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Offline RE

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☠️ Extinction Rebellion: Climate protesters block roads
« on: April 15, 2019, 07:33:21 AM »
https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-london-47935416

Extinction Rebellion: Climate protesters block roads

    26 minutes ago

Image caption Extinction Rebellion protesters are carrying out a global day of action

Climate change protesters have blocked roads across central London sparking traffic disruption.

Members of campaign group Extinction Rebellion have also parked a boat at Oxford Circus, and blocked Marble Arch, as part of a global day of action.

Activists smashed the glass of the revolving doors of oil company Shell's London headquarters in Waterloo.

Police have advised people travelling into London to allow extra journey time.

Yen Chit Chong, from Extinction Rebellion in London, said: "This is our last best shot at survival."


Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Protesters have parked a boat at Oxford Circus to represent the threat posed by rising sea levels


Image copyright Holly-Anna Petersen/Christian Climate Action
Image caption A truck was used to block off a road in Marble Arch, with members locking themselves under the vehicle

Organisers claim protests are being held in over 80 cities across 33 countries.
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Extinction Rebellion said protests would continue throughout the week "escalating the creative disruption across the capital day by day".

The group said it planned to "bring London to a standstill for up to two weeks", and wanted the government to take urgent action to tackle climate change.

In Parliament Square, protesters unfurled banners, held up placards and waved flags as speakers took to the stage.
Who are Extinction Rebellion?

Since its launch last year, members have shut bridges, poured buckets of fake blood outside Downing Street, blockaded the BBC and stripped semi-naked in Parliament.

It has three core demands: for the government to "tell the truth about climate change", reduce carbon emissions to zero by 2025, and create a citizens' assembly to oversee progress.

Controversially, the group is trying to get as many people arrested as possible.

One of the group's founders, Roger Hallam, believes that mass participation and civil disobedience maximise the chances of social change.

But critics say they cause unnecessary disruption and waste police time when forces are already overstretched.


Image copyright Reuters
Image caption Oil company Shell had its London headquarters targeted

By intentionally causing more than 6,000 damage at the Shell headquarters activists aim to get the case into crown court to put their case to a jury, the campaign said.
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Protester Chay Harwood told the BBC: "We live in a very sick society at the moment. There's a lot of social issues and social ills that need curing.

"But at the moment the biggest threat we face is the threat of climate change."


Image copyright PA
Image caption Demonstrators have blocked roads leading to Marble Arch


Image copyright PA
Image caption Protesters have gathered to hear speeches in Parliament Square

The Met said it had "appropriate policing plans" in place for the demonstrations and officers from across the force would be used "to support the public order operation".

In November, activists blockaded the Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy by chaining themselves together on the pavement, leading to 85 arrests.
At the scene

By Matthew Cannon, BBC News

The unusual sight of a pink yacht stands in the centre of Oxford Circus, surrounded by protesters holding aloft a sea of coloured flags.

The focus here is on the future of the planet - and there is a sense of urgency.

Some are wearing red to symbolise "the blood of dying species", one group wants to "save the bees", while a man dressed as a centaur holds a placard which says "climate change is not a myth ...unlike centaurs".

Two young women tell me they are not willing to have children due to their fears for the world they will be bringing them into.

Another man, who plans to protest through the night, says the protests will be peaceful but he is willing to be arrested.

"The more the authorities will get fed up with us the more it brings us to their attention," he said.

Organisers have encouraged people to set up camp in Hyde Park overnight into Monday - an offence under Royal Parks legislation.

A spokeswoman for The Royal Parks said Extinction Rebellion had not asked for permission to begin the protest in the park and that camping was not allowed.


Image copyright Tolga Akmen/AFP
Image caption Waterloo Bridge has been closed off to traffic
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Offline RE

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☠️ Extinction Rebellion: Climate protesters block roads
« Reply #1 on: April 15, 2019, 10:26:40 AM »
https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-london-47935416

Extinction Rebellion: Climate protesters block roads

 
 
 
 

Extinction Rebellion want to get arrested to fight climate change

An Extinction Rebellion protester blocking Blackfriars Bridge, in London, November 2018.

London (CNN)Earlier this month a group of climate change activists stripped down to their underwear in British parliament and glued their hands to the glass of the House of Commons' public gallery.

Why? To get arrested.
Extinction Rebellion, a grassroots environmental group based in the UK, is responsible for a series of stunts that deliberately break the law to highlight the threat of climate change.
Since launching last year they have caused disruption by holding a "Funeral for our Future" outside Buckingham Palace, which led to 14 arrests, poured 200 liters of fake blood outside Downing Street, and brought London to a standstill by shutting down five bridges.
So far Extinction Rebellion has counted 222 arrests -- and thousands have declared they are willing to be arrested, or even go to prison, to demand action on climate change.

Method to the madness

Extinction Rebellion claims their actions are based on research into how to use "non-violent civil disobedience to achieve radical change."
An Extinction Rebellion protester, London, November 2018
They estimate that significant numbers of people will have to get arrested and cause disruption for the government to pay attention to their demands. These include the UK government declaring a climate change emergency, reducing greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2025 and starting a citizen's assembly.
"People making decisions have to pay attention to a mass of people that come out on to the streets to demand action in the face of this crisis we are in," said Roman Paluch-Machnik, an Extinction Rebellion activist who has been arrested more than once.
"You put the police in a dilemma," explained Nuala Gathercole Lam, another protester. "If you have got thousands of people refusing to move, they either have to let you do it, which is hugely economically disruptive, or they have to arrest you."
According to the group, research shows that non-violent uprisings involving 3.5% of the public participating in acts of civil disobedience force a political response because they cannot be ignored.
"Every non-violent uprising since 1900, if it achieves that threshold, succeeds in its aims," said Paluch-Machnik. "One of our main principles is to get this 3.5% mobilized."
That would need about 2 million people to get involved in the UK.

Willing to get arrested

Almost 10,000 people worldwide have signed up as "willing to get arrested," as of April 8, 2019, according to the group. Around 3,000 are based in the UK.
Of those people, over 80% are also "willing to go to prison." The group holds prison workshops and training sessions to prepare people for what to do if they end up at a police station.
Pictured, a protest outside Downing Street, March 2019.
"Nothing has been achieved after 30 years of regular environmental campaign," said Paluch-Machnik. "People are so motivated by what is happening right now because there is not really another option."
"I've always been very worried about continuous news about the government not addressing the situation," said Alanna Byrne, an activist for Extinction Rebellion. "I felt very isolated in the way that I felt."
Along with 25 others, Paluch-Machnik, Lam and Byrne have quit their jobs to work for Extinction Rebellion full time.

How far are you willing to go to demand action?

Since the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) warned last year that the planet only has 11 years before it reaches disastrous levels of global warming, Extinction Rebellion isn't the only group to launch radical climate activism.
Extinction Rebellion activists threw 200 liters of fake blood outside Downing Street in March 2019.
School students around the world have been skipping school to demand that world leaders take action on climate change.
The movement has spanned more than 100 countries and 1,500 cities, with teenagers missing out on their education to show how worried they are about the threat to their future.
In response to critics, who say Extinction Rebellion is causing unnecessary disruption and wasting police time, the activists say the "climate and ecological emergency" demands their actions.
"I think that any suffering that is caused as a result of a few hours sitting in a traffic jam is incomparable to what is going to happen in a few years" said Paluch-Machnik.
London's Metropolitan Police Service told CNN that it is aware of a number of Extinction Rebellion demonstrations and protests planned over the coming weeks, and that "Appropriate policing plans are in place."
It added: "We will always provide a proportionate policing plan to balance the right to a peaceful protest, while ensuring that disruption to communities is kept to a minimum."
This Monday, the group plans to shut down London in their biggest action yet. They plan to meet at five London locations and block traffic by playing music, hosting discussions and refusing to move from the street.
Demonstrators blocked Waterloo Bridge by bringing trees and solar panels.
Extinction Rebellion  demonstrating on Waterloo Bridge, London, April 15, 2019.
The group says hundreds of people have taken time off work to camp for as long as it takes get their demands heard by the government. Read more coverage of the protest.
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Offline RE

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☠️ Extinction Rebellion London activists glue themselves to DLR train
« Reply #2 on: April 17, 2019, 07:06:08 AM »
https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-london-47959207

Extinction Rebellion London activists glue themselves to DLR train


More than 300 people have been arrested this week over the protests.


Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Two activists climbed on to a train at Canary Wharf while another glued his hand to the window

A campaigner who had glued himself to the train's window was removed about an hour after the start of the DLR protest, at about 10:50 BST.

A man and a woman who unfurled a banner and glued themselves to the top of the train's carriage were also later removed and carried off by officers.

BTP said three people had been arrested for obstructing the railway.

    Extinction Rebellion: Can the plan work?
    London climate protest arrests close to 300
    WATCH: 'Our objective is to cause disruption'

Extinction Rebellion targeted the DLR on Wednesday after protesters changed their minds about disrupting the Tube network.

Earlier, BTP ordered Transport for London (TfL) to switch off wi-fi at Tube stations in an attempt to deter protests.
Image copyright PA
Image caption The group targeted the DLR after it changed its mind about disrupting the Tube network
Image copyright Reuters
Image caption Specialist British Transport Police officers have been deployed to Canary Wharf station

Supt Matt Allingham said extra officers would be on duty throughout the day, adding: "We will not tolerate any activity which disrupts the millions of passengers who rely on using the rail network in London."

Scotland Yard said protesters were being removed from Waterloo Bridge, adding those who did not comply would be arrested.

Most of the people arrested so far have been held in connection with public order offences.
Image copyright DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP/Getty Images
Image caption Police arrested more than 200 people on Waterloo Bridge on Monday and Tuesday

The Met Police said "contingency plans are in place should custody suites become full".

Extinction Rebellion earlier said "thousands" more people were willing to be arrested as part of the non-violent disruption.

It had been planning to target London Underground to "highlight the emergency of ecological collapse" and persuade ministers to meet group members.

On Wednesday morning, the campaign group said: "Today we will disrupt one overground line as part of our escalating campaign to demand the government acts now on the climate and ecological emergency."

London Mayor Sadiq Khan urged protesters to "think again", adding public transport helped tackle climate change.
Skip Twitter post by @ExtinctionR

    As dawn breaks on the third day of the Rebellion, protesters have held on to all four of their locations. With police cells full, thousands more Rebels willing to be arrested and hundreds joining daily, Government is increasingly feeling the pressure. pic.twitter.com/enXhRneecN
    Extinction Rebellion 🐝⌛️🦋 (@ExtinctionR) April 17, 2019

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Protester and climate lawyer Farhana Yamin, who was arrested on Tuesday, earlier told BBC Radio 4's Today programme: "I totally want to apologise to people using public transport.

"But at the same time we need to take actions that are disruptive so everyone understands the dangers we're facing right now. People should understand that we are at a critical moment in our humanity's history."

    Dozens of protesters arrested in Edinburgh
    What is climate change?
    The protesters who want to get arrested

Jace Tyrrell, chief executive of the New West End Company, said the first two days of protests had so far caused a loss of 12m in trade in the West End.

He told BBC Radio London: "Everyone has a right to peaceful protest. But this is really disruptive for us."

In Edinburgh, dozens of people were arrested earlier this week when hundreds of protesters blocked a main road.
Image copyright DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP/Getty Images
Image caption Oxford Street has been empty of traffic since activists parked a pink boat in Oxford Circus on Monday

Organisers said protests had been held in more than 80 cities across 33 countries and wanted to continue "shutting down London" until 29 April.

Campaigners at Waterloo Bridge and Oxford Circus have been ordered to restrict their protests to Marble Arch after they caused widespread disruption on Monday. That order will continue until 21:10 on Friday.

Joao Verga, who works at a printing company, says the protesters at Oxford Circus have caused him disruption.

The 58-year-old said: "We're trying to make a living and we can't. We move very quick in this country, this is only going to slow down everything."

Three men and two women, in their 40s and 50s, arrested on suspicion of criminal damage at Shell's headquarters in London on Monday, have since been released while inquiries continue.

The majority of the other protesters detained have been held on suspicion of public order offences.
What is Extinction Rebellion?
Image caption Four people glued and chained themselves to a lorry on Waterloo Bridge

Since the group was set up last year, members have shut bridges, poured buckets of fake blood outside Downing Street, blockaded the BBC and stripped semi-naked in Parliament.

It has three core demands: for the government to "tell the truth about climate change", reduce carbon emissions to zero by 2025, and create a citizens' assembly to oversee progress.

Controversially, the group is trying to get as many people arrested as possible.

But critics say they cause unnecessary disruption and waste police time when forces are already overstretched.

The government said it shared "people's passion" to combat climate change and "protect our planet for future generations".

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy said the UK had cut its emissions by 44% since 1990.

A spokesman said: "We've asked our independent climate experts for advice on a net zero emissions target and set out plans to transition to low emission vehicles and significantly reduce pollution through our Clean Air Strategy."
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Offline RE

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Hey!  They wear ALL BLACK, just like me!  I would fit right in!  :icon_sunny:  I took up the all black motif though before their movement existed.

RE

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/F3IPGQ0akQI" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/F3IPGQ0akQI</a>
« Last Edit: April 17, 2019, 01:28:06 PM by RE »
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☠️ Extinction Rebellion: Climate protesters 'making a difference'
« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2019, 12:10:08 AM »
https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-london-48003955

Extinction Rebellion: Climate protesters 'making a difference'








 

Extinction Rebellion: Climate protesters 'making a difference'

  • 8 hours ago
 
 

Media captionTeenage activist Greta Thunberg addresses the Extinction Rebellion rally

A teenage climate change activist has told Extinction Rebellion protesters in London they are "making a difference".

Greta Thunberg, 16, was greeted with chants of "we love you" as she took to the stage in front of thousands of people at the rally in Marble Arch.

A protest organiser said they planned "a week of activities" including a bid to prevent MPs entering Parliament.

More than 950 people have been arrested during the climate change protests and 40 people have been charged.

Ms Thunberg, a Swedish teenager who is credited with inspiring an international movement to fight climate change, told the crowd "humanity is standing at a crossroads" and that protesters "will never stop fighting for this planet".

Addressing the crowd at about 19:30 BST, she said: "For way too long the politicians and people in power have got away with not doing anything at all to fight the climate crisis and ecological crisis.

"But we will make sure they will not get away with it any longer."

Image copyright AFP Image caption The Swedish teenager was greeted with loud cheers as she took to the stage

As of 19:00 on Sunday, a total of 963 people had been arrested during the climate change protests.

The Met Police said 40 people, aged 19 to 77, have been charged for "various offences including breach of Section 14 Notice of the Public Order Act 1986, obstructing a highway and obstructing police".

Extinction Rebellion said it hoped to negotiate with the Mayor of London and the Met over continuing its demonstrations at Old Palace Yard in Westminster and leaving other sites.

Organisers said there would be a "people's assembly" at Marble Arch on Monday afternoon to decide what will happen in the coming week.

At the scene

By Dan Coles, BBC News

For much of the day there had been several hundred people at Extinction Rebellion's Marble Arch site.

But the chance to hear from Greta Thunberg - something of a celebrity in the climate protest world - saw the numbers swell into the thousands. The crowd was bolstered by an influx from the Parliament Square location and their banners filled the air.

Greta Thunberg's two-day journey to London by train was eagerly followed on social media and she got a huge cheer as she finally took to the stage.

Her speech was short and sweet, but the message was exactly what the crowd wanted to hear: "Keep going. You are making a difference."


Image copyright PA Image caption Hundreds of officers from other police forces have been sent to London to help the Met

Earlier, Extinction Rebellion member Farhana Yamin said the group had offered to "pause" protests and begin "a new phase of rebellion" to achieve "political aims".

She said the move would show the group was an "organised and a long-term political force to be reckoned with".

However, another Extinction Rebellion organiser Larch Maxey told the BBC there "certainly won't be a pause in our activities".

He said: "On Tuesday we've got a series of strategic points around the city which we will be targeting to cause maximum economic disruption while simultaneously focusing on Parliament and inviting MPs to pause."

Asked if MPs would be able to get into Parliament, he added: "Not if we are successful, we're going to prevent them getting in so they have time to separate themselves from the politicking and concentrate on what's at stake here."

Image copyright Reuters Image caption Cressida Dick said Londoners had experienced "miserable disruption" because of the protests

Police have been trying to confine the protests to Marble Arch but demonstrators have ignored the threat of arrest and continued to block roads across the capital.

Areas around Oxford Circus and Parliament Square have reopened to traffic after officers cleared protesters.

On Sunday afternoon, police removed the skate ramp, cooking tents and other infrastructure from the activists' camp on Waterloo Bridge.

Some protesters began removing their collection of trees and plants, and officers removed the last activist from the bridge at about 22:00.

Image copyright AFP Image caption Officers carry away pieces of wood as they break up the protesters' camp on Waterloo Bridge

Met Commissioner Cressida Dick said that during her 36-year career she had never known a single police operation to result in so many arrests.

She said she was grateful for the help from hundreds of police officers drafted in from several forces, including the neighbouring City of London Police.

Officers from Kent, Sussex, Essex, Hampshire and Greater Manchester have also been sent.

Mayor of London Sadiq Khan said "more than 9,000 officers" had been responding to the demonstrations and he was "extremely concerned" about their impact on tackling issues such as violent crime.

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Police cleared Oxford Circus of protesters on Saturday after six days of demonstrations

What is Extinction Rebellion?

 
 
Media captionThe co-founder of the protest group invites people to join

Since the group was set up last year, members have shut bridges, poured buckets of fake blood outside Downing Street, blockaded the BBC and stripped semi-naked in Parliament.

It has three core demands: for the government to "tell the truth about climate change"; to reduce carbon emissions to zero by 2025; and to create a citizens' assembly to oversee progress.

Controversially, the group is trying to get as many people arrested as possible.

But critics say they cause unnecessary disruption and waste police time when forces are already overstretched.

More on this story

  • Extinction Rebellion: Met Police asks for 200 extra officers
    20 April 2019
  • More than 650 arrests in climate protests
    20 April 2019
  • Extinction Rebellion: Climate protests 'diverting' London police
    18 April 2019
  • Extinction Rebellion: What do they want and is it realistic?
    16 April 2019
  • Greta Thunberg nominated for Nobel Peace Prize for climate activism
    14 March 2019
  • Greta Thunberg: 16-year-old climate activist inspired international youth movement
    6 March 2019
  • What is climate change?
    3 December 2018
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