AuthorTopic: ⛸️ -40F is FUCKING COLD!  (Read 3327 times)

Offline RE

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Now we are REALLY talking some serious cold!  :o

Still pretty balmy here in the 20sF today.

RE

https://www.accuweather.com/en/weather-news/75-below-zero-polar-vortex-yields-deadly-cold-as-thousands-endure-power-cuts-travel-issues-mount-in-midwest/70007291

77 below zero? Polar vortex yields deadly cold as thousands endure power cuts, travel issues mount in Midwest
By Brian Lada, AccuWeather meteorologist and staff writer
By Amanda Schmidt, AccuWeather staff writer
January 31, 2019, 3:49:55 AM EST


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Long-standing records are being broken as the polar vortex sends extremely cold air into midwestern and northeastern United States to end January.

States of emergency have been issued in Wisconsin, Illinois and Michigan due to the extreme cold with many schools and businesses closing until the frigid air loosens its grip on the region later this week.

Minneapolis could break low temperature records originally set in the 1800s, and Chicago could challenge its all-time record low of minus 27 F, set on Jan. 20, 1985.

ap cold

Commuters braves the wind and snow in frigid weather, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019, in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)


In addition to the bone-chilling cold, a biting wind will send AccuWeather RealFeel® Temperatures to even lower levels.

The deep freeze has a firm grip on the Upper Midwest with an AccuWeather RealFeel® Temperature of 77 degrees below zero Fahrenheit reported at Thief River Falls, Minnesota, on Tuesday evening.

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Multi-vehicle accidents ensue as dangerous snow squalls usher fierce cold into northeastern US
Taste of March to follow polar vortex invasion in midwestern, eastern US

Values this low can cause frostbite on exposed skin in a matter of minutes.

The arrival of the Arctic air was accompanied by dangerous snow squalls in the Northeast on Wednesday.

(AP Photo/Teresa Crawford)

Ice covers the Chicago River Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019, in Chicago. A deadly arctic deep freeze enveloped the Midwest with record-breaking temperatures triggering widespread closures of schools and businesses.

(AP Photo/Teresa Crawford)

Chicago's lakefront is covered with ice on Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019. Temperatures are plummeting in Chicago as officials warn against venturing out into the dangerously cold weather.

(AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato)

A person walks along the lakeshore, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019, in Chicago, Illinois.

(AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato)

Ice forms along the shore of Lake Michigan before sunrise, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019, in Chicago.

(AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato)

Ice forms along the shore of Lake Michigan before sunrise, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019, in Chicago., Illinois.

(AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato)

Ice forms along the shore of Lake Michigan before sunrise, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019, in Chicago. A deadly arctic deep freeze enveloped the Midwest with record-breaking temperatures.

(AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato)

A man poses for a picture as ice forms along the shore of Lake Michigan, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019, in Chicago. A deadly arctic deep freeze enveloped the Midwest with record-breaking temperatures on Wednesday.

(AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato)

A Metra train moves southbound to downtown Chicago as the gas-fired switch heater on the rails keeps the ice and snow off the switches near Metra Western Avenue station in Chicago, Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2019.

(AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato)

A Metra train moves southbound to downtown Chicago as the gas-fired switch heater on the rails keeps the ice and snow off the switches near Metra Western Avenue station in Chicago, Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2019.

(AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato)

A worker shovels snow off the rail switches at the Metra Western Avenue Yard, Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2019, in Chicago.

(AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

A warning sign is covered by ice at Clark Square park in Evanston, Ill., Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019.

(AP Photo/Jeffrey Phelps)

Geese huddle in the water as the sun rises at the harbor in Port Washington, Wis., on Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019. A deadly arctic deep freeze enveloped the Midwest with record-breaking temperatures.

(AP Photo/Nati Harnik)

First responders evacuate a person found in sub-freezing temperatures on the banks of Carter Lake, in Omaha, Neb., Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019.

(AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

A tree is shrouded in fog at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill., Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019.

(AP Photo/Nati Harnik)

Pedestrians bundle up in sub-freezing temperatures on the campus of the University of Nebraska-Omaha, in Omaha, Neb., Wednesday, Jan. 30. An arctic deep freeze enveloped the Midwest with record-breaking temperatures.

(AP Photo/Nati Harnik)

University of Nebraska students sip complementary hot chocolate as they wait in freezing temperatures to be admitted to Pinnacle Bank Arena for an NCAA college basketball game against Wisconsin, in Lincoln, Neb., Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2019.

(AP Photo/John Minchillo)

Commuters braves the wind and snow in frigid weather, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019, in Cincinnati. The extreme cold and record-breaking temperatures are crawling into a swath of states spanning from North Dakota to Missouri and into Ohio.

(AP Photo/John Minchillo)

Commuters braves the wind and snow in frigid weather, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019, in Cincinnati, Ohio.

(AP Photo/John Minchillo)

Commuters braves the wind and snow in frigid weather, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019, in Cincinnati.

(AP Photo/John Minchillo)

A commuter braves the wind and snow in frigid weather, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019, in Cincinnati, Ohio.

(AP Photo/John Minchillo)

Commuters braves the wind and snow in frigid weather, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019, in Cincinnati. The extreme cold and record-breaking temperatures are crawling into a swath of states spanning from North Dakota to Missouri and into Ohio after a powerful snowstorm pounded the region earlier this week.

(AP Photo/Bruce Crummy)

Moorhead, Minn. area elementary school electronic sign shows cancellation of school because of frigid temperature Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2019. Daytime temperatures in the Fargo-Moorhead area were near -20F as Wednesday weather will be even colder.

(AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

A bank shows a closed sign in front of the door in Northbrook, Ill., Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019. A deadly arctic deep freeze enveloped the Midwest with record-breaking temperatures on Wednesday.

(AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

Traffic moves along Milwaukee avenue in Wheeling, Ill. Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019. A deadly arctic deep freeze enveloped the Midwest with record-breaking temperatures on Wednesday.
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2:45 a.m. CST Thursday:

AccuWeather RealFeel® Temperatures have dipped to 10-30 below zero F across the interior Northeast early this morning. State College, Pennsylvania, recorded a RealFeel Temperature as low as 31 below zero.

Windy conditions through Thursday will keep temperatures at dangerously low levels throughout the region.

Thurs RF Jan 30


1:30 a.m. CST Thursday:

Pittsburgh has already broken its record low temperature for the date of minus 3 F from 1971, with a current temperature of minus 5.

12:15 a.m. CST Thursday:

Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer has requested that residents in the lower peninsula turn down thermostats to 65 F or lower to curb energy usage, according to WLNS-TV. The request comes in the wake of a fire at the Ray Compressor Station on Wednesday morning.

General Motors has suspended and canceled several shift operations at the request of Consumers Energy. This will "allow the utility to manage supply issues brought on by the extreme temperatures and equipment issues," WLNS-TV stated.

12:00 a.m. CST Thursday:

Moline, Illinois, has set a new all-time record low for any date as the mercury dipped to minus 29 F.
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Offline Surly1

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The Coldest Day in American History
« Reply #31 on: January 31, 2019, 03:32:49 AM »
The Coldest Day in American History

As you find yourself cursing the cold outside your window, just take a moment and be grateful that you weren’t around in February 1899.


The Coldest Day in American History

Photo courtesy: Sb2s3
Photo courtesy: Sb2s3

As the nation finds itself in the throes of another harsh winter, it’s sometimes reassuring to take a look back at just how much colder things could be — like the time children had a snowball fight on the steps of the a Capitol Building.

February 1899 was remembered for generations as being the coldest month in American history, particularly on the week of Valentines Day when more than 100 individuals froze to death and nearly every single state in the Union recorded sub-zero temperatures.

The unprecedented surge of intensely cold weather owed its existence to a polar vortex that originated in Canada’s extreme north.

The western third of the country was the first to feel the bitter cold with temperatures dropping to the freezing point in Los Angeles, California, on February 4, but as the air mass slowly pushed east, things progressively got colder for the nation – particularly in the American southeast.

“The full force of the outbreak wasn’t felt until February 10… That day, temperatures across the Midwest and Ohio Valley were below −20°F, and even Washington, DC, recorded a low temperature of −8°F. By February 11, temperatures plummeted even further with Fort Logan, Montana, recording an astonishing low of −61°F,” according to the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration.

On the morning of Monday, February 13, 1899, residents in Tallahassee, Florida, awoke to a −2°F temperature and several inches of snow outside their window. Braving the dangerous cold, residents congregated at the Sunshine State’s capitol building to participate in a snow ball fight.

Farther south in Tampa, residents were treated to the once in a lifetime sight of falling snow, though no significant accumulation was ever reported. In Miami, the city recorded its first ever below-30 temperature reading, registering a reading of 29 °F.

Snowball fight on the steps of the FL capitol
Snowball fight on the steps of the FL capitol

The entire eastern 2/3rds of the nation was brought to a standstill as residents of Lexington, Virginia, attempted dig out of 70-inches of snow. Adding insult to injury, the people of the mountainous Virginia town were awakened from their sleep early that morning when an earthquake shook the Appalachian mountainside, creating minimal damage to homes near the epicenter of the quake.

The Houston Post reported, that “The Capitol City of the Nation is in the grip of a genuine Dakota blizzard today. It is the worst storm in the history of the city and it is positively indescribable. Thirty inches of snow on the level, still snowing and a wind blowing forty miles an hour, piling it into drifts ten feet deep and the thermometer at zero, everything at standstill, all traffic abandoned and backmen charge $5 ($142.86 today’s dollar value) to haul a passenger five blocks.”

The unimaginable snow drifts piling against doors that opened to the outside were responsible for a great number of deaths, as individuals were trapped inside their homes without any means to bring in wood stacked only a few feet outside their doors.

In New York City, The Post stated, “All charitable societies are taxed beyond their resources. Of the 15,000 destitute families in this city nearly all are either freezing or suffering.”

Across the South, where cities and farmers were inexperienced in surviving such harsh winter weather, things were even more frightening.

With thousands on the brink of starving to death in the face of the worst natural disaster in the state’s history, the city of Atlanta converted its police barracks into a commissary and the Atlanta Constitution began taking up donations to feed the city’s starving residents.

“Goods and groceries were piled up in the drill hall on the first floor… the manner in which the money and goods poured in upon the committee was surprising even for Atlanta. people sent in subscriptions without being asked, and many were for very handsome sums… This made it unnecessary for the relief committee to do any begging or even asking, and they went to work at once to distribute the food, clothing and fuel,” reported the paper on February 14, 1899.

With less than enough hay in storage, an estimated tens of thousands of livestock perished as a result of the unprecedented cold.

Though the toll of human suffering was great during the storm, the lasting affects the cold would have upon the nation would be catastrophic.

The port of New Orleans was completely iced over by February 13, with ice floes reportedly floating out of the Mississippi River into the Gulf of Mexico. On February 14 the city experienced its coldest-ever Mardi Gras reading of 7 °F.

In Cuba, which was a U.S. territory at the time, the island experienced hard frost which killed or damaged many crops. This was despite the cold air first having to cross the Florida Strait and its warm Gulf Stream waters.

In Georgia, the peach crop was altogether ruined, one contemporary reported stated, “not a living leaf remains above the ground today.”

A local report from Americus, Georgia, stated, “Chickens and birds were frozen last night. Every water pipe in the city was frozen and much suffering will result… The intense cold this morning signed the death knell to vegetation in this section, the mercury ranging 6 degrees below zero. Not only are the fruit buds killed, but the opinion prevails that hundreds of fruit trees are killed likewise.”

The lasting affect the Blizzard of 1899 would have upon the nation’s economy would be horrific.

With hundreds of fruit trees dead in the southeast, food across the nation would be extremely scarce throughout 1899 and the year that followed.

In days where so many of the nation’s urban inhabitants lived from day to day, the complete shutting down of cities meant that all factory work and service work came to a halt – financially crippling hundreds of thousands of people for months to come.

With the Mississippi River froze over and the Port of New Orleans closed, the nation’s infrastructure broke down in a matter of hours – right at the height of the industrial revolution.

Unfortunately, warmer weather did not offer any significant relief and in many cases compounded the problem, as virtually every city in the East found itself flooded from the melting snow and ice.

In June of that same year, four months later, the nation officially entered into a recession. Business activity was down 15.5%, as people simply did not have any additional money to spend. The nation would not officially pull out of the recession until the opening days of 1901.

So as you find yourself cursing the cold outside your window, just take a moment and be grateful that you weren’t around in February 1899.

“The old world is dying, and the New World struggles to be born: now is the time of monsters.”

Offline roamer

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Re: ⛸️ -40F is FUCKING COLD!
« Reply #32 on: January 31, 2019, 10:32:16 AM »
When i went to milk cows this morning it was -40f on the thermometer in south west wisconsin.  Pretty brutal chipping ice from the barn cleaner, waters and just keeping things alive.  Very thankful didn't have to use a backup generator during this snap and that all my pipe insulation/heattape did the job.

https://photos.app.goo.gl/RgVvXWsX877gozvX7

Offline RE

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Re: ⛸️ -40F is FUCKING COLD!
« Reply #33 on: January 31, 2019, 01:56:02 PM »
When i went to milk cows this morning it was -40f on the thermometer in south west wisconsin.  Pretty brutal chipping ice from the barn cleaner, waters and just keeping things alive.  Very thankful didn't have to use a backup generator during this snap and that all my pipe insulation/heattape did the job.

https://photos.app.goo.gl/RgVvXWsX877gozvX7

Try not to Freeze to Death.

RE

https://thehill.com/homenews/news/427878-university-of-iowa-student-found-frozen-to-death-amid-51-degree-windchill
 
University of Iowa student found frozen to death amid minus 51 degree windchill
By Rachel Frazen - 01/31/19 01:08 PM EST


A student at the University of Iowa froze to death, becoming at least the eighth casualty of the polar vortex.

Temperatures at the university plunged to about minus 21 degrees, with a windchill as low as 51 degrees below zero, this week amid an Arctic front that has hit large parts of the country.

At least eight people have died as a result of the weather in the past few days, due to hypothermia, car crashes and more, according to media reports.

Gerard Belz, 18, was a second-year pre-medicine major according to the university. His body was found about 3 a.m. behind a university building on Wednesday. They do not suspect foul play.

"We are saddened to share we’ve lost a member of the Hawkeye family," the university said in a statement. "Our thoughts are with his family, friends, and loved ones. We encourage our students to reach out if they are in need of support."

The university canceled classes between 5 p.m. Tuesday and 12 p.m. Thursday and encouraged grieving students to seek counseling.

Gerard Belz’s father, Michael Belz, told TV station KCRG that his son was quiet but tough.

"He was probably more of a mama's boy with a tough exterior,” he said.

Last year, a student was also killed at the University of Iowa amid cold weather. Paul Biagas, 24, was found dead outside a recreation center. The temperature was about 5 degrees with a windchill of minus 10, according to Time.
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Re: ⛸️ -40F is FUCKING COLD!
« Reply #34 on: January 31, 2019, 02:25:33 PM »
I remember making hospital service rounds outside of Minot, ND when it was -40o. The personnel had numerous stories of drunks that passed out outside bars in the winter and just froze to death. Wonder if that's what happened here? :o
AJ
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Offline RE

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Re: ⛸️ -40F is FUCKING COLD!
« Reply #35 on: January 31, 2019, 02:36:02 PM »
I remember making hospital service rounds outside of Minot, ND when it was -40o. The personnel had numerous stories of drunks that passed out outside bars in the winter and just froze to death. Wonder if that's what happened here? :o
AJ

Possibly with a fake ID, but he was below the drinking age.

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⛸️Polar Vortex Updates: Bitter Cold Weather Spreads East
« Reply #36 on: January 31, 2019, 03:18:05 PM »
Toasty weather here in Alaska today,  25F. Bikini Weather on the Slopes!  :icon_sunny:


RE

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/31/us/weather-polar-vortex.html

Polar Vortex Updates: Bitter Cold Weather Spreads East
Video


Brutal Cold Lingers in the Midwest
By Ainara Tiefenthäler and Sarah Stein Kerr
Temperatures remained low, near record levels, in much of the Midwest on Thursday morning. The extreme cold has been linked to at least eight deaths.CreditCreditScott Olson/Getty Images

By Mitch Smith, Julie Bosman and Monica Davey

    Jan. 31, 2019

CHICAGO — Midwesterners trudged ahead Thursday into a familiar, grim reality: temperatures well below zero, schools and businesses closed, stern warnings to wear extra layers or, better yet, just stay indoors.

The polar vortex that arrived earlier this week has for days disrupted life across an entire region. Deaths and injuries were reported. Decades-old records fell. And, for one more day, even stepping outside remained a painful, risky experience.

But the forecast finally suggested relief ahead. By Thursday night, temperatures across much of the Midwest were expected to poke above zero. By the end of the weekend, meteorologists predicted as much as a 70- or 80-degree swing, with balmy-for-February readings in the 40s or 50s and rain instead of snow.

Still, risks remained. A band of snow complicated travel on Thursday, and in the Northeast, officials warned of their own cold wave, with heavy snow in some places and subzero wind chills in others.

Here are the latest developments:

• At least eight deaths have been connected to the Midwest’s dangerously cold weather system, according to The Associated Press, including that of a University of Iowa student who was found behind an academic hall several hours before dawn on Wednesday. [Read more about those who have died here.]

• A weather observer in Mount Carroll, Ill., recorded a temperature of minus 38 on Thursday morning. If confirmed by state officials, that would become Illinois’s record low, supplanting the previous record of minus 36. [See photos here that show what life is like in the frozen Midwest.]

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• The sustained cold taxed energy systems across the Midwest, leading to some power failures and urgent calls to customers to reduce the heat in their homes.

• Many schools, businesses and restaurants remained shuttered on Thursday, though some offices were reopening and many more were expected to reopen Friday.

• By midday on Thursday, airlines had already canceled more than 2,200 flights in the United States, according to FlightAware. On Wednesday, cancellations topped 2,700.

• The East Coast was feeling the bitter cold, too. Temperatures barely broke the double digits in New York City. [Read more here about how the city’s homeless population is coping with the cold.]
An Iowa college student is among the dead

In Iowa City, a student at the University of Iowa was found dead in the early morning hours of Wednesday. Gerald Belz, 18 and a pre-med student, was found lying outside, unresponsive, near a campus building after 2 a.m. local time.

He was one of at least eight people whose deaths were believed to be tied to the streak of extreme cold and icy weather in recent days. Among the others were an elderly Illinois man who fell and was found not far from his home; a man who was hit by a snowplow in the Chicago region; a couple in a vehicle crash along snowy roads in Indiana; and a Milwaukee man who the police say was found in his garage and likely froze to death.

[Read more about Mr. Belz here.]
Hospitals have treated dozens of frostbite patients

Throughout the Midwest, hospitals reported patients arriving with symptoms tied to the weather. The Illinois Department of Public Health said at least 30 people statewide had been to emergency rooms for frostbite or hypothermia-related visits by Wednesday morning.

[You could get frostbite in a matter of minutes. Here’s what to do.]

At Hennepin County Medical Center in Minneapolis, the emergency department reported “many patients” who were injured or ill because of the weather. Frostbite cases alone led to at least 13 admissions.

“It’s busier than it would normally be,” Dr. Douglas D. Brunette, an emergency room doctor in Minneapolis, said on Wednesday afternoon. “But it’s not a mass casualty incident yet.”
Temperatures are plunging in the Northeast, too

Officials in New York and other parts of the Northeast warned residents to prepare for temperatures that, while not nearly as cold as the Midwest, could still be dangerous.

In Vermont, Rhode Island and Connecticut, where it was expected to dip into the single digits or lower, officials opened warming centers.

In New York City, where it was 10 degrees at midday, Mayor Bill de Blasio urged people to “bundle up and stay inside as much as possible.” With wind chills expected to fall below zero, city officials warned landlords to provide adequate heat to their tenants.

Conditions were worse in the western part of the state, where Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo declared a state of emergency in several counties and instructed some state workers to stay home. More than 13 inches of snow fell Wednesday in Buffalo, a record for Jan. 30, and more was falling on Thursday.
Records were broken, but there is some warmer weather coming

At least two cities in Illinois and one in Iowa reached record lows overnight, as a dangerously deep freeze kept its hold on the Midwest.

In Rockford, Ill., temperatures dipped to minus 31, breaking a previous record of minus 27 from Jan. 10, 1982. Moline, Ill., on the border with Iowa, also broke a record, reaching minus 33 on Thursday morning, according to the National Weather Service. Cedar Rapids, Iowa, set a record of minus 30.

Chicago did not reach a record low overnight — the previous record was minus 27, from Jan. 20, 1985. But the city was expected to be hit with one to three inches of snow on Thursday, beginning in the late afternoon and stretching into the evening.

[We asked people in Chicago who work in extreme cold for their practical tips for survival. Here’s what they said.]

After several days of brutally cold weather, Chicagoans have something to look forward to, said Matt Friedlein, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service.

“We’ll be on our way up here soon,” Mr. Friedlein said. “In fact, later in the week, it looks like temperatures in the 40s across much of northern Illinois. No matter what, it will be a significant warm up when you consider how cold we are right now.”
Rescuers come to the aid of hundreds stranded in their cars

Car breakdowns and medical emergencies took on greater urgency across the Midwest as police and fire departments dealt with dangerously low temperatures and increased workloads.

The Illinois State Police assisted more than 1,300 drivers over an eight-hour period on Wednesday, about 10 times troopers’ normal workload. In Michigan, where the extreme cold thwarted efforts to treat frozen roadways, emergency workers closed part of Interstate 675 on Thursday after a series of crashes. And in Indiana, a state trooper helped a dog named Marley and its owner warm up after finding them in a stalled car along a highway.

The cold was especially risky for those surrounded by water. The Coast Guard used air boats to rescue seven people stranded in an ice shanty off the coast of Sturgeon Bay, Wis. And on Mackinac Island, Mich., where the dangerous weather made plane travel impossible, another Coast Guard ship sliced through the ice to rescue a woman needing medical attention.

“The crew responded admirably in adverse conditions to answer the call,” said Lt. Steele Johnson, the commanding officer of the ship that rescued the woman, in a statement. “We’re happy to have done our part in getting her the advanced medical treatment she needed.”
Calls to reduce the heat despite the frigid cold

In Minnesota, Xcel Energy asked customers to conserve power and reduce their thermostats to 63 degrees or 60 degrees, depending on their location. Xcel also paid for hotel rooms for customers who lost their gas supply in Princeton, Minn., where the temperature on Thursday morning was minus 35.

“Your cooperation is critical to try to prevent widespread natural gas outages,” the company posted on its website.

In Michigan, a fire Wednesday night at a Consumers Energy facility led to fears of a natural gas shortage. Gov. Gretchen Whitmer went on television late at night urging residents of the state’s Lower Peninsula to reduce their thermostats to 65 degrees or less.

“You can play a role in helping people across the state survive these extreme temperatures,” Ms. Whitmer said in a statement.

Consumers Energy also asked several manufacturers to halt production because of the natural gas shortage. Erin Davis, a General Motors spokeswoman, said work was stopped on Wednesday night at 11 plants in Michigan. Many workers had been told not to report for their shifts on Thursday.

[With schools closed, one family tried five polar-weather experiments. Here’s what happened.]
The extreme cold and the connection to climate change

The extremely low temperatures this week in parts of the United States stand in sharp contrast to the trend toward warmer winters. But they may also be a result of warming.

Emerging research suggests that a warming Arctic is causing changes in the jet stream and pushing polar air down to latitudes that are unaccustomed to them and often unprepared. Hence this week’s atypical chill over large swaths of the Northeast and Midwest.
A Closer Look at the Polar Vortex’s Dangerously Cold Winds

Chicago will be as cold as the Arctic on Wednesday. We’ll show you why.
Jan. 30, 2019

Friederike Otto, an Oxford University climate scientist who studies how specific weather events are exacerbated by global warming, said that while not all of these extreme events could be attributed to climate change, the profound changes in the earth’s atmosphere raised “the likelihood of a large number of extreme events.”

[Read more here about the climate change connection.]
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Offline Surly1

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Re: ⛸️ -40F is FUCKING COLD!
« Reply #37 on: January 31, 2019, 04:39:21 PM »
When i went to milk cows this morning it was -40f on the thermometer in south west wisconsin.  Pretty brutal chipping ice from the barn cleaner, waters and just keeping things alive.  Very thankful didn't have to use a backup generator during this snap and that all my pipe insulation/heattape did the job.

https://photos.app.goo.gl/RgVvXWsX877gozvX7

How were the cows?

Stay warm.
“The old world is dying, and the New World struggles to be born: now is the time of monsters.”

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Re: ⛸️ -40F is FUCKING COLD!
« Reply #38 on: January 31, 2019, 05:24:56 PM »
When i went to milk cows this morning it was -40f on the thermometer in south west wisconsin.  Pretty brutal chipping ice from the barn cleaner, waters and just keeping things alive.  Very thankful didn't have to use a backup generator during this snap and that all my pipe insulation/heattape did the job.

https://photos.app.goo.gl/RgVvXWsX877gozvX7

Day-um!!! Good work on keeping the dairy going. I know how crucial it is to get the milking done. For farmers, staying inside is not a option. Keep us posted. Best of luck.
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Re: ⛸️ -40F is FUCKING COLD!
« Reply #39 on: February 01, 2019, 07:24:16 AM »
Kept the cows fed, milked and watered and the shit out of the barn....so that was good.  But broke a barn cleaner chain chiseled it out of ice and frozen shit, froze a tractor up despite 3x amount of recommended diesel fuel treatment and worst of all seem to have broken down my relationship with my lady. I do not recommend the path of dairy farmer to anyone.


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Re: ⛸️ -40F is FUCKING COLD!
« Reply #40 on: February 01, 2019, 07:30:16 AM »
Oh and two clueless heifers dropped calves that -40f day and that was not a fun a rodeo.  Calves and new moms are ok.  Like i said don't recommend dairy farming to anyone.

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Re: ⛸️ -40F is FUCKING COLD!
« Reply #41 on: February 01, 2019, 07:59:04 AM »
Kept the cows fed, milked and watered and the shit out of the barn....so that was good.  But broke a barn cleaner chain chiseled it out of ice and frozen shit, froze a tractor up despite 3x amount of recommended diesel fuel treatment and worst of all seem to have broken down my relationship with my lady. I do not recommend the path of dairy farmer to anyone.

Sorry to hear about the troubles with your lady.  Usually a cold day is good for snuggling.

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Re: ⛸️ -40F is FUCKING COLD!
« Reply #42 on: February 01, 2019, 08:31:04 AM »
RE, not when you spend 10+ hrs cussing, sweating, freezing covered in shit, placenta, frost all whilst being irrationally yelled at, kicked at and whatnot.

Offline RE

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Re: ⛸️ -40F is FUCKING COLD!
« Reply #43 on: February 01, 2019, 08:51:40 AM »
RE, not when you spend 10+ hrs cussing, sweating, freezing covered in shit, placenta, frost all whilst being irrationally yelled at, kicked at and whatnot.

I suppose not.  Well, Springtime will come eventually.  :icon_sunny:

RE
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Offline Nearingsfault

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Re: ⛸️ -40F is FUCKING COLD!
« Reply #44 on: February 01, 2019, 08:32:55 PM »
Oh and two clueless heifers dropped calves that -40f day and that was not a fun a rodeo.  Calves and new moms are ok.  Like i said don't recommend dairy farming to anyone.
my grandfather sold his dairy farm in 1976. He referred to it as the equivalent of getting out of prison.  Of course then he proceeded to grow a huge garden, raise a few veal calfs, keep chickens, cut haul split all his own wood, in his "retirement" for the next 25 years. I was in awe of the man, still am.
If its important then try something, fail, disect, learn from it, try again, and again and again until it kills you or you succeed.

 

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