution for everyone. Crap is crap everywhere but the best designs reflect the local.
Cheers,  David
« Last Edit: October 28, 2018, 09:13:00 PM by Nearingsfault »
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