AuthorTopic: Henry the 8th: 8 Years of Collapse on the Doomstead Diner  (Read 2450 times)

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Henry the 8th: 8 Years of Collapse on the Doomstead Diner
« on: January 19, 2020, 02:29:37 AM »


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Published on The Doomstead Diner  January 19, 2020






Discuss this Video & Article at the Diner Anniversary Table inside the Diner



 



Image result for isaac newton Despite the title of this article, it has absolutely ZERO to do with Henry 8th, King of England in the early part of the 16th Century, despite the fact it was a very interesting time period, just predating the real birth of Capitalism which didn't arrive until the 17th Century and the founding of the Bank of England by Master of the Mint at the time, Sir Isaac Newton.  Yes, that is the same Isaac Newton famous for Newtonian Mechanics, his Gravity Equation, the Apple falling on his Head and so forth.  His most significant achievement though was that along with the German mathematician Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, they simultaneously invented The Calculus.  You know, that Math class most of you never took, or if you did you only did so because it was required and you hated it and only did the first year of it on Differentiation and Integration.  Not so with me, I LOVED mathematics, and took many further courses in Differential Equations (known fondly by Geeks as "DiffEq") and Partial Differential Equations (PDE), Matrix Algebra, Thermodynamics…yada, yada, yada.  It is Leibniz' notation we use today, but all the principles are the same, and in Newton's case, he applied them to the Monetary System of Jolly Old England, way back when.  This maneuver essentially took England off the need to use Gold in transactions, and then enabled the development of Markets using various form of notes to do Bizness.  Along with their powerful Navy of the time, this is what enabled the tiny island of Brittannia to leapfrog themselves over the much larger nation of Spain, which was at the time well ahead in the race for raiding the resources of the "New World", including of course vast quantities of Aztec Gold. In modern market terms,you can think of Isaac as the first "Quant", and the Calculus as the first "Algo".  Anyhow, I will save this history lesson on mathematics, economics and monetary systems for another day.



This week though has many important Collapse Events ongoing which I might have written about or ranted on in a video.  There is Impeachment of course, impending Brexit, Saber-Rattling with Iran & North Korea, Trade nonsense with China, Wildfires in Oz, the cross-country Snowstorm, etc, etc, etc.  All worthy topics which we discuss all the time Inside the Diner.  However, NO, I didn't pick any of those topics to rev myself up to write and rant on, because there is a MUCH more important event impending here IMHO (lol).  In February, we mark the 8th Anniversary of the Founding of the Doomstead Diner by myself, Surly & our tech wizard of the time  Peter Offerman.  It has been an 8 year Roller Coaster ride here of highs & lows, good times & bad times for the Diners.  Somehow though, we made it and we are still here reporting on the Collapse of Industrial Civilization.  Unbeleivably to me at least, we survived so far for 8 fucking years and we are going stronger than ever, now getting Subscriptions from our numerous Lurkers! 🙂



So today's Doomstead Diner/Collapse Cafe Sunday Brunch Special is an ANNOUNCEMENT of our Anniversary Celebration Week, which will commence February 9th and run until February 16th.  I invite all Diners, Lurkers and Blog contributors to discuss aspects of Collapse with me leading up to this week, with text, audio only or video (if you are comfortable going "on camera").  I explain the details of how to contact me on this if you are not an active member of the Diner Forum in the above video, along with other details of how the celebration week will be run.



LONG LIVE THE DOOMSTEAD DINER!



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Online Eddie

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Re: Henry the 8th: 8 Years of Collapse on the Doomstead Diner
« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2020, 09:36:06 AM »
I put the Birth Of Capitalism (and colonialism) at 1602, with the brith of the Dutch East India Company, fwiw.

I took the first two semesters of calculus. I made an A in the second half (integral calculus) after having taken the first course (derivative calculus) three times over a five year period and finally completing it with a B.

I did NOT love it, although I was determined not to let it beat me. This was the story in general  at all levels of my mathematics education, because I didn't love it and I loved doing ANY boring homework even less and pretty much refused to make myself do it. But I stuck with it, erroneously believing that it might be important to me at some future point.

Now, computers easily do what calculus once did in elegant fashion , by using very simple arithmetic instead, and just crunching out the area of a LOT of rectangles very quickly in order to figure out the area under a curve. I get a certain amount of schadenfreude from just understanding that, so maybe it was worth it for that alone.

Engineers and real scientists usually take a third semester of calculus, known as differential equations, which is notorious for turning engineering majors into high school teachers and gas station attendants. I never had the pleasure. But it is kind of a sorting hat more than anything else now, because they they use computers in the real world, like everybody else.

I seriously resent anyone who likes math, and secretly wish for each and every person who makes that claim to experience an unfortunate accident of some kind.

Congrats on hitting the 8 Year mark.  It's roughly 7 for me. I seem to have registered on 12-9-2012, missing the launch by nearly a year.

Doesn't seem like that long, and the world is still surprisingly complex and technical and yet resilient. But it is true there are lots of cracks in the facade of civilization.

When the end comes and the machines lose power and the computers go dark, I hope somebody is around who can even add and subtract and multiply and divide, mathematically speaking. I expect they will perform an important role.
« Last Edit: January 19, 2020, 09:42:54 AM by Eddie »
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Re: Henry the 8th: 8 Years of Collapse on the Doomstead Diner
« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2020, 11:41:05 AM »
I seriously resent anyone who likes math, and secretly wish for each and every person who makes that claim to experience an unfortunate accident of some kind.

Geeks like me aren't generally popular with the rest of the population.  That's why we congregate together.  For our group, it was in the basement of Havemeyer Hall, where we held nightly Blackboard Contests and smoked dope.  lol.

I got straight As in all math classes until Partial DiffEq, where I got an A-. :(  I didn't study and was hung over for the Final.  By this time I was a really serious Partier. lol.  I never did any Homework, the only thing that really counted were 4 Quizzes, the Mid-term and the Final.  You could substitute your Homework grades for up to 2 Quizzes, but I never needed to do that so I didn't do any Homework, which I also despised.  Always extremely repetitious.

Finally, Calculus is not just about the Area under a Curve.  It's about Flow rates and many other things that computers can't work out.  Do you think a computer could have worked out Maxwell's electromagnetic laws?  Einstein's Special or General Relativity theories? The laws of Thermodynamics?  I hardly think so.  For all these things, you need to have at least got through PDE.

Dentists of course are not concerned with any of these things, so this math is useless to them.

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Calculus Is Ded
« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2020, 12:06:02 PM »




Do you really think you can talk down to me? Good try, no cigar.

It's not just dentists, although it certainly is a complete waste of time for dentists to study calculus.

It's fairy well known that the typical college math curriculum hierarchy is not useful for many people, regardless of their occupation. The reason we teach college math the way we do is based on antiquated thinking and tradition. It's not based on any use case encountered in the real world.



Quora:

Are college calculus courses useless for most engineers?


Arteom Korotchenya
Arteom Korotchenya, specialist degree Civil and Structural Engineering
Updated Sep 19 2018

It is useless. No one in their clear mind would solve indefinite integrals or differential equations manually, or try to use combinatoric definition of a determinant to find eigenvalues when dealing with stability of structures problems.
In theory, calculus course is a prerequisite for engineering courses - which i as a trained structural engineer took - such as vector mechanics, strength of materials, structural analysis and finite element analysis.
These are important courses, but for the ideal engineer. In mundane structural engineering there are abundance of finite element method programs, which take 3D model of the, for example, office building and produce quite reliable output. Ideally, the user should know the basics of finite element analysis, but really, what to check in program such as ETABS? Mesher? Solver? Well, the truth is that many computer programs have at last one common solver library. Would a human being solve a system of 300 000 linear equations by hand? Not likely. There are alternative and faster ways of checking the validity of results which don’t require calculus skills, and when they nevertheless do - for example dynamics problem - , there are “wolfram mathematica” and “matlab” at one’s service.
I can even say that calculus is useless to an engineer who wants to become a professor. To achieve a true understanding of a theory behind engineering methods one need an advance mathematical courses up to functional analysis, topology and elements of tensor calculus.
Before computers calculus could have been a valuable skill, but nowadays most real world engineers are in fact more sort of technicians who possess some intuitive understanding of various disciplines but mostly CAD monkeys.
One could say that it is bad, but the truth is that it is the benefit of a progress. CAD monkeys are cheap, houses and airplanes are getting cheaper, cad monkey could allow themseves to buy more for earned money.
Software engineering industry because of it’s relatively young age resist the progress and keeps clinging at the illusion that good software engineer is the one who can restore the details of how a computer creates random numbers or write an advanced sorting algorithm or who can take an indefinite integral in five minitues. However, as it was previously mentioned, the average developer of Finite element Analysis program don’t write Kholetsky algorithm from scratch. An average game designer uses ready engine, though occasionaly he would need to remember something from lilear algebra.
To sum up. Powerful computers created a division in the engineering profession. At the one hand there are CAD monkeys, who used to have structural analysis, theoretical mechanics and four semesters of calculus, but don’t use that in their daily work. At the other hand there are professors and R&D engineers whom i endlessly admire and who are busy in creating new powerful algorithms, new processors and who know the necessary mathematics behind their work. But that mathematics have nothing to do with calculus in form of bag of tricks aimed at taking integrals, solving differential equations, taking Lagrangians or finding limits of a function.
Upd.
When i had my theory of elasticity class, we had to find fourth derivative of a polynomial of - probably forth order - with rather ugly coeficients. I took the first derivative and then feed the polynomial to Mathematica, not feeling sorry for that, cause i didn’t understand how procedural manipulation on which i would have spent half an hour would have enriched my knowledge.
 When i took advanced undergraduate microeconomics course, we students were expected to take Lagrangians to solve max(mini)misation problem. The strategy to solve the problem was presented as the above mentioned bag of tricks: find partial derivatives, and so on. It was not clear why the procedure is true. I thought to use minimise function of Mathematica but the professor wouldn’t have accept the solution, hence I limited myself to using “grad” function in mathematica and that at least forced me to think about the answer obtained. Clear picture, why the procedure was true came after exercises from V. Zorich Analysis book.
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Calculus Is So Last Century

Training in statistics, linear algebra and algorithmic thinking is more relevant for today’s educated workforce.

By Tianhui Michael Li and Allison Bishop
March 4, 2016 6:09 pm ET


Can you remember the last time you did calculus? Unless you are a researcher or engineer, chances are good it was in a high-school or college class you’d rather forget. For most Americans, solving a calculus problem is not a skill they need to perform well at work.

This is not to say that America’s workforce doesn’t need advanced mathematics—quite the opposite. An extensive 2011 McKinsey Global Institute study found that by 2018 the U.S will face a 1.5 million worker shortfall in analysts and managers who have the mathematical training necessary to deal with analysis of “large data sets,” the bread and butter of the big-data revolution.

The question is not whether advanced mathematics is needed but rather what kind of advanced mathematics. Calculus is the handmaiden of physics; it was invented by Newton to explain planetary and projectile motion. While its place at the core of math education may have made sense for Cold War adversaries engaged in a missile and space race, Minute-Man and Apollo no longer occupy the same prominent role in national security and continued prosperity that they once did.


The future of 21st-century America lies in fields like biotechnology and information technology, and these fields require very different math—the kinds designed to handle the vast amounts of data we generate each day. Each individual’s genome contains more than three billion base pairs and a quarter of a million genomes are sequenced every year. In Silicon Valley, computers store over 100 GBs of data—more information than contained in the ancient library at Alexandria—for every man, woman and child on the planet.

Accompanying the proliferation of new data is noise, and a major job for data analysts and scientists is to tease out true signal from coincidence and noise. Knowing when a result is due to chance versus when it is statistically significant requires a firm grasp of probability and statistics and an advanced understanding of mathematics.

We no longer think of outcomes as being triggered by a single factor but multiple ones—possibly thousands. To understand these large and complex data sets, we need an educated workforce that is also equipped with a firm understanding of multivariate mathematics and linear algebra.

Computers and computation are ubiquitous and everyone—not just software engineers—needs to learn how to think algorithmically. Yet the typical calculus curriculum’s emphasis on differentiation and integration rules leaves U.S. students ill-equipped at posing the questions that lead to innovations in computation. Instead, it leaves them well-equipped at performing rote computations that can be easily done by a computer.

We’re not saying calculus shouldn’t be taught. Calculus, like any rigorous technical discipline, is great mental training. We would love for everyone to take it. But the singular drive toward calculus in high school and college displaces other topics more important for today’s economy and society. Statistics, linear algebra and algorithmic thinking are not just useful for data scientists in Silicon Valley or researchers for the Human Genome Project. They are becoming vital to the way we think about manufacturing, finance, public health, politics and even journalism.


« Last Edit: January 19, 2020, 12:08:05 PM by Eddie »
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Re: Calculus Is Ded
« Reply #4 on: January 19, 2020, 12:21:51 PM »

Do you really think you can talk down to me? Good try, no cigar.


LOL.  You started it!  You were the one who said we should all suffer some kind of "accident".  You got your wish on that, I did suffer a BIG one.

Who do you think the "Quants" are who set up the trading algos these days for the computers?  They are in general mathematicians and theoretical physicists recruited by Wall Street to apply their skills to money flows, and the computers make their algos operate in milliseconds.  You cannot compete with that.

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Re: Calculus Is Ded
« Reply #5 on: January 19, 2020, 12:32:59 PM »

Do you really think you can talk down to me? Good try, no cigar.


LOL.  You started it!  You were the one who said we should all suffer some kind of "accident".  You got your wish on that, I did suffer a BIG one.

Who do you think the "Quants" are who set up the trading algos these days for the computers?  They are in general mathematicians and theoretical physicists recruited by Wall Street to apply their skills to money flows, and the computers make their algos operate in milliseconds.  You cannot compete with that.

RE

I don't try to out-trade the algos. I try to figure out what they can't...which is which assets will be worth something in a few years, and which ones won't. I mostly trade as a last resort, to preserve capital in downtrends. It works sometimes. Enough times, hopefully.

Your accident was no accident. It was a matter of laziness and bad habits. I've been lucky, (and I did work out a lot  in my middle years) , and never got hooked on tobacco. But my time is coming. I eat too well and have other bad habits. Nobody gets outa here alive.



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Offline RE

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Re: Calculus Is Ded
« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2020, 12:47:32 PM »

Do you really think you can talk down to me? Good try, no cigar.


LOL.  You started it!  You were the one who said we should all suffer some kind of "accident".  You got your wish on that, I did suffer a BIG one.

Who do you think the "Quants" are who set up the trading algos these days for the computers?  They are in general mathematicians and theoretical physicists recruited by Wall Street to apply their skills to money flows, and the computers make their algos operate in milliseconds.  You cannot compete with that.

RE

I don't try to out-trade the algos. I try to figure out what they can't...which is which assets will be worth something in a few years, and which ones won't.

A good Algo can figure out almost anything, it just depends how good the mathematician who designed the Algo is.  But you are not a mathematician, you have self-proclaimed this fact.

Some things cannot be elucidated by a computer and an algo, I listed a few above.  However, there is nothing I can see in the world of market trading not subject to algorithmic analysis by a super computer, so unless you are a true GENIUS who can do this by intuition alone, you cannot beat it.  You may be one of those.  I HOPE so, because it would be nice to have a BILLIONAIRE as a Diner. lol.

RE
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Online Eddie

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Re: Henry the 8th: 8 Years of Collapse on the Doomstead Diner
« Reply #7 on: January 19, 2020, 01:34:10 PM »
If I have any genius at all, it has nothing to do with math.

My form of intelligence  is that I know a little bit......about a lot more things.....than most people. I consider my education to have been a fairly broad one, and in most things that really matter to me, I am an autodidact.

if accumulating money had been my aim, I would have gone about living my life in a radically different way. I always wanted to lead a life that balanced family life, work, and my hobbies, which are numerous and mostly pointless, when it comes down to it. I could have chased after money but I chose not to, and I blame no one for my financial condition except me.

I wanted a certain amount of money. Enough to be comfortable.When it comes to money, my life has been something of a struggle, really. I was a broke-ass student for a dozen years. I started my business with a 12% loan, and it was hard to pay back on what I made in the early years.

I've gone bankrupt once. I've been hounded by the IRS. I've seen my practice income rise and fall with no real change in how I work or run my business. It ebbs and flows.

But I've also pissed away a lot of money.....meals, booze, toys ..........lots spent on my kids for sports and sports trips and camp and on and on.......I paid for college for four kids who were all on the six year plan.

Every day I read articles by t people who bitch about wealth inequality. Most of them are journalists. I could have told any of them on the front end, way before they ended up without a pot to piss in, that journalism is a bad college major for making money. Only the best journalists ever make money, and it's on their books, if they're lucky enough to sell any.

I see no real difference between the books that sell and those that don't....in terms of usefulness to anybody. People buy books that reinforce their own belief systems. Book sales are another popularity contest. See Marriane Williamson...and also Chris Hedges.

Making money is related to a person's personality and character traits, more than it is to anything else. I will never be a billionaire. I don't have what it takes, nor do I want be that kind of person. I have a goal for retirement, and if I hit it, that's it. I'm done. I might not even get there.
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Re: Henry the 8th: 8 Years of Collapse on the Doomstead Diner
« Reply #8 on: January 19, 2020, 03:22:17 PM »
   Despite the title of this article, it has absolutely <strong>ZERO</strong> to do with Henry 8th, King of England in the early part of the 16th Century, despite the fact it was a very interesting time period, just predating the real birth of Capitalism which didn't arrive untile the 17th Century and the founding of the Bank of England by Master of the Mint at the time, Sir Isaac Newton.  Yes, that is the same Isaac Newton famous for Newtonian Mechanics, his Gravity Equation, the Apple falling on his Head and so forth.  His most significant achievement though was that along with the German mathematician Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, they simultaneously invented<strong> The Calculus</strong>.  You know, that Math class most of you never took, or if you did you only did so because it was required and you hated it and only did the first year of it on Differentiation and Integration.  Not so with me, I <strong>LOVED</strong> mathematics, and took many further courses in Differential Equations (known fondly by Geeks as "DiffEq") and Partial Differential Equations, Matrix Algebra, Thermodynamics…yada, yada, yada.  It is Leibniz' notation we use today, but all the principles are the same, and in Newton's case, he applied them to the Monetary System of Jolly Old England, way back when.  This maneuver essentially took England off the need to use Gold in transactions, and then enabled the development of Markets using various form of notes to do Bizness.  Along with their powerful Navy of the time, this is what enabled the tiny island of Brittannia to leapfrog themselves over the much larger nation of Spain, which was at the time well ahead in the race for raiding the resources of the "New World", including of course vast quantities of Aztec Gold. In modern market terms,you can think of Isaac as the first "Quant", and the Calculus as the first "Algo".  Anyhow, I will save this history lesson on mathematics, economics and monetary systems for another day.
</p>
Webster Tarpley says Newton did not invent calculus but this is a story invented in response to the growing political power or Prussia and the other German states. Tensions really escalated after the development of the Berlin to Baghdad railway in the 19th century, and Germany was eventually drawn into WW I and to a certain extent finished off in WW II.

The Bank of England was founded to implement fractional reserve banking, which combined with modern technology is responsible for a lot of the problems we have today.

I love math too. I really wish I had kept a copy of that issue of the Stuy Alum Assoc newsletter where I was credited with solving the Coconut Monkey problem without using diophantine equations. I also tossed my solution into the trash like Mat Damon did in the movie.

« Last Edit: January 19, 2020, 03:31:26 PM by moniker »

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Re: Henry the 8th: 8 Years of Collapse on the Doomstead Diner
« Reply #9 on: January 19, 2020, 04:06:47 PM »
I love math too. I really wish I had kept a copy of that issue of the Stuy Alum Assoc newsletter where I was credited with solving the Coconut Monkey problem without using diophantine equations. I also tossed my solution into the trash like Mat Damon did in the movie.

You might have told me this before, but if you did I forgot.  I did not know you were another graduate of Stuyvesant HS!  :icon_sunny:  What were your years of attendance?

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Re: Henry the 8th: 8 Years of Collapse on the Doomstead Diner
« Reply #10 on: January 19, 2020, 04:07:54 PM »
I seriously resent anyone who likes math, and secretly wish for each and every person who makes that claim to experience an unfortunate accident of some kind.

Geeks like me aren't generally popular with the rest of the population.  That's why we congregate together.  For our group, it was in the basement of Havemeyer Hall, where we held nightly Blackboard Contests and smoked dope.  lol.

I got straight As in all math classes until Partial DiffEq, where I got an A-. :(  I didn't study and was hung over for the Final.  By this time I was a really serious Partier. lol.  I never did any Homework, the only thing that really counted were 4 Quizzes, the Mid-term and the Final.  You could substitute your Homework grades for up to 2 Quizzes, but I never needed to do that so I didn't do any Homework, which I also despised.  Always extremely repetitious.

Finally, Calculus is not just about the Area under a Curve.  It's about Flow rates and many other things that computers can't work out.  Do you think a computer could have worked out Maxwell's electromagnetic laws?  Einstein's Special or General Relativity theories? The laws of Thermodynamics?  I hardly think so.  For all these things, you need to have at least got through PDE.

Dentists of course are not concerned with any of these things, so this math is useless to them.

RE

I'm reading about complexity theory.  Algorithms are only good for certain things and the approximations and guesses they make are leaks in Pandora's jar.

Under ideal conditions of temperature and pressure the organism will grow without limit.

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Re: Henry the 8th: 8 Years of Collapse on the Doomstead Diner
« Reply #11 on: January 19, 2020, 05:37:10 PM »
I love math too. I really wish I had kept a copy of that issue of the Stuy Alum Assoc newsletter where I was credited with solving the Coconut Monkey problem without using diophantine equations. I also tossed my solution into the trash like Mat Damon did in the movie.

You might have told me this before, but if you did I forgot.  I did not know you were another graduate of Stuyvesant HS!  :icon_sunny:  What were your years of attendance?

RE
1974 - 1977. I loved reading Subway Swan Song on TBP and that's how I found the Diner. I lived in Sunnyside and took the 7 train also.

My first term at Stuyvesant was amazing; then due largely to family stressors, I became chronically depressed. Early untreated onset dysthymia is a horrible life-long illness. Then you have to preface every life anecdote with an explanation like I wouldn't be in this fucking mess except for...

It became a little easier after the publication of Prozac Nation,  whose author died recently.

« Last Edit: January 19, 2020, 05:52:19 PM by moniker »

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Re: Henry the 8th: 8 Years of Collapse on the Doomstead Diner
« Reply #12 on: January 19, 2020, 06:22:44 PM »
I love math too. I really wish I had kept a copy of that issue of the Stuy Alum Assoc newsletter where I was credited with solving the Coconut Monkey problem without using diophantine equations. I also tossed my solution into the trash like Mat Damon did in the movie.

You might have told me this before, but if you did I forgot.  I did not know you were another graduate of Stuyvesant HS!  :icon_sunny:  What were your years of attendance?

RE
1974 - 1977. I loved reading Subway Swan Song on TBP and that's how I found the Diner. I lived in Sunnyside and took the 7 train also.

My first term at Stuyvesant was amazing; then due largely to family stressors, I became chronically depressed. Early untreated onset dysthymia is a horrible life-long illness. Then you have to preface every life anecdote with an explanation like I wouldn't be in this fucking mess except for...

It became a little easier after the publication of Prozac Nation,  whose author died recently.

WOW!   :o  You came right after me!  I was 1972-1974!

Did you ever have Frank McCourt for an English Teacher or Journalism Teacher?  Mr. Price for Chemistry?  Old Man Lowenthal for History?

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Re: Henry the 8th: 8 Years of Collapse on the Doomstead Diner
« Reply #13 on: January 19, 2020, 06:42:37 PM »
I love math too. I really wish I had kept a copy of that issue of the Stuy Alum Assoc newsletter where I was credited with solving the Coconut Monkey problem without using diophantine equations. I also tossed my solution into the trash like Mat Damon did in the movie.

You might have told me this before, but if you did I forgot.  I did not know you were another graduate of Stuyvesant HS!  :icon_sunny:  What were your years of attendance?

RE
1974 - 1977. I loved reading Subway Swan Song on TBP and that's how I found the Diner. I lived in Sunnyside and took the 7 train also.

My first term at Stuyvesant was amazing; then due largely to family stressors, I became chronically depressed. Early untreated onset dysthymia is a horrible life-long illness. Then you have to preface every life anecdote with an explanation like I wouldn't be in this fucking mess except for...

It became a little easier after the publication of Prozac Nation,  whose author died recently.

WOW!   :o  You came right after me!  I was 1972-1974!

Did you ever have Frank McCourt for an English Teacher or Journalism Teacher?  Mr. Price for Chemistry?  Old Man Lowenthal for History?

RE
We missed each other by a few months!

I don't recall Price or Lowenthal. My wife had a friend who knew Frank McCourt from the Irish Arts Center, though. I didn't know about him until years after I graduated and would maybe have wanted to take a class with him.

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Re: Henry the 8th: 8 Years of Collapse on the Doomstead Diner
« Reply #14 on: January 19, 2020, 07:23:21 PM »
I love math too. I really wish I had kept a copy of that issue of the Stuy Alum Assoc newsletter where I was credited with solving the Coconut Monkey problem without using diophantine equations. I also tossed my solution into the trash like Mat Damon did in the movie.

You might have told me this before, but if you did I forgot.  I did not know you were another graduate of Stuyvesant HS!  :icon_sunny:  What were your years of attendance?

RE
1974 - 1977. I loved reading Subway Swan Song on TBP and that's how I found the Diner. I lived in Sunnyside and took the 7 train also.

My first term at Stuyvesant was amazing; then due largely to family stressors, I became chronically depressed. Early untreated onset dysthymia is a horrible life-long illness. Then you have to preface every life anecdote with an explanation like I wouldn't be in this fucking mess except for...

It became a little easier after the publication of Prozac Nation,  whose author died recently.

WOW!   :o  You came right after me!  I was 1972-1974!

Did you ever have Frank McCourt for an English Teacher or Journalism Teacher?  Mr. Price for Chemistry?  Old Man Lowenthal for History?

RE
We missed each other by a few months!

I don't recall Price or Lowenthal. My wife had a friend who knew Frank McCourt from the Irish Arts Center, though. I didn't know about him until years after I graduated and would maybe have wanted to take a class with him.

I had Frank for Journalism in my Junior year.  He was my main mentor as a writer.  My final Thesis Paper for that class analyzed Marshall McLuhan's "The Medium is the Message".  I wish I still had a copy of it.  :(  It was a 20 page MASTERPIECE I pounded out on an ancient manual Royal Typewriter at the age of 14-15 or so.  Lowenthal was a REAL old guy and may have retired before or during your years there.  He also truly SUCKED as a teacher and was very boring.  I had no interest in History for many years because he was so truly bad as a teacher by that time.  Maybe he was good once, but by the 1970s he sucked.  I think he was probably in his 70s.  Price was pretty young, but there were several chem teachers so you probably did not get him unless you took Orgo at Stuy, which I did.  I think he was the only Chem teacher who taught Organic Chemistry at Stuy High in those years.

I went back to re-read the Subway Swan Song article I wrote.  SHIT that was a long one!  lol.

RE
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